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Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns

Azizi 08 Aug 06 - 08:34 PM
Azizi 08 Aug 06 - 08:53 PM
Azizi 08 Aug 06 - 08:59 PM
Azizi 08 Aug 06 - 09:09 PM
Sorcha 08 Aug 06 - 10:56 PM
Franz S. 08 Aug 06 - 11:04 PM
GUEST,HughM 09 Aug 06 - 07:53 AM
Azizi 09 Aug 06 - 08:11 PM
Azizi 09 Aug 06 - 08:29 PM
GUEST 10 Aug 06 - 03:34 AM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 04:29 AM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 04:35 AM
Willie-O 10 Aug 06 - 06:27 AM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 06:37 AM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 06:42 AM
GUEST,HughM 10 Aug 06 - 08:08 AM
BuckMulligan 10 Aug 06 - 09:07 AM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 10 Aug 06 - 10:12 AM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 10 Aug 06 - 10:29 AM
Bill D 10 Aug 06 - 11:10 AM
Jim McLean 10 Aug 06 - 12:16 PM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 10 Aug 06 - 02:15 PM
GUEST 10 Aug 06 - 02:50 PM
Kaleea 10 Aug 06 - 03:09 PM
Little Robyn 10 Aug 06 - 03:36 PM
GUEST 10 Aug 06 - 04:42 PM
Jim McLean 10 Aug 06 - 05:44 PM
Matt_R 10 Aug 06 - 05:50 PM
dick greenhaus 10 Aug 06 - 06:58 PM
Azizi 10 Aug 06 - 07:26 PM
Franz S. 10 Aug 06 - 07:42 PM
Bev and Jerry 10 Aug 06 - 07:56 PM
The Walrus 10 Aug 06 - 08:13 PM
Bev and Jerry 10 Aug 06 - 08:46 PM
Genie 11 Aug 06 - 12:57 AM
GUEST 11 Aug 06 - 03:09 AM
JohnInKansas 11 Aug 06 - 03:19 AM
Genie 11 Aug 06 - 03:30 AM
Jim McLean 11 Aug 06 - 05:16 AM
JohnInKansas 11 Aug 06 - 05:10 PM
dick greenhaus 11 Aug 06 - 10:26 PM
Azizi 12 Aug 06 - 01:40 PM
Bev and Jerry 12 Aug 06 - 08:25 PM
dick greenhaus 13 Aug 06 - 10:33 AM
Azizi 17 Aug 06 - 10:32 PM
Azizi 13 Oct 08 - 11:44 AM
Azizi 13 Oct 08 - 12:28 PM
Jim Carroll 14 Oct 08 - 03:03 AM
Azizi 14 Oct 08 - 10:30 AM
Azizi 14 Oct 08 - 11:09 AM
MissouriMud 14 Oct 08 - 01:06 PM
Azizi 14 Oct 08 - 01:56 PM
MissouriMud 14 Oct 08 - 02:23 PM
Banjovey 14 Oct 08 - 08:02 PM
Azizi 14 Oct 08 - 11:17 PM
GUEST,Sue 24 Oct 08 - 02:37 PM
Azizi 24 Oct 08 - 02:47 PM
GUEST,mama trish 04 Dec 12 - 09:54 PM
Jack Campin 05 Dec 12 - 04:38 AM
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Subject: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 08:34 PM

This thread focuses on the role of songs, chants, and jingles in current & past political campaigns.

Please post your thoughts about the use of songs etc. in political campaigns or as social commentary about politics and/or political campaigns.

Do you know any examples of such songs, chants, and jingles?

Please post them.

I'll start with an example I found this evening on another website.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 08:53 PM

Imo, it is possible to acknowledge the creativity of a song parody that is used as political commentary about a candidate regardless of whether you support or oppose that particular candidate.

But I confess that acknowledging the creativity of such a parody is easier if you agree with the words of the parody {as I do in this case}.

So without further ado, here's a series of posts from a dailykos dairy. I've included the posting times to show the intervals between the postings of the song's verses:


Hit the road, Joe
And don't ya come back no more no more
Hit the road, Joe
And don't ya come back no more.
You Republican whore.
We can but try. Sherlock Holmes.

by Carnacki on Tue Aug 08, 2006 at 04:19:48 PM PDT

---

What you say?? n/t

by Elwood Dowd on Tue Aug 08, 2006 at 04:21:03 PM PDT

----

Joe oh Joe you treat us so mean
(you're the worst Democratic Senator we've ever seen
and if you keep treating us so
we'll have to take our votes and go

by Lefty the playwright on Tue Aug 08, 2006 at 04:24:33 PM PDT

----
That's right!

by juliesie on Tue Aug 08, 2006 at 04:25:25 PM PDT

---

What I say

Hit the road, Joe
Woah, Senator, oh Senator, don't treat my party so mean
You're the meanest old Senator that I've ever seen
I guess if we said so
You have to pack your things and go (That's right)

[chorus]

Now Joe, listen, Joe, don't ya treat me this-a way
Cause the Democratic Party be back on its feet some day
(Don't care if you are 'cause it's understood)
(You took Repubilcan money you just ain't no good)
Well, I guess if we say so
You have to pack your things and go (That's right)

[repeat chorus]

With apologies to the late, great Ray Charles.

by Carnacki on Tue Aug 08, 2006 at 04:26:18 PM PDT


CT-Sen: Turnout stuff by kos; Tue Aug 08, 2006 at 04:26:29 PM PDT


-snip-


I love the quick wit that this group composition demonstrates. This parody seemed to be spontaneously created. In my opinion, this shows that the folks process is alive and well.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HIT THE ROAD JOE
From: Azizi
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 08:59 PM

Correction:

The line "We can but try. Sherlock Holmes." is probably a signature quote used by that poster and not part of the parody.

With that deletion, the entire song would be:

HIT THE ROAD, JOE
Hit the road, Joe
And don't ya come back no more no more
Hit the road, Joe
And don't ya come back no more.
You Republican whore.

What you say??

Joe oh Joe you treat us so mean
(you're the worst Democratic Senator we've ever seen
and if you keep treating us so
we'll have to take our votes and go

That's right!

What I say

Hit the road, Joe
Woah, Senator, oh Senator, don't treat my party so mean
You're the meanest old Senator that I've ever seen
I guess if we said so
You have to pack your things and go (That's right)

[chorus]

Now Joe, listen, Joe, don't ya treat me this-a way
Cause the Democratic Party be back on its feet some day
(Don't care if you are 'cause it's understood)
(You took Repubilcan money you just ain't no good)
Well, I guess if we say so
You have to pack your things and go (That's right)

[repeat chorus]

----

"Joe" of course, is Senator Joe Lieberman. And the political campaign is the August 8, 2006 Democratic primary in Connecticut between Leiberman and Ned Lamont.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 09:09 PM

Here's a chant about that same campaign [from that same site]:

Joe! Joe!
Gotta Go! (repeat)

by Bulldawg on Tue Aug 08, 2006 at 05:51:40 PM PDT


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Sorcha
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 10:56 PM

Abe Lincoln used the tune Rosin the Bow/Beau for an election song...I'm sure I can find the words.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Franz S.
Date: 08 Aug 06 - 11:04 PM

In 1948 I was about seven and attending a "Saturday school" for workers' kids at Washington Hall in Seattle. I have a clear but disconnected memory of being in a children's choir that recorded what were probably Progressive Party campaign songs. I have no idea what became of those recordings, haven't been able to track them down. But on his Loafer's Glory radio program (Program #35, on the Progressive Movement) Utah Phillips played "The Battle Hymn of '48", sung by Paul Robeson:

There's a fresh breeze a-blowing all across this mighty land,
And it sings of peace and progress and prosperity at hand,
With security and plenty for the people to command,
For the people's march is on!

Glory, glory, hallelujah! (3x)
The people's march is on!

From the village, from the city, all the nation's voice has roared,
Down the rivers, 'cross the prairies (couldn't get this part)
We will march with Henry Wallace, we will fight with Gideon's            sword,
Fro the people's march is on!

I'm sure this came out of People's Songs (Pete Seeger et al.). I don't believe that such songs are meant to convert anyone so much as to fire up the faithful, and for that they do seem to work. As recently as a decade ago I was at a rally lustily singing "Sacaremos ese buey de Sacramento!" (We'll kick that ox out of Sacramento!) referring to Pete Wilson, the Republican candidate for governor of California. Wilson won, of course, and Henry Wallace lost, but that's not the point. Is it?


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST,HughM
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 07:53 AM

I heard on the TV once that "Deutschland Ueber Alles" was written in support of the campaign to unify Germany in the 19th. century.
   "Ue" in "Ueber" represents U umlaut, which I don't know how to type.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 08:11 PM

Sorcha, Franz S, and Guest HughM thanks for your contributions to this thread.

****

Franz S., I was very interested in your childhood remembrance.

I've read a little bit about how unions and other social movements changed the words of religious songs to rally folk, lift up their energy, and reinforce that energy through the difficult times that they inevitably faced as part of those movements. Of course, the Civil Rights movement built on that practice of using songs to energize, inspire, sustain, and comfort folk.

As to your statement that "Wilson won, of course, and Henry Wallace lost, but that's not the point. Is it?" I agree, that's not the point of this thread, though certainly a candidate winning who you support[ed] is exhilarating, and a candidate losing who you support[ed] can be quite deflating.

Btw, not that I want to go off on a tangent :o) but that song "glory, glory hallelujah" sure does get around! There are a number of children's taunts that are parodies of that religious song.
And most of them have lyrics which are quite violent {such as "Glory Glory Hallelujah/teacher hit me with a ruler/I met her at the door/with a loaded 44/and she aint gonna teach no more"

Of course, most adults who remember these kind of taunts say they weren't serious about what they were saying...

Oh well, that's a whole 'nother discussion...


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 09 Aug 06 - 08:29 PM

Sorry.

Sorcha I meant to write that it would be great if you would post the words or post a link to the "Rosin the Bow/Beau" song that you referred to.

And Guest HughM, I don't know the song that you referred to. I'm also sorry to say that I know very little about the campaign to unify Germany in the 19th century. I'm wondering under what kind of banner was that campaign wanting to unify Germany? I guess I'm wondering did this pre-date the 20th century Nazi German movement in any ways?

I mean no disrespect. I'm just curious because I don't know this history.

Thank you in advance for your response if you care to give one.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 03:34 AM

UK 1960s
Vote, vote, vote for Harold Wilson,
Voote, vote, vote for Edward Heath,
Play the parliamentary game and you'll find they're just the same,
You Can only tell the difference by their teeth

UK 30's
All the kings horses, all the king's men,
They march to attack and and they run back again,
Jimmy Maxton and the ILP (Independant Labour Party)

there's more to this latter, but can't remember at present

Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 04:29 AM

Thanks, Jim for those two examples!

****

I thought I knew the name of the ragtime song that was picked up by a campaign or written specifically for a USA political campaign.

I guess I could google it, but I bet somebody here knows it without using a search engine to find it.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 04:35 AM

Speaking of google, I did find this website by inserting the key words "songs in political campaigns": http://www.cyberbee.com/campaign/music.html

Here's some excerpts and one example from that site:

Political music was written to stir the emotions, generate candidate support, and cast doubt on the opposition. Many of the lyrics in the 1800's were set to popular tunes of the day such as "John Brown's Body,""Go Tell Aunt Rody," "Yankee Doodle," and "Battle Cry of Freedom." The following is one example of words set to an existing tune.


Zachary Taylor, Whig 1848
Rough and Ready - Celebrates Taylor's Military Career
Words by Alfred Wheeler
Tune: "Yankee Doodle"
Published By: Firth, Hall & Pond, New York, N.Y., 1847

We'll sing a song to suit the times,
With voices bold and steady,
And cheerily we'll tell in rhymes
Of good old Rough and Ready.
His foes may slander as they can,
And bluster at his manners,
Who cares a fig? He's just the man
To lead the Yankee banners.

In Florida he gained a name
That won our admiration,
And loudly has his gallant fame
Been echoed thro' the nation.
There's not a heart in all the land,
That beats not firm and steady,
For the hero of the Rio Grande,
Old gallant Rough and Ready.

At Monterrey he showed the world
That Yankees ne'er are daunted,
The flag of freedom he unfurled,
And on the towers planted;
And there it waves in triumph high
'Mid freemen bold and steady,
A monument to every eye
Of gallant Rough and Ready.

Old Zach's the boy for Santa Anna,
Ampudia or Arista,
And long 'twill be ere they forget
The field of Buena Vista.
Though legions of the foeman swarm,
Against our brave defenders,
Old Rough and Ready they will find
The man who ne'er surrenders.

Success has aye with glory bright
Upon his path attended,
And give him but the chance to fight,
The war will soon be ended.
And never shall Columbia cease
To cherish long and steady,
The man in war and peace,
The same old Rough and Ready.

Now we predict it won't be long,
In spite of Madam Rumor,
Before we sing this very song
In the Halls of Montezuma.
And then we'll shout in chorus strong,
With voices firm and steady,
And this the burden of our song,
Old gallant Rough and Ready.

Chorus:
Then Rough and Ready let it ring,
And set the bells a chiming,
Where'er we go we're bound to sing
His praises in our rhyming.

Original music was also created. Marches were very popular in the 1800's as was Ragtime in the campaigns of the early twentieth century."

-snip-

That page on that site features one other example of a political song.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Willie-O
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 06:27 AM

One of the rare songs of this ilk to outlive the campaign it was created for was "Charlie on the MTA".

Did he ever return, no he never returned,
And his fate is still unknown.
He may ride forever neath the streets of Boston,
He's the man who never returned.

Popular through the 70's at least. Greatly singable chorus and used humour to make its point. The issue was a fare increase on the Boston transit system whereby passengers would have to pay another nickel or dime when EXITING the train. So the premise the song is built on is, what becomes of the hapless commuter who loses his last dime and can't get off? We find out.

"Charlie's wife goes down to (whatever) station
Every day at half past two.
Through the open window she hands Charlie a sandwich
As the train comes whistling through."

And saves the campaign slogan for the last verse:

So fight the fare increase, vote for Walter O'Brien
And get Charlie off the MTA!

Did he ever return, no he never returned...etc.

W-O


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 06:37 AM

Hello, Williw-O!

Thanks for that great example!

Here's a website about Charlie On The M.T.A..

That website has these words to that song:

Lyrics
Copyright Info: These words, as far as I know, are copyright Jacqueline Steiner, and Bess Lomax-Hawes. The Kingston Trio version is copyright Capitol Records.
Before I get into the background of the song, let me present the lyrics in their entirety. The version recorded by The Kingston Trio includes the chorus after each verse. Words in italics indicate the changes made by The Kingston Trio in their later recording. Parentheses indicate backing vocals.

Let me tell you the story
Of a man named Charlie
On a tragic and fateful day
He put ten cents in his pocket,
Kissed his wife and family
Went to ride on the MTA

Charlie handed in his dime
At the Kendall Square Station
And he changed for Jamaica Plain
When he got there the conductor told him,
"One more nickel."
Charlie could not get off that train.

Chorus:
                        Did he ever return,
                        No he never returned
                        And his fate is still unlearn'd
                        He may ride forever
                        'neath the streets of Boston
                        He's the man who never returned.

Now all night long
Charlie rides through the tunnels
                                 the station
Saying, "What will become of me?
Crying
How can I afford to see
My sister in Chelsea
Or my cousin in Roxbury?"

Charlie's wife goes down
To the Scollay Square station
Every day at quarter past two
And through the open window
She hands Charlie a sandwich
As the train comes rumblin' through.

As his train rolled on
underneath Greater Boston
Charlie looked around and sighed:
"Well, I'm sore and disgusted
And I'm absolutely busted;
I guess this is my last long ride."
{this entire verse was replaced by a banjo solo}

Now you citizens of Boston,
Don't you think it's a scandal
That the people have to pay and pay
Vote for Walter A. O'Brien
Fight the fare increase!
And fight the fare increase
Vote for George O'Brien!
Get poor Charlie off the MTA.

Chorus:
Or else he'll never return,
No he'll never return
And his fate will be unlearned
He may ride forever
'neath the streets of Boston
He's the man (Who's the man)
He's the man who never returned.
He's the man (Oh, the man)
He's the man who never returned.
He's the man who never returned

-snip-

Here's information from that website about the song's tune:
"The melody of this song is a fairly old one. The first song (as far as I know) to use this melody was "The Ship That Never Returned", written in 1865 by Henry Clay Work. Work also wrote the more well-known song "My Grandfather's Clock" (and there are some similarities in melody between the two). The more famous use of this melody was in "The Wreck of Old #97"."

For more information about that song, please visit that website.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 06:42 AM

Off topic:

Here's information about Henry Clay Work's song:
Grandfather's Clock


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST,HughM
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 08:08 AM

I originally thought Deutschland Ueber Alles came from the Nazi period, but it seems I was wrong and it is much older than that. I can't remember exactly when it was written. I think the title means that the writer regarded German unity as the most important issue at the time, rather than that Germany should dominate the world.
   I don't know the reason for this. Perhaps the writer felt that one state could function more efficiently than a number of smaller ones, or would be better placed to defend itself. No doubt there is a historian out there who can enlighten us!


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: BuckMulligan
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 09:07 AM

No historian, but I'd say your interpretation of "united Germany over the individual duchies, electorates, and principalities" is probably sound. Into the middle of the 19th century, there was no such thing as "Deustchland" there was Saxony (several) and Hesse and Prussia, and a raft of dinky baronies etc. The notion of constructing a "Deutschland" to unite all the "germanies" was somewhat radical and needed a good song. The iconic song of the Nazi period was The Horst Wessel Lied.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 10:12 AM

Two issues: The desire to "unite the Germanies" - at least amidst Germanic peoples - may be dated to the late eighteenth/early nineteenth century, and in the early nineteenth was partly in resistance to Napoleon's defeat and humbling of Prussia and Saxony in 1806 (ironically, in forming the Confederation of the Rhine out of numerous minor dukedoms and principalities, Boney gave an impetus and a modern state structure to the unification interest). The resistance to French domination involved, among other things, the liberal, elite developing an interest in national traditions, "Volkslied"/folksong and the like. Of course, such cultural interest was used by the ruling class as part of an imperialist policy in the later nineteenth century; but then, "jingoism" wasn't exactly confined to them. Wasn't it Haydn who wrote the music of "The Emperor Hymn", i.e. that to which "Deutschland U. A." was added? Notice that some C of E hymn or other has this tune; as Brendan Behan said, it just reminds you where the Brit Royal Family comes from, and that they all speak German among themselves anyway.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 10:29 AM

Secondly, in the late eighteenth century, Robert Burns wrote a few "Election Ballads" for local M.P.s (Dumfries, in southern Scotland). There are a few good satirical points, though of course these would have been more "pointed" for a contemporary audience. However, there's continuing relevance in something like this:

"Here's Freedom to them that would read,
Here's Freedom to them that would write:
There's none ever feared that the Truth should be heard
But them whom the Truth would indite"

(in the original Scots, "would" is given as "wad" - with an "Ah" sound - and "none" is, of course, "nane")

To take this further, into the realms of "general political movements", check out his song "A man's a Man for aa that" (first line, "Is there, for honest Poverty...").
To reel it in a little - to the Europe of the 1790s - contempt for the ruling classes is well leavened with humour in his songs to the air of "The Campbells are coming" (selections):

"When Princes and Prelates
And het-headed Zealots
All Europe hae set in a lowe                  (i.e. "aflame")
The wise man lies down
Nor envies a Crown,
But comforts himself with, a Mowe...

And why shouldna puir folk mowe, mowe, mowe?
And why shouldna puir folk mowe?
The rich folk hae siller, and houses, and land;
Puir bodies hae naethin but Mowe...

When Brunswick's great Prince
Cam a-cruisin tae France
Republican billies tae cowe,
Auld Brunswick's great Prince
Wad hae shown better sense
At hame, wi' his Princess, tae mowe...

And why shouldna, &c

By sea and by shore
The Emperor swore
All Paris he'd set in a lowe;
But Paris, sae ready,
Just laugh'd at the laddie
And bid him, "gae tak a guid Mowe"

And why shouldna, &c

But, Peace to commotions
And new fangel't notions,
One bumper I trust ye'll allow;         
Here's tae Geordie our King,
And Charlotte his Queen,
And lang may they tak a guid mowe"

(Another set of verses to the same air begins:

"When Prose-work and Rhymes
Are hunted for crimes,
And things are, the-devil-knows-how;")

Exits, whistling a jaunty wee Scots Sang.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Bill D
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 11:10 AM

Oscar Brand did an album (on CD now) of this very thing.

Also, Vera Brodsky Lawerence published an entire book covering our 1st hundred years...with this as its central theme.

"Music for Patriots, Politicians, and Presidents"

A search on her name, plus the word 'politicians' will give you many hits.


One of my favorites is the Republican attempt to capitalize on Grover Cleveland's 'supposed' fathering of an illegitimate child by chanting "Ma, Ma, where's my Pa" After Clevland won, the Democrats expanded it with "Gone to the White House, ha ha ha!"


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Jim McLean
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 12:16 PM

During the anti Polaris marches in Scotland (early 1960)I wrote: To the tune of Three Craws.

The USA are gi'en subs away
Gi'en subs away,
Gi'en subs away hay hay
The USA are gi'en subs away,
But we dinnae want Polaris

I wrote a few more verses and the song was used as a chant, very easy for marchers to pick up the song as it was mainly a one liner. Many veses were added to thisby other hands and the title actualy made it as a front page headline of The Daily Worker.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 02:15 PM

Mention of the 1960s in Scotland reminds me they had some kind of a song about,

"Scotland hasnae got a King,
And it husnae got a Queen;
How can ye huv a Second Liz
When the First hus nivvur been?"

(and the sound of "got" was nearly "goat", but with only half a "T" at the end of it)


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 02:50 PM

Chorus of above
Nae Liz the First, Nae Lillibet the twa,
Nae Liz will ever dae,
We'll mak oor land Republican
At the Scottish breakawa.

or
Up wi' the rampant Lion (three times)
And Awa' wi Kennedy (JF not William)

If you really want to extend it beyond elections theer are a couple of great ones about the stealing of The Stone of Scone

Jim Carroll


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Subject: Lyr Add: LINCOLN AND LIBERTY (Jesse Hutchinson)
From: Kaleea
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 03:09 PM

Azizi, from the Digitrad:




LINCOLN AND LIBERTY
(Jesse Hutchinson)

Hurrah for the choice of the nation,
Our chieftain so brave and so true,
We'll go for the great reformation,
For Lincoln and Liberty, too!

We'll go for the son of Kentucky
The hero of Hoosierdom through,
The pride of the "Suckers" so lucky,
For Lincoln and Liberty, too!

They'll find what by felling and mauling,
Our railmaker statesman can do;
For the people are everywhere calling
For Lincoln and Liberty too.

Then up with the banner so glorious,
The star-spangled red, white, and blue,
We'll fight till our banner's victorious,
For Lincoln and Liberty, too.

Our David's good sling is unerring,
The Slavocrat's giant he slew,
Then shout for the freedom preferring,
For Lincoln and Liberty, too.

We'll go for the son of Kentucky,
The hero of Hoosierdom through,
The pride of the "Suckers" so lucky,
For Lincoln and Liberty, too.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Little Robyn
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 03:36 PM

Back in 1972 I heard a young Isla StClair sing:
Vote, vote, vote for Harold Wilson,
Who's that knocking at the door?
If it's Edward let him in, with a dimple on his chin
And we won't need Harold any more, shut the door.

It goes to the kids hymn, 'Jesus loves the little children'.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 04:42 PM

Two early ones from US not nec campaigns

ROCKABYE BABY (ca. 1920's)
Rockabye baby, on the tree top,
When you grow up, you'll work in a shop,
When you are married, your wife will work too,
So that the rich will have nothing to do.

Hush-a-bye baby, on the tree top,
When you grow old your wages will stop.
When you have spent the little you've made,
First to the poorhouse, then to the grave.

(1800-1864 approximately)
JEFF DAVIS AND ABE LINCOLN
The form of this fragment is very reminiscent of the English piece
Big bees fly high
Little bees gather the honey
The poor man work hard
The rich man pocket the money.

BLACK SHEEP, BLACK SHEEP
This small lullabye is said to have been sung by the negro slave nurse, forced to neglect her own black child in order to tend to the white children in the 'big white house', as the home of the plantation owner was so often called.

Jeff Davis rides a big white horse,
Lincoln rides a mule
Jeff Davis is a gentleman
Lincoln is a fool.

Black sheep, black sheep, where's your lamb?
Way down in the valley.
Bees and the butterflies picking out his eyes,
Poor little thing cryin' 'Mammy!'
Black sheep, black sheep, where's your lamb?
Way down in the valley.
My mamma told me before she went away
To take good care of the baby,
But I went out to play
And the baby ran away
And the poor little thing cryin' 'Mammy!'

(Repeat part 1)


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Jim McLean
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 05:44 PM

Jim Carrol, The song you mentioned was by Morris Blythman AKA Thurso Berwick, The Coronation Coronach and didn't mention Kennedy. The chorus was:
Nae Liz the twa, nae Lillibet the wan, nae liz will ever dae, We'll mak oor lan' republican in the Scottish breakaway.
This and many other songs by myself, Morris and Hamish Henderson were recorded on the Folways LP 'Ding, Dong, Dollar'.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Matt_R
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 05:50 PM

James! James! James G. Blaine!
The monumental liar from the state of Maine!


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 06:58 PM

There are really too many of these to list. Check DigiTrad for @campaign and @political. Ane that mit be apprpro is:
It's the same old merry-go-round
Which one will you ride this year
The donkeys and elephants bounce up and down
On the same old merry-go-round.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 07:26 PM

Thanks to all those posting on this thread.

****

Eureka!!! Oh Happy Day!!

I found the composer I was thinking of in my post 10 Aug 06 - 04:29 AM: That composer is W C Handy and the song is St. Louis Blues.
See this excerpt from http://www.jass.com/Others/wchandy.html

"In 1909, Handy and his band were asked to play for the campaign of the Memphis political boss, Edward H. Crump. At the time, the most popular song in their repertoire was a piece called "Mr. Crump" which contained some lines not exactly complimentary to their patron:

Mr. Crump doan allow no easy riders here.
We doan care what Mr. Crump doan allow,
We gonna Barrel-house anyhow.
Mr. Crump can go and catch himself some air.
But Boss Crump was not interested in the lyrics if he ever even heard them. What he was interested in was the drawing power of Handy's music, which proved so successful that Crump won the election. Later new words by George Norton were added, and the title was changed to The Memphis Blues.

It was the first blues Handy ever wrote. Many consider it to be the first blues song in history, although due to Handy's problems finding a publisher it was preceded in print by Baby Seals Blues by Artie Matthews, in August of 1912 and the Dallas Blues by Hart A. Wand in September of the same year. Handy's song, which had been released as an instrumental in 1910, came out at the end of September or the beginning of October 1912, when Handy finally decided to publish it himself."

-snip-

And while searching for this info, I found this other reference to a song being used in a political campaign: "Adeline Shepherd's "Pickles and Peppers" became the theme song for William Jennings Bryan's presidential campaign.". See this passage from 'The Music Survives': An Interview with Max Morath

"Vaudeville played a major part in the development of ragtime. "You go back and read the trade magazines," Morath says. "They spoke of ragtime, and they were talking about the vaudeville songs... The vaudeville people, they wanted songs tinged with the steady, constant syncopation." Ragtime's popularity also increased with the popularization of sheet music. Woolworth's and other 5-and-10-cent stores carried the sheet music to many songs, even though not many of their customers could read it. To help customers choose which songs to buy, the stores hired young educated white women to sit at pianos in the store and play whatever songs a customer might want to hear. These women, Morath explains eagerly, could never socialize with the young black men who composed these songs, but their worlds were bridged through music. Some of these women, in turn, became rag composers themselves, although they often had to quit the business when they married. (There have been enough female ragtime composers to warrant a CD of their work, which Morath has made.) "The [black] men failed," he ruminates, "and the women failed, but the music survived." At least one of the female composers had some success with her work: Adeline Shepherd's "Pickles and Peppers" became the theme song for William Jennings Bryan's presidential campaign."


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Subject: Lyr Add: I DON'T WANT YOUR MILLIONS, MISTER
From: Franz S.
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 07:42 PM

One of my favorites, from Minnesota:

cho: I don't want your millions, mister.
I don't want your diamond ring.
All I want's just live and let live,
Give me back my job again.
(Repeat chorus after each verse)

I don't want your Rolls Royce, mister,
I don't want your pleasure yacht.
All I want is food for my babies,
Now give to me my old job back.

We worked to build this country, mister,
While you enjoyed a life of ease.
You've stolen all that we've built, mister,
Now our children starve and freeze.

Yes, you have a land deed, mister,
The money is all in your name.
But where's the work that you did mister ?
I'm demanding back my job again.

Think me dumb if you wish, mister,
Call me green or blue or red.
There's just one thing that I know, mister,
Our hungry babies must be fed.

We'll organize together, mister,
In one big united band,
And with a Farmer-Labor party
We will win our just demands.

Take the two old parties, mister,
No difference in them I can see.
But with a Farmer-Labor party,
We will set the workers free.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 07:56 PM

Irwin Silber published a book in 1971 entitled, "Songs America Voted By" (google it!)which contains 320 pages of presidential camlpaign songs. Most are set to well-known tunes of the time. The tune "Rosin the Beau" is used no less than nine times.

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: The Walrus
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 08:13 PM

Not an election song, but a piece of doggrel I picked up from an old shopkeeper whan I bought a work of fiction from him (The War Diaries of David Lloyd-George)

Lloyd-George, No doubt, when life ebbs out
Will ride in a firey chariot.
He'll be driven, in state on a red-hot plate
With Satan and Judas Iscariot.

W


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 10 Aug 06 - 08:46 PM

Azizi:

The version of "MTA" you posted appears to be the Kingston Trio's version except that, in the last verse, O'Brien's first name is given as both Walter and George.

The lyrics were composed by Jacqueline Steiner and Bess Hawes (Lomax) for the 1948 election campaign of Walter O'Brien who was running for mayor of Boston. The Kingston Trio recorded the song in the late 1950s and changed his first name from Walter to George.

This was probably due to the fact that this was the era of the House Unamerican Activities Committee, Senator Joe McCarthy and blacklisting of artists with left leaning tendencies such as Pete Seeger. Walter O'Brien billed himself as a "progressive", a term which was read as "communist" by a lot of folks.

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Genie
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 12:57 AM

The song "I'm Just Wild About Harry" was modified for use as a campaign song for Harry Truman.    And the George M. Cohan song "H-A-double-R-I-G-A-N" was similarly morphed into a campaign song when Averell (sp?) Harriman ran for president in the 1950s.

Of course, kids have been known to come up with their own campaign songs, even when they're pretty clueless about the actual issues and candidates. E.g., when I was in 3rd or 4th grade (whatever grade I was in in the fall of 1952), lots of my classmates were singing:

Whistle while you work,
Stevenson's a jerk!
Eisenhower has the power,
Whistle while you work.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 03:09 AM

Jim McLean
Thanks for the info - that's the way I remember singing it on the way to Holy Loch.
Somebody gave me a video of a programme called 'Glasgow Eskimos' recently, were you involved?
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 03:19 AM

True Blue Republican Campaign Songs for 1888
S. Brainard's Sons, Chicago

Grover's Veto                     2
When Grover Goes Marching Home    4
Turn the Rascals Out             6
Political Barber Shop             8
On the Louisiana Plan            10
Democratic Boat                  12
Vacant Chair                     14
All on Account of the Mugwumps   16
Glory, Glory, Hallelujah         19
Marching Through Georgia         20
Star Spangled Banner             21
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp             22
Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean   23
America                         24
Hold the Fort                   24

A sample:
TITLE: On the Louisiana Plan

They tell us they are solid For Cleveland and reform,
And they say they love the old flag With affection true and warm.
They try to blind the people, But we hardly think they can,
While they carry their elections On the LouisIana plan.

CHORUS:
       
        'Tis the slickest operation that ever you did see.
       This peaceful way to figure up a big majority;
       Just count your populationon, Ev'ry woman, child and man,
       And the—sh! *names upon the tombstones!
       That's the. LouisIanna plan.
           * italics whispered.

"Walk up and do your voting We'll not hinder you", they say,
"For our double-barreled shotguns Are forever laid a -way."
"Walk up, my colored brother We'll not hinder any man,
All the same we'll do the counting On the LouisIana plan.

CHORUS

They let the colored brother Put his little ballot in,
And they smile upon him blandly When you see the count begin.
But every vote is counted For the Democratic man,
And you bet he always gets there On the LouisIana plan.

CHORUS

They'll be ready in November To repeat the little scheme,
With a fair and honest ballot That's as gauzy as a dream.
From Maryland to Texas They'll be waiting to a man,
To set it up for Grover On the LouisIana plan.

I believe I have .jpg scans of all the songs, but the above is the only one I've processed to text. The typography is rather poor, and OCR takes a lot of correction.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Genie
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 03:30 AM

Wasn't Grover Cleveland the one who inspired the song,
"Ma, Ma, where's my pa?
Gone to the White House! Ha ha ha!" ?

'Course, I guess 't'warn't really a campaign song, come to think of it. ;-D


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Jim McLean
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 05:16 AM

Jim Carroll
Yes, I was one of the Eskimos, in fact Nigel Denver and Morris Blythman's wife are the only other remaining ones still living!
The video I think was of a show in Glasgow by people who used the name but were not 'Eskimos'. Neither myself, Nigel nor Jacky keir, who was alive at the time, were informed of the show. There is a picture on the front of 'Ding, Dong, Dollar', taken on board the ferry to Dunnon, showing Josh MacRae, Jacky O'Connor, Morris Blythman, Nigel Denver and myself all singing anti Polaris and Scottish Republican songs. In the foreground you can see Jacky Keir and Marion Blythman. You can also just see Hamish Imlach.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 05:10 PM

The story I've heard on the "MTA" is that the Kingston Trio were hired to perform it during the campaign, but after that the politician involved "asserted copyright" in hopes that the song would fade away.

The trio changed the name (from Walter to George?) to make it a "new song" in order to continue performing it. Whether the change was "negotiated" with the politician, or whether they just got by with it as a "parody" is unclear.

It does appear that "Walter" did object to having it performed in the original version after the campaign concluded. I've not seen the opinion that the objection was related to McCarthy, but I suppose it's possible.

John


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 11 Aug 06 - 10:26 PM

John-
Good story, but the campaign was long over when th kT arrived upon the scene. And as far as I know, Steiner and Hawes collected royalties from the Trio's recording. I suspect that the name change was to avoid having thoes prehistoric Homeland Security folks shout "Commie!"


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 12 Aug 06 - 01:40 PM

Though these songs don't refer to a specific political campaign, see a page from my website Cocojams: Civil Rights Songs for a collection of songs from the 1960s USA civil rights movement.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Bev and Jerry
Date: 12 Aug 06 - 08:25 PM

This could be "fakelore" and we'll be damned if we can remember where we read it but the story is that Steiner and Hawes didn't copyright the song and when KT recorded it, a guy called 'Specs' who was living in San Francisco got the copyright, collected the royalties and gave them to the authors.

Bev and Jerry


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 13 Aug 06 - 10:33 AM

One of the finest (IMO) campaign songs is "Jefferson and Liberty" Check it out in DigiTrad


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 17 Aug 06 - 10:32 PM

Hey, there, Georgie Boy,

There's a little racist deep inside,

Spew out all the hate you hide.

And, oh, what a change there'll be,

V-A will see
A new Senator!

by big spoiled baby on Thu Aug 17, 2006 at 06:26:13 PM PDT; http://www.dailykos.com/story/2006/8/17/205057/800

This parody was composed in response to Virginia Republican Senator George Allen and his recently videotaped racist comment. For more on Allen's comment, see http://www.crooksandliars.com/posts/2006/08/14/george-allens-macaca/ and numerous other Internet entries.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 13 Oct 08 - 11:44 AM

For the folkloric record, here are links to a political song/chant that I've just come across:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfcRkBXM8yk&eurl=http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2008/10/13/94720/657/443/629090
Added: October 10, 2008

Barack Obama supporters at a Sarah Palin fundraiser {Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania}


Here are the words that I transcribed from the video Mama Mama...Obama video

{The video starts with the male soloist saying "Hold your head up head". However, the soloist doesn't complete that verse but appears to start the song again. The song uses a call & response pattern, with the group repeating word for word what the soloist says}.

Mama Mama....Obama

{A soloist sings the first line}
Mama Mama can't you see. {group repeats="gr"}
What Obama done for me. {"gr"}
Mama Mama can't you see. {"gr"}
What Barack has done for me. {"gr"}

Standin tall and lookin good {"gr"}
He* oughta be in Hollywood {"gr"}
Standin tall and looking good {"gr"}
He* oughta be in Hollywood {gr"}

Chorus:
Oh-Oh-Oh-Oh {"gr"}
Oh Oh-Oh-Oh-o-Oh {"gr"}

Ain't no sense in lookin down. {"gr"}
Barack Obama's comin to town. {"gr"}
Ain't no sense in lookin down. {"gr"}
Barack Obama's comin to town. {"gr"}

-snip-

*Some of the group sung "we".

Note: The video shows that some of the protestors who were singing held SEIU union signs. Also, fwiw, the majority of the protestors appeared to be White women and White men.

**

"Mama Mama Can't You See" is a call & response song that is based on the African American spiritual "Honey In The Rock". This song has also been used as a military cadence {jodie} and as a children's handclap rhyme.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 13 Oct 08 - 12:28 PM

The same poster who added the "Mama Mama...Obama" video to YouTube, schultzchr, also added these two videos of protestors chanting/singing during that same Sarah Palin protest rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on 19/10/2008:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rn-oGVb_0o&feature=related
We Will Barack You

and

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBNBxHn53hs&feature=related
Everywhere We Goooo....People Wanna Knoowwww...

**

The "We Will Barack You" song is a take off of the still very popular pop song "We Will Rock You". That song wa recorded in 1977 by Queen. In this video, the group sings in unison. The only words captured by the video are "We will we will Barack you", though some of the group may be singing "We will we will rock you. Barack you".

As a point of information, in the USA, this song is widely used as a children's cheerleader cheer.

**

"Everywhere We Go" is actually an introduction, bragging chant and not a protest song. The chant has a call & response pattern. The group exactly repeats what the soloist said. The words as chanted in that video are:

Everywhere We Go
Everywhere we go-o {"group responds "gr"}
People wanna know-o {"gr"}
Who we are-r {"gr"}
So we tell them {"gr"}
We are the union {"gr"}
The mighty mighty union {"gr"}
The American union {"gr"}

-snip-

This chant is widely used in the USA by cheerleaders, by parading drill teams and other organizations.

**

I should also note that in each of these videos, a drummer accompanies the group chanting/singing. I'm not sure what kind of drum it is, but it's one that is usually found in drum & bugle corps.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 03:03 AM

Here in Ireland songs have always been a vital part of politics, both in recording the happenings and as morale-boosters; it seems every event was immortalised in songs and squib.
Just before I left the UK for Ireland a builder I was working with, from Kildare, sang me two lines of a squib from the Civil War (1922) which goes:

What's the news, what's the news, DeValera's sold his shoes
To buy ammunition for his men
(to the tune of Kelly, The Boy From Killane)

Would love to know if there is any more to it!
The same man also told me about 'the arm in the bottle' - will go to see it one day.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 10:30 AM

Thanks for posting that example, Jim!

**

I want to add that the type of drum that was played in those videos I referred to in my 13 Oct 08 - 12:28 PM was a two headed snare drum that the drummer carries in front of him. Both of the drum heads are played by the same drummer with two sticks. Perhaps there is another name for this drum, but if so, I can't find it.

The drum looked like this. But it was held upright and not placed on a stand.

Since at least the 1990s, there have been more and more West African djembe drums played at African American cultural events. I think that these djembes are too heavy to carry around on protest demonstrations. But I wonder if djembes are being played at stationary protest rallies?


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 11:09 AM

Imo, having any drums accompanying chanting at poltical protests exemplifies the difference between protests in the early 2000s and protests in the 1960s.

There were no drums accompanying chants during 1960s protests because carrying a drum would impede their mobility. Those protestors knew that carrying a drum would impede them from protecting themselves from life threatening situations-like dogs, and water from fire hoses, and angry mobs.

In contrast, most of the protests in the early 2000s seem to be much less threatening. Indeed, these gatherings of drum playing and people chanting their opposition to a candidate and their support of another candidate seem to be "fun" and somewhat "festive". Or at least it seems that way to me, though, admittedly, I'm on the outside looking in.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: MissouriMud
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 01:06 PM

In Lincoln's 1860 campaign republicans took an old song called "Down in Alabam" (melody similar to the currently known Old Grey Mare) and reworked it to suit their candidate.   

I gather The orginal had verses like:
"Old grey horse came tearing out the wilderness
Tearing out the Wilderness,tearing out the Wilderness
Old grey horse came tearing out the Wilderness
Down in Alabam"

This was reworked for the campaign as:

"Old Abe Lincoln came tearing out the wilderness
Tearing out the Wilderness,tearing out the Wilderness
Old Abe Lincoln came tearing out the Wilderness
Down in Illinois"


The song - either the orginal or the parody or a combination - subsequently became a play-party song with all sorts of floating verses that fit the basic formula. Some how the "Old Grey Mare she aint what she used to be" verses came in (a clear reference back to the "old grey horse" but possibly a political statement of their own), stuck and took over the title of the song and represents the most commonly known survivor of that family.

Another variant of the song (possibly another verse)is "The Old yellow dog came trotting through the meeting house", which remains the title of a popular southern and midwestern fiddle square dance tune/song, and which has a chorus with a different tune which goes "brave boys die, down in Alabam", which could derive in some way from the original song. I have heard theories on both sides as to whether or not the "Old Yellow Dog" is a political reference that was used in a campaign.

I can't say I have thoroughly researched the issue though so perhaps others have some better information.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 01:56 PM

MissouriMud, thanks for that post about the old grey mare song. That's new information for me. Hopefully, other posters will add to the discussion about that song.

I'm wondering if "grey {or "gray"}* is the most common color for horses or mares. Or maybe "gray mare" just happened to be the phrase most commonly used when talking about a horse. For example, the phrase "ole gray mare" shows up as a floating verse in the 29th century {or ealier} African American "went to the river but I couldn't get across" songs. Is this just a coincidence?

*Now I'm confused. What is the correct spelling for this color in the USA-gray or grey?

**

Also, MissouriMud, your post prompted me to look up the meaning of "yellow dog Democrats". It might not be pertinent to this thread, but in case someone else might be wondering what that term means, here it is:

"In the late 19th century and throughout the 20th century, Yellow Dog Democrats were voters in the U.S. Southern states who consistently voted for Democratic candidates. The term arose from the notion that loyal Southern Democrats would vote for a yellow dog before voting for a Republican. The term is now often used more generally to mean any Democrat who will vote the Party ticket under almost any circumstances...

The first known usage to date of "yaller dog" in relation to Democrats occurred in the 1900 Kentucky gubernatorial contest which turned into quite a dogfight"...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_dog_Democrat


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: MissouriMud
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 02:23 PM

I think current US spelling is "gray" but things were greyer a while back.

I think old and gray go together - so it may be less a function of the natural color of the animal than it is a comment on its age.   Some how the "old brown mare" doesnt conjure up the same image.   Frankly I have no idea if horses gray with age - so this may be an anthropromorphism.

The term Yellow Dog Democrat is apparently a usage that significantly post dates the Civil War (if Wikipedia is accurate) but the term Yellow Dog as a disparaging comment most likely predates that. Interestingly Lincoln at one point was known for walking around Springfield with a large yellow dog. I have not been able to document if the Yellow Dog in the song was meant to refer in any way to Lincoln either negatively or positively - but I know people who believe that to be the case. On the other hand I have seen some indications that the Yellow Dog in the song predated or was totally independent of Lincoln - but I suppose even if that were the case some might have used the words retrospectively with him in mind.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Banjovey
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 08:02 PM

Here is part of a song I wrote which was sung on picket lines in Exeter during a health workers strike in 1970's
The Norman was Norman Fowler, the then Minister of Health.

'Have you seen the size
of Norman's little rise.
It would fit between the thighs of a gnat.
It is so small and mean
that it hardly can be seen
Now I ask you what the hells
the use of that.'


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 14 Oct 08 - 11:17 PM

Oh.

I think I understand what that song is about. That was rather "tauntalizing".

Thanks for posting it, Banjovey.

:o)


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST,Sue
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 02:37 PM

This is a good one from 1972 when Nixon won his short-lived second term:

The election is over,
the results are now known,
the will of the people
has clearly been shown.

Let's all get together
and show by our deeds,
that we will give Dick
all the help that he needs.

Let bygones be bygones
and all bitterness pass,
I'll hug your elephant
if you kiss my ass.


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Azizi
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 02:47 PM

Thanks Sue for posting that example.

:o)


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: GUEST,mama trish
Date: 04 Dec 12 - 09:54 PM

this was written as "billie holiday, arlo guthrie, and randy newman on a whiskey bender at a political rally..."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tjAsYDaYbs


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Subject: RE: Songs & Jingles in Political Campaigns
From: Jack Campin
Date: 05 Dec 12 - 04:38 AM

From an election campaign in East Lothian, Scotland, in 1978ish. To the tune of "Brown Girl in the Ring" which was a hit in the UK at the time.

John Hume Robertson, he's the man for us
John Hume Robertson, he's the man for us
John Hume Robertson, he's the man for us
And he lives in a big house too!

Robertson was a local landowner who was standing for the Labour Party (i.e. what we would now call a "champagne socialist"). The big issue locally was whether the Torness nuclear power plant would be constructed (I was in East Lothian campaigning against it). Robertson was all for it, as was the Callaghan Labour government of the time.


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Mudcat time: 19 July 5:48 PM EDT

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