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Common poems set to music

GUEST 22 May 13 - 03:20 PM
Stilly River Sage 22 May 13 - 02:21 PM
GUEST,Tony 21 May 13 - 11:13 PM
GUEST,Tony 21 May 13 - 11:00 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 May 13 - 12:10 AM
Nigel Parsons 20 May 13 - 04:18 AM
Jim Carroll 20 May 13 - 03:36 AM
eftifino 20 May 13 - 02:01 AM
Stilly River Sage 19 May 13 - 05:24 PM
Paul Davenport 14 Feb 12 - 10:11 AM
Beer 14 Feb 12 - 09:25 AM
Jean(eanjay) 14 Feb 12 - 06:59 AM
Jon Corelis 13 Feb 12 - 11:52 AM
GUEST 12 Feb 12 - 07:38 PM
ollaimh 18 Nov 11 - 09:39 PM
Acorn4 18 Nov 11 - 07:30 PM
Dave the Gnome 18 Nov 11 - 06:56 PM
GUEST,John Bailey 18 Nov 11 - 06:02 PM
Elmore 18 Nov 11 - 04:19 PM
BTNG 18 Nov 11 - 03:42 PM
katlaughing 18 Nov 11 - 03:20 PM
Mysha 18 Nov 11 - 02:52 PM
Mysha 18 Nov 11 - 02:51 PM
Tunesmith 18 Nov 11 - 01:55 PM
Mysha 18 Nov 11 - 01:49 PM
Tunesmith 18 Nov 11 - 01:41 PM
GUEST,Peter Laban 18 Nov 11 - 01:37 PM
johncharles 18 Nov 11 - 01:12 PM
Tunesmith 18 Nov 11 - 01:05 PM
Rog Peek 04 Nov 09 - 03:33 AM
BK Lick 03 Nov 09 - 10:15 PM
Suegorgeous 03 Nov 09 - 07:06 PM
GUEST,Joseph de Culver City 03 Nov 09 - 11:31 AM
clueless don 03 Nov 09 - 08:34 AM
maeve 03 Nov 09 - 08:08 AM
skipy 31 Jan 07 - 05:01 AM
Leadfingers 31 Jan 07 - 04:53 AM
Leadfingers 31 Jan 07 - 04:52 AM
DriveForever 31 Jan 07 - 12:45 AM
Haruo 30 Jan 07 - 01:38 AM
GUEST, still docked 29 Jan 07 - 04:18 PM
GUEST, still docked 29 Jan 07 - 03:30 PM
Songster Bob 29 Jan 07 - 02:43 PM
Stewart 29 Jan 07 - 02:01 PM
GUEST, still docked 29 Jan 07 - 01:25 PM
GUEST,Mad musix 28 Jan 07 - 04:34 PM
GUEST,Mad Musix 28 Jan 07 - 01:47 PM
An Buachaill Caol Dubh 24 Nov 06 - 07:43 AM
oldhippie 24 Nov 06 - 07:36 AM
Rowan 24 Nov 06 - 01:56 AM
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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST
Date: 22 May 13 - 03:20 PM

July Wakes was originally a poem written by R Pomfret. It's been said he was not pleased with the song.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 May 13 - 02:21 PM

I compared these last two posts to the DT.

The Three Fishers appears in the DT, but it displays very oddly because the Mudcat Midi note pushes it way over to the side of the page.

For Lorraine Lorraine Lorèe there is a discussion, and Joe Offer started a Tune Req: Lorraine Loree thread. It may have a different title - there are forum results but no DT listing - I looked under "Lorraine Lorraine Lorèe," "Lorraine Lorèe," and "Lorraine."

SRS


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST,Tony
Date: 21 May 13 - 11:13 PM

Lorraine Lorraine Lorèe written 1874 by Charles Kingsley (1819-1875)
Written while in Colorado, during a speaking tour of the U.S. He got sick during that tour and never recovered. This was his last poem. It was apparently very popular for a very long time. In the 1975 documentary film "Grey Gardens" Edith Bouvier Beale (1896–1977, Jacqueline Kennedy's aunt) recites it from memory.

"Are you ready for your steeple-chase, Lorraine, Lorraine, Lorèe?
You're booked to ride your capping race today at Coulterlee.
You're booked to ride Vindictive, for all the world to see,
To keep him straight, and keep him first, and win the run for me."

She clasped her new-born baby, poor Lorraine, Lorraine, Lorèe.
"I cannot ride Vindictive, as any man might see,
And I will not ride Vindictive, with this baby on my knee;
He's killed a boy, he's killed a man, and why must he kill me?"

"Unless you ride Vindictive, Lorraine, Lorraine, Lorèe,
Unless you ride Vindictive today at Coulterlee,
And land him safe across the brook, and win the run for me,
It's you may keep your baby, for you'll get no keep from me."

"That husbands could be cruel," said Lorraine, Lorraine, Lorèe,
"That husbands could be cruel, I have known for seasons three;
But oh! to ride Vindictive while a baby cries for me,
And be killed across a fence at last for all the world to see!"

She mastered young Vindictive – Oh! the gallant lass was she,
And kept him straight and won the race as near as near could be;
But he killed her at the brook against a pollard willow tree;
Oh! he killed her at the brook, the brute, for all the world to see;

And no one but the baby cried for poor Lorraine, Lorèe.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST,Tony
Date: 21 May 13 - 11:00 PM

The Three Fishers poem (pub. 1851) by Charles Kingsley (1819-1875).
Set to music by John Hullah (1812-84, a friend of Kingsley's).
Recorded by Richard Dyer-Bennet, ca 1962, and by Joan Baez.
Set to a different tune by Garnet Rogers, and sung by his brother Stan on "For the Family" album.
Also set to music by S.D.S. 1856, Robert Goldbeck 1878, Charles Kunkel 1883, W. F. Sudds 1883.
S.D.S. might be a pseudonym or collaborator of Hullah.
The last lines of each stanza refer to the belief that it was a bad omen if the tide made a moaning sound as it receded over the sand bar that kept the harbor waters still. The line, "Men must work and women must weep," became a well-known catchphrase.


Three fishers went sailing away to the West, away to the West as the sun went down.
Each thought on the woman who loved him the best, and the children stood watching them out of the town.
For men must work and women must weep, and there's little to earn, and many to keep,
Though the harbour bar may be moaning.

Three wives sat up in the lighthouse tower, and they trimmed the lamps as the sun went down;
They looked at the squall, and they looked at the shower, and the night-rack came rolling up ragged and brown.
But men must work and women must weep, though storms be sudden, and waters deep,
And the harbour bar be moaning.

Three corpses lay on the shining sands in the morning gleam as the tide went down,
And the women are weeping and wringing their hands for those who will never come home to the town.
For men must work and women must weep, and the sooner it's over, the sooner to sleep;
And good-bye to the bar and its moaning.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 May 13 - 12:10 AM

That Jim Croce performance is excellent. I haven't heard anything of his in a while, I'd forgotten what a great voice he had.

SRS


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 20 May 13 - 04:18 AM

Link for above: Jim Croce 'Gunga Din'


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 20 May 13 - 03:36 AM

One of the last songs we recorded from Walter Pardon was Thomas Hardy's 'The Trampwoman's Tragedy' - the only song he learned in later life.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: eftifino
Date: 20 May 13 - 02:01 AM

This may have already been mentioned, but Jim Croce diid a great version of 'Gunga Din'. Here it is :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34Vxqydpmus


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 May 13 - 05:24 PM

I've been sorting through books and tapes. I was reminded of this thread when I found some of my Dad's favorite song versions of Eugene Field poems.

SRS


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Paul Davenport
Date: 14 Feb 12 - 10:11 AM

'Interestingly, the theme of "Sands of Dee" i.e. drowning on treacherous tidal sands, is, of course, the same theme as "On Morecambe Bay" which has just been nominated in the BBC Folk Awards.'
There are two version of 'The Sands of Dee' going the rounds currently. One is our version on 'Songbooks' (Hallamshire Traditions HATRCD03) and the other is by Roy Clinging. oth to completely different tunes.
Other poems set to music worth mentioning are Barbara Berry's setting of 'I wandered by a Brook' recorded by Eva Cassidy (among others), 'The Dalesman's Litany', 'Flowers of Knaresborough Forest' and 'Jenny Storm', all by F.W.Moreman the Yorkshire Dialect poet.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Beer
Date: 14 Feb 12 - 09:25 AM

I don't know if memorizing poems still take place in school or not. I know for a fact that in Quebec English school system my son never had to nor has my grand son who is 13. When I was around 12/13 we had to memorize many poems and this one comes to mind that fit very well to "Road to the Isle".

Robinson Crusoe's Story

    THE night was thick and hazy   
    When the "Piccadilly Daisy"   
Carried down the crew and captain in the sea;   
    And I think the water drowned 'em;   
    For they never, never found 'em,          5
And I know they didn't come ashore with me.   
   
    Oh! 'twas very sad and lonely   
    When I found myself the only   
Population on this cultivated shore;   
    But I've made a little tavern   10
    In a rocky little cavern,   
And I sit and watch for people at the door. etc......

Adrien


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Jean(eanjay)
Date: 14 Feb 12 - 06:59 AM

November 1837 also known as "Spellbound" and "The Night is Darkening Round Me" is an Emily Brontë poem which was set to music with piano in the 1970s by Janet Jones. The link is to the song taken from a re-mastered CD which includes the cello.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Jon Corelis
Date: 13 Feb 12 - 11:52 AM

"Duh" for today: I wasn't logged in. Just posting a follow-up so this thread will appear when I search for my postings. Apologies for the extraneous redundancy.

Jon Corelis


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Feb 12 - 07:38 PM

Since there is still some fairly recent interest in this thread, I'll mention that I have nearly twenty famous poems set to music (some with melodies of my own, some adaptations of traditional folk melodies) on my Kaleidoscope: Great Poems Set to Music page.

Since I can't sing and don't yet have a singer to work with, the sound files use various instruments to simulate voice. But the text is there too, so with a little imagination, I hope you can get a feel for how a performance would sound.


Jon Corelis


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: ollaimh
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 09:39 PM

i was playing daddy won't you take me back to muellenberg county, by john prine, and i realized it was in an anapestic tetramater meter. so as a joke i occasionally sing byron's poem, the assyrian, to the same tune.

i am a w h auden afficianado so i often try settings for his poems. time will say nothing and in memory of w b yeats deserve great tunes--if i find one i'll let ya all know


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Acorn4
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 07:30 PM

Good examples are "To Althea" - Richard Lovelace/Dave Swarbrick, and "Going and Staying" - Thomas Hardy/Brass Monkey - there is also a good setting of a John Masefield poem by John Connolly the name of which escapes me at the moment.


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 06:56 PM

Anything by Rudyard Kipling. Oh, hang on, has someone done that already?

DtG


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: GUEST,John Bailey
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 06:02 PM

Phil Ochs also adapted Edgar Alan Poe's 'The Bells' which I used to sing in the 60s. By a strange coincidence I remembered this just last week and it reminded me of The Highwayman and that it was about time I learned it, as this Alfred Noyes poem has always been a favourite of my wife's since she first discovered it at the tender age of 13 and how uncomfortable it made her feel with its imagery - how times have changed - gone is the age of innocence.


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Elmore
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 04:19 PM

Words: Stopping by woods on a snowy evening. Music: Hernando's Hideaway.


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: BTNG
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 03:42 PM

Vikki Clayton's adaptation of John Clare's poem The Gardener's Bonny Daughter, performed by her and The Albion Band on the album The Guv'nor's Big Birthday Bash

The Gardener's Bonny Daughter


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: katlaughing
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 03:20 PM

Do you want long ballad types, witty, full of humour...what kinds of subjects strike your fancy?

There's a long, old one I've always loved. Never thought of it being put to music, but it could be interesting: Bingen on the Rhine..


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Mysha
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 02:52 PM

But I'm far from fluent in speaking Thought.
                                                                  Mysha


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Mysha
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 02:51 PM

Reading minds is the easy part.
                                                                  Mysha


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Tunesmith
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 01:55 PM

Mysha, it's funny that you should say that because that's exactly what I have been doing!


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Mysha
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 01:49 PM

Hi Tunesmith,

Do you think it's a matter of the kind of poems you picked? Or may it have been your skill wasn't as developed in the sixties as it is today? Maybe it would work if you would revisit the ones you looked at then, with the skill you have now.

Bye,
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: Tunesmith
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 01:41 PM

Interestingly, the theme of "Sands of Dee" i.e. drowning on treacherous tidal sands, is, of course, the same theme as "On Morecambe Bay" which has just been nominated in the BBC Folk Awards.


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: GUEST,Peter Laban
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 01:37 PM

Look up Seán Tyrrell


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Subject: RE: Poems set to music
From: johncharles
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 01:12 PM

How about the Sands of Dee by Charles Kingsley
sands of dee
john


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Subject: Poems set to music
From: Tunesmith
Date: 18 Nov 11 - 01:05 PM

I remember being enthralled with Phil Ochs' musical setting of the poem "The Highwayman", and at the time, mid-60s - I went looking for poems that I could set to music.
I did find a couple poems but I wasn't happy at my attempts at adding a melody.
Has anyone out there got any suggestions for poem(of a folky nature?) that would work as a song.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BELLS (Phil Ochs/Edgar Allen Poe)
From: Rog Peek
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 03:33 AM

THE BELLS
(Phil Ochs/Edgar Allen Poe)

Hear the sledges with the bells
Silver bells
What a world of merriment
Their melody foretells
How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle
In the icy air of night
All the heavens seem to twinkle
With a crystalline delight
Keeping time, time, time
With a sort of Runic rhyme
From the tintinnabulation
That so musically wells
From the bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells
From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells

Hear the mellow wedding bells
Golden bells
What a world of happiness
Their harmony foretells
Through the balmy air of night
How they ring out their delight
Through the dances and the yells
And the rapture that impels
How it swells
How it dwells
On the future
How it tells
From the swinging and the ringing of the molten golden bells
Of the bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells
Of the rhyming and the chiming of the bells

Hear the loud alarum bells
Brazen bells
What a tale of terror now
Their turbulency tells
Much too horrified to speak
Oh, they can only shriek
For all the ears to know
How the danger ebbs and flows
Leaping higher, higher, higher
With a desperate desire
In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire
With the bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells
With the clamor and the clanging of the bells

Hear the tolling of the bells
Iron bells
What a world of solemn thought their monody compels
For all the sound that floats
From the rust within our throats
And the people sit and groan
In their muffled monotone
And the tolling, tolling, tolling
Feels a glory in the rolling
From the throbbing and the sobbing
Of the melancholy bells
Oh, the bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells, bells
Oh, the moaning and the groaning of the bells

Notes: Lyrics cleverly adapted from Edgar Allen's poem of the same name. Track 7 on 'All The News That's Fit To Sing'.
RP Nov09
    Threads combined. Messages below are from a new thread.
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: BK Lick
Date: 03 Nov 09 - 10:15 PM

Ef You Don't Watch Out!: Anne Hills Sings the Poems of James Whitcomb Riley (clicky here)


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 03 Nov 09 - 07:06 PM

Here in Bristol, the lovely Wraiths sing poetry they've put to music, mostly of Emily Dickinson, but other poets too. They're here The Wraiths


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST,Joseph de Culver City
Date: 03 Nov 09 - 11:31 AM

Phil Ochs also set another fine poem to music: "The Bells" of Edgar Allen Poe. The Fugs set many William Blake poems to music including "How Sweet I Roamed From Field to Field". Simon and Garfinkel set Edward Arlington Robinson's "Richard Cory" to music.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: clueless don
Date: 03 Nov 09 - 08:34 AM

Back on 10 Oct 06 - 03:01 PM GUEST,CA mentioned singing Emily Dickinson poems to the tune of the Gilligan's Island theme. Another standard gag that I have frequently heard of is singing Emily Dickinson poems to "The Yellow Rose of Texas". And of course, there is also singing Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" to "Hernando's Hideaway".

Don


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: maeve
Date: 03 Nov 09 - 08:08 AM

Hauro- The dog/cat/mouse poem oldhippy posted back on 23 Nov 06 - 11:35 AM is to be found here on Google Books The title is "How the Feud Started" and was found in "The Mirthful Lyre" by Arthur Guiterman.

This an old thread, refreshed by a guest, but it makes for some good reading. With winter moving in here in Maine I'll be thinking of other poems that are ripe for songmaking.

maeve


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: skipy
Date: 31 Jan 07 - 05:01 AM

No, not neatly, never neatly, it just brings you!
Morning.
Skipy


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Leadfingers
Date: 31 Jan 07 - 04:53 AM

Which brings us nicely to 100 posts


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Leadfingers
Date: 31 Jan 07 - 04:52 AM

Just had a scan through , and am surprised to NOT see any Tolkein in here !
Donald Swann set all of 'Tales of Tom Bombadil' and recorded them , with most of Tolkein's 'Elvish' poems -IN ELVISH on an old ARGO LP .


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: DriveForever
Date: 31 Jan 07 - 12:45 AM

One of my favorite's is Joni Mitchell's "Slouching Towards Bethlehem"
adaptation of W.B. Yeats poem.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Haruo
Date: 30 Jan 07 - 01:38 AM

Speaking of Tennyson's Crossing the Bar set by Parry, Parry's most famous such setting is doubtless Blake's "Jerusalem".

Haruo


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST, still docked
Date: 29 Jan 07 - 04:18 PM

And I had thought "movers and shakers" to be a recent expression, Songster Bob.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST, still docked
Date: 29 Jan 07 - 03:30 PM

That's a splendid poem, Stewart. I wish my father were still alive so that I could read it to him. Thank you.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Songster Bob
Date: 29 Jan 07 - 02:43 PM

I seem to be one of four folkies and one classical composer who have set Arthur O'Shaunessy's "Ode" to a tune. Elgar did it in 1912, so he beats out Bob Zentz, Lorraine Lee Hammond, Jake Walton and me when it comes to being early in the game.

But who wouldn't want to sing something that starts out,

"We are the music-makers,
We are dreamers of dreams"?

I don't know of any recordings of Bob's, Lorraine's or my setting of it, but Jake Walton did record his. Elgar, who knows? It's a choral piece and there are probably any number of obscure recordings of same.

Someone up-thread said that "Drink to Me Only" comes from Bing Crosby. That would surprise Geo. Washington and his contemporaries, who knew the song pretty well, I'm told.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Stewart
Date: 29 Jan 07 - 02:01 PM

Here's a poem by John E. M. Sumner as collected by Hugh Brown ("All I can recall is an older gentleman sent me a copy from the Liverpool area some time back when I was searching for "tree" info on my grandfather (also from that area). I would think Mr Sumner is probably from that area."). It's a lovely poem, which I have set to music here

LIVERPOOL BAY – John E. M. Sumner

The strong salt winds at Liverpool
That sweep across the Bay
Once brought the great proud ships of old
With teak from Mandalay,
With bars of gold from lands untold,
With cloves from Zanzibar,
With tea and jute from Chittagong
And rubber from Para;
Trim figurehead and snowy sail,
Tall mast and taper'd spar,
A rhythmic shanty from the waist,
The smell of Stockholm tar.

Whilst yet the fog bells clang and drone
And eyes are tired and red
With peering over weather cloths
To see what looms ahead;
Or Summer shakes her train of gold
And dawn breaks slow, supreme,
With funnels red and funnels white
Reflected in the stream;
The times have changed on Merseyside,
The years have travell'd on,
And ugly ducklings plough and sheer
Where once there sailed a swan.

Safe anchored in a landlocked bay,
Washed by some river cool,
They lie at rest in fairer ports
Than even Liverpool;
Forgotten, garland'd with mist and fog
They drowse at anchor there,
Whilst crews of bearded sailormen
Patrol each deck and stare;
Borne faintly on an eerie wind
There goes a bosun's call,
Scraping as dim yards come around,
The clacking of a pall.

Then idly, these tall ships will turn
And hearken to the breeze
That whispers in the ghostly shrouds
Of days remote from these;
Remembering weeks of driving sleet
And high seas round the Horn,
And little islands, silver rimmed,
Where mollymawks are born;
Recalling long, cool, fragrant nights
Beneath a Southern moon;
The Rio Grande or Shenandoah
To a concertinas tune.

Yet often, just before the dawn,
They see in dreams afar
The glimmer of the Crosby Light
And rain across the Bar.

Cheers, S. in Seattle


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST, still docked
Date: 29 Jan 07 - 01:25 PM

I've grown to like Charles Hubert Hastings Parry's musical setting of Tennyson's "Crossing the Bar," which I found at ingeb.org, although I haven't heard a performance or record of it. It may sound too Edwardian for some.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST,Mad musix
Date: 28 Jan 07 - 04:34 PM

On 2nd thoughts, looking back, perhaps they aren't "commom poems". So, sorry to barge in folks ... I'll do a new thread

Byee
Norm


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: GUEST,Mad Musix
Date: 28 Jan 07 - 01:47 PM

Hi people
Anyone got the words to hand of 2 poems by Hugh Lupton ... Bleary Winter, and Mari Lwyd ...

ATB
Norm


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: An Buachaill Caol Dubh
Date: 24 Nov 06 - 07:43 AM

Jill mentions "The Gartan Mother's Lullaby": I'd thought it the work of the same person who did "My Lagan Love", and I had the idea that this was "Seumas MacCathamoil" (?spelling), which would translate as "James" rather than "Joseph". Did he write under this name, or is that the name of the person who made the air?


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: oldhippie
Date: 24 Nov 06 - 07:36 AM

Haruo,
no idea who the cat/dog/mouse poem is by, or its title - something my father used to read to us kids some 50 years ago.....perhaps someone here knows.


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Subject: RE: Common poems set to music
From: Rowan
Date: 24 Nov 06 - 01:56 AM

Thanks Stewie!
It's not often I'm right but I was wrong on this occasion.
You've reminded me that there are several Australian poems that Skreitch used to recite that several other have set to music, thinking that because they were Australian poems they must have been by Lawson or Paterson when they were by other (now forgotten) bush poets. When I get my books out of storage I'll be able to refresh my memories of them.

Cheers, Rowan


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Mudcat time: 1 October 7:03 PM EDT

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