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The Battle of New Orleans

DigiTrad:
BATTLE OF BANNOCKBURN
BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS
THE BATTLE OF CAMP KOOKAMONGA
THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Battle of New Orleans (Jimmie Driftwood) (34)
Lyr Req: Battle of New Orleans parody (7)
(origins) Lyr Req: Eighth of January (21)
Lyr Req: Battle of Bull Run (Johnny Horton) (24)
History of 8th of January (33)
Tune Req: The Eighth of January (5)
Chords Req: Battle of New Orleans (7)
(origins) Lyr Req: Eight of January (2) (closed)


Roberta 14 Mar 99 - 06:17 PM
Ronn 15 Mar 99 - 12:53 AM
Wally Macnow 15 Mar 99 - 07:31 AM
N.C. Girl 23 Nov 99 - 04:25 PM
Allan C. 23 Nov 99 - 04:34 PM
Allan C. 23 Nov 99 - 04:36 PM
23 Nov 99 - 04:39 PM
Betty 23 Nov 99 - 04:54 PM
23 Nov 99 - 05:01 PM
bunkerhill 23 Nov 99 - 10:19 PM
Gene 24 Nov 99 - 12:31 AM
Sandy Paton 24 Nov 99 - 02:28 AM
Pete Peterson 24 Nov 99 - 08:04 AM
arkie 24 Nov 99 - 09:55 AM
anniedj616@hotmail.com 06 Jan 00 - 04:25 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 06 Jan 00 - 11:11 AM
vikinglass 06 Jan 00 - 08:04 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 06 Jan 00 - 10:26 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 06 Jan 00 - 10:32 PM
Susan A-R 06 Jan 00 - 10:39 PM
jeffp 07 Jan 00 - 03:51 PM
Susan A-R 07 Jan 00 - 09:24 PM
wildlone 07 Jan 00 - 09:33 PM
Billy the Bus 02 Aug 03 - 08:08 AM
Amos 02 Aug 03 - 04:16 PM
Mr Happy 07 Feb 08 - 07:35 AM
GUEST,Jim 07 Feb 08 - 07:54 AM
Mr Happy 07 Feb 08 - 07:57 AM
The Villan 07 Feb 08 - 08:15 AM
kendall 07 Feb 08 - 08:16 AM
Mr Happy 07 Feb 08 - 08:44 AM
Marc Bernier 07 Feb 08 - 08:54 AM
Keith A of Hertford 07 Feb 08 - 09:13 AM
PoppaGator 07 Feb 08 - 10:08 AM
GUEST,Jim 07 Feb 08 - 10:13 AM
goatfell 07 Feb 08 - 10:51 AM
Mr Happy 07 Feb 08 - 10:53 AM
goatfell 07 Feb 08 - 11:06 AM
Mr Happy 07 Feb 08 - 11:08 AM
The Villan 07 Feb 08 - 12:11 PM
Marc Bernier 07 Feb 08 - 12:44 PM
Marc Bernier 07 Feb 08 - 03:29 PM
John Hardly 07 Feb 08 - 03:49 PM
Big Mick 07 Feb 08 - 03:57 PM
The Villan 07 Feb 08 - 04:01 PM
kendall 07 Feb 08 - 04:01 PM
greg stephens 07 Feb 08 - 04:01 PM
Big Mick 07 Feb 08 - 04:19 PM
The Villan 07 Feb 08 - 04:25 PM
PoppaGator 07 Feb 08 - 04:36 PM
The Villan 07 Feb 08 - 04:52 PM
Banjo-Flower 07 Feb 08 - 05:26 PM
McGrath of Harlow 07 Feb 08 - 05:37 PM
The Villan 08 Feb 08 - 02:16 AM
Keith A of Hertford 08 Feb 08 - 03:48 AM
The Villan 08 Feb 08 - 03:58 AM
Roger the Skiffler 08 Feb 08 - 04:05 AM
Keith A of Hertford 08 Feb 08 - 04:52 AM
PoppaGator 08 Feb 08 - 12:08 PM
Mr Happy 11 Feb 08 - 06:07 AM
The Villan 11 Feb 08 - 09:40 AM
Roger the Skiffler 14 Feb 08 - 09:45 AM
PoppaGator 14 Feb 08 - 09:55 AM
Mr Happy 14 Feb 08 - 09:59 AM
GUEST,Black Hawk 14 Feb 08 - 10:26 AM
Little Hawk 14 Feb 08 - 12:48 PM
PoppaGator 14 Feb 08 - 01:18 PM
GUEST,Black Hawk 15 Feb 08 - 04:54 AM
Keith A of Hertford 15 Feb 08 - 05:03 AM
GUEST,Black Hawk 15 Feb 08 - 05:13 AM
Mr Happy 15 Feb 08 - 05:16 AM
GUEST,Black Hawk 15 Feb 08 - 05:23 AM
Arkie 15 Feb 08 - 11:05 AM
Genie 25 Jun 10 - 03:08 PM
Les from Hull 25 Jun 10 - 03:23 PM
voyager 25 Jun 10 - 06:49 PM
Acorn4 25 Jun 10 - 06:59 PM
Genie 25 Jun 10 - 10:03 PM
Genie 25 Jun 10 - 10:04 PM
Arkie 25 Jun 10 - 10:09 PM
Ron Davies 25 Jun 10 - 10:57 PM
GUEST,Guest 04 Jan 11 - 07:47 PM
fat B****rd 05 Jan 11 - 03:24 PM
kendall 08 Jan 12 - 09:40 AM
Arkie 08 Jan 12 - 11:12 AM
Lonesome EJ 08 Jan 12 - 12:07 PM
Bert 08 Jan 12 - 11:37 PM
Splott Man 09 Jan 12 - 03:42 AM
kendall 09 Jan 12 - 08:36 AM
jacqui.c 09 Jan 12 - 09:29 AM
GUEST,kendall 09 Jan 12 - 10:35 AM
Arkie 09 Jan 12 - 10:55 AM
voyager 09 Jan 12 - 11:50 AM
GUEST,Greger Sandbäck 10 Feb 12 - 05:29 AM
GUEST 10 Feb 12 - 05:43 AM
GUEST,Teribus 11 Feb 12 - 12:03 AM
Jim Dixon 24 Nov 17 - 01:18 PM
Lighter 24 Nov 17 - 03:42 PM
leeneia 26 Nov 17 - 12:01 AM
GUEST 26 Nov 17 - 02:10 AM
Snuffy 26 Nov 17 - 07:06 AM
Lighter 26 Nov 17 - 09:34 AM
GUEST 26 Nov 17 - 07:03 PM
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Subject: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Roberta
Date: 14 Mar 99 - 06:17 PM

I found the lyrics for "Battle of New Orleans" recorded by Pete Seeger, Jimmy Drifwood and Johnny Horton. Can I get a recording of this for my 8th grade history class??


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Ronn
Date: 15 Mar 99 - 12:53 AM

Roberta-- There are many recordings available that include Johnny Horton's or Jimmy Driftwood's version of this song. I never knew that Pete Seeger had any involvement with writing it, and I do not know of any recording of it by him. I happen to be partial to the version by the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.

Versions by any of these people should be available in any decent record store or any number of internet sources.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Wally Macnow
Date: 15 Mar 99 - 07:31 AM

Jimmy Driftwood wrote it and it's available on his "Americana" boxed set recordings at Camsco Music - www.camsco.com


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: N.C. Girl
Date: 23 Nov 99 - 04:25 PM

I am looking for "Streaming Audio" of the Johnny Horton recording of The Battle of New Orleans." It is a song my uncle sang to me as a child. I found a site a while back that did have it, but the site is no longer active. I would appreciate it, if anyone out there knows where I might find a link to this. I want to record it into my Midi Files for later use. Thanks, Sharon Dover Romanek


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Allan C.
Date: 23 Nov 99 - 04:34 PM

Look here for Rockin' Woman's site


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Allan C.
Date: 23 Nov 99 - 04:36 PM

However, none of Rockin' Woman's (Marybeth) recordings are re-recordable.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From:
Date: 23 Nov 99 - 04:39 PM

Wally, straight from the horse's mouth just doesn't cut it anymore. Better get an New Age PR man who can work the modern process: Just praise them for some trivial thing, and then they feel good and love you, and then you can sell them anything.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Betty
Date: 23 Nov 99 - 04:54 PM

I grew up in Arkansas and visited Jimmy Driftwood's house to listen to him sing as a child--he always said he wrote that song as a teaching aid in American History. Not grammar, I hope! The old fiddle tune he used is "The Eighth of January," which is the date that the Battle of NO took place: Jan. 8, 1815.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From:
Date: 23 Nov 99 - 05:01 PM

Find the laocaion of the file eg the Temp folder in a windoze box, find the file usualy a ra type, simply mocve that file to a permanent location and rename it to myra - that simple, oh to record it run the analogue feed out to a mixer .... more fun heheheeee


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: bunkerhill
Date: 23 Nov 99 - 10:19 PM

Thanks, Allan C., that's a great site. Sandy Paton, whose name I've seen around the Mudcat Forum, was carrying a collection of Driftwood recordings. Someone might have a link to his record company's site. Anybody remember anything about a parody Homer & Jethro did of "The Battle...?"


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Gene
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 12:31 AM

The Battle of Kookamonga/Homer & Jethro
Click here for - * previous H & J discussion *


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 02:28 AM

I'm afraid you've confused me (Sandy at Folk-Legacy) with Wally Macnow at Camsco Music. He's the one with the Jimmy Driftwood collection, among many great recordings of more traditional material. Watch the Mudcat for a blockbuster announcement about events relating to the Camsco web site and its future!

Sandy


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Pete Peterson
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 08:04 AM

Roberta-- no you are NOT crazy Pete Seeger DID record it with Frank Hamilton on their Folkways record "Nonesuch"-- in fact there was a posting by Frank a little while ago asking for one of the verses which he himself had forgotten! I've never heard the Jimmy Driftwood recording but certainly know the Homer and Jethro parody!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: arkie
Date: 24 Nov 99 - 09:55 AM

Cassettes of Jimmy Driftwood songs are also available from the Ozark Folk Center in Mountain View, Arkansas. PO Box 500, Zip 72560. The cassettes have about 10 songs, come without jackets, but are pure Jimmy. They were compiled by Jimmy before his death. Cost is $9.00 plus $2.00 shipping. There is also the everpresent sales tax of 60 cents. Arkansas has a sales tax on everything including oxygen.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: anniedj616@hotmail.com
Date: 06 Jan 00 - 04:25 AM

Could someone please send me lyrics to Jonny Horton's songs???


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 06 Jan 00 - 11:11 AM

Check out Cowpie and OLGA for most of that:

Cowpie
OLGA


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: vikinglass
Date: 06 Jan 00 - 08:04 PM

Roberta, Thanks for your post. You've given me a blast from the past. That was one of my favorites as a child. Now you've got me wanting an old Johnny HOrton recording of that song to pass on to my kids. After 30 years I still can remember the words.......AMAZING!!!! If you find one, please send me a personal message. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 06 Jan 00 - 10:26 PM

There are a couple of sites with some information about the song...

War of 1812
Johnny Horton

If you want recordings with the song

Honky Tonk Man
Greatest Hits of Johnny Horton


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 06 Jan 00 - 10:32 PM

Whoops! That first link should be: War of 1812


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Susan A-R
Date: 06 Jan 00 - 10:39 PM

Nice timing for this site being refreshed. Isn't the tune to the song The 8th of January? I always say I'm going to play the tune on the date, and I always forget. Maybe not this year (or do I have the wrong tune entirely?


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: jeffp
Date: 07 Jan 00 - 03:51 PM

Susan, you're right. The tune is the 8th of January. That tune holds a special place in my heart, since that was also the date I moved out of my parents' house to begin my life as an adult (sort of).


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Susan A-R
Date: 07 Jan 00 - 09:24 PM

Thanks for posting again Jeffp, now I am even more likely to remember to play the darned thing tomorrow. Me memory isn't what it used to be, and it has always been particularly bad about playing this tune on the appropriate day.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: wildlone
Date: 07 Jan 00 - 09:33 PM

There should be a progamme on channel 4 soon about the American sailors imprisoned in Dartmoor and the escape they made.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Billy the Bus
Date: 02 Aug 03 - 08:08 AM

I've just been listening to our Kiwi version of this song on the wireless, so thought a thread revival appropriate.

Battle of the Waikato
Gerry Merito, 1960
"This is a Maori memory of their ancestors' actions against the British in the 19th century land wars. It helped make The Howard Morrison Quartet extremely popular in the 1960s. It is a variant of The Battle of New Orleans".

It's on the NZ Folk Song site. There's lyrics, a link to an MP3 (Which I can't hear, must get the sound system hooked up again). Also information on the Howard Morrison Quartet, and links to the NZ Land Wars, for those with an historical bent.

Kia ora - Sam


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Amos
Date: 02 Aug 03 - 04:16 PM

Sam:

Thanks -- I have just spent the last three hours wandering among the various accounts of the Maori strategies and fortifications during the years when they were seriously embarassing the British.   I am very impressed, and delighted to learn about this important piece of history which was completely omitted from my education.

Thanks for the lead!!


A


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS (Lonnie Donegan
From: Mr Happy
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 07:35 AM

Here's Lonnie Donegan's jolly rendition:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtGI9z0L2bg

His version:

BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS

Well, in 1814, we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Pak’n’am down the mighty Mississip'.
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans,
And we fought the bloomin’ British in a town in New Orleans.

CHORUS: Well, we fired our guns and the British kept a-comin'.
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
Well, we fired once more and they began a-runnin',
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf o' Mexico.

Well, we looked down the river till we see the British come,
There must’ve been a hundred of 'em beatin' on the drum.
They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring.
Well, we stood beside our cotton bales and never said a thing. CHORUS

Old Pakenham said we could take 'em by surprise
If we didn't fire our muskets 'til we looked 'em in the eyes.
We stood quite still 'til we seen their faces well,
Then we opened up our muskets and we really gave 'em—well, CHORUS

Well, they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through he bushes where the rabbits couldn't go.
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em,
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf o' Mexico.

Well, we fired our muskets 'til the barrel melted down,
Then grabbed an alligator and we fought another round.
We stuffed his head with cannon balls and powdered his behind,
And when we touched the powder off the 'gator lost his mind. CHORUS

Well, they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through he bushes where the rabbits couldn't go.
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em,
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf o' Mexico.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Jim
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 07:54 AM

"Pakenham," the General in charge of the British force attacking New Orleans? Not "Ole Hickory?" Didn't they go down to New Orleans with "Col. Jackson" or "Gen. Jackson" instead of "Pakenham"? I know Donegan was a Brit, but you'd think he'd at least not mix up the British and American commanders.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Mr Happy
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 07:57 AM

....could've been deliberate?


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 08:15 AM

Battle of New Orleans


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: kendall
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 08:16 AM

No one brags about getting his ass kicked.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Mr Happy
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 08:44 AM

My mistake, just substituted 'Jackson' for 'Packenham' in my copy.

More here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_new_orleans


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Marc Bernier
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 08:54 AM

Donnegan also clearly says Bloomin' British instead of bloody british. I assume to please television sensors. Bloody doesn't mean anything bad here.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 09:13 AM

"Bloody" could not have been broadcast back then in UK.
"Hell" probably could here, but not in US I think.(...we really gave 'em well")
Did either side get "ass kicked" Kendall?
I believe it was closer than the song suggests.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: PoppaGator
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 10:08 AM

Battle as NOT close; Jackson. Lafitte, and the Americans turned back the British invaders at Chalmette, so they never reached the city proper..

What no one knew at the time was that the war had already ended; the treaty had recently been signed, but word didn't get here in time to prevent the carnage.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Jim
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 10:13 AM

No, Keith, it really was a slaughter. The British attempted an unfortunate two-pronged assault on the entrenched Americans, with one of the columns arriving late (forgot ladders or some such?), leaving the frontal assault mired deep in Mississippi Delta mud, in a perfect killing field. Over two thousand British casualties, as opposed to less than a hundred American.

(This is all off the top of my head, so I may be, and probably am, wrong on the particulars.)


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: goatfell
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 10:51 AM

over here it was recoreded by the Late Lonnie Donigan


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Mr Happy
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 10:53 AM

Really??


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: goatfell
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 11:06 AM

go to youtube and type in Lonnie donigan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTKSWnWIxnM

and there you will see him doing it.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Mr Happy
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 11:08 AM

Astounding!!

Do you realise the words he's singing are nonsense?


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 12:11 PM

2036 Brits killed versus 71 Yankees.

As a Brit that doesn't sound fair to me.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Marc Bernier
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 12:44 PM

So, who here finds posts like Arran's amusing?


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Marc Bernier
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 03:29 PM

Sorry Arran. I believe my earlier comment was uncalledfor.
Marc


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: John Hardly
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 03:49 PM

eighth of january


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Big Mick
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 03:57 PM

Keith, your defense of all things British is well noted in these parts. But to ignore facts is ridiculous. The British suffered 2037 casualties in this series of battles. There were 291 dead (including 3 senior Generals one of which was Packenham himself)on the British side. This included 1262 wounded, and 484 captured or missing. The Americans suffered 71 casualties, which was made up of 13 dead, 39 wounded, and 19 missing.

By anyones math, sir, that is an ass kicking.

Mick


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 04:01 PM

Maybe but we will get you one day LOL

Lonnie Donegan is God in the UK, so don't you yanks knock him.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: kendall
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 04:01 PM

Trivia. The British army suffered the largest single day slaughter in history. The battle of the Somme in WW 1, 57,000 dead and wounded charging German machine guns.
Brave men led by dinosaurs.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: greg stephens
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 04:01 PM

Big Mick: we Brits do not have asses, so by definition we cannot receive an ass kicking.What we got there, in Brit war parlance, was a bloody nose.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Big Mick
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 04:19 PM

greg, you apparently also have a blatant disregard for following the rules. I am speaking, sir, of the Mudcat rule which requires a warning when making posts such as that one. You are required to warn folks to empty all body cavities that have an opening to the outside world prior to reading. As a result of your callous, and typical British arrogance, you now owe me a new keyboard and monitor, a new pair of underwear and jeans, and you must write a note my wife explaining the stain on the chair.

Do this again, and as a Site Moderator, I will consider banning you for several lifetimes.

Mick, still chuckling. That one just caught me as funny.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 04:25 PM

LOL


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: PoppaGator
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 04:36 PM

What do Brits have in place of asses? There must be something holding their trousers up behind...


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 04:52 PM

A belt or braces


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Banjo-Flower
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 05:26 PM

UK braces = US suspenders

UK suspenders =(don't go there Les)

Gerry


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 07 Feb 08 - 05:37 PM

Ass kicking? Disgusting practice. Fortunately there are people like this.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 08 Feb 08 - 02:16 AM

Gerry LOL
You mean like this

UK Braces or US Suspenders

UK Suspenders
or
UK Suspenders


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 08 Feb 08 - 03:48 AM

My entire knowledge of the event was a memory of reading a post here that I can not now find.
So did the British run?


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 08 Feb 08 - 03:58 AM

Of course we didn't run. Stiff upper lip and all that.
Just American propaganda!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Roger the Skiffler
Date: 08 Feb 08 - 04:05 AM

Most of the UK LD fans have known since 1957 that Pakenham was on the British side but we didn't agonise over the error (get a life, folks!): perhaps Lonnie misheard the Jimmy Driftwood version which I think (but I have been known to be wrong!) was earlier. I always sing Jackson ( but then no-one ever listens to me!

RtS
(the voice that sank a thousand ships)


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 08 Feb 08 - 04:52 AM

LD did a spoken intro.
He said that "The British came off rather ignominiously."
He also said something like, "They ain't never done any good anyway"
It was the first record I ever bought.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: PoppaGator
Date: 08 Feb 08 - 12:08 PM

"perhaps Lonnie misheard the Jimmy Driftwood version which I think (but I have been known to be wrong!) was earlier."

Jimmie Driftwood wrote the song, so his version would be the earliest ;^)

If Jimmie recorded it, he did not make much of a hit. The song is best-known in the States as recorded by someone else: Johnny Horton, if I recall correctly.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Mr Happy
Date: 11 Feb 08 - 06:07 AM

Thanks to all contributors to this thread, especially for the info on Jimmy Driftwood; the composer of BoNO.


I쳌fd never heard of him, but have checked him out & find what an important asset to folk he was.

Here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Driftwood

& on You Tube: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=NUGpwPQ1PSs

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=75sCISLjmXQ

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=fcYDMHkFtt4

Unfortunately, there쳌fs no footage on YT of him doing BoNO, however there쳌fs one쳌fve Johnny Horton쳌fs big hit with it here: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=zyXrxfjEOhs


The British can be clearly seen in the background running about all over the place!!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: The Villan
Date: 11 Feb 08 - 09:40 AM

Boo, American propoganda :-)


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Roger the Skiffler
Date: 14 Feb 08 - 09:45 AM

tHERE ARE 150+ RECORDINGS LISTED ON THE (dAMN CAPSLOCK!) Allmusic Guide (that's better!) . Both Lonnie & Johnny Horton had hits in 1959 but the earliest recording by Driftwood I've found (Voice of the People- I have the CD reissue) is 1963 but I suppose he could have had a single earlier, Lonnie & Johnnie must have heard it somewhere.

RtS


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: PoppaGator
Date: 14 Feb 08 - 09:55 AM

I don't know a whole lot about Jimmie Driftwood ~ it might well be that he was a "nobody," in no position to make a record, when he wrote the song (i.e., in 1959 or earlier). He might not have become a recording artist until a few years later.

Perhaps the transatlantic success of the song he wrote (hit recordings by two different singers in two countries) is what won him enough recognition to cut his own record.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Mr Happy
Date: 14 Feb 08 - 09:59 AM

We sang it in our sesh last night - went down well!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Black Hawk
Date: 14 Feb 08 - 10:26 AM

Written in 1936

RCA Victor recorded 1957 & released June 1958
Not given much air time due to two words - 'bloody' & 'hell'.

Johnny Horton heard it played on radio & asked for permission to record it.
Lonnie heard it & recorded without permission. Post-requested permission when it was realised how big a hit it had become.

Info from 'The Jimmy Driftwood Story' available from 'The Jimmy Driftwood Legacy Project'.

A remarkable story of a remarkable man!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Little Hawk
Date: 14 Feb 08 - 12:48 PM

Interesting battle. It shows how badly wrong things can go when an army stubbornly and unimaginatively attempts to attack a well-prepared defence line over open ground and wholly unsuitable terrain. On that occasion it was the British who screwed up in that fashion.

They should have known better, because back in the Hundred Years War they did the same kind of thing (but in reverse) to the French several times at battles like Agincourt, Crecy, and Poitiers, where outnumbered English armies used archers in well-prepared defensive lines to slaughter almost unbelievable numbers of attacking Frenchmen. The English might lose a hundred or so men in such a battle, while the French would lose ten thousand! Even worse for the attackers than at New Orleans.

Courage cannot overcome a complete failure in tactics.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: PoppaGator
Date: 14 Feb 08 - 01:18 PM

Black Hawk:

Written in 1936
Or did you mean '56? Maybe that's a typo.
Mr. Driftwood was probably alive in '36, but if so, quite young. A twenty-plus-year gap between composition and recording seems a bit much...

RCA Victor recorded 1957 & released June 1958
...by Jimmie, I assume? I guess you're telling us that Jimmie Driftwood did record and release his song as a single that was not widely heard ~ except, of course, by the two artists who made hits of the song in '59.

I'll have to look up that biography!

I don't believe the word "bloody" would have disqualified a song for US radio airplay, even in the most puritanical years of the 1950s, but "hell" may have done the trick. In the UK, on the other hand, "bloody" was probably even more offensive than "hell."


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Black Hawk
Date: 15 Feb 08 - 04:54 AM

Hi poppagator

Mr. Driftwood was probably alive in '36, but if so, quite young. A twenty-plus-year gap between composition and recording seems a bit much...
Yes, he was alive. Born in 1907 he wrote the song (1936 according to him) as an aid to teaching history (he spent thirty years as a teacher in the Ozarks) not as a performing songwriter.

by Jimmie, I assume? I guess you're telling us that Jimmie Driftwood did record and release his song as a single that was not widely heard ~ except, of course, by the two artists who made hits of the song in '59. Correct! It did get air time but was very restricted because of two 'offensive' words.

Sorry, my bad memory. Banned words were 'hell' & 'Damn' in U.S.
'Bloody' was changed to 'bloomin' in Lonnies british version for similar reasons (airplay)

I recommend the biography & also his recordings. Plays a mouth-bow like nobody & his home-made guitar sounds different to a Martin, Gibson etc. but non the worse for it.

Cheers


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 15 Feb 08 - 05:03 AM

I think that the attack began under cover of fog.
Bad luck for the Brits, the fog lifted.
Did they run?


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Black Hawk
Date: 15 Feb 08 - 05:13 AM

Jimmys recording contained more verses than Lonnies.Its a long time since I played Hortons so he may have recorded the full version.

Jimmy is correct spelling - record companies altered it as Sun records did with John Cash.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Mr Happy
Date: 15 Feb 08 - 05:16 AM

See my links above for Horton's rendition


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Black Hawk
Date: 15 Feb 08 - 05:23 AM

Mr Happy

I have the Horton recording , just havent listened to that particular song for a while.

I am still on dial-up at home so you-tube etc. is a no-go for me.
Works PC (this one) doesnt allow streaming access!

But thanks anyway :-)


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Arkie
Date: 15 Feb 08 - 11:05 AM

There are several stories about where Johnny Horton got "The Battle Of New Orlean". He may well have heard Jimmy's recording but he and Jimmy also performed on the Louisiana Hayride, and he could have heard the song there. The song was published by Don Warden, a member of Porter Wagoner's band. Warden and Wagoner were from southeastern Missouri and not all that far from Stone County, Arkansas. A mutual friend of Jimmy's and Warden, Hugh Ashley, son of Hobart Ashley of Ashley's Melody Men and once a member of Zeke Manner's Beverly Hillbillies (paving the way for Elton Britt, a friend and neighbor) encouraged Warden to listen to Jimmy's songs. Ashley had transcribed some of Jimmy's songs for a Kansas City recording company and knew the potential if they could get in the right hands.

Jimmy's real strength was in live performances. He had some good songs and some good stories. He was in his fiftys when Horton recorded Battle of New Orleans and made the most of the opportunity. Sales of Jimmy's recordings increased after Horton's hit and both performers got a career boost from "Battle". In 1959, after the success of "Battle" other artists became interested in Jimmy's songs and five songs charted in that year.

My personal favorite of Jimmy's songs is "Long Chain On" which was recorded by Peter Paul and Mary and has also been more recently recorded by Robert Earl Keen. Peter Yarrow and his daughter Bethany perfomed a magnificent version at the Ozark Folk Center in Mountain View, Arkansas a few years ago.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans - song origins
From: Genie
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 03:08 PM

So is Jimmie Driftwood recognized as the songwriter, or is it someone else (e.g., Don Warden).
Who holds the copyright on the lyrics? Was the tune composed in 1956 or is it borrowed or adapted from an older folk tune?

It sounds like there is still some dispute.

Here's what Wikipedia says about the song's origins. (Of course, that could change in a few minutes.)

"The melody has its roots in a well-known American fiddle tune "The 8th of January", which was the date of the Battle of New Orleans. Jimmie Driftwood, a school principal in Arkansas with a passion for history, set a historical account of the battle to this music in an attempt to get students interested in learning history. It worked, and Driftwood became well known in the region for his historical songs. He was "discovered" in the late 1950s by Don Warden, and eventually signed to a recording contract by RCA, for whom he recorded 12 songs in 1958, including "The Battle of New Orleans"."


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Les from Hull
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 03:23 PM

'historical account of the battle to this music in an attempt to get students interested in learning history' - phew, if that's how Americans learn history, no wonder they keep getting it wrong. They'd be better off reading a history book, written by a historian!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: voyager
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 06:49 PM

Johnny Horton's BoNO recording was about my 1st exposure to the Folk Tradition. In 1984 (abouts) I penned my own version of -

The Battle of New Oil-Lease (CHORUS)

Iran thru the presses and
Iran thru the papers
Iran thru the White House where the oil money flows
Iran so bad, our Army couldn't catch them
They took our radar bases
In the Gulf of Texaco

In light of the Deep Horizon disaster, it might be time to update the lyrics to this parody tune.

Cheers
voyager


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Acorn4
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 06:59 PM

A totally pointless battle as the peace treaty had already been signed unbeknown to the combatants.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Genie
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 10:03 PM

Les, the report said Driftwood wanted to use the song to get kids INTERESTED in history. That didn't mean he used it as a textbook. : D


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Genie
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 10:04 PM

@Acorn4
Yeah, they didn't have them there internets back then.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Arkie
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 10:09 PM

If Andrew Jackson and Lord Packenham had spent more time watching television or read a newspaper now and then, they would have known that the war was over and gone home instead of fighting over possession of New Orleans. But that would wrecked the careers of both Jimmy Driftwood and Johnny Horton.

I know of no serious dispute about who wrote the words to the Battle of New Orleans. The royalties paid for Jimmy's farm and provided a level of retirement he could not have earned from teaching. The tune was the old fiddle tune "8th of January" also known in some circles as "Old Jake Gilly". The tune was well known in Stone County where Jimmy was raised.

Jimmy used to tell how he had written the song to help him teach a history lesson, and that may have been the truth but Jimmy was an entertainer and a gifted storyteller as well as a singer and song writer.

As for the copyright, I do not know a lot about how that works, but Warden may have held the copyright as the publisher. Driftwood was the writer.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Ron Davies
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 10:57 PM

And don't forget Jackson himself. He got quite a career boost.   

Pakenham, not so much.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 04 Jan 11 - 07:47 PM

You can earn money on Amazon's Mechanical Turk by trying to find evidence in old books that confirm or refute a claim about the battle of New Orleans. Go to Amazon Mechanical Turk and search for New Orleans battle.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: fat B****rd
Date: 05 Jan 11 - 03:24 PM

In the film I saw Yul Brynner won the battle.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: kendall
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 09:40 AM

This morning I caught my English wife singing Jimmy Driftwood's Battle of New Orleans. For shame! Of course, I sorta started it.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Arkie
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 11:12 AM

198 years have now passed. That should ease hard feelings a little. That is, unless you are hill folks. It takes a little longer up here.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Lonesome EJ
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 12:07 PM

Kendall, that's a very positive sign. First step in the Americanization of Jacqui. Next step- baseball fan!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Bert
Date: 08 Jan 12 - 11:37 PM

It is a great song but not historically correct.

What actually happened was, that the British attacked three or more times, and when they finally gave up it was only 22 soldiers who actually RAN.

Not quite the rout that the song suggests.

Also, as an aside, Packenham was Wellington's Brother in Law and they didn't send Wellington, because Wellington was pro-American.

Wellington would never have camped where Packenham did and was far too experienced a soldier to have attacked under those circumstances.

I like to think that Wellington was visionary enough to see what a great ally America would be in the future.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Splott Man
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 03:42 AM

And it was the 8th of January yesterday.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: kendall
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 08:36 AM

I don't think Jimmy Driftwood was an historian.

If our history is correct, something over 400 were killed, over 500 captured and over 1300 wounded.Maybe not a rout but the battle was decisive.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: jacqui.c
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 09:29 AM

First step in the Americanization of Jacqui

Not really LEJ - I first learned that song as a pre-teenager from the version that was popular at the time in the UK by Lonnie Donegan. Didn't even give the historical context a thought.

Baseball??? ICK!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,kendall
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 10:35 AM

She doesn't enjoy watching grown men play a kids game while spitting tobacco juice and scratching their naughty bits.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Arkie
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 10:55 AM

Technically, Jimmy was not a historian, but he did read a lot and gathered a lot of historical information which he used as the basis for his songs. He was also an entertainer and would sometimes stretch the truth a bit to make things more interesting. I believe that Jimmy's real gift was as a storyteller. Sometimes the story was told with music sometimes not. His intent was not to provide historical information but to entertain and make the stories interesting.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: voyager
Date: 09 Jan 12 - 11:50 AM

If you're a fan of 'synchronicity' (events that are coincident in time) then you'll appreciate the link -

8th of January - The King is Gone (but not Forgotten)

voyager


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Subject: RE: Irish Pirate Ballads - Smithsonian/ Milner, et al.
From: GUEST,Greger Sandbäck
Date: 10 Feb 12 - 05:29 AM

Does anybody know the title of a song ;some of the lyrics goes; "we fired our arms(guns),.....the British started coming(firing) but they weren´t as many as they were a while ago...")


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Subject: RE: Irish Pirate Ballads - Smithsonian/ Milner, et al.
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Feb 12 - 05:43 AM

Alright, it's called The Battle of New Orleans

http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=535


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST,Teribus
Date: 11 Feb 12 - 12:03 AM

"Maybe not a rout but the battle was decisive. - kendall

Not really, by definition a "decisive" battle is one that decides an issue. Peace had already been agreed before the battle took place but neither side was aware of it.

The British Forces did not leave after the battle, New Orleans was only one of a number of targets, they decided to leave New Orleans even although they received reinforcements and a seige train to take the city after the battle. One month after the battle of New Orleans they took Biloxi in Mississippi then captured Fort Boyer in Mobile Baywere actively engaged in operations against Mobile itself, when word reached them that peace had been agreed. Immediately on hearing that the British withdrew in accordance with what had been agreed.

"Also, as an aside, Packenham was Wellington's Brother in Law and they didn't send Wellington, because Wellington was pro-American." - Bert

They didn't send Wellington because Wellington was far, far busier elsewhere acting a British plenipotentiary at the Congress of Vienna, I do not quite know why the song starts with "In 1814 we took a little trip" when the battle was actually fought in 1815.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS (Commonwealth v
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 24 Nov 17 - 01:18 PM

According to Wikipedia, Horton recorded this version for release in the Commonwealth countries. Most of the pronouns and only a few other words are changed, compared to the version released in the US. I have boldfaced the differences below. I found this on Spotify, where it is called "The Battle of New Orleans - special version cut for England." It is from an album called "The Spectacular Johnny Horton," which also has the American version.

THE BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS (Commonwealth version)
Written by Jimmy Driftwood
As recorded by Johnny Horton.

1. In 1814 we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Packenham up the Mississip'.
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans,
And we met the bloomin' rebels in a town in New Orleans.

CHORUS: We fired our guns and the rebels kept a-comin'.
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they begin to runnin'
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

2. We looked up the river and we see'd the rebels come,
While we had at least a hunnerd of us beatin' on the drum.
We stepped so high and we made our bugles ring.
They stood beside their cotton bales and didn't say a thing. CHORUS

3. Old Hick'ry said they could take us by surprise
If they didn't fire their muskets 'til they looked us in the eye.
They held their fire 'til they see'd our faces well,
Then they opened up their squirrel guns and really gave us ... well ... CHORUS

BRIDGE: Yeah, they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go.
Ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em,
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

4. They fired their cannon 'til the barrel melted down,
So they grabbed an alligator and they fought another round.
They filled his head with cannon balls and powdered his behind,
And when they touched the powder off the 'gator lost his mind. CHORUS

REPEAT BRIDGE


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Lighter
Date: 24 Nov 17 - 03:42 PM

So in the British version, the Brits win?

Pretty weird.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: leeneia
Date: 26 Nov 17 - 12:01 AM

It was a terrible battle with great slaughter. Both sides should have been ashamed.

This song ought to be buried six feet deep.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Nov 17 - 02:10 AM

First folk song I ever learned from a Lonnie Donegan single.

As to there being great slaughter. The American force suffered just over 1% fatalities, the British just over 2% in a battle involving just under 20,000 men. As someone else has mentioned the real tragedy regarding the battle in question was that, like the Battle of Toulouse, it was fought after an armistice was in place.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Snuffy
Date: 26 Nov 17 - 07:06 AM

Unlike Johnny Horton, Lonnie Donegan seems to have had no qualms about portraying a British defeat. But in his version Packenham is commanding the Americans!


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Nov 17 - 09:34 AM

> The American force suffered just over 1% fatalities, the British just over 2%.

Very low rates, but each side also suffered roughly four times those numbers in wounded.

If you or a loved one had been among the relatively few casualties, the "slaughter" would have been, shall we say, significant.


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Subject: RE: The Battle of New Orleans
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Nov 17 - 07:03 PM

"If you or a loved one had been among the relatively few casualties, the "slaughter" would have been, shall we say, significant."

I suppose that would depend upon how far one would wish to distort the accurate definition of the noun, or the verb to slaughter.

Noun used in the context of a battle: "the killing of great numbers of people indiscriminately; carnage: the slaughter of war."

As far as the Battle of New Orleans goes there was no indiscriminate killing of great numbers of people.

Verb used in the context of a battle: "to slay in great numbers; massacre."

As far as the battle of New Orleans goes there was no massacre and the numbers slain were minute compared to the number of troops engaged.

In simple terms, if you had fought at the battle of New Orleans you would have stood a 98% chance of survival. For people of a certain age group with a certain sort of lifestyle you face greater danger of being killed just going out on a Friday or Saturday night in many major cities throughout the world than you would have than if you had fought in the Battle of New Orleans.


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