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Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence

DigiTrad:
I'VE GOT SIXPENCE


jonathan.sceeles@ccmailgw.genpub.com 12 Mar 99 - 06:00 PM
12 Mar 99 - 06:34 PM
13 Mar 99 - 01:44 PM
GUEST,allan s 16 Jun 06 - 06:33 PM
Peace 17 Jun 06 - 12:18 AM
johnross 17 Jun 06 - 12:30 AM
open mike 17 Jun 06 - 12:21 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 06 - 02:15 PM
Joe Offer 17 Jun 06 - 02:29 PM
Effsee 17 Jun 06 - 02:34 PM
Deckman 17 Jun 06 - 02:43 PM
Joe Offer 17 Jun 06 - 03:21 PM
Joe Offer 17 Jun 06 - 03:22 PM
Joe Offer 17 Jun 06 - 03:23 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 17 Jun 06 - 03:28 PM
chazkratz 17 Jun 06 - 03:46 PM
Joe Offer 17 Jun 06 - 04:24 PM
Little Robyn 17 Jun 06 - 10:37 PM
Little Robyn 17 Jun 06 - 10:43 PM
Mo the caller 18 Jun 06 - 05:51 AM
Schantieman 18 Jun 06 - 01:25 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Jun 06 - 02:35 PM
Little Robyn 18 Jun 06 - 03:13 PM
chazkratz 18 Jun 06 - 11:55 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 19 Jun 06 - 12:36 AM
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Subject: I've Got Sixpence
From: jonathan.sceeles@ccmailgw.genpub.com
Date: 12 Mar 99 - 06:00 PM

Who holds rights to the lyrics of Elton Box's song, I've Got Sixpence? We are a publisher and wish to use a few lines in an upcoming book.


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Subject: RE: I've Got Sixpence
From:
Date: 12 Mar 99 - 06:34 PM

Never heard of Elton Box. Is it the old folk song that goes?:

I've got sixpence, jolly, jolly sixpence,
I've got sixpence to last me all my life.
I've got twopence to spend, and twopence to lend,
An twopence to send to my wife, poor wife.

There's an older folk song version, published in 1891, called "The Jolly Shilling"


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Subject: RE: I've Got Sixpence
From:
Date: 13 Mar 99 - 01:44 PM

The Opies trace versions back to 1810 in 'The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes', #480 (2nd. ed. 1997)


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Subject: who wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly
From: GUEST,allan s
Date: 16 Jun 06 - 06:33 PM

who composed, wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly sixpence. what is the history of this song?? RAF, WW1 WW2???


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Subject: RE: who wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly
From: Peace
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 12:18 AM

I think the song is traditional. However, it seems that various arrangemments have been copyrighted.


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Subject: RE: who wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly
From: johnross
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 12:30 AM

Dunno where it came from, but it seems to have been very widely used as a cadence (marching) song in U.S. military basic training during World War II. Just about everybody in the Army and Air Corps knew the song.


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Subject: RE: who wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly
From: open mike
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 12:21 PM

in the DT it says WW1 and WW2
further info here:
http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=3118


I'VE GOT SIXPENCE (DT Version)

I've got sixpence
Jolly. jolly sixpence
I've got sixpence to last me all my life
I've got twopence to spend
And twopence to lend
And twopence to send home to my wife-poor wife.

CHORUS: No cares have I to grieve me
No pretty little girls to deceive me
I'm happy as a lark believe me
As we go rolling, rolling home
Rolling home (rolling home)
Rolling home (rolling home)
By the light of the silvery moo-oo-on
Happy is the day when we line up for our pay
As we go rolling, rolling home.

I've got fourpence
Jolly, jolly fourpence
I've got fourpence to last me all my life
I've got twopence to spend
And twopence to lend
And no pence to send home to my wife-poor wife.

I've got twopence
Jolly, jolly twopence
I've got twopence to last me all my life
I've got twopence to spend
And no pence to lend
And no pence to send home to my wife-poor wife.

I've got no pence
Jolly. jolly no pence
I've got no pence to last me all my life
I've got no pence to spend
And no pence to lend
And no pence to send home to my wife-poor wife.
@Army @money @WWI @WWII
filename[ SIXPNCE
TUNE FILE: SIXPNCE
CLICK TO PLAY
RG




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Subject: RE: who wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 02:15 PM

Elton Box, Cox and Hall are credited (Chappell & Co. Ltd., international copyright).
In print from WW2, but, as stated in "Songs from the Front & Rear," the "amounts of money seem more applicable to WW1".

There are songs of similar type that are older ("The Jolly Shilling", 1891 acc. to a post in thread 9630). "The Jolly Shilling" was sung by UK folk singer Cyril Tawney and others. Material posted at Folktrax says the tune also appeared as a march. The song may be traditional.

It also has been called "an Australian" folk song.

Sibelius Music calls it English traditional and publishes scores of the music (no lyrics).

TWO songs are wedded in the versions from WW2; "I've Got Sixpence," and "Rolling Home (by the light ...)."


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Subject: RE: who wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 02:29 PM

I'da sworn it was traditional, but Iona and Peter Opie's Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes says words and music were by Box, Cox, and Hall - in 1941:
    I've got sixpence, I've got six pence,
    I've got sixpence to last me all my life.
    I've got tuppence to spend and to lend.
    And tuppence to send unto my wife.
Other sources say that the 1941 copyrighted version was by Elton Box and Desmond Cox - but is the Cox-Box song the version we all know?.

That's not the whole story, of course. The Opies say this is an old song, given new life by Tin Pan Alley - but the Opies trace printed versions back to 1810.

The primary version in the Opie book is this:


    I love sixpence, jolly little sixpence,
    I love sixpence better than my life;
    I spent a penny of it, I lent a penny of it,
    And I took fourpence home to my wife.

    Oh, my little fourpence, jolly little fourpence,
    I love fourpence better than my life;
    I spent a penny of it, I lent a penny of it,
    And I took twopence home to my wife.

    Oh, my little twopence, jolly little twopence,
    I love twopence better than my life;
    I spent a penny of it, I lent a penny of it,
    And I took nothing home to my wife.

    Oh, my little nothing, jolly little nothing,
    What will nothing buy for my wife?
    I have nothing, I spend nothing,
    I love nothing better than my wife.


Aw, that's sweet.....

Then there's a version that starts with twelvepence:

    O dear twelvepence, I've got twelvepence,
    I love twelvepence as I love my life;
    I'll grind a penny on't, I'll spend another,
    And I'll carry tenpence home to my wife.


Then the Opies cite "Jolly Shilling" (from Williams, Folk Songs of the Upper Thames, 1923):
    I have a jolly shilling, a lovely jolly shilling,
    I love my jolly shilling as I do love my life;
    I've a penny to spend, another to lend,
    And jolly, jolly tenpence to carry home home to my wife.

    CHORUS:
    There's neither pins nor quarts shall grieve me,
    Nor this wide world shall deceive me,
    But bring me the girl that will keep me,
    While I go fambling about.


The version I learned in 1950's Detroit is what's in the Digital Tradition, except that I think those were "saucy little girls" that were deceiving me. Now, is the DT version a copyrighted version? The Opie book doesn't give enough information to determine that. Here's the first part of the DT version:
    I've got sixpence
    Jolly. jolly sixpence
    I've got sixpence to last me all my life
    I've got twopence to spend
    And twopence to lend
    And twopence to send home to my wife-poor wife.

    CHORUS: No cares have I to grieve me
    No pretty little girls to deceive me
    I'm happy as a lark believe me
    As we go rolling, rolling home
    Rolling home (rolling home)
    Rolling home (rolling home)
    By the light of the silvery moo-oo-on
    Happy is the day when we line up for our pay
    As we go rolling, rolling home.

    Here's what's in the Traditional Ballad Index:

    I Love Sixpence

    DESCRIPTION: "I love sixpence," spend a penny, lend a penny, and take fourpence home to the wife. The singer repeats the process with fourpence and twopence. With nothing left he says "I have nothing, I spend nothing, I love nothing better than my wife"
    AUTHOR: unknown
    EARLIEST DATE: 1810 (Ritson)
    KEYWORDS: poverty humorous nonballad wife
    FOUND IN: Britain(England(North,South),Scotland(Aber))
    REFERENCES (6 citations):
    Williams-Thames, p. 90, "The Jolly Shilling" (2 texts) (also Wiltshire-WSRO Wt 405)
    Opie-Oxford2 480, "I love sixpence, jolly little sixpence" (1 text)
    Baring-Gould-MotherGoose #113, pp. 93-95, "(I love sixpence, a jolly, jolly sixpence)"
    GreigDuncan3 572, "I've Got a Shilling" (3 texts, 1 tune)
    Kidson-Tunes, pp. 158-159, "The Jolly Shilling" (1 text, 1 tune)
    ADDITIONAL: Joseph Ritson, Gammer Gurton's Garland (London, 1810 ("Digitized by Google")), p. 40, "The Jolly Tester" ("I love sixpence, a jolly, jolly sixpence") (1 text)

    Roud #1116
    ALTERNATE TITLES:
    The Jolly Tester
    The Shilling
    NOTES: The Wiltshire-WSRO text consolidates the two Williams-Thames texts, adds three verses but shows only one of the two choruses. - BS
    Last updated in version 3.0
    File: OO2480

    Go to the Ballad Search form
    Go to the Ballad Index Song List

    Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
    Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

    The Ballad Index Copyright 2014 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


There's quite a bit of information at folktrax.org:
    JOLLY SHILLING, THE - "I've got sixpence" or "I love sixpence" or "I got a shilling" - jolly jolly shilling" - ROUD#1116 - CHAPPELL PMOT 1858 2 p737-8 "O dear twelve pence" - MASON NRCS 1877 p28 - LONG DIOW pp150- 151 (w/o) "The Song of Sixpence" - GREIG-DUNCAN 3 1987 #572 3var - KIDSON TT 1891 pp158-9 Washington Teasdale, Yorksh - SHARP Cf 2 p117 - SHARP-KARPELES CSC 1974 #344 pp433-4 Mr Mayle, Barrington, Som 1904/ Mrs Hezeltine, Camborne, Cornwall 1913 - WILLIAMS FSUT 1923 p90 #405 Elijah Iles, Inglesham, Wiltsh (w/o) - JFSS 8:34 1930 pp233-5 H H Albino: Thomas Lanchbury, Wyck Rissington, Gloucestersh 1928/ Gilchrist: Mrs Bowker, Sunderland Point, Lancash 1909 - DUNSTAN CDFS 1932 p41 Jim Thomas, Camborne, Cornwall 1931 - OPIE ODNR 1951 #480 - HUGILL SSS 1961 p180 "Rolling Home by the Silvery Moon"-- Live performance by 2 accs, 2 tambourines, dancing & voices rec near Listowel, Co Kerry (Doc Rowe collection): TOPIC TSCD-666 1998 "By the light of the silvery moon" bef "Highland Fling" (Love will you marry me?)

Can anybody find the Hugill version and post it? My copy of Shanties From the Seven Seas is the edition from Mystic Seaport Museum, and doesn't seem to have it - is the Mystic edition abridged?


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Subject: RE: who wrote I've got sixpence jolly jolly
From: Effsee
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 02:34 PM

Children's Songs from Devon & Cornwall by Cyril Tawney, (Argo ZFB4 1970),credits the "Jolly Shilling" to being collected by Ralph Dunstan from Jim Thomas of Cambourne, October 21st, 1931.
Hope this helps.


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Deckman
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 02:43 PM

GEEZE LOUISE!!! I learned this song when I was a crumb cruncher in "camp" and was about ten years olde! SHEEEUUUUHHHH!!!! bOB


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Subject: ADD Versions: Jolly Shilling / Jolly Sixpence
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 03:21 PM

There are three texts and one tune in the Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection:

I've Got a Shilling
(#572A - Singer Robert Alexander, September, 1906)

I've got a shilling, a jolly, jolly shilling,
And I love that shilling as I love my life;
A penny I will spend, another I will lend,
And tenpence I'll take home to my wife.

No pot nor pint shall grieve me,
Nor no false girl shall deceive me,
But happy is the girl that shall keep me,
As I go rolling home.
Rolling home, rolling home, rolling home,
As I go rolling home.


I've got a tenpence, a jolly jolly tenpence
And I love that tenpence as I love my life
A penny I will spend, and another I will lend
And eightpence I'll take home to my wife.

I've got an eightpence, a jolly jolly eightpence
And I love that eightpence as I love my life
A penny I will spend, and another I will lend
And sixpence I'll take home to my wife.

I've got a sixpence, a jolly jolly sixpence
And I love that sixpence as I love my life
A penny I will spend, and another I will lend
And fourpence I'll take home to my wife.

I've got a fourpence, a jolly jolly fourpence
And I love that fourpence as I love my life
A penny I will spend, and another I will lend
And twopence I'll take home to my wife.

I've got a twopence, a jolly jolly twopence,
And I love that twopence as I love my life
A penny I will spend, and another I will lend
And myself I'll take home to my wife.

Interesting tune - is this the tune that's common in the UK?

Click to play (joeweb)


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Subject: ADD Version: The Shilling (I've Got Sixpence)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 03:22 PM

The Shilling
Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection (#572B - Source William Spence, 1909?)


I love my shilling, my jolly jolly shilling
I love my shilling as I love my life
A penny I'll spend and another I'll lend
And it's tenpence I'll carry home to my wife.

No merry merry maid shall deceive me
No gill stoups nor pint stoups to grieve me
Sally is the girl that will keep me
When I go rowling home.
Row-row-row-rowling ho-o-ome
Row row row rowling ho-o
Sally is the girl that'll keep me
When I go rowling home.


I love my tenpence, my jolly jolly tenpence
I love my tenpence as I love my life
And a penny I'll spend and another I'll lend
And it's eightpence I'll carry home to my wife.

I love my twopence, my jolly jolly twopence
I love my twopence as I love my life
And a penny I'll spend and a penny I'll lend
And it's nothing I'll carry home to my wife.

WILLIAM SPENCE — Collector: Greig


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 03:23 PM

(Untitled)
Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection (#572C - Source Miss Bell Robertson, 1909?)

Hey my jolly shilling, how my jolly shilling,
I love my shilling as dear's I love my life.
I've a penny for to spend, I've a penny for to lend,
I'll take tenpence home to my wife.
Neither pint stoup nor glass shall grieve me,
And no flashy girl shall deceive me
But happy is the girl that does keep me,
When I go rolling home,
Rolling home, rolling home,
When I go rolling home.


Miss BELL ROBERTSON — Collector: Greig

    I have to say I don't completely understand the notes in Greig-Duncan, and it's unclear to me when and how versions B and C were collected from Spence and Robertson - but 1909 is mentioned in the notes.
    -Joe-


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 03:28 PM

I looked at the Gammar Gurton 1810 on line, but couldn't find it. There may be more than one printed version of this little book.

The "primary" version in the Opies book (Joe's post above) appears in slightly different form in J. O. Halliwell's "The Nursery Rhymes of England" 1846, Fourth Edition, song CV:

I love sixpence, pretty little sixpence,
I love sixpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And took fourpence home to my wife.

Oh, my little fourpence, pretty little fourpence,
I love fourpence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took twopence home to my wife.

Oh, my little twopence, my pretty little twopence,
I love twopence better than my life;
I spent a penny of it, I spent another,
And I took nothing home to my wife.

Oh, my little nothing, my pretty little nothing,
What will nothing buy for my wife?
I have nothing, I spent nothing,
I love nothing better than my wife.

Where did the "Rolling Home by the Light ..." come from?

Opies' books are confusing- I have their "Oxford Nursery Rhyme Book" but not the "Dictionary."


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: chazkratz
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 03:46 PM

The version I learned--I think at church camp in the '50s--has the first person in the song as a bit of a scoundrel, as the Da in _Angela's Ashes_.

It starts the same, but the singer, until he's spent it all, always has tuppence to spend. First, the wife loses out:

I've got tuppence to spend and tuppence to lend
And no pence to take home to my wife (poor wife)

Then there's no tuppence to lend, and finally, the rascal has spent it all, but still maintains his good spirits and is rolling home.

The chorus is the same as the one Joe cited as in the DT.

Charles


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Subject: ADD Version: O Dear Twelve Pence/My Man Thomas
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 04:24 PM

In Popular Music of the Olden Time (1856), William Chappel gives these lyrics:

O Dear Twelve Pence

O dear twelvepence, I've got twelvepence,
I love twelvepence as I love my life;
I'll grind a penny on't, and I'll end another on't,
And I'll carry tenpence home to my wife.

...the last verse ending, "I'll carry nothing home to my wife."



Chappell says the tune he learned was from "My Man Thomas," a song in Fletcher's Monsieur Thomas:

My Man Thomas

My man Thomas Did me promise
He would visit me this night;
"I am here, love; Tell me, dear love,
How may I obtain thy sight."



Click to play



That's not the tune I know, either - so where'd the current common tune come from? The DT Tune is close to the one I learned as a kid, but not exactly it. Is the tune the Box-Cox contribution to this song? I certainly wouldn't pay them royalties for the lyrics, since Greig-Duncan proves most of it goes back at least to 1909.
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Little Robyn
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 10:37 PM

Can anybody find the Hugill version and post it?

Stan's version doesn't have sixpences or shillings in it! From p.180 of Shantys from the seven seas, here's;
Rolling home by the silvery moon

Here's to the good ol' whiskey, mop it down, mop it down!
Here's to the good ol' whiskey, mop it down, mop it down!
Here's to the good ol' whiskey, that makes you feel so frisky,
Here's to the good ol' whiskey, mop it down!
Rolling home, rolling home, rolling home, rolling home,
By the light of the silvery moon,
Happy is the sailor who has shipped aboard a whaler
When she's rolling, rolling, rolling, rolling home.

Here's to the good ol' beer, mop it down, mop it down!
etc.
Here's to the good ol' beer, that makes you feel so queer,

Here's to the good ol' rum,

Here's to the good ol' claret,

Here's to the good ol' cider,

Stan says these latter verses are mainly bawdy but he doesn't give the rhyme for the second part.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Little Robyn
Date: 17 Jun 06 - 10:43 PM

Stan Hugill calls it a shore-song, adapted for sea use. He claims it was a minstrel song originally and he heard it on the American ship William T. Lewis and from Arthur Spencer, Charlie Evans and others who had shipped in American windjammers.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Mo the caller
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 05:51 AM

The (UK) version my father used to sing was the DT version, but only the first 4 lines of chorus. Tune similar to DT.


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Schantieman
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 01:25 PM

My dad sang this song when a soldier in WWII and I learned it from him as a child in the 60s on long car journeys.   I occasionally sing it in public and will be recording it soon, so if it is in copyright I could do with finding out.

It's basically Chazkatz's version above but we also used to sing the booze version given by Little Robyn. Except, of course, that it was the day the soldier gets his pay.

Tune nothing like the one given.

Interested in any further info ...

Steve


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 02:35 PM

Little Robyn's reference to the Hugill shanty must be to a volume different from "Shanties from the Seven Seas" as published in the U. S. edition. It does not appear in the U. S. A. editions (p. 180 is "Ranzo Ray").
The only "Rolling Home" is the well-known "... to dear old England," pp. 146-150.


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Little Robyn
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 03:13 PM

It's just before the 'dear old England' one.
Maybe it's an older edition - we've had it for years.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: chazkratz
Date: 18 Jun 06 - 11:55 PM

Little Robyn, your words sound like "On the Farm," purportedly a Stanford University drinking song:

Oh, it's whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, that makes us feel so frisky,
On the farm, on the farm.
Oh, it's whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, that makes us feel so frisky,
On the Leland Stanford Junior Farm.
My eyes are dim, I cannot see
I have not brought my specs with me.

Oh, it's beer, beer, beer, that makes us want to cheer...(as above)
Oh, it's wine, wine, wine, that makes us feel so fine...
Oh, it's gin, gin, gin, that makes us want to sin...
Oh, it's ice-cold-duck that makes us want to______

Charles


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Jun 06 - 12:36 AM

Not in current "SFSS" available in U. S.
Removed because not a legitimate chantey?

Now that you have mentioned it, Chazkratz, I remember the song too, except that the lines I knew were:
Oh, it's whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, that makes us feel so frisky,
Drink it down, Drink it down.
Can't remember any more without guessing, or whether it was sung at Illinois, Texas or more likely the military college I attended. It was a college drinking song that was rather widespread. Possibly a development with different tune from:

Here's success to whiskey
Drink it down, drink it down,
Here's success to whiskey
Drink it down, drink it down,
For it makes the spirits frisky,
Drink it down, drink it down, drink it down!
(and verses for many more intoxicants)

Pardon the digression-


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Little Robyn
Date: 19 Jun 06 - 01:02 AM

Hi chazkratz, that one is more like "In the store" that was sung around a camp fire - scouts, guides, soldiers, anybody.

There were eggs, eggs, growing hairy legs,
In the store, in the store,
There were eggs, eggs, growing hairy legs,
In the quartermaster's store.

My eyes are dim, I cannot see
I have not brought my specs with me,
I have not brought my specs with me.

Robyn


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Mo the caller
Date: 19 Jun 06 - 04:59 AM

The quartermaster's store was also sung on coach trips - with insulting verses ad-lib for every passenger.


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 21 Jun 06 - 09:18 AM

Q, the text posted by Little Robyn is indeed on pp. 180-81 of Hugill's SSS (N.Y.: E.P. Dutton, 1961). You must have the unwisely abridged paperback ed. of decades later.

Joe, thanks for the Greig-Duncan material, especially the Midi! Not every big library owns that fabulous (and fabulously pricey) set of books!

Silber has an American text of "I've got Sixpence" in Songs of the Civil War, 1961, but without the tune IIRC.


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 21 Jun 06 - 12:39 PM

Thanks, Lighter. I'll have to trash that Mystic Seaport edition and look for the Dutton printing.

Lil Robyn, sorry that I doubted you.


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: GUEST,thurg
Date: 21 Jun 06 - 09:37 PM

Despite her abstemious habits, my ex-RCAF mother taught us to sing the chorus as:

Rolling home (dead drunk!), rolling home (dead drunk!),
By the light, etc.


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Subject: RE: who wrote: I've Got Sixpence.. Jolly Jolly
From: MairSea
Date: 22 Jun 06 - 06:30 AM

Thanks Joe Offer (above) the 50s version is the one my old Scottish dad, now deceased, used to sing as his party piece. A few wee drams and he was off on the trail of his sixpence! He was also ex-RAF (National Service).


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Jul 09 - 03:01 PM

Don M

My father used to sing this song to me when I was a child, in the
30's. He was a soldier (Royal Engineers). I've long believed it
was a Regimental song, perhaps of the 1880's, but I now think it's
much older: pay for a Red Coat in the British Army in the 18th
century was maintained at sixpence a week. My father used to sing
'I'm as happy as a Lord, belee-eeve me, as I go ro-olling along'.


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: oldhippie
Date: 19 Jul 09 - 04:42 PM

The DT version is the one we sang in Boy Scout camp in the mid fifties.


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: GUEST,Tracey
Date: 31 May 10 - 01:30 PM

I also learned it from my Dad in the 60's... I'm sure he learned it in the infantry during WWII, and I know he sang "happy is the day, when the soldier gets his pay..."


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: Deskjet
Date: 31 May 10 - 02:23 PM

As a boy the very first thing I learned on the guitar, plucking the open BGD strings and singing along - ah memories!


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: meself
Date: 31 May 10 - 02:46 PM

My mother (ex-RCAF) sang it as "happy is the day, when the Air Force gets their pay", but I've also heard it sung as "when the army gets their pay." Seems to depend on which branch of the forces one is connected to.


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpe
From: Stringsinger
Date: 31 May 10 - 04:23 PM

This is one of the songs sung by the earlier incarnation of the Weavers years ago.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Rollin' Home (sea song)
From: GUEST,hooch
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 10:47 AM

Sixpence version was song sung by staff at Boy Scout Camp McKenzie near Columbus GA . We understood that it came from an Australian ballad, probably about a military unit far from home
the last lines go something like:

I've got no pence, jolly jolly no pence
Ive got no pence to last me all my life.

ive got no pence to spend and no pence to lend
and no pence to send home to my wife -- poor wife
no cares have I to grieve me
no pretty little girls to deceive me
im as happy as lark believe me
as we go rolling rolling home

rolling home ROLLING HOME rolling home ROLLING HOME
by the light of the silvery moon
happy is the day when the staff gets paid
and we go rolling rolling home.
I've Got Sixpence [CLICK HERE]


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: GUEST,RP
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 04:02 PM

agree with
chakratz introduced to song as part of group sing in junior high approximately 1945


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: RTim
Date: 21 Dec 10 - 05:37 PM

There is also a version collected by Dr. George Gardiner from Frank Harrington, aged 62,
At Cadnam in Hampshire on Nov. 3rd 1908
Harrington was born in Fordingbridge and worked in The New Forest as a keeper.
The original manuscript can be seen as part the EFDSS Take6 web site.

Tim Radford
-------------------------------------
I Love Sixpence - Frank Harrington

I love sixpence, jolly, jolly sixpence
I love sixpence as I love my life
Here's twopence I'll lend and twopence I'll spend
And twopence I'll take home to my wife

For the pints and quarts they do grieve me
While no fresh girl shall deceive me
I'll give it to the girl that will keep me
Whilst I go rolling home,
Rolling home, rolling home, rolling home,
Whilst I go rolling home,

I love threepence, jolly, jolly threepence
I love threepence as I love my life
Here's a penny I'll lend and a penny I'll spend
And a penny I'll take home to my wife


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 Dec 10 - 10:41 AM

The camp version I'm familiar with has the boys and girls trying to outshout each other in the line "no silly little (girls shout BOYS and boys shout GIRLS) to deceive me" and ditto for counselors/campers in the line "happy is the day when the (campers shout COUNSELORS and vice-versa) go away!"


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Subject: ADD: I Have a Little Sixpence
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Jan 12 - 09:54 PM

Boas says that this was a popular song from the play Don Giovanni in London in 1817. The song was mentioned enough so that researchers consider that it was very popular.

I HAVE A LITTLE SIXPENCE

                I have a little sixpence,
                A pretty little sixpence,
        I love my little sixpence more dearly than my life;
                But I'll spend a penny,
                I'll lend a penny,
        And I'll take fourpence home to my wife.        

                I have a little fourpence,
                A pretty little fourpence,
        I love my little fourpence more dearly than my life;
                But I'll spend a penny,
                I'll lend a penny,
        And I'll take twopence home to my wife.

                I have a little twopence,
                A pretty little twopence,
        I love my little twopence more dearly than my life;
                But I'll spend a penny,
                I'll lend a penny,
        And I'll take-- nothing home to my wife.

                I have a little nothing,
                A pretty little nothing,
        I love my little nothing more dearly than my life;
                I'll spend nothing,
                I'll lend nothing,
        I'll take nothing home to my wife.

Graham, Don Juan and Regency England, p. 70
        Montcreiff's extravaganza Don Giovanni featured Mrs. Gould in the breeches role.


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Subject: ADD: Jolly Shilling
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Jun 14 - 05:37 PM

Somebody asked me about the song "Jolly Shilling." I found a transcription at the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library. Can anybody tell me more about this song and direct me to a melody for it, recordings, and other information? There's an obvious relation to "I've Got Sixpence."

JOLLY SHILLING

O I like my jolly shilling
And I love my jolly shilling
And I love my jolly shilling
As well as I love my wife

I
There's a penny I will lend
And another I will spend
And there's tenpence I'll carry home
To my dear wife

CHORUS
Nor the pot nor the poem shall [decrieve] (decree) me
Nor the wide world never shall deceive me
But give to me the girl that shall keep me
While I goes a rambling about

II
O I like my jolly tenpence
etc. . . .
And there's eightpence I'll carry home to my dear wife

III
O I like my jolly eightpence
etc . . .

IV
O I like my jolly sixpence
etc . . .

V
O I like my jolly fourpence
etc . . .

VI
O I like my jolly twopence
etc . . .
And there's nothing I'll carry home to my dear wife

VII
O I like my jolly nothing
etc . . .
There's nothing I will lend and there's nothing I will spend
And there's nothing I'll carry home to my dear wife

Mayle of Barrington
Jan 6th 1904
(86)





Last three lines giving Singer etc. are on the right of the verse.


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: Mrrzy
Date: 28 Jun 14 - 07:16 PM

Fascinating...


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Jun 14 - 07:30 PM

Yeah, Mrr - who woulda thunk that the song we learned as kids was a 1941 composition?

Seems to me, that modern versions of traditional songs, don't deserve copyright protection.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: I've Got Sixpence, Jolly, Jolly Sixpence
From: GUEST,Malcolm Smith
Date: 30 Jun 14 - 02:27 AM

The Dollymopps sing Jolly Sixpence on their 2011 CD "Long Songs", with the verse text taken from W H Long's 1886 Dictionary of the Isle of Wight Dialect . Sleeve notes say that the tune is Mr Mayne's collected by Sharp, and they have also incorporated a chorus similar to the Baring Gould transcription of The Jolly Shilling at VWML

"'Nother* pint nor a half wouldn't grieve us,
May the pipe and the bowl never leave us
Happy are the girls that receive us
when we go rolling home."

*might be "Neither"

Best wishes,

Malcolm.


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