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Lyr Req: Seafarers (from Hugill)

MartinRyan 05 Nov 06 - 04:47 PM
Charley Noble 05 Nov 06 - 05:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Nov 06 - 06:07 PM
MartinRyan 05 Nov 06 - 06:20 PM
Charley Noble 05 Nov 06 - 08:58 PM
MartinRyan 06 Nov 06 - 04:00 AM
Charley Noble 16 Nov 09 - 01:05 PM
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Subject: Hugill's 'Seafarers' poem/song
From: MartinRyan
Date: 05 Nov 06 - 04:47 PM

Stan Hugill, in "Shanties from the Seven Seas" prints an anonymous poem called Seafarers which he says was well known to sailors, who sang it to "Can't Ye Dance the Polka". I've never heard it sung - and find as I read it that another tune ,"Barrack Street" , keeps coming into my head! With a few kicks here and there, it seems to fit well.

Any of you shantymen any experience of the song? I'm tempted to have a go.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Hugill's 'Seafarers' poem/song
From: Charley Noble
Date: 05 Nov 06 - 05:36 PM

Martin-

There was an earlier inquiry here about this song:

SEAFARER
Anonymous

Shanghaied in San Francisco
We brought up in Bombay
Where they put us afloat in an old Leith boat
That steered like a stack of hay.

We've sweltered in the Tropics
When the pitch boiled through the deck--
And saved our hides and little besides
In an ice-cold North Sea wreck.

We've drunk our rum in Portland
And we've thrashed through Bering Strait--
And we've toed the mark on a Yankee barque
With a hard-case Down-East mate.

We know the streets of Santos
And the loom of the lone Azores--
We've eat our grub from a salt-horse tub
Condemned from the Navy stores.

We know the quay of Glasgow
And the river at Saigon--
We've drunk our glass with a Chinese lass
In a house-boat at Canton.

We know the road to Auckland
And the light on Sydney Head--
And we've crept close-hauled when the leadsman called
The depth of the Channel bed.

They pay us off in London
And it's "O for a spell ashore!"
But again we ship for the Southern trip
In a week or hardly more

For-- it's "Goodbye Sally and Sue"
And-- "It's time to get afloat--"
With an aching head and a straw-stuffed bed,
And a knife and an oil-skin coat.

Sing-- "Time to leave her, Johnny!"
Sing-- "Bound for the Rio Grande!"
When the tug turns back you follow her track
For a last, long look at land.

Then the purple disappears--
And only the blue is seen--
That will take our bones to Davy Jones
And our souls to Fiddler's Green.


Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Seafarer
From: Skipper Jack - PM
Date: 28 Oct 03 - 05:43 AM

Stan Hugill's "Shanties from the Seven Seas" contains a version of this shanty entitled "Away, Susanna!"

There are slight variations in some of the verses.

The shanty can be found on Stan's LP "Aboard the Cutty Sark".

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Hugill's 'Seafarers' poem/song
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Nov 06 - 06:07 PM

"Seafarer" posted in thread 63976 by Marion in Cornwall, 28 Oct 03:
Seafarer

Not the Old English poem of the 10th c. or earlier.


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Subject: RE: Hugill's 'Seafarers' poem/song
From: MartinRyan
Date: 05 Nov 06 - 06:20 PM

Thanks for that - I have the words and have started to knock a set into my head using, I think, the "Barrack Street" tune. I suppose I'm just curious to get a sense of how people find it goes down, in practice.

Regards
p.s. What it probably means is that it'll take a few years to ferment in my head before it escapes in public!


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Subject: RE: Hugill's 'Seafarers' poem/song
From: Charley Noble
Date: 05 Nov 06 - 08:58 PM

I haven't a clue what the "Barrack Street" tune sounds like but if you can work up an MP3 with a link to a website we could all enjoy it. The lyrics seem to work quite well with "All You New York Girls, Can't You Dance the Polka."

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Hugill's 'Seafarers' poem/song
From: MartinRyan
Date: 06 Nov 06 - 04:00 AM

Sorry Charley - thought "Barrack Street" was very well known - I'll chase up a version of it somewhere.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Hugill's 'Seafarers' poem/song
From: Charley Noble
Date: 16 Nov 09 - 01:05 PM

While I was doing some research on sailor songs in Victoria, British Columbia, I ran across this variant of "Seafarers" aka "Deep Sea Sailor" reprinted (twice) in the daily newspaper. This is certainly a very well put together song and I still wonder what it's origin was. This song certainly became a favorite of deep-water sailors:

Seafarers

Shanghaied in San Francisco,
And we fetched up in Bombay;
They set us afloat on an old Leith boat,
That steered like a stack o' hay.

We panted in the Tropics,
When the pitch boiled up on deck,
And we saved our lives and little besides,
From an ice-cold North Sea wreck.

We have drunk our rum in Portland,
We have thrashed up Bering Strait --
We have toed the mark on a Yankee bark,
With a hard-case Down-East mate.

We know the streets of Santos,
And the loom of the lone Azores,
And we found our grub in a salt-horse tub
Condemned from the navy stores.

We know the track of Auckland,
And the light on Sydney Head;
We have crept close-hauled while the leadsman called
The depths of the channel's bed.

We know the quays of Glasgow,
And the river at Saigon,
And have drunk our glass with a Chinese lass
In a house-boat at Canton.

They pay us off in London
It's "O for a spell ashore!"
And again we ship for the Southern trip
In a week, or hardly more.

It's "Goodbye, Sally and Sue"
For it's time to get afloat,
With an aching head and a straw-stuffed bed,
And a knife and an oilskin coat.

Sing, "Time to leave her, Johnnie!"
Sing, "Bound for the Rio Grande!"
When the tug turns back, we follow her track,
For a long last look at land.

Then the purple disappears,
And only the blue is seen,
That will send our bones down to Davy Jones
And our souls to Fiddler's Green.

Notes:

From VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST, British Columbia, Canada, May 24, 1910, p. 3.

Also titled "Deep Sea Sailor" as printed in VICTORIA DAILY COLONIST, British Columbia, Canada, March 22, 1918, p. 8.

Charley Noble


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