Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button

beardedbruce 10 Jul 06 - 01:42 PM
Alan Day 10 Jul 06 - 06:10 PM
GUEST,Rowan 10 Jul 06 - 09:12 PM
Bob Bolton 10 Jul 06 - 11:31 PM
beardedbruce 13 Jul 06 - 08:15 AM
pavane 13 Jul 06 - 09:43 AM
GUEST,Eamon 08 Mar 14 - 03:38 PM
Richard Mellish 08 Mar 14 - 03:46 PM
GUEST,Eamon 08 Mar 14 - 04:03 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: beardedbruce
Date: 10 Jul 06 - 01:42 PM

I recently picked up a Bandmaster 20 button concertina, made in Germany, with the word "Foreign" on the side in block letters under "Bandmaster" in large script. It has a rose ( pink/red/yellow) motif on the bellows to body joint, otherwise sort of a painted-grain wood finish.
It plays different notes on each button, depending on the bellows motion. 40 total notes- and sounds pretty good.

Anyone know anything about this thing?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: Alan Day
Date: 10 Jul 06 - 06:10 PM

You have there an Anglo Concertina.
The centre note on the push,left hand on the top and bottom row will give you the key of the instrument and the point from which you can start your scale.The tune for English style playing is played on the right hand and the accompaniment on the left.
Al


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: GUEST,Rowan
Date: 10 Jul 06 - 09:12 PM

Others may be able to tell you how to play, better than I can, but this could get you started. Apologies if it seems very (too?) basic but I'm assuming you know nothing about the instrument.

Never having seen this brand I don't know whether its rows of buttons are straight or curved but there should be two rows, each with five buttons, on each side. If you put your hands through the straps so that the concave of the curved rows is facing you rather than facing away from you, you're holding it correctly. There should also be a single button near the right thumb, used to control air flow in and out of the bellows while you're playing (or putting it away). Most learner start by playing while seated. Ideally, you should not allow the bellows to rub on your knees, to prevent wearing of the bellows.

Holding the instrument properly and with a bit of air in the bellows, the 'top' three fingers of each hand will naturally rest against the 'top' three buttons on each side of the instrument. Make sure they're on the same row on each side, ie the row nearer you or the row further away. Push in the bellows and, with the ring finger of your left hand, depress the 'middle' button of the row; this gives the tonic of the scale. On the same button, pull the bellows and the next note up in the scale will sound.

With the next finger (the 'rude' one) depress the next button up the left side of the instrument and push the bellows in; on the same button, pull the bellows. This gives the next two notes going up the scale. Ditto with the index finger of the left hand on the top button gives the next two notes up the scale. Now for the right side.

With the index finger of the right hand on the top button (in the same row) of that side, keep pulling on the bellows; still on the same button, push on the bellows. This gives the next two notes up the scale; the first is the leading note and the second is the tonic again, one octave above the one you started with.

With the next finger (the other 'rude' one) depress the next button down the right side of the instrument and pull the bellows out; on the same button, push the bellows. This gives the next two notes going up the scale. Ditto with the ring finger of the right hand on the third button down, gives the next two notes up the scale. Now for the tricky bit.

With the little finger of the right hand on the fourth button down, pull the bellows out. Move the little finger to the fifth button down and keep pulling the bellows out. These two operations give the next two notes up the scale, the last one being the leading note an octave above the earlier one I mentioned. Move the little finger of the right hand back to the fourth button from the top and push the bellows; this gives the tonic again, two octaves above the one on the left hand side.

Both rows have the same pattern and the nearer row will have the higher scale, a fifth above the lower scale on the row further away. This pattern allows you to get a selection of chords by pushing the bellows in and having all your fingers depressing all the available buttons in a row. Pulling the bellows out while doing this can lead to consonant or dissonant chords, depending on what your index fingers are doing. Melodeons and mouth organs both use similar patterns, if that is any help to you.

Alan's advice works up to a point but I found early on that the tunes I wanted required me to use both hands to play melody. Later on I found I was doubling lots of notes by playing the octaves and this had come from learning to play with both hands, so to speak. Some parts of Australia have this doubling as a regional style but that may not be really relevant to you.

Bon chance!

Cheers, Rowan.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 10 Jul 06 - 11:31 PM

G'day beardedbruce,

Bandmaster was a brand used by an East German free-reed instrument manufacturer in the Berlin Wall era ... and I think they still manufacture under some name like Weltmeister (as well as having made the cheapest concertina in Hohner's Hohner international branding).

Strictly speaking (pace Alan) what you have is a German Concertina. The Anglo (short for Anglo-German) is what happened when Uhlig's bright idea of dropping the bass end of a button accordion and splitting its melody rows over two sides of a small box met up with the much higher grade of manufacture that was happening to the concertina in England, under the tutelage of Lachenal ... originally hired by Wheatstone to tool up production for his instruments.

What most keen players play, these days, is an Anglo-(German)-chromatic ... using at least another row of semitones and/or alternate direction reeds to allow more keys / faster playing. Such extended scales were independently developed on the German instruments and the British ones - but the simple 2-row (2 key-sets) instrument is the starting point for both. Simple, cheap instruments like your Bandmaster won't last as long - or be as easily repaired - as a good London-made (or similar) concertina ... but they are fun while they last.

Regards,

Bob


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: beardedbruce
Date: 13 Jul 06 - 08:15 AM

Thanks, all.


Bruce


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: pavane
Date: 13 Jul 06 - 09:43 AM

See my posting in another thread "concertina tutor for song accompaniment" for details of my program which does tablature for the Anglo concertina.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: GUEST,Eamon
Date: 08 Mar 14 - 03:38 PM

Is it possible to tune this type of concertina and if so how?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: Richard Mellish
Date: 08 Mar 14 - 03:46 PM

> Is it possible to tune this type of concertina and if so how?

The short answers would be "Yes" and "Carefully".

Any free reed can be taken up in pitch by filing it a tad thinner near the free end, or down by filing it a millitad thinner near the fixed end. But it's very easy to go too far and wreck the reed. If one of my concertinas needs tuning I take it to an expert.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Concertina- Bandmaster 20 button
From: GUEST,Eamon
Date: 08 Mar 14 - 04:03 PM

Thanks, much appreciated ;0)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 27 May 4:15 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.