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Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more

Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 03:08 PM
Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 03:20 PM
Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 03:27 PM
Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 03:31 PM
Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 03:38 PM
dick greenhaus 03 Jun 06 - 04:33 PM
Little Robyn 03 Jun 06 - 06:35 PM
Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 08:06 PM
Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 08:16 PM
GUEST,Bernadette 03 Jun 06 - 09:26 PM
Azizi 03 Jun 06 - 09:43 PM
Les in Chorlton 04 Jun 06 - 04:31 AM
Mo the caller 04 Jun 06 - 07:04 AM
GUEST 04 Jun 06 - 07:37 PM
Little Robyn 04 Jun 06 - 08:04 PM
Azizi 04 Jun 06 - 08:17 PM
Azizi 04 Jun 06 - 08:34 PM
Little Robyn 05 Jun 06 - 06:16 AM
Azizi 05 Jun 06 - 07:48 AM
Azizi 05 Jun 06 - 07:52 AM
Azizi 05 Jun 06 - 07:59 AM
Little Robyn 05 Jun 06 - 03:26 PM
Azizi 05 Jun 06 - 07:44 PM
Little Robyn 06 Jun 06 - 03:27 AM
Mo the caller 06 Jun 06 - 04:35 AM
Mo the caller 06 Jun 06 - 05:00 AM
old salty 06 Jun 06 - 05:12 AM
Mo the caller 06 Jun 06 - 05:14 AM
Azizi 06 Jun 06 - 06:58 AM
Azizi 06 Jun 06 - 07:25 AM
Little Robyn 06 Jun 06 - 04:12 PM
Azizi 06 Jun 06 - 05:41 PM
Azizi 06 Jun 06 - 05:43 PM
Mo the caller 06 Jun 06 - 06:16 PM
Charmain 06 Jun 06 - 06:49 PM
Little Robyn 07 Jun 06 - 04:20 PM
GUEST 07 Jun 06 - 05:23 PM
Mo the caller 08 Jun 06 - 03:29 AM
old salty 08 Jun 06 - 04:42 AM
GUEST,Joe_F 08 Jun 06 - 09:39 PM
Azizi 10 Jun 06 - 12:06 AM
Azizi 10 Jun 06 - 12:47 AM
LadyJean 10 Jun 06 - 12:49 AM
Mo the caller 10 Jun 06 - 01:40 AM
Little Robyn 10 Jun 06 - 05:49 PM
Azizi 10 Jun 06 - 06:08 PM
Azizi 11 Jun 06 - 10:34 AM
Azizi 11 Jun 06 - 11:48 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 03:08 PM

Do you know any children's playground rhymes that mention food, beverages, candy, fruit, and/or other desserts?

If so, this thread's for you.

I'll start off by posting some examples of rhymes I've gathered from here & there.

Please join in the fun.

And if you don't mind, please add demographical information such as the geographical area and the decade that you remember reciting this rhyme or hearing this rhyme recited.

Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 03:20 PM

Since this thread was inspired by the current Mudcat thread McDonald's or Burger King, I'll start off with some McDonald's handclap rhymes:


Ronald McDonald
was ah Hamburger

Ronald McDonald
was ah hamburger

Ooh! Wishie Washie
Ah hamburger

Ooh! Wishie Washie
Ah hamburger

It tasted good, like
Ah hamburger

It tasted good, like
Ah hamburger

Ice cream soda
with a cherry on top.
Now shake it baby
Ah boom bang!
-Donetta Agbodzie, who said her younger sister taught it to her around 1976, 1977 in Pittsburgh, PA.

RONALD MCDONALD LOVES A HAMBURGER
Ronald McDonald
loves ah hamburger
Ooh she she wah wah
ah hamburger
I fell in love
With ah
Hamburger
Big Mac
Quarter Pouder
Icey coke
Milk shake
You deserve a beak today *
At McDonald's!
And the dish ran away with the spoon **
-T. Powell; 1980s; Pittsburgh, PA {my daughter, who is a school teacher, reports that [African American] elementary school age girls & boys still "do" this exact same "song" to handclaps, particulary during school bus rides to field trips}

* the first lines until "you deserve etc" are a recitation of the exact words of that McDonald's commercial; "You deserve a break today/so get up and get away/at McDonald's" is sung in the same tune and the same way as was done in that commercial"

** And the dish ran away with the spoon" is recited; the line is from a Mother Goose rhyme {which one??}


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 03:27 PM

McDonald's is your kind of place;
They serve you rattlesnakes,
Hot dogs up your nose,
French fries between your toes,
And don't forget those chocolate shakes,
They're from polluted eggs,
McDonald's is your kind of place;
The last time that I was there,
They stole my underwear,
I really didn't care,
They were a dirty pair.
The next time that you go there,
They'll serve my underwear.
McDonald's is your kind of place.
Scooo-oobie.

from: ONE POTATO, TWO POTATO...:
THE SECRET EDUCATION OF AMERICAN CHILDREN
by Mary and Herbert Knapp
New York: W. W. Norton & Co., Inc.
1976; p. 163

online source: http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0502c&L=ads-l&P=6454


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 03:31 PM

COCA COLA WENT TO TOWN
Coca Cola (clap clap clap)
went to town (clap clap clap)
Hi-C (clap clap clap)
knocked him down (clap clap clap)
7up (clap clap clap)
picked him up (clap clap clap)
Dr. Pepper (clap clap clap)
gave him (clap clap clap)
sleeping pills (clap clap clap)
jelly rolls (clap clap clap)
Theres a place on Mars
where the ladies smoke cigars
every puff they take
is enough to kill a snake
when the snake is dead
you put diamonds in his head
when the diamonds break
it's enough to bake a cake
when the cake is done
it is 1991
when you tie your shoe
it is 1992
when you get stung by a bee
it is 1993
when you slam a door
it is 1994
when you dance the jive
it is 1995
when you pick up sticks
it is 1996
when you like a boy named devon
it is 1997
when you close the gate
it is 1998
when you're feelin' fine
it is 1999
then it gets all cold
then you
FREEZE!

Source: http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php; "Schoolyard games thread";posted by Miranda at August 19, 2004 [used with permission of that blog's members]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 03:38 PM

Correction:

In my 03 Jun 06 - 03:20 PM post I wrote:

Ronald McDonald
was ah Hamburger

Ronald McDonald
was ah hamburger

-snip-

The first time those lines are written, they're the title.

The second time those lines are written, they're the beginning of the recitation.

Sorry for any confusion.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & mo
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 04:33 PM

"It takes two hands to handle a teacher
A two-headed creature
From outer space"

...from Burger King Whopper jingle.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 06:35 PM

If you already know Ram sam sam...

A...Pizza Hutt, a Pizza Hutt,
Kentucky fried chicken and a Pizza Hutt,
McDonalds, McDonalds,
Kentucky fried chicken and a Pizza Hutt.

with actions too, of course.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 08:06 PM

Opps!

I've been informed that I left out some of this rhyme and made other typographical errors. Sorry {aka "My bad"}.

Here's the right version of

RONALD MCDONALD LOVES A HAMBURGER
Ronald McDonald
loves ah__ hamburger *
Ooh she she wah wah
ah___ hamburger
I fell in love
With ah __
Hamburger
Big Mac
Quarter Pounder
Icey coke
Milk shake
Sundaes
and apple pie.
You deserve a beak today
so get up and get away
At McDonald's!
And the dish ran away with the spoon.

* __ signifies a pause for one beat before saying the next word


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 08:16 PM

Robyn,

this rhyme 'sounds'like a version of the rhyme that you posted:

Kentucky fried chicken and a pizza hut,
Mc Donalds, Mc Donalds

Luck Skywalker and a Jabba the hut
Dath Vader, darth vader

A luck sky chiken and a Pizza the hut
Mc Vader Mc Vader

Source:http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php posted by mandi at April 26, 2006
{the poster identified herself {himself?} as a college freshman}

[reposted with permission from that blog's members]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: GUEST,Bernadette
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 09:26 PM

I cannot think of any Children's Rhymes about Fast Foods or fizzy, sugar filled, Caffeine laced Drinks. The concept of these Food items being part of Children's Lives and Rhymes today, all be it considered "normal", is quite sad from a dietary viewpoint I think.
Then again I suppose this old Rhyme could be considered to be about a food item that is now considered unhealthy also.

As a Tongue Twister, my Daughters found it to be a lot of fun to say as quickly and as articulately as possible!

Betty Botter


Betty Botter bought some butter,
But, she said, the butter's bitter.
If I put it in my batter,
It will make my batter bitter.
But a bit of better butter
Is sure to make my batter better.
So she bought a bit of butter
Better than her bitter butter,
And she put it in her batter
And the batter was not bitter.
So 'twas better Betty Botter
Bought a bit of better butter.

B. Mahoney
(Visiting a Mudcat Member)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 03 Jun 06 - 09:43 PM

Thanks, Bernadette. Happy visiting!

And also thanks to others who have posted and hopefully will post to this thread!

Please note, This thread can be about any type of food, or drink, or fruit, or dessert found in kid's rhymes. The rhyme doesn't have to be about "fast food".

See this handclap rhyme for example:

EANIE MEANIE JUSTA LEANIE
Eenie Meanie Justa Leanie
Ooca Acla Trackalacka, I love you.
Take a peach, Take a plum
Take a piece of bubble gum.
Teacher, Teacher, Dummy Dum
Gimme back my bubble gum.
Saw you with your boyfriend last night.
How do you know?
I was peekin' through the keyhold.
NOSY
Wash them dishes
LAZY
Jump out the window
CRAZY
Peaches on the tree, Bananas on the floor
Jump back baby. I DON'T LOVE YOU NO MORE!

-snip-

There are multiple versions of this rhyme. I collected this version in 1998 from Donetta A., Pittsburgh, PA.. Donetta is an African American woman who recalls learning this in 1984 from another African American girl who was visiting Pittsburgh from Alabama.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & mo
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 04 Jun 06 - 04:31 AM

Where is this from?

If you already know Ram sam sam...

"A...Pizza Hutt, a Pizza Hutt,
Kentucky fried chicken and a Pizza Hutt,
McDonalds, McDonalds,
Kentucky fried chicken and a Pizza Hutt.

with actions too, of course.
Robyn"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Mo the caller
Date: 04 Jun 06 - 07:04 AM

I think Ram sam sam is a Girl Guide camp fire song, that's where I learnt the Pizza hut version.
And I'm amazed the Azizzi doesn't know what every English 2 year old does (or did in my day)
Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed to see such fun*
And the dish ran away with the spoon

*"sport" in some written versions

Hi tiddly i ti
Eat brown bread
I saw a sausage fall down dead
Along came a savaloy and hit him on the head
I tiddly i ti eat brown bread

Something like that anyway, from my sister's London childhood (c1960), I'd never heard in at primary school, so like Chinese skipping it must have got here 1956-1961. No tune, just a rhythmic chant.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & mo
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Jun 06 - 07:37 PM

The only thing that comes to mind is what I (and many others) used to do to "David Melech Yisroel" back in Jewish Day Camp days.

We'd sing it as "Watermelon, ginger ale, French fries, pizza pie"

-- Gary


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 04 Jun 06 - 08:04 PM

It's all here Ram Sam Sam
but we have different movements -
Ram sam sam - stamp your feet
Gooli gooli - arm twiddling (like thumb twiddling but with the whole arm)(same as 'This old man came rolling home')
Arafi - raise your arms in the air as you stand up and then sit down again.
At least, that's the way we do it.
For the Pizza Hutt version -
Pizza Hutt - make a roof shape with your hands
Kentucky fried chicken - make wing flapping movements, with hands under your armpits
McDonalds - make the big M shape - either drawing it in the air or hold arms up with hands curved over and fingertips touching.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Jun 06 - 08:17 PM

Off topic comments:

Mo the caller, if I understood your post correctly, "Ram Sam Sam" is the song that you believe that every English child 2 year old and up knows or knew in your childhood, and that version of "Hey diddle diddle" that you posted after that sentence is from your sister's London childhood. Is that right?

Well, I know that first verse of version of "Hey Diddle Diddle" with the 'sport' word. But I've never heard or seen the second verse.

And I have never heard of "Ram Sam Sam" before this thread. Also, my 33 year old daugther had never heard of it before. She has taught in a large urban, almost all African American public school for 10 years. And she said that she is almost 100% sure that the students in her school don't know "Ram Sam Sam".

I also asked her did she or her students know "Ging Gang Gooli," a song that seems to be sung by kids in the same 'circles' as "Ram Sam Sam". She said that she only knows that song because I have asked her about it before.

Of course, this is totally unscientific. But my daughter and I have done cultural programs on game songs, rhymes, and cheers for almost 10 years now in the Pittsburgh, Pa area. Our focus populations are mostly Black children's groups. In addition to these one time formal presentations, we've both worked with ongoing groups of elementary school age girls & boys. These groups are also African American.
Given these activities, and other activities, we both are alert to the game songs and rhymes children around us 'sing' and 'do'.

Since an integral part of our presentations is asking the children to share what 'songs' they know, it seems likely that somewhere along the way, we would have heard these two songs if they were known to our focus population.

However, it should also be said that we have only presented our game song program at a Boy Scout and Campfire organization one time each, and we've not presented that program at any Girl Scout organization. So maybe we would have heard "Ram Sam Sam" and "Ging Gang Goolee" at those venues.

Btw, when I googled "Ging Gang Goolee" I found an example of that song on a website of a Boy Scout troup in Beaver Falls, PA. Beaver Falls is not far from Pittsburgh, and it is an integrated community. But if I were a betting woman, I'd bet that troup was made up of White boys or predominately White boys.

It's my personal opinion, and that of my school teacher daughter, that "Ram Sam Sam" and "Ging Gang Gollee" songs don't conform to Black American [if not other Black] preferences for the lyrics and accompanying movements of children's rhymes. For instance, we don't think that they either of these songs are percussive enough. Also, we felt that many African American children would quickly tire of the repetitive nonsense or unfamiliar words or sounds in both the songs.

In addition, I think that the inclusion of the word "gang" in "Ging Gang Gollee" might cause adults to view that song with suspicion.
Furthermore, the name "Shayla" is relatively common among post 1980s African American girls. One form of this name is "LaShay" {and there are countless other "la" names and "Shay" names, mostly female.
I think kids try to make sense out of non-sense words. Since "Hey la Shay la" sounds like it might be 'talkin about' a girl name "Shay" or "LaShay", I could see this song causing trouble to those who might sing it. For example I can imagine some girl sayin to another "Who you think you are callin me out of my name?" And then it might go downhill from there.

Of course, I might be wrong about some or all of these comments.

But I might not be.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Jun 06 - 08:34 PM

Although these children's rhymes don't include any references to food, since we have discussed them, it's fitting that the words to "Ram Sam Sam" and "Ging Gang Golee" in this thread:

RAM SAM SAM
A ram sam sam
(hit one fist on top of another)

A ram sam sam
(hit one fist on top of another)

Goolie Goolie Goolie
(Roll hands)

and a Ram Sam Sam
(Hit fists again)

A Raffy A Raffy
(Lift arms)

Goolie Goolie Goolie
(Roll hands again)

and a RAM SAM SAM!
(Hit fists again)
http://www.thebestkidsbooksite.com/funfingerplay.cfm?fingerplayid=287

Here's another version:
A Ram Sam Sam
A ram sam sam, A ram sam sam
Goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li ram sam sam
A ram sam sam, A ram sam sam
http://parentingteens.about.com/library/sp/gs/blsongs16.htm


And here's a version of GING GANG GOLLEE

Goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li ram sam sam
A ra-vi A ra-vi,
goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li ram sam sam
A ra-vi A ra-vi,
goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li goo-li ram sam sam

http://parentingteens.about.com/library/sp/gs/blsongs16.htm

Here's another version of GING GANG GOLLEE:
Ging gang gooli, gooli, gooli, gooli, watcha,
Ging, gang goo, Ging, gang goo,
Ging gang gooli, gooli, gooli, gooli, watcha,
Ging, gang goo, Ging, gang goo.

Heyla, heyla sheyla,
Heyla sheyla, heyla ho,
Heyla, heyla sheyla,
Heyla sheyla, heyla ho.

Shalli-walli, shalli-walli, Shalli-walli, shalli-walli.

Oompa, oompa, oompa...
http://www.macscouter.com/Songs/ScoutingSongs.html#gooli

I know that "Ging Gang Gollee" has been discussed on other Mudcat threads but I was unable to identify any of those threads using the Mudcat search engine.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 05 Jun 06 - 06:16 AM

I can't make the blickies work but if you put ram sam sam in the box up top, it'll take you to another thread on it.
Then just use that rhythm/tune for the Pizza Hut version.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 05 Jun 06 - 07:48 AM

Here's that hyperlink:

Mudcat thread: Ram Sam Sam

****

I had forgotten that I posted to that thread, and asked the question about whether that song is related to Gang Gollee.

In addition to that thread, there's at least one Mudcat thread where posters from Britain said that kids weren't allowed to sing "Ging Gang Gollee" for one reason of the other. Does anyone remember that discussion?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 05 Jun 06 - 07:52 AM

Here's a handclap rhyme that [briefly] mentions fruit:

APPLES ON A STICK
Apples on a stick
Make me sick
Makes my tummy go
Two Forty-six
Not because its dirty
Not because its clean
Not because I kissed my mommy
Behind the magazines
Girls, girls
Do you want to fight?
Here comes Dickey
With her pants on tight
She can wiggle
She can woggle
She can do all that
I bet you ten dollars
You can do this
Count to ten with your eyes closed
A-baby one
A-baby two
A-baby three, four, five
Baby, I don't take no jive.
A-baby six
A-baby seven
A-baby eight, nine, ten
You better back it up and do it again

-various sources, including: Barbara Michels & Bettye White:
"Apples On A Stick, The Folklore of Black Children"
{New York, Coward-McCann, Inc., 1983; p.11; collected by the authors in Houston, Texas}


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 05 Jun 06 - 07:59 AM

Here's one that mentions beverages:

I love coffee.
I love tea.
I love the boys
And they love me.

Tell your mother
To hold her tongue.
She was the same
When she was young.

No more coffee.
No more tea.
No more boys
And no more me.                        (* Jumper exits *)

Source: Abrahams (1969), Cochran (1976), Knapp (1976), Solomon (1980), Hastings (1990)
http://www.mudcat.org/jumprope/jumprope_display.cfm?rhyme_number=119

****

FYI,I've collected a number of different handclap rhymes with that
"I love [like]coffee/"I love [like] tea verse in combination with "Down Down Baby" {down by the roller coaster/Shimmy Shimmy Coco pa} rhyme.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 05 Jun 06 - 03:26 PM

Some love coffee, some love tea,
But I love the pretty girl that winks at me,
Such a getting upstairs and playing on the fiddle
Such a getting upstairs I never did see.

A version of that one is in Ruth Crawford Seeger's book but is also used by Morris dancers in England - a dance called Getting upstairs.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 05 Jun 06 - 07:44 PM

Robyn, thanks for that information!

I wasn't aware that rhyme was used for a Morris dance. Actually, I'd never heard of Morris dancing until I read about them on several Mudcat threads and then googled the term.

I'm trying to identify the earliest documented date of the "I love coffee, I love tea" line in adult songs or children's rhymes.
My guess is that this children's rhyme is based on an adult song   and not the other way around. Does anyone have an opinion of this?

Is the Morris dance 'Getting upstairs' an adult dance?
Any ideas about the earliest date this dance was documented?   

****

I found that "I love coffee, I love tea" line in the song "Vinie" which is included in Thomas W. Talley's 1922 collection "Negro Folk Rhymes":

"I loves coffee, an' I loves tea
I axes you, Vinie, does you loves me?"

-snip-

I'm wondering if the Morris dance is earlier.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 03:27 AM

Just found a comment in a Morris site:

Some of the Cotswold tunes are very old - for example ' Trunkles ' - while others come from the music hall era (' Getting Upstairs ' and ' Old Black Joe ')It is probably true to say that they were generally popular tunes of the day adapted to fit the dances.

It's from an article on Father Kenneth Loveless here http://www.themorrisring.org/More/tunes.html

Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Mo the caller
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 04:35 AM

Sorry for my confusing post above.
1. Ram sam sam/ Pizza hut is the girl guide song
2. Hey Didle Diddle is one of the nursery rhymes that every baby learns (with a certain amount of parental competitiveness, at least in my childhood, but that was before TV was widespread, they probably learn to talk with Patman Pat etc. nowadays)
3. I tiddley i ti is a food rhyme that my sister brought home from school.

Your mention of the book reminds me the counting out rhyme. [You stand with hands clenched, knuckles facing out (and isn't it hard to describe what 'everyone knows'), the counter points to 1 fist/ syllable, on the word "out" put that hand behind your back and carry on till only one hand is left.]
One potato, two potato, three potato, four.
5 potato, 6 ,7 potato more
O U T spells out.

And 2 about jelly.I'm not sure if we said these in the playground, I think they may have been on "Listen with Mother" (a wireless programme for under 5s)

My husband reminds me of
Old --- is a funnyun
His face like a picked onion
His nose like a squashed tomato
And legs like match sticks

--- is someones name, usually a teacher.
"is a funny un" is the Yorkshire version
In London it was "Old ---'s got a bunion"
Jelly on a plate, jelly on a plate,
Wibble wobble wibble wobble
Jelly on a plate.

Red jelly, Yellow jelly (repeated many times fast as a tongue twister)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Mo the caller
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 05:00 AM

We remember The Java jive from the 40s, (Ink Spots), so not as old as yours
http://www.chlond.demon.co.uk/JavaJive.html
Yes Morris is an adult dance.
We used
I like coffe, I like tea, I like -- in with me.
I don't like coffee, I don't like tea, I don't like -- in with me.
as a skipping rhyme.
Long rope with 2 turning. 1st girl skips, calls next in, skip together, then 1st jumps out.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: old salty
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 05:12 AM

i remember the 2 ball game
   mrs mop[drop ball] bought a shop[drop ball]
   all she sold[drop ball] was ginger pop [drop ball]

get the picture?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Mo the caller
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 05:14 AM

Sorry again, my post above has dropped a potato
"5 potato, 6 potato, 7 potato, more."

Which reminds me of the, not so much a rhyme more a trick
"After everything I say you have to say 'dropping potatoes'"
Went up 1 stair .....
Went up 2 stairs ....
Went into a room .....
Looked out the window ....
Saw a donkey ....

This one was used when "After every thing I say you have to say 'just like me'" then the same chant, had ceased to catch anyone out.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 06:58 AM

Salty:
Does "drop the ball" means the same thing as "bounce the ball" which is what I think most people in the United States say for the action of a person hitting [or throwing] the ball on the floor one time and then catching it to the beat of the rhyme.

Is that what you meant? That's how I pictured it when I read your rhyme example. Btw, what country are you from. I'm just curious because of the difference in phrases.

Mo the caller, and Robyn, am I remembering correctly that you both are from England? I think I remember reading that in another thread or even asking you both that before. I don't think that the program Postman Pat was in the United States. When I was growing up in the 1950s two little children's educational/entertainment shows we had were "Romper Room" and "Captain Kangaroo". "Mr Rogers' Neighborhood" came later. That program and "Sesame Street" are still aired on television.

I recognize that television is a medium of teaching children's rhymes {Mother Goose rhymes and others]. I think that-at least currently-to a much lesser extent for teens and younger ages, the Internet also is a medium for spreading children's rhymes, and acquainting children and adults to the fact that there may be and often are different versions of the same rhyme. Most children [and quite a few adults] think that there is only one version of children's rhymes-their version. Also, if they think about it at all {and I believe most people don't}, most people assume that kids throughout the world "perform" the rhyme the same way as they do. For instance, if two girls chant a rhyme while alternately clapping or slapping each other's hands, then when a person reads this rhyme, they think that is the only movements that 'can' or 'should' occur with that particular rhyme.

It seems to me that the tune a rhyme uses is much more constant than how it is performed or its words. And the words are the least constant of the three.

Some words to children's "playground" or "street" rhymes demonstrate a great deal of stability in their words. I think 1 potato; 2 potato" is one of those rhymes. But there are other children's playground rhymes {and I'm purposely excluding Mother Goose rhymes from this particular comment} whose verses have changed somewhat or a great deal over time, in different places, and-I maintain-among different groups of people. While publishing a rhyme greatly adds to the likelihood that there will be a standard version, other versions of that published rhyme still can exists {because after all, books and other forms of the printed word are usually not the primary way that children learn rhymes. They usually learn them from other children}.

To demonstrate the fact that the words to rhymes change among groups of people, see my next post to this thread for an example of how the words to "I like coffee, I like tea" has changed among some African American girls.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 07:25 AM

Down Down Baby {Version #1}
Down, down, baby down by the roller coaster
Sweet, sweet baby I'll never let you go

Shemie, shemie coco butter, shemie shemie pop
I like coffee, I like tea, I like a black boy and he likes me
So step back white boy, you don't shine
I'll get the black boy to beat your behind

Last night and the night before
I met my boyfriend at the candy store
He bought me ice cream he bought me cake
He brought me home with a belly ache

Mama, mama, I feel sick
Call the doctor, quick, quick, quick
Doctor, doctor, will I die
Close your eyes and count to five
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, I'm Alive!

Source: email to www.cocojams.com on November 2002; from Tonya Thornton {African American female} from her memories of her childhood in Crawfordville, Georgia {1979 -1987}

I collected similar versions of this rhyme from direct observation of children in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania {1999-2006} and elsewhere in the United States {1998-2006}. I have also seen other examples of the verses: "I like a black boy and he likes me/so step back white boy/you don't shine/Imma get a black boy to beat your behind" on websites that post children's rhymes {in addition to my website]. On one occassion, I found the version: "I like a black boy and he likes me/so step back white girl/you don't shine/I'mma get a black girl to beat your behind".

Most of these rhymes don't include any information about the poster's race or ethnicity. But I think it's reasonable to assume that these rhymes originated with and are largely chanted by Black girls. That said, here's an example that I received from a Puerto Rican woman from New York City:

Down Down Baby {Version #2}
Down, down baby
Down, down the roller coaster
Sweet, sweet baby
I'll never let you go
Chimey chimey cocoa pop
Chimey, chimey pow
Chimey, chimey cocoa pop
Chimey, chimey pop
I like coffee, I like tea
I like a colored boy and he likes me
So lets here the rhythm of the hands, (clap, clap) 2x
Let hear the rhythm of the feet (stomp, stomp) 2x
Let's hear the rhythm of the head (ding dong) 2x
Let's hear the rhythm of the hot dog
Let's hear the rhythm of the hot dog
Put em all together and what do you get
(Clap clap, stomp stomp), ding dong, hot Dog!

Source: email to www.cocojams.com on November 2004; from Yasmin Hernadez {Latina female from {Brooklyn} New York, New York,
from her memories of her childhood in the 1980s

Yasmin did however say that her neighborhood was mixed Black & Latina, so the source for this rhyme may have been Black girls.

It's my position that children's rhymes can provide information about the life, times, values, attitudes, concerns, and hopes that children have. These examples of "I Love Coffee" {which is often called "Down Down Baby" in Pittsburgh area and elsewhere} reveal that confrontation [still] exist among children of different races. Perhaps this rhyme is evidence of the time when children experienced integration for the first time in school and on the playground. Maybe this rhyme speaks to present day grievances among children of different races. And maybe these words don't mean anything at all.

But maybe they do.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 04:12 PM

Hi Azizi, I'm from New Zealand tho' my ancesters came from Britain about 150 years ago.
Most NZers were into 'rugby, racing and beer' but I could never relate to that. I discovered American folk songs in the 60s and later got into British folk - and discovered that's where I really belonged.
School journals and song books used to include folk songs and rhymes and we often used the same rhymes as you in the playgound (50 years ago).
I was a student at teacher's training college when someone introduced Cookie Jar to NZ kids (hey, there's another food one!). This came from the Folkways record "One, two, three and a zing, zing, zing" which was recorded on the streets of New York, if I remember rightly and one of the music lecturers had the record. I don't know if modern kids still play it but it started in the early 60s in NZ.
I used to have a copy of the record but I sent it to the Opies, in England, many years ago, when they couldn't find a copy anywhere else.
Later, when my daughter was little, we picked up Down, down baby (similar to version 2 but without the reference to the coloured boy) from kids TV - we watched and sometimes recorded Sesame Street and The Elephant Show, and learned lots of songs from there. Now she has a baby of her own, she's digging out the old tapes and is doing the same thing with my granddaughter (who is only 12 weeks old).
Way to go!
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 05:41 PM

Thanks for posting that Robyn!It's interesting how rhymes travel!!

I learned "Who Stole The Cookie From The Cookie Jar" when I was growing up {I don't remember how]. But I'm almost positive we didn't use the introductory phrase "One two three and a zing zing zing". However, that phrase changed around to "Zing Zing Zing And Ah One Two Three" is very widely used for a number of handclap rhymes.

I've only experienced "Who Stole The Cookie..." played as a sit down hand game, though I've read that some people have played it standing up. In my childhood I remember being seated in a circle, and clapping our own hands to one beat, then hitting our knees, and then clapping our hands again. This clap-slap-clap-slap beat is maintained throughout the entire chant. The tune to this song isn't very uptempo.

In my childhood the children said numbers in sequential order {so maybe this was a school thing}. But when I taught it to the Pittsburgh kids a few years ago, I used the version a Black Pittsburgh woman had shared with me. In that version, before the chant begins, every child is given a specific number. The game always starts with a leader voicing the line for "number 1". After number 1 recites that game's standard line, he or she picks another number at random. That person must say that standard line etc. and then must pick another number at random. Because they never know when their number is going to be called, each girl and boy must be alert to the possibility of her or his number being called, and must respond accordingly. * Technically, the game is supposed to end after every number is called.

* It's my opinion that some recreational games have [or had] a purpose beyond mere fun. I think that "Who Stole the Cookie Jar etc" may have been a means of reinforcing among children the need to remain alert & and aware, to think quickly, and respond appropriately. In similar fashion, I think that "let me see your motion" ring [circle] games where one child is selected at random to be in the center of the circle] also taught {teaches} children to be alert & aware, and think fast and act appropriately. In those circle games, a child is suppose to come up with a motion {usually nowadays a social dance move}. If someone before you performs the move you had thought to do, you're suppose to think fast and come up with another one {or better yet, in anticipation of the fact that you may be called to go in the 'middle' of the circle, and someone might have 'taken' the dance step you were going to do, you should have another dance step in mind as a 'back up plan'. Training and exercising their minds in such a way was [is] important for children anywhere, but perhaps even more important for children living in a dangerous, oppressive society {such as the mid 19th century American South, not to mention 21th century American South, East, North, and West.

In my neck of the woods, it seems to me that "Who Stole The Cookie.." is not a child initiated game anymore {if it ever was}. It appears to me that this game is most often taught to children by adults, and that adults lead children in playing this game. And even then, that's doesn't happen very often. Around 2003 or so I introduced "Who Stole The Cookie..." to a group of African American girls and boys-ages 5-12 years old. It was clear that they had never heard of the game before. Maybe it was because the group was too large {20 children or so}, but truth be told, the group quickly got bored with that repetitious chant, so long before all the numbers were called I switched up and moved to another game.

Here's the Pittsburgh, PA version of "Who Stole The Cookie..."

WHO STOLE THE COOKIE FROM THE COOKIE JAR
Group-    Who stole the cookie from the cook-ie jar
[leader]   Number 1 stole the cookie from the cook-ie jar
#1         Who me? Couldn't be
Others    Then who stole the cookie from the
          cook ie jar
#1         [Picks a number at random]
          Number 8 stole the cookie from the cook-ie jar
#8         Who me? Couldn't be
Others    Then who stole the cookie from the
          cook ie jar
#8         [Picks a number at random]
          Number 3 stole the cookie from the cook-ie jar
{etc etc etc}   

Btw-I should also confess that I changed the words to "who took the cookie from the cookie jar" as I didn't want to promote stealing...

Maybe the word 'stealing' was an American substitution. I have a vague memory of reading a Caribbean version of this rhyme that said something like "Someone took my cookie, was it you?" and a similar pattern continued from there...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 05:43 PM

Also, Robyn, I meant to say "Congratulations on your grandchild!"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Mo the caller
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 06:16 PM

Yes Azizi, I'm from England, London origionally and the primary school I went to was mostly white, as there was less imigration here in the 40s and than later.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Charmain
Date: 06 Jun 06 - 06:49 PM

The same as Mo the Caller's one but different dialect possibly (This one is from Bolton in Greater Manchester - or Lancashire if you're a pedant):

Oh --- is a funny-un
He's a face like a skelly onion
A nose like a squashed tomato
And legs like clothes props

Or substitute the last line with:
...
And eyes like boiled eggs


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 04:20 PM

The 1,2,3 and a zing, zing, zing bit came from a similar game called Jacquline and if you were caught out you became Jacquline. It was similar to the 'who me? couldn't be' above.
The Cookie jar one went:

Who stole the cookie from the cookie jar?
Not I stole the cookie from the cookie jar,
Then who stole the cookie from the cookie jar?
Robyn stole the cookie from the cookie jar!
Not I stole the cookie from the cookie jar.
Then who stole the cookie from the cookie jar?
Azizi stole the cookie from the cookie jar!
Not I stole...... etc.

Yes, it keeps you on your toes.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Jun 06 - 05:23 PM

On the discussion of "Who Stole the Cookie From the Cookie Jar?":

I am a 44-year-old male from Colorado, US.

I learned this clapping rhyme at church camp when I was about 8-10 (?). I don't remember who introduced me to it, but it was picked up by my age group of kids and we played it every year--and taught it to the younger kids--for at least 10 years. In fact, now that I'm thinking about it, I remember teaching it to kids at church camp in Missouri and Iowa, too. We probably played this as old as high school, but I don't think I've done so since.

We played it sitting down. The leader would start and it would bounce around the circle randomly until someone missed their number. At that point the repetition would stop, that person would go to the end of the line and everyone would get renumbered. The trick was to get to the head of the line and stay there.

We did a similar, but much faster version, too. (But no food mentioned). The first three people were "Saint Peter", "Saint Paul", and "Saint John". They were succeeded by "Number 1", "Number 2", etc. This clapping game was very simple: "My name" on the first two claps, followed immediately by "someone else's name" on the second two beats. At a tempo of about 200-250 bps.

BB,
Hutch


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Mo the caller
Date: 08 Jun 06 - 03:29 AM

Sounds like "Freeman, Hardy and Willis" (the name of a UK chain of shoe shops)
This was a game for childrens parties, taught by adults. No rhyme or clapping, you just sat in a circle with names or numbers Freeman, Hardy, Willis, 1,2,3....Teaboy. Someone called a name or number, that person had to reply with another number. If you didn't you moved down to the teaboy's seat, everyone else moved up and changed number. The aim was to get a seat on the board.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: old salty
Date: 08 Jun 06 - 04:42 AM

azizi,yeah its the same as drop the ball.iam from england.the game carries on,ie,throw the ball over hand against the wall,under the leg etc,all at the same part of the song.some did it with 3 balls,but i had enough trouble with 2 :)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: GUEST,Joe_F
Date: 08 Jun 06 - 09:39 PM

Old Mr Kelly Had a pimple on his belly. His wife cut it off And it tasted like jelly.

(And me without a spoon!)

--- Joe Fineman    joe_f@verizon.net

||: You can't even trust me to be ornery. :||


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Jun 06 - 12:06 AM

Thanks, old salty, for that explanation.

****

Hutch, I'm not sure that I understand how to play the game you mentioned.

You wrote "The first three people were "Saint Peter", "Saint Paul", and "Saint John". They were succeeded by "Number 1", "Number 2", etc. This clapping game was very simple: "My name" on the first two claps, followed immediately by "someone else's name" on the second two beats. At a tempo of about 200-250 bps"
-snip-

I believe that you're saying that Saint Peter to Saint John were given out as names to individuals and people clapped two claps after saying each of these names. And the fourth person was "Number 1"
{2 claps}; then "Number 2" {two claps} and so on. Right? If so, my question is what do you do if there is a large group? Does everyone get Numbers? {instead of their name}. It seems you are saying that the numbers are recited in sequential order. Is that right? If so, how does the game end?

Also what's "bps" as in the phrase 200-250 bps? Would you please provide the name of a familiar children's tune that has that tempo? For instance, is it the same tempo as "The Farmer In The Dell"?or "Ring around the Rosey"?

****

Also, Mo the caller, when you said "The aim was to get a seat on the board." ,what does that mean? You don't mean a board game, right? Do you mean that the object is not to lose your seat? Is this like what happens in the game "Musical Chairs"-the game starts with one chair less than the number of children playing. The children walk around the chairs while music plays. When the music abruptly stops, the children have to quickly sit in a chair. The person who doesn't sit in a chair is out. Another chair is removed, and this pattern continues until there is only one chair, and two people moving around that chair. The person who sits in that chair when the music stops is the winner. I'm curious if Musical Chairs is played outside of the USA know that game.

Btw, I very much dislike that "Musical Chairs" game. It often results in children under age 7 or so crying when they don't get a seat. Not to mention that it's unfair to children with disabilities and it rewards bullies and teaches the virtue of competition..Not that competition is always bad, but, must it be taught this way?

****

Hopefully, this is understood but maybe I need to say it:
By no means are these question meant as put downs of those non-USA games [or at least I think that they are non-USA games]. I'm delighted to learn about these games and I'm truly interested in knowing how they are played.

Thanks for sharing information about them.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Jun 06 - 12:47 AM

And returning to the subject of children's rhymes that mention food or beverages, or fruit, or candy etc, see this rhyme:

PIZZA PIZZA DADDY-O

Leader #1
(Center)        Georgia has a boyfriend
Group                Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Leader #2        Oh how do you know it?
                Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Leader #1        cause she told me
Group                Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Leader #2        What's his name?
Group                Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Leader #1        Jesse James
Group                Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O        
Leader #2        Where does he live?
Group                Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O        
Leader #1        Up a hill
Group                Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Leader #1        Let's jerk it *
Group                Jerk it, jerk it Daddy-O
Leader #1        Let's swim it
Group                Swim it, swim it, Daddy-O
Leader #1        Let's twist it
Group                Twist it, twist it Daddy-O
Leader                Let's end it
Group                End it, end it, Daddy-O

source: Eleanor Fulton & Pat Smith, Let's Slice the Ice, p 50 (MMB Music, Inc., St. Louis, Missouri, (1978);
The authors noted that they collected these rhymes from children from multiple states in the USA. No specific state was cited for individual rhymes. The introduction to that book indicates that the rhymes' informants were African American children.

Directions [as given in that book]: "Children form a circle with one child in the center. On each repeat of the words, "Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O, all the children in the center do the foot pattern as described below:
        
Piz         Jump and land with feet apart
za        jump and cross feet, with left foot in front of right
piz        jump and land with feet apart
za        daddy        jump and cross feet, with right foot in front of left
O        jump and land with feet apart

This pattern always begins and ends with "jump and land with feet apart. Beginning with the words "let's jerk it, the center child becomes the caller, and the group responds by singing and imitating the caller. The "center" can decide the motions to be imitated and determine the length of the game. The game ends with the words "let's end it" as the enter child puts his hand over his eyes, spins around, and points to a new player to be "it". Note, if the center child is a boy, the name "Georgie" is used at the beginning. And his girlfriend 's name is "Jenny James"."

-snip-

Although the term "daddy-o" was first popularized as a referent for a "hip" male during the swing eras of jazz {1930s-1940s}, I think that this rhyme dates more from the 1960s. That date is suggested by the referents to "The jerk", "The swim" and "The twist", all popular dances from the mid 1960s.

Btw, I've not found any evidence of this rhyme being known among the African American children in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area {my primary source for rhyme collections}. And I've not seen this rhyme mentioned among contemporary sources. However, Betty Jones and Bess Lomax-Hawes include an example of a very similar rhyme from Gullah {Georgia} traditions called "Pizza Pizza Mighty Moe". This game was described as a 'play' [dramatic, role playing game that is performed with syncopated chanting, {non-partner] hand claps and movements].
I have also found a very similar version of "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O" in a book about Black American culture entitled "Talk That Talk" {source: African American children Philadelphia, PA, 1980s [editor: Linda Goss, I believe, and the 1980s' is if I'm not mistaken, since I tried to but can't find that book at the moment}

Another similar version of "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O} is included in a book on African American children's rhymes called "Apple On A Stick" [children from Houston, Texas, again 1980s I think]..That book has two authors. U'll also have to track that book down {it's 12:30+ here in the morning, and I'm winding down

:0}

But before I go, it's my opinion that "Pizza Pizza Mighty Moe" is probably the earliest version of this rhyme {among the ones I have found so far}. Also, imo, "Daddy-o" replaced the phrase "mighty Moe" because the personal name "Moe" wasn't [and still isn't] given much any more {among African Americans-maybe thanks to "Three Stooges"}...Also, imo, this rhyme really isn't about food because "pizza pizza daddy-o" serves as a syncopated refrain and not really a reference to that cheesy meal that many kids and other people like.

I'm outta here! See ya lata, alligata!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: LadyJean
Date: 10 Jun 06 - 12:49 AM

From Jo Sherman's "Greasy Grimey Gopher Guts" There's a miming game where the child is asked to open a pretend refrigerator and take out a coke, then open the coke, then drink the coke, then the child who intiated the game puts her hands together, bows and says, "Me Chinese. Me play joke. Me go peepee in your Coke."
From my girlhood, a joke, "Why did Lurch give Thing a Coke? Because things go better with Coke." (From "The Addams Family".)
And from Grandma:
Mary had a little lamb
A little pork
A little jam
Some ice cream soda topped with fizz
and oh how sick our Mary is!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Mo the caller
Date: 10 Jun 06 - 01:40 AM

"A seat on the board" - board of directors o the company i.e. Freeman, Hardy or Willis. Sounds the same game as Hutch's St Paul one everyone has a name or number, when your number is called you can call any number except your own. You finish when you are fed up with it, or the adult in charge decides it's time for something else, or everyone is hopelessly confused with all the changing numbers. It obviously is a US game too, Hutch said he was from Colorado.
Yes, we play Musical chairs in the UK too. I remember many a Sundayschool party being bored because I was "out" and there was nothing to do while the game dragged on to the end.
There is even a version for "Pony Club" members where they ride in a circle till the music stops, then dismount and drag the pony by its reins to stand on a sack. Uggh.
Impossible for the person in charge to always see if there is cheating too.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Little Robyn
Date: 10 Jun 06 - 05:49 PM

That game reminds me of one that I saw played by adults at a church gathering about 55 years back - I was too young to play but it made an impression on me. Everyone sits in a circle and is given a number.
The leader starts off saying:
"The priest of the Parish has lost his considering cap. Some say this and some say that, but I say number (1) 1,2,3, down"
The person with whichever number has been called must answer before the leader says "down", with
"I sir?"
"Yes, you sir!"
"No, not I sir."
"Then who sir?"
"Number (5) 1,2,3,down."

If the person whose number has been called is too slow (or the 1,2,3, is too quick) the game starts again, with the slow person having to say the leader's words. I don't remember how it ended but it was hilarious, watching the 'grown-ups' struggling to keep up.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Jun 06 - 06:08 PM

That's great, Robyn!!

I love having adults play these types of games along with children. And for children to experience adults getting in touch with the child within them-wonderful!!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 11 Jun 06 - 10:34 AM

Since we have posted examples of children's rhymes that mention "Coca Cola", I feel it's only fitting that we post rhymes that mention "Pepsi". Here's one:

MY MOTHER/YOUR MOTHER
my mother your motha
live down da street
18, 19 marble street
and evry nite
dey had a fite
and dis is wat dey told me

girls are sexy drink lots of pepsi
boys are rotten chew on sum cotten
ishy wishy lollypop
ishy wishy woo
ishy wishy lollypop
da guyz luv YOU

posted by Duilz at http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php;October 28, 2004

[used with permission of that blog's members]

This handclap rhyme with the "girls drink pepsi to get sexy" line appears to be rather popular {in my area anyway}. And I bet that verse has increased Pepsi's sales.

Here's a true story about that:
Two years ago, a group of six 10-13 year old girls did a presentation with me & my daughter on African American children's rhymes. Before the presentation, I took them and two of the girls' 5 year old brother to Pizza Hut. In addition to their pizza, every one of these children ordered "Pepsi". When I commented about that, one of the girls said "It's because of that rhyme". I said "What rhyme?" and she started recited {and the other girls joined in} that "girls drink pepsi/to get sexy" rhyme. That's the first time I had heard that rhyme.

I guess the five year old boy ordered pepsi in imitation of his older sisters and the other girls. Or maybe-even at that young age-he wanted girls to be sexy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Kid's rhymes: Big Mac, Coca Cola & more
From: Azizi
Date: 11 Jun 06 - 11:48 AM

Judging from the number of examples that I get on my website, and the number of examples I see posted on other websites, "BrickWall WaterFall" currently appears to be the most widely known handclap rhyme in the United States.

That rhyme was featured in the 2003 movie "Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star".

I posted three examples of that rhyme, and my thoughts on the sources of that rhyme in this Mudcat thread:

2026 Mudcat origins question

And here's another example of that rhyme that I received from a girl from England:

Brick wall Water Fall
When ur talking to me all im thinking is
Brickwall water fall, (name) thinks they no it all, You don't so i say boom wid that attutude pinch punch captin crucnch i have something you can't touch bang,bang cho cho tran you wind me up i do my thing no reason piece of 7up mess wid me i'll mess u up.
this is for girls of any years that want to show off

-kenisha, http://www.cocojams.com/taunting_rhymes.htm; 3/8/2006

-snip-

This rhyme 'fits' in the category of 'kid's rhymes that mention food and beverages' because of the references to "Captain Crunch" {cereal} and 7-Up {soft drink}. Other versions of this rhyme mention "tic tac" {candy/mouth freshners} and reeces pieces {candy}.


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Mudcat time: 1 October 9:48 AM EDT

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