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Tech: papier mache instrument case

erinmaidin 18 Jul 06 - 07:13 AM
Geoff the Duck 18 Jul 06 - 07:31 AM
s&r 18 Jul 06 - 07:52 AM
GUEST,Bee 18 Jul 06 - 08:05 AM
Mr Happy 18 Jul 06 - 08:08 AM
manitas_at_work 18 Jul 06 - 08:13 AM
Dave Hanson 18 Jul 06 - 08:42 AM
open mike 18 Jul 06 - 09:35 AM
IanC 18 Jul 06 - 09:45 AM
open mike 18 Jul 06 - 09:57 AM
Mr Happy 18 Jul 06 - 10:04 AM
Sorcha 18 Jul 06 - 10:21 AM
Geoff the Duck 18 Jul 06 - 10:42 AM
dick greenhaus 18 Jul 06 - 12:19 PM
JohnInKansas 18 Jul 06 - 02:02 PM
folkwaller 18 Jul 06 - 03:02 PM
Dave Hanson 19 Jul 06 - 02:25 AM
harpmaker 19 Jul 06 - 07:22 AM
erinmaidin 22 Jul 06 - 08:39 PM
dick greenhaus 22 Jul 06 - 10:04 PM
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Subject: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: erinmaidin
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 07:13 AM

Ran into a fella (gently, mind you) who had taken his mandolin, traced it and formed a papier mache instrument case using wood glue as a base instead of flour/water. Wondered had any mudcatters tried this and tips and success rate? I've an old cardboard mando case that is mostly made of metal duct tape now and would be interested in trying to use it as the mold.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 07:31 AM

Hey what an idea - you could make safe storage for piano accordians by covering them with glue and paper...
That'd stop the beggers from playing them };>).
Quack!
GtD.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: s&r
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 07:52 AM

PVA wood glue will work - it's used in some schools I go to to make puppet heads - quite strong, but done with strips of newspaper rather than pulp. There's a waterproof PVA that might be better for instruments.

Stu


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: GUEST,Bee
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 08:05 AM

http://www.lotzdollpages.com/lmakcom.html

Very useful instructions for wood composition sculpting. Their goal is doll heads, but a little adaptation, such as reinforcing broad areas with wood or metal slats, or even stiff wire netting, and voila!

Might be heavy, though.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: Mr Happy
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 08:08 AM

Now that'd be novel- a case with a head on it- wow!!

Like the figure head on an old ship!


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: manitas_at_work
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 08:13 AM

I knew someone who made his mandolin from papier mache! it was quite delicate but playable.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 08:42 AM

I know someone who made a papier mache woman, not as good as the real thing but it didn't witter him to death.

eric


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: open mike
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 09:35 AM

one site i saw suggests using a box of wall paper paste avaialbe at the hardware store.

the main project i have done with paper mache' is masks...you could
add a mask of your face to the case! figure head, indeed..

http://www.lotzdollpages.com/lmakcom.html

if you google info you might spell it "paper" and get more hits.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: IanC
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 09:45 AM

Mandolin case should be a doddle.

I make dragons for mummers plays. Both mine have taken a heap of stick and are still fine. I base them on a safety helmet (still inside) and theyre great.

Don't need to use PVA. Flour and water paste is best (soaks into the paper better) but you can use gloss paint on them afterwards.

:-)
Ian


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: open mike
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 09:57 AM

i see a web site that has instructions for makeing
a p.m. narrow boat here http://www.papiermache.co.uk/
probably some good info there about water proofing!


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: Mr Happy
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 10:04 AM

More about paper boats here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papier_mache


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: Sorcha
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 10:21 AM

Hey...!!! I need a new fiddle case...I can DO this!!!!!


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: Geoff the Duck
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 10:42 AM

Flour and water paste could be useful for a starving muso - when things get too bad you could always eat the case...
Quack!
GtD.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 12:19 PM

Been there. Did that. Worked fairly well. Not much more work to do the samething in fiberglass, using epoxy resin (polyester is cheaper, but stinks to high heaven while you're working with it.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 02:02 PM

Most of the articles linked assume one is using paper strips and laying them up with glue. An alternative process, especially using newsprint is to actually "pulp" the paper and layup on a form in "gobs." For small projects, the pulp can be made in a kitchen blender, and for larger batches a bucket, and a "paint mixer" in an electric drill will get you there.

A difficulty with this latter method is getting consistent thickness as you lay it on; but there's little real difference in the end result for small objects I've made. For larger items the "strips" method may offer somewhat better strength, although I've never seen a test lab report on the structural properties of pâpier maché.

As dick greehhaus notes, going the bit extra and just doing it in fiberglass and resin will produce (depending on how well it's done) a much stronger case that in principle would protect your instrument better.

The method of laying up layers of strips or sheets with adhesive is quite versatile, and one way of getting slightly better strength than with paper would be to use cloth in place of the paper; and a cloth first layer and last layer with paper in between may give more durable exposed surfaces.

There are no water-base glues/pastes that will be truly waterproof after the job is done. Even the "outdoor" pvc carpenter glues are only "tolerant" for rain or other incidental moisture that runs off or evaporates fairly quickly without having a chance to soak in. Latex paints/enamels, and many varnishes are "moisture permeable" on purpose, so any prolonged exposure to moisture will let the paper inside get damp eventually. If you use a "coating" to exclude moisture it will eventually pick up enough chips and cracks to let the innards be damp. This is not to say that a serviceable instrument case can't be made; but you do need to recognize the limitations of the materials.

Experience many years ago with classroom art projects also suggests the warning that initial drying of pâpier maché projects should be done in an open area with free air circulation. Damp paper, especially with the common flour-based glues, can be incredibly susceptible to molds and mildew, and a project left in a closet for a couple of days may come out green and fuzzy. (Okay for long-hair musicians, I suppose, but who else wants a furry case?)

And don't forget about the termites and the bookworms.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: folkwaller
Date: 18 Jul 06 - 03:02 PM

Eric, I might be interested in a papier mache woman. I'm a Brit.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 02:25 AM

Just don't get one made from ' Men Only ' magazines.

eric


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: harpmaker
Date: 19 Jul 06 - 07:22 AM

I have just made a case for a ukulele using stiff cardboard and strips of soaked paper, it was a success, but it took far longer than I anticipated.
Before you start, consider the following;

After you have made the main components,

1. Marrying the lid to the case and fitting the hinges and catches.

2. Making and fitting a handle.

3. Forming the internal box for plecks, strings, ect.

4. Fitting out and lining the inside to take the instrument.

5. External covering.

And when you've done all that;

Be prepared to make to make further adjustments, because the whole thing tends tends to warp quite badly as it dries out.

All in all, including drying time between jobs, it took me 3 days to make. Next time i will just buy a case off the shelf :)
Fun to make though!!
John.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: erinmaidin
Date: 22 Jul 06 - 08:39 PM

thanks so much for the info (except, perhaps, the one about making a woman out of papier mache...face it guys...she'd never be able to clean house or make the coffee) I think I'm going to give it a go....going to use the glue mentioned and paint afterwards with something waterproofish....one advantage to the rickety old cardboard case I have now is that all of the airlines I've traveled have allowed me to carry it on as it looks to risky for any other cargo store.


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Subject: RE: Tech: papier mache instrument case
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 22 Jul 06 - 10:04 PM

one point: Papier Mache (or fiberglass, for that matter) is nowhere as rigid as plywood. If you make a case, it's good practice to break up large flat surfaces with ribs or valleys, or provide an arch.


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