Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Printer Friendly - Home
Page: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]


Classical music - what makes you listen?

JMB 24 Sep 18 - 06:32 PM
Donuel 24 Sep 18 - 04:09 PM
Donuel 22 Sep 18 - 05:03 PM
Donuel 20 Sep 18 - 08:52 AM
Steve Shaw 19 Sep 18 - 08:41 PM
gillymor 19 Sep 18 - 04:50 PM
Helen 19 Sep 18 - 04:50 PM
Helen 19 Sep 18 - 04:32 PM
Will Fly 19 Sep 18 - 12:50 PM
GUEST,gillymor 19 Sep 18 - 12:11 PM
Steve Shaw 19 Sep 18 - 11:44 AM
Dave the Gnome 19 Sep 18 - 10:27 AM
Donuel 18 Sep 18 - 05:17 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 17 Sep 18 - 12:35 PM
Will Fly 17 Sep 18 - 04:01 AM
olddude 16 Sep 18 - 10:36 PM
olddude 16 Sep 18 - 10:35 PM
Donuel 16 Sep 18 - 09:51 PM
GUEST 16 Sep 18 - 02:13 AM
Joe Offer 16 Sep 18 - 12:44 AM
Donuel 15 Sep 18 - 09:43 PM
Helen 15 Sep 18 - 04:31 PM
Steve Shaw 15 Sep 18 - 12:06 PM
Donuel 15 Sep 18 - 09:51 AM
Donuel 15 Sep 18 - 09:35 AM
Donuel 15 Sep 18 - 09:17 AM
Helen 15 Sep 18 - 07:07 AM
GUEST,Roderick A Warner 15 Sep 18 - 06:02 AM
GUEST,IvanB 14 Sep 18 - 09:41 PM
Helen 14 Sep 18 - 08:37 PM
Steve Shaw 14 Sep 18 - 08:33 PM
Helen 14 Sep 18 - 05:08 PM
Steve Shaw 14 Sep 18 - 11:16 AM
gillymor 14 Sep 18 - 10:20 AM
Steve Shaw 14 Sep 18 - 09:44 AM
gillymor 14 Sep 18 - 08:26 AM
gillymor 14 Sep 18 - 08:23 AM
Joe Offer 13 Sep 18 - 09:55 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Sep 18 - 09:28 PM
Helen 13 Sep 18 - 09:13 PM
GUEST,keberoxu 13 Sep 18 - 09:13 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Sep 18 - 07:57 PM
Helen 13 Sep 18 - 05:08 PM
gillymor 13 Sep 18 - 04:48 PM
Helen 13 Sep 18 - 04:38 PM
gillymor 13 Sep 18 - 04:34 PM
Will Fly 13 Sep 18 - 04:34 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 13 Sep 18 - 04:19 PM
Will Fly 13 Sep 18 - 04:02 PM
GUEST,Tunesmith 13 Sep 18 - 01:35 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: JMB
Date: 24 Sep 18 - 06:32 PM

I have several CDs of classical music with sounds of nature in the background. There is one with pieces such as Asante by Mozart and a piece from Swan Lake that is played on guitar.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 24 Sep 18 - 04:09 PM

Our local library is a center where they discard books, paintings and CDs and sell them. I have even found classified stuff and formidable historic signatures there. Anyway I have amassed quite a classical collection. I would be happy to look for CDs and collections if I knew what you are seeking since they are super cheap.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 22 Sep 18 - 05:03 PM

If you go for a Fall foliage drive, might I suggest The Pines of Rome at the peak of your trip.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 20 Sep 18 - 08:52 AM

Speaking of NOVELTY there is this performance of Argh in D minus


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 08:41 PM

Enough! I'd sooner hack off my Gounods with a rusty machete than continue with this line of enquiry. Let's Tippett into touch here and now!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: gillymor
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 04:50 PM

Please, no mouret!
Now, time to start supper, I'm getting honegger pangs.
(okay, I'm done.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 04:50 PM

I'm assuming Mrs Steve will be Bach in a Minuette.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 04:32 PM

It's all right. I can Handel a Fauré into puns.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Will Fly
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 12:50 PM

What a lot of Bizet bees...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST,gillymor
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 12:11 PM

Steve, it sounds like your coming unRaveled. Maybe you need some time offenbach.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 11:44 AM

Er... I just need a fugue minuets to think that one through...can't ask Mrs Steve either...she's out Chopin with a long Liszt, taken the Allegro...she's gone with her uncle andante...


Sorry, Helen! It's that Dave.   I'll get serious again soon!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 19 Sep 18 - 10:27 AM

If someone could not play the paritas on harpsichord but could play them on computer keyboard could you say his Bach is worse than his byte?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 18 Sep 18 - 05:17 PM

Will you are a god damn music historian :^)
You are positioned well. Stealing from folk repertoire for classical treatment is ubiquitous and normal. Stealing the other way around is a rare novelty.

A novelty of mine is taking some of the hundreds of 'baritone duets' Haydn wrote for his King to play BUT I change the instruments to folk instruments and make them as fast as a bat outta hell. Add some syncopation and boom- its folk music.

I play only half of the cello suites which is a fair indication how half assed my skills are. The Bach violin partitas are so famous and thrilling at times I have to hear them 5 times in a row. The cello suites are far more meditative.

I'm still discovering 'new to me' music.
This week it was Quiet City by Arron Copland.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 17 Sep 18 - 12:35 PM

And, of course, the modern " discovery" of the cello suites by Pablo Casals is a great story.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Will Fly
Date: 17 Sep 18 - 04:01 AM

What separates Bach from earlier Baroque musicians is that his musical lifetime coincided with changes to the musical temperament of instruments, as Donuel has said. Brass instruments acquired valves, and keyboards were tuned to equal temperament. The main effect of these developments was to increase the number of keys that musicians could play in without retuning/resetting instruments - and this, in turn, allowed much more sophisticated modulation and more complex adventures in melody and harmony. All of which JSB used to the full. He also drew inspiration from French and Italian music, rather than just German.

His suites for solo cello are wonderful creations; you can hear the chord sequences in the melodic progression, which seems to flow effortleslly. Great stuff!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: olddude
Date: 16 Sep 18 - 10:36 PM

His piano concertos especially


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: olddude
Date: 16 Sep 18 - 10:35 PM

Easy question mozart for this guy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 16 Sep 18 - 09:51 PM

Vivaldi has some nice mandolin concertos.

BTW Vivaldi is certainly a great Baroque composer and conducter.

I 'll show you a swampy mire .

The tripe JSB's sons composed that were just vertical tripe they called music

Yes JSB himself wrote about raising and refining Baroque music with fugues and chromatic fantasias.

Shall we get into what makes different keys fit together.
It was tempering partly invented by JSB


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Sep 18 - 02:13 AM

I'd possibly start with the things Pip/mum used to play on piano at home which would include some Chopin as well as Beethoven and Mozart sonatas.

While I couldn't name you any piece, I've enjoyed mandolin concertos I've heard on the radio and more generally speaking, probably find earlier/baroque stuff easier listening.

But it's all a bit of a wash and I'd like some material (at least if I can hear a melody...) of any era and dislike other bits and I never really follow up... Not sure that's too different to the way I am with "folk" really. Bits of either can move me, some can leave me cold (or worse) and some in between...

Favorite piece today would be the guitar arrangement of Granada by Albeniz

Performers. I'll go by Pip when she was a student. She reckoned that Alfredo Campoli gave the most amazing concert when she was a student in Brum.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 16 Sep 18 - 12:44 AM

Steve Shaw says: I think that Bach's crowning achievement was to pull baroque music out of a sort of mire...

Joe Offer says: Exactly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 09:43 PM

Old time recordings may have been played faster than the tempo signature to fit on a 78 side. But today no one plays Beethoven's 5th as marked. It is blazingly fast. It has been recorded at its real tempo but I don't know how to find it. The entire first phrase goes by in under 10 seconds.
Toscanini was famous for his quick crisp tempos.

I just remembered how a conductor took the Bach concerto for 2 violins in one for the first time for performance and fooled the orchestra into playing twice as slow as marked. I let it go by for about ten seconds when I stood up and did a Jimmy Durante imitation yelling 'stop the music stop the music'. Ladies and Gentlemen lets see how fast we can really play this thing, Maestro take it away. and away we went. The accident ended up looking staged.

So many fun things happened, I should make a list.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 04:31 PM

All I can say is, it's lucky I am retiring next year because otherwise I would never have time to listen to all these musical recommendations.

So much music, so little time!

Thanks everyone.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 12:06 PM

Thank you, Donuel. By the way, try the version of the Flute and Harp Concerto conducted by Thomas Beecham with René Le Roy on Flute and Lili Laskine on harp, from the 1940s. It's on YouTube. They seem to have brightened the sound from what I remember when I bought the record over thirty years ago. It's an absolute joy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 09:51 AM

Steve I like the way your threads allow me to hear many mental excerpts of some of the works you mention. They are better than ear worms.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 09:35 AM

The impressionism of Claire d'Lune is a masterpiece I put into a wonderfully crowded classification of an extra musicular event.

If you perform Bach with a flexible free reign on tempo it becomes music.
If you chain yourself to a metronome and organize volume on a second repetition of a phrase, it is math.

The true golden note in music is a momentary silence.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Donuel
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 09:17 AM

I had a Mozart moment during a competition between violinists performing Mozart concertos. An Asian woman interpreted a concerto in such a way that I had never experienced before. All of Mozart became clear to me all at once. His heart and soul lay bare for all to hear.
Despite being encouraged to give the competition to a young man I had no other choice but to choose the performance of the gods. Each movement described more than I can describe. The work for flute and harp is a fragrant breeze but this violin concerto went farther than music normally goes. Nachtmuzic is not even in the running.

btw
I have my own greatest classical hits medly and Rhapsody in blue is naturally a part of it


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 07:07 AM

Thanks Roderick.

The reason I bought the first Leftfield CD was because of 'Open Up' with John Lydon. I heard it on the alternative radio station a few times and went looking for the CD. I can never just listen to Open Up just once. I have to hit repeat a few times.

When I first used to listen to the CD it was always in the car with the usual car and traffic noises drowning out some of the music, but when I listened to it with earphones I heard so much more complexity. It was a revelatory experience.

BTW, with reference to John Lydon, I also have an original vinyl copy of Never Mind the Bollocks, bought way back when I used to listen to punk.

Helen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST,Roderick A Warner
Date: 15 Sep 18 - 06:02 AM

Hi Helen... to work in a Leftfield mention, a small digression. Most Fridays i go to a vintage market, most of it crap but some interesting stuff. For the last 18 months a guy has been coming with his vinyl stall and that's where I head for. Good prices, eclectic selection. Recently I've picked up some good condition classical very cheap, Mozart Jupiter which is mind blowing, ditto Charles Ives piano and 4th symphony. And a load of house/techno 12 inches, including Leftfield last week, 'Open Up' with John Lydon, bought with a double 12 inch Underground Sounds of Australia. Buying vinyl again has re opened a lot of sonic doors as you go with availability and odd stuff pops up. Add in some Stockhausen and Miles Davis second great quintet recently (interlinked in curious way) and most weekends I have this great mix of stuff playing which weaves in and out of classical (I have BBC radio 3 on a lot which covers a lot of ground) across the genres/sub genres and back. At the moment of writing, Steve Reich playing and the power of the music has pulled me away from this post for the duration. Labels are clumsy, keep the fields wide open...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST,IvanB
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 09:41 PM


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 08:37 PM

Well Steve, I'll see whether it is the annoying Mozzie-bite experience or the life-changing experience. I'll let you know. As I said, it may take a while for the life-changing bit because sometimes it takes time for music to grow on me - like a fungus, I suppose. LOL


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 08:33 PM

No worries, Helen (another Aussie term!) They're mozzies here too, and here in Cornwall it's peak mozzie-bite season right now. Two vicious bites on me poor legs kept me awake all last night. I know I've come on a bit thick and fast with Mozart, but that's just a reflection of my enthusiasm. It's no affectation, honest. There really are depths to plumb, and the effort is, no exaggeration, potentially life-changing!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 05:08 PM

Hi Joe,

I like some Baroque.

All right, Steve, I'll give the old Mozzie (the common Aussie term for a mosquito, in case you didn't know that) a go. Light and tinkly is probably about right for me, but maybe I've been listening to the wrong pieces. It will take me a while to listen to all of the pieces you have recommended but I'll do it with open ears and an open mind.

Congratulations everyone for totally IGNORING my mentions of Leftfield. Was this a concerted effort or a series of solo performances? LOL

Helen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 11:16 AM

Try Mozart's late G Minor quintet. No wig powder in sight there, but plenty of angst, until he finds the sunlit uplands right at the end.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: gillymor
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 10:20 AM

Excellent post, Steve. Much of Mozart's music makes me think of powdered wigs and silken knee breeches but some of those late symphonies were transcendent, particularly the Jupiter.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 09:44 AM

I think that Bach's crowning achievement was to pull baroque music out of a sort of mire, in which heaviness, thick textures and a formulaic approach to a sort of layered musical structure, with quite a heavy bass line, often seemed to be the order of the day, especially in pieces for larger ensembles. It isn't helped by some of the big-band performances we used to get, thankfully a phenomenon we seem to be evolving away from. Bach's incredible use of harmony was in contrast to, er, some less imaginative efforts by lesser lights of the era. After him there was nowhere else to go for baroque, which is where Haydn and Mozart come in. To me, they were the giants of the classical era, Haydn the worthy (in more senses than one) creator and Mozart taking the classical style to a pinnacle in music that I don't think has ever been eclipsed. Helen's not fully relating to Mozart rang a bell, in that a good mate of mine, a superb teacher of music and multi-instrumentalist, doesn't "get" Mozart either. He considers it to be light, tinkly and not demanding enough. Well light the candles, pour a glass, shut out the noise and put on the slow movement of Piano Concerto no 21. There's a singing tune going on, on first hearing sounding like all those things I've just said. But listen to what's going on "underneath." There's profound restlessness and disquiet, an emotional quiet storm going on. Then whack up the volume and put on the finale of the Jupiter Symphony, a tour de force, visionary and forward-looking, a complex yet thoroughly coherent masterpiece of driving force (I feel the same about the first movement of the Prague Symphony, my favourite). Beethoven sort of bestrode the classical and romantic periods but he's no revolutionary. True, his works broke all the rules about length, he knew how to "shock" via dynamic extremes and he ditched (almost) the elegance of minuets in favour of spiky scherzos, etc. But he returned again and again to the old forms, fugue and variation, paid explicit homage to Bach and Palestrina even in his late music and used only the forces of Haydn and Mozart. His very last string quartet, the last completed work, was homage to those two, deified!

Unenlightened and subjective opinion only. Shoot!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: gillymor
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 08:26 AM

Whoops, that Bach link didn't take, here it is again-

Minuet in G


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: gillymor
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 08:23 AM

It's true that some of J.S. Bach's stuff can sound like sawing-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWk2tYaA6A0

Here's a lovely piece from the Baroque era by Francois Couperin that is a bit less saw-like-

Mysterious Barricades- Christopher Parkening, guitar


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 09:55 PM

I like classical music from the Romantic era. I like folk music just fine, but I have to listen to folk music to enjoy it. I can play classical music all day long and do other things.

But my wife likes Baroque, and only Baroque. It sounds like sawing to me, and I can take it in only little bits.

-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 09:28 PM

I have half a dozen earworms, Helen. I can switch freely from one to another, but I can't not have one at all! The piano concertos are a wonderful body of work and choosing favourites is very subjective. The one in G, K453 (forgotten what number it is), no 23 in A and the last one, no 27 in B flat, are all sublime. His two minor-key ones, no 20 in D minor K466 and the C minor one, no 24, K 491, are full of smoky drama and, at times, pathos. My very favourite is the one in C, K 467, of Elvira Madigan fame. It's the perfect work of art just as The Magic Flute is perfect. Go on, give them a whirl! If you want really nice performances, any by Murray Perahia will get you there. Or Mitsuko Uchida. Many more but I don't keep up!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 09:13 PM

And then, Steve, there is that earworm which, once contracted will not die, no matter how many times or how hard I stomp on it - from Eine Kleine Nachtmusik .

LOL


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 09:13 PM

Helen, I second Steve Shaw,
and I particularly suggest the piano concerti of Mozart,
especially the later ones.
Early ones, Mozart was still a kid.

The later concerti come when Mozart is full-blown mature.
And it helps to listen to these piano concerti
and to think of them as instrumental dramas,
and to imagine what sort of story is being played out.

This is one thing that separates the piano concerti of Mozart
from the piano concertos composed by so many others
during the golden age of the piano.
Remember, pianos used to be big business, big moneymakers, and they supported financially a number of cultural developments in the Industrial Age which were more mercenary than musical.
It's why I have trouble with piano concertos in general;
one has this impression of cutthroat competition, and prize-winning,
and "war-horse" repertoire which, as the English say, puts bums in seats.

Not Mozart, bless him.
Mozart is an operatic composer par excellence, so drama and storytelling are natural for him.
And if some composers write songs without words,
then Mozart is capable of writing operas without words --
and the piano concerto is one way for him to do that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 07:57 PM

I implore you to have another crack at Mozart, Helen. There's a whole world of profound beauty waiting for you. Get your headphones on and hit Youtube. Where to start? Try the Clarinet Quintet, or the Piano Concerto no 21, or the Sinfonia Concertante (the K364 one), or the Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments, or the C minor Mass, or the last four symphonies. The finale of the Jupiter Symphony is one of the most incredible pieces of music ever written. We only live once...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 05:08 PM

And one more thought about discussing disagreements about definitions, or disagreements about anything in fact:

"If we’re to survive this post-truth world we seem to have found ourselves in, it’s time to stand up for evidence-based decision-making, critical thought, facts, rational discussion and transparent, open communication."
Joanne McCarthy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: gillymor
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 04:48 PM

Very well said, Helen, especially that last paragraph.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Helen
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 04:38 PM

This is the OP's opinion.

There is some amazing classical music, and there is some classical music that I have tried to listen to, given it my best shot, and it just doesn't do it for me. Some of that is the atonal, or anti-melody creations of musical academics, but some of it is the exact same musical piece or composer which someone else absolutely adores.

For example, I've never really related to most of Mozart's music, except that I love The Magic Flute opera. Play me just about any other Mozart piece and I'll just go, "Yeah, whatever!", but play me some Vivaldi or J.S. Bach and I am more likely to sit up and listen, and in some cases - hence the original posting - I am so transfixed that I am incapable of re-directing my brain, hands or feet into any other activity because I am totally focused on the music. I probably get watched now and then by my manager at work when I suddenly go dead still and forget to work because I am listening to a piece of music on the earphones.

Alternatively, as gillymor said, there are some other musical pieces outside of the classical genre which can also bring me to the same standstill. I can't possibly list them all but at the top of the list is Louis Armstrong, Billie Holliday, and a bunch of others in just about every musical genre you can name, including the electro-percussion duo I mentioned before, Leftfield.

To discuss the concept of "genius" would take a very large thread, and it wouldn't be confined to a thread about classical music. Maybe we could start that thread, but all I would say is that MY loose definition of a genius (off the top of my head, without asking Google) is someone with amazing mental and creative capabilities, with the capacity to bring together seemingly unrelated ideas, concepts or elements which generates among other people a new understanding of the field of study. That Eureka moment. An idea which, once formulated, changes the way that the field of study is evaluated from that time forward.

Having watched the wonderful documentary series called Jazz - directed by Ken Burns I believe that a process of genius was used to create jazz (including the influence on popular music even up to today) which used the genius of a lot of different musicians coming from a lot of social and musical backgrounds. So, in my opinion, the genius was not just one or a few people, but the sum of the parts, i.e. synergy between a lot of people not just in one group, but scattered geographically and socially.

I think that the word "genius" is bandied about without really evaluating the person and their capabilities against a real definition of genius, but personally I think that if you get a Eureka moment from a piece of music and you experience that shift in your concept of the musical world from that moment on, then you personally have identified a "genius" in your world and that's a wonderful and amazing experience. Far be it for anyone else to underrate your experience by saying that they don't agree. If it was a Eureka moment for you, then no one else should be able to take that away from you. Someone else can have a different opinion, but they cannot tell you what you think or feel.

Helen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: gillymor
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 04:34 PM

I agree with most of your list, Will, but mine would also include Lennon and McCartney.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Will Fly
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 04:34 PM

I see your point, and I understand where you're coming from. I'm seeing Classical music and, say, Popular music as two separate genres - each with its own geniuses.

Gershwin is actually an interesting example, with a foot in both camps.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 04:19 PM

Will, the term becomes meaningless if we include the names you mentioned...including Gershwin.
OR...we will have to invent a new word to describe the talents of Bach and Beethoven...and Handel...and Liszt...and


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: Will Fly
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 04:02 PM

The dictionary definition of genius is someone with exceptional ability in a particular activity.

You could say that some rock/popular compsers and musicians measured up in that respect. What about, say, Randy Newman, Richard Thompson, Leonard Cohen, George Gershwin...?

Just a thought...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Classical music - what makes you listen?
From: GUEST,Tunesmith
Date: 13 Sep 18 - 01:35 PM

Please don't EVER use the word genius when talking about pop and rock musicians because that wouldn't make any sense.
Pleasant they may be. Entertaining they may be. Stimulating they may be BUT genius they ain't


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
Next Page

  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 25 September 9:32 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.