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Lyr Req/Add: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again

*#1 PEASANT* 29 Nov 06 - 07:48 AM
*#1 PEASANT* 30 Nov 06 - 07:16 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 01 Dec 06 - 05:42 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 01 Dec 06 - 05:42 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Apr 10 - 10:39 PM
Jim Dixon 18 Apr 10 - 11:23 PM
Jim Dixon 19 Apr 10 - 12:20 AM
Jim Dixon 19 Apr 10 - 12:42 AM
GUEST,GUEST, David W 19 Apr 10 - 03:54 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again -
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 29 Nov 06 - 07:48 AM

Looking for lyrics and tune for:
Slap Bang, Here We Are Again

This is the extent of the reseaerch thus far:

Slap Bang, Here We Are Again by Alfred Vance
Alfred Vance (real name Alfred Peck Stevens, 1839±88)

from the book allusions in Ulysses-p396
…a music hall song entitled slap bang here we are again by Sheridan….
"Chorus: Slap bang! here we are again
Here we are again here we are a gain
slap bang here we are again
what jolly dogs are we
(cited in Christopehr Pulling in They were singing briefly mentioned)

another annotated notes on Ulysses:

1866 by Sheridan

First verse and chorus-

Long live our British gentlemen
Who like a bit of sport,
Who smoke their weed and swig their stout
And Won't have Gladstone's port

Chorus
For they always go a-rolling home
They always go a -rolling home,
A Jolly lot are they!
Tra, la, la, Tra, la la
Slap bang, here we are again
Slap bang, here we are again,
A jolly lot are we!

yet another citation similar book

is from another rousing song which the rakes of the turn of the century sang in their robust manliness one stanza of the twenty-four in the song will demonstrate the primitive qualities the lyrics espouse:

When you feel blue and worried too
And things are not just right,
Throw out your chest and try your best
To sing with all your might:

Chorus:
Slap Bang Here we are again!
Here we are again, boys, here we are again!
Slap!Bang! Here we are again,
A jolly bunch (gang) are we!

in the book maidenhood p 311
The three jolly dogs was the name of the tune "slap Bang here we are again was the refrain…. By Sara Anna MarshPublished 1867

referred to by priestly as the Great Vance (author)
By J. B. Priestley
Published 2006


English Humour Originally published in 1929



This song was used at the front of the bonfire processions in lewes sussex in 1878....

Many thanks in advance for your kind assistance.

Conrad Bladey
cbladey@bcpl.net


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again -
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 07:16 PM

surprising that no one knows anythign about this as it was a very big song in its tradition....

Anyone?

CB


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again -
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 01 Dec 06 - 05:42 PM

Lyrics and tune found!
The file thus far:


40Th Edition
Sung by the
Great Vance
Crystal Palace & The Strand Music Hall

Jolly Dogs
We're All Jolly Dogs
Such Jolly Dogs Are We
or
Slap Bang
Here we are Again.

London
M O'alcorn 8 Rathbone Place Oxford St. W.

Slap Bang, Here We Are Again or
The School of Jolly Dogs

Written by Harry Copeland

There is a school of jolly dogs,
I've lately come across
They're game for any mortal thing, From this (sparing attitude) to pitch and toss.

Chorus

And they always seem so Jolly oh; so jolly oh: so jolly oh:
They always seem so jolly oh! where ever they may be.
They dance they sing

They laugh ha ha
They laugh ha ha they dance they sing

What jolly dogs are we

Fal la la, fal la la
fal la la
fal la la, fal la la, fal la la.
Fal de the ral, de the ral lal ti da,

Slap bang here we are again
here we are again here we are again.

Slap bang here we are again,
What jolly dogs are we.

2
They meet each night at six o'clock,
And then sit down to dine,
They get the courses out of sight,
And then they take their wine
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!

3.
At eight o'clock they sally forth,
Because you know its dark;
"Follow my leader" cries the chief,
To night we'll have a lark;
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!


4
To halls or hops of course they go.
And each man does his weed;
They stick by one another
As they've previously agreed,
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!


5.

Spring heel Jack and all his pals
With their nocturnal larks,
I'm sure were not a patch upon
This school of modern sparks,
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!


-This popular Melody may also be had arranged as a March by the great Vance
-Just Published The Ladies version of this popular song: We are all Jolly Girles

ABCs

X: 2
T:Slap Bang, Here We Are Again
M:2/4
L:1/8
C:Harry Copeland
K:E
B,|G G G G|A A A> A|B B G E|F2 z B,> |
G G G G|A A A> A|G B A F|E2 z||G/2 A/2|B B A F|E G G> E|
D F F> D|E G G G/2A/2|B D A> F|E G G G/2A/2|
B B A F|E z E|G3 A |B3 A/2G/2|F A A G/2F/2|
E G G> B,2|G3 A|B3 A/2G/2|
F A G F|E2 z |c c c2|B B B2|
d d/2 d/2 d d/2 d/2|e B c d| e2 B2|G/2 A/2 B/2G/2 E x| G/2 G/2
A/2 F/2 D x|E/2 F/2 G/2 E/2 B, z|
e2 B2| G/2 A/2 B/2 G/2 E F/2G/2 | B B A F| E|

% Output from ABC2Win Version 2.1 i on 12/1/2006

ABCs-


____________________________________________
end printed version


Notes:
Written by Harry Copeland, it seems, c.1865; and *performed* by "the Great Vance" (but also by Frank Hall and Tom MacLagan). See Kilgarriff, 'Sing Us One of the Old Songs' for references, and the Lester Levy Sheet Music Collection for sheet music.


Slap Bang, Here We Are Again by Alfred Vance
Alfred Vance (real name Alfred Peck Stevens, 1839±88)

from the book allusions in Ulysses-p396
…a music hall song entitled slap bang here we are again by Sheridan….
"Chorus: Slap bang! here we are again
Here we are again here we are a gain
slap bang here we are again
what jolly dogs are we
(cited in Christopehr Pulling in They were singing briefly mentioned)

another annotated notes on Ulysses:

1866 by Sheridan

First verse and chorus-

Long live our British gentlemen
Who like a bit of sport,
Who smoke their weed and swig their stout
And Won't have Gladstone's port

Chorus
For they always go a-rolling home
They always go a -rolling home,
A Jolly lot are they!
Tra, la, la, Tra, la la
Slap bang, here we are again
Slap bang, here we are again,
A jolly lot are we!

yet another citation similar book

is from another rousing song which the rakes of the turn of the century sang in their robust manliness one stanza of the twenty-four in the song will demonstrate the primitive qualities the lyrics espouse:

When you feel blue and worried too
And things are not just right,
Throw out your chest and try your best
To sing with all your might:

Chorus:
Slap Bang Here we are again!
Here we are again, boys, here we are again!
Slap!Bang! Here we are again,
A jolly bunch (gang) are we!

in the book maidenhood p 311
The three jolly dogs was the name of the tune "slap Bang here we are again was the refrain…. By Sara Anna MarshPublished 1867

referred to by priestly as the Great Vance (author)
By J. B. Priestley
Published 2006
Read Country Books
Literature / Classics /
Criticism
320 pages
ISBN 184664979X

]



3 separate broadsides by Forth of
Hull, Glasgow Poet's Box (1865) and Fortey of London.

'The jolly Dogs Polka' which is based on
Vance's 'Slap Bang'. it is dated 1864, music arranged by C.H.Marriott. It
has a coloured litho on the cover and is dedicatd to Vance. Published by
Ashdown & Parry A&P 2397.
    Threads combined. Messages below are from a new thread.
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: Slap Bang
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 01 Dec 06 - 05:42 PM

40Th Edition
Sung by the
Great Vance
Crystal Palace & The Strand Music Hall

Jolly Dogs
We're All Jolly Dogs
Such Jolly Dogs Are We
or
Slap Bang
Here we are Again.

London
M O'alcorn 8 Rathbone Place Oxford St. W.

Slap Bang, Here We Are Again or
The School of Jolly Dogs

Written by Harry Copeland

There is a school of jolly dogs,
I've lately come across
They're game for any mortal thing, From this (sparing attitude) to pitch and toss.

Chorus

And they always seem so Jolly oh; so jolly oh: so jolly oh:
They always seem so jolly oh! where ever they may be.
They dance they sing

They laugh ha ha
They laugh ha ha they dance they sing

What jolly dogs are we

Fal la la, fal la la
fal la la
fal la la, fal la la, fal la la.
Fal de the ral, de the ral lal ti da,

Slap bang here we are again
here we are again here we are again.

Slap bang here we are again,
What jolly dogs are we.

2
They meet each night at six o'clock,
And then sit down to dine,
They get the courses out of sight,
And then they take their wine
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!

3.
At eight o'clock they sally forth,
Because you know its dark;
"Follow my leader" cries the chief,
To night we'll have a lark;
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!


4
To halls or hops of course they go.
And each man does his weed;
They stick by one another
As they've previously agreed,
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!


5.

Spring heel Jack and all his pals
With their nocturnal larks,
I'm sure were not a patch upon
This school of modern sparks,
And they always seem so jolly, oh!
So Jolly Oh! so jolly oh!


-This popular Melody may also be had arranged as a March by the great Vance
-Just Published The Ladies version of this popular song: We arfe all Jolly Girles

____________________________________________
end printed version


Notes:
Written by Harry Copeland, it seems, c.1865; and *performed* by "the Great Vance" (but also by Frank Hall and Tom MacLagan). See Kilgarriff, 'Sing Us One of the Old Songs' for references, and the Lester Levy Sheet Music Collection for sheet music.


Slap Bang, Here We Are Again by Alfred Vance
Alfred Vance (real name Alfred Peck Stevens, 1839±88)

from the book allusions in Ulysses-p396
…a music hall song entitled slap bang here we are again by Sheridan….
"Chorus: Slap bang! here we are again
Here we are again here we are a gain
slap bang here we are again
what jolly dogs are we
(cited in Christopehr Pulling in They were singing briefly mentioned)

another annotated notes on Ulysses:

1866 by Sheridan

First verse and chorus-

Long live our British gentlemen
Who like a bit of sport,
Who smoke their weed and swig their stout
And Won't have Gladstone's port

Chorus
For they always go a-rolling home
They always go a -rolling home,
A Jolly lot are they!
Tra, la, la, Tra, la la
Slap bang, here we are again
Slap bang, here we are again,
A jolly lot are we!

yet another citation similar book

is from another rousing song which the rakes of the turn of the century sang in their robust manliness one stanza of the twenty-four in the song will demonstrate the primitive qualities the lyrics espouse:

When you feel blue and worried too
And things are not just right,
Throw out your chest and try your best
To sing with all your might:

Chorus:
Slap Bang Here we are again!
Here we are again, boys, here we are again!
Slap!Bang! Here we are again,
A jolly bunch (gang) are we!

in the book maidenhood p 311
The three jolly dogs was the name of the tune "slap Bang here we are again was the refrain…. By Sara Anna MarshPublished 1867

referred to by priestly as the Great Vance (author)
By J. B. Priestley
Published 2006
Read Country Books
Literature / Classics /
Criticism
320 pages
ISBN 184664979X

]



3 separate broadsides by Forth of
Hull, Glasgow Poet's Box (1865) and Fortey of London.

'The jolly Dogs Polka' which is based on
Vance's 'Slap Bang'. it is dated 1864, music arranged by C.H.Marriott. It
has a coloured litho on the cover and is dedicatd to Vance. Published by
Ashdown & Parry A&P 2397.


X: 2
T:Slap Bang, Here We Are Again
M:2/4
L:1/8
C:Harry Copeland
K:E
B,|G G G G|A A A> A|B B G E|F2 z B,> |
G G G G|A A A> A|G B A F|E2 z||G/2 A/2|B B A F|E G G> E|
D F F> D|E G G G/2A/2|B D A> F|E G G G/2A/2|
B B A F|E z E|G3 A |B3 A/2G/2|F A A G/2F/2|
E G G> B,2|G3 A|B3 A/2G/2|
F A G F|E2 z |c c c2|B B B2|
d d/2 d/2 d d/2 d/2|e B c d| e2 B2|G/2 A/2 B/2G/2 E x| G/2 G/2
A/2 F/2 D x|E/2 F/2 G/2 E/2 B, z|
e2 B2| G/2 A/2 B/2 G/2 E F/2G/2 | B B A F| E|

% Output from ABC2Win Version 2.1 i on 12/1/2006


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again -
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Apr 10 - 10:39 PM

This article is interesting in that it not only sheds some light on the origin of this song, and some related songs, but it illustrates how copyright law was enforced at the time. I had been under the impression that copyright, before the 20th century, was largely unenforced and unenforceable, but that apparently was not the case.

From The Bookseller, No. 89, (London: Publishers' Association, Booksellers Association of Great Britain and Ireland, May 31, 1865), page 290:

Curious Copyright Case.—D'Alcorn versus Sheard.—The following curious case, illustrative of the history of a song and its commercial value, was tried in the Court of Common Pleas, on the 27th instant. As any abridgement would spoil some of the points, we give the report in extenso.

This was an action to recover damages for an alleged infringement of copyright in the popular song known as "Jolly Dogs" or "Slap-bang."

Mr. Hawkins, Q.C., said the plaintiff was a music publisher in Rathbone-place, and the defendant carried on a similar business in Holborn. In October, 1864, the plaintiff bought the copyright of the song in question of Mr. Harry Copeland, who had written it; and at great expense the plaintiff brought the song fully under the notice of the public; the "Great Vance" was induced to sing it, and it was now a most popular song. The full name of the song was, "Jolly dogs; we're all jolly dogs; such jolly dogs are we; or, slap bang, here we are again!" and in February, 1865, the defendant published a polka called "The Slap bang, here we are again Polka;" and in the course of the dance the dancers were to sing "Slap bang, here we are again; what jolly folks are we." The plaintiff did not claim any copyright in the music of his song; but the infringement he complained of was the use of words so similar to those of his song.

Mr. D'Alcorn, the plaintiff, said that he had spent upwards of £100 in bringing his song before the public. The selling price was 1s. 3d. a copy, the cost being about 1½ d. The defendant published his polka at 6d. The sale of witness's song rose from 200 a week in October to 600 in February, and afterwards rapidly sank until it got down to 100 in May. He had himself sold permission to a person to publish a "Slap bang" polka for £10 10s., and had refused the offer of £21 for permission to publish a set of quadrilles with the same title. He thought his copyright was now worth £300, and that it would have been worth £300 or £400 more had it not been injured by the defendant's publication.

Mr. Harry Copeland said that he composed the words of the plaintiff's song. It had attained great popularity—a fact which did not say much for the taste of the British public, for though he had written 100 songs this was the worst of them all (laughter.)

Mr. Hawkins.—If the public had song your best, then, it must have driven them mad with ecstasy (renewed laughter). What is your best?

Witness.—I think the one founded upon Mr. Sala's story of "Twice Round the Clock."

Mr. Hawkins.—What do you call it?

Witness.—I call it "London."

Mr. Hawkins (to his junior).—Make a note of that (loud laughter).

Cross-examined.—He frequently heard the air played in the streets, much to his annoyance.

Mr. James.—Annoyance! Why, I should have thought it was immortality.

Witness continued.—He first sung it in Dublin in 1864; but the medical students kicked up such a row, and broke so many glasses, that he was not allowed to continue singing it (laughter). He afterwards sang it at Brighton, where it was a "hit." He sold the copyright to the plaintiff for a guinea, and thought himself remarkably well paid (laughter); but he should add that plaintiff had given him several pounds since in consequence of the great popularity and sale of the song.

Mr. Penniket, Mr. Vance, comic singer; Mr. W. West, "a delineator of negro character and stump orator;" Mr. Barnard Isaacson, musical director; and Mr. Wm. B. Wright, comedian, were examined upon the question of copyright in the song, and also in reference to its popularity, and the damage done by the defendant's publication.

In cross-examination it appeared that the music was almost identical with that of an obscene song called "The Bungalow."

Questions were also asked with the view of showing that words similar to the refrain of the plaintiffs song had sometimes been used when singing the "Bungalow," in a song called "Slap Bang, or the Adventures of Solomon Slip stitch," and in the song in the pantomime of Hey Diddle Diddle, performed at the Surrey Theatre.

Most of the witnesses denied knowledge of the circumstances suggested by the questions, as distinguishing the plaintiff's song from the other compositions.

Mr. H. James addressed the jury for the defendant, contending that there was no copyright in the chorus of the plaintiff's song, inasmuch as the words had been used in a song written long before that of the plaintiff. Even if there were copyright, he contended that the defendant's polka did not amount to an infringement.

Mr. Henry James Whymark, a composer of songs, said that in 1858 he wrote a song, called "Slap-bang, or the Adventures of Solomon Slipstitch." In the song there were the words, "Here we are again, love, here we are again, what jolly folks are we." He sung this song at all the concert rooms in London; and he sold to a person named Roberts the right to sing it for 3s., and he gave another person named Walker permission to sing it.

Cross-examined.—The words of the song which he had just mentioned did not occur in the chorus.

Mr. Walter Thomas, the proprietor of a concert room at Liverpool, said that he had received the song "Bungalow" from a captain who brought it from America. He sung it and it became very popular in Liverpool; and he substituted the words "Slap-bang, here we are again," for an objectionable chorus. Afterwards the song was generally known by the name of "Slap-bang."

Other evidence was given to the effect that the "Bungalow" had been sung in America by Mat. Peel's troupe, with the chorus "Here we are again, here we are again, all on a summer's day," and that at Christmas, 1861, in the pantomime at the Surrey Theatre, the song was introduced with a chorus similar to the plaintiff's.

Verdict for the defendant.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE SCHOOL OF JOLLY DOGS (Harry Copeland)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 18 Apr 10 - 11:23 PM

From Tony Pastor's Book of Six Hundred Comic Songs and Speeches, by Tony Pastor (New York: Dick & Fitzgerald, 1918), page 66:

THE SCHOOL OF JOLLY DOGS.
As sung by Tony Pastor.
Written by Harry Copeland.

There is a school of jolly dogs,
I've lately come across;
They're game for any mortal thing.
From this [sparring] to pitch and toss:

CHORUS. And they always seem so jolly oh!
So jolly oh! so jolly oh!
They always seem so jolly oh!
Wherever they may be.
They dance, they sing, they laugh ha, ha,
They laugh ha, ha, they dance, they sing.
What jolly dogs are we!
Fal lal la, fal lal la, fal lal la,
Fal lal la, fal lal la, fal lal la,
Fal de the ral, de the ral lal li do.
Slap, bang, here we are again,
Here we are again, here we are again—
Slap, bang, here we are again,
What jolly dogs are we!


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Subject: Lyr Add: HERE WE ARE JOLLY DOGS, or SLAP BANG
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 12:20 AM

From the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, Firth b.27(362):

HERE WE ARE JOLLY DOGS, or SLAP BANG.

1. We're jolly dogs who take our ease,
And never take things cross.
We neither heed laws or police,
And spree about, of course;
And we always are so jolly, oh,
So jolly, oh, so jolly, oh.
A fig for melancholy, oh.
Rare jolly dogs are we.

CHORUS: We lark—we spree—we laugh, ah, ah.
We laugh, ha, ha, and spree and sing.
Rare jolly dogs are we.
Fal lal, lal, tol, lol, lol, fol, lol, lol,
Fol lol lol, tral lal lal, lol lol lol,
Fal-de-riddle-iddle i-do.
Slap, bang! Here we are again.
Here we go again! Here we go again.
Slap, bang! here we go again.
Rare jolly dogs are we.

2. From "Evans's" at three o'clock,
In the morning forth we go,
And floor the market flower stalls,
And lark down the "Grand Row,"
And we spree away, so jolly, oh,
So jolly, oh, so jolly, oh.
Who cares for melancholy, oh?
Rare jolly dogs are we.

3. We wrench of knockers, plates and bells,
For "Bobbies," what care we?
They don't molest such jovial swells,
If well we do them fee.
So on we go, so jolly, oh,
So jolly, oh, so jolly, oh.
Policemen treat, all jolly, oh,
Rare jolly dogs are we.

4. We dine and sup, we drink and sing,
And revel as we please,
Till "Big Ben" sounds the little hours,
Then sally out, on sprees;
And along we go, so jolly, oh,
So jolly, oh, so jolly, oh.
Blow care, and melancholy, oh.
Rare jolly dogs are we.

5. We quiz Miss Menkin, on her steed,
Fast dash the stage across,
And think each of us, jolly dogs,
Would like to be the horse.
Oh, we are the boys, so jolly, oh,
So jolly, oh, so jolly, oh.
Away with melancholy oh.
Rare jolly dogs are we.

6. The fam'd Marquis of Waterford,
For fast life, fast went in,
But we, were he alive again,
"A wrinkle" could teach him;
For we're merry boys, so jolly, oh,
So jolly, oh, so jolly, oh.
So much for melancholy, oh.
Rare jolly dogs are we.

7. At masquerades and music halls,
We're in our element.
Who cares a jot how money flies?
'Twas all meant to be spent.
And we always spend ours jolly, oh,
So jolly, oh, so jolly, oh,
On sport and pleasure, jolly, oh.
Rare jolly dogs are we.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SLAP BANG
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 12:42 AM

From the Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads, Harding B 11(3537):

SLAP BANG

1. O we're a crew of jolly dogs
Who never can get cross.
We're good at any mortal thing,
At fighting, fun, or toss.

CHORUS: And we're always off to the races O!
Races O, races, O!
And we're always off to the races O!
Such jolly dogs are we.
We dance, we sing, we laugh, O! ah!
We laugh, ha! ha! and dance and sing.
Such jolly dogs are we.
Fal lal la, fal lal la, fal lal la.
Fal lal la, tra la la, fal lal la.
Tral di dal di dal, al I da.
Slap bang, there we are again,
There you are again, there are you again
Slap bang, there you are again,
Such jolly days are we.

2. Each night we meet at six o'clock.
Together all we dine.
Each course, of course, soon out of sight,
And quickly to the wine.

3. Near eight o'clock sallying forth
That is when it is dark
I'll do you dads, exclaim the chief,
All ready for a lark.

4. To masquerades and hops we go
Each smokes the fragrant weed
Stick well up for each other
If one's in grief or need

5. Waterford, will all his pals
In the Haymarket larks,
Could never life his head among
Our crew of jolly sparks.


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again -
From: GUEST,GUEST, David W
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 03:54 PM

[Marginal, but not completely off topic]

A music camp I attended in 2000 and 2001 in W Va used to do the following:

   Crash! Bang! [slamming cutlery down on table] here we are again,
   Here we are again, here we are again;
   Crash! Bang! [slamming cutlery] here we are again,
   In the Dining Hall.

That's it. No verse, no origin myth, hardly a tune (more a chant); just an ongoing custom, enacted "as loudly and obnoxiously as possible" [my characterization].

David W


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Subject: RE: Req/ADD: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again -
From: Sorcha
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 04:49 PM

gads! I'd not heard this for years! My grandfather used to eat Holiday Meals in the kitchen at the childrens table because he preferred our company. He'd do this song, and Slap Bang the table top....make all the plates and cutlery bounce! Drove my gran nuts, but of course the kids LOVED it!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req/Add: Slap Bang, Here We Are Again
From: Joybell
Date: 25 Jul 12 - 07:55 PM

Thank you Jim. That's a great article.
I add here, because there's nowhere else to put the information, that: In February of 1867 the Great Barlow sang Slap Bang adding an original verse in Maori. I don't think he ever sang it again. The reporter had the same view, of this song, as the author did. Except for Barlow's verse which he thought clever.
Cheers, Joy


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Mudcat time: 22 June 2:10 AM EDT

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