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Tech: Printing lists of file names

katlaughing 08 Dec 06 - 08:18 PM
GUEST,petr 08 Dec 06 - 08:24 PM
JohnInKansas 08 Dec 06 - 10:41 PM
Bill D 08 Dec 06 - 10:42 PM
Bill D 08 Dec 06 - 10:48 PM
JohnInKansas 08 Dec 06 - 10:51 PM
Bill D 08 Dec 06 - 10:59 PM
wysiwyg 08 Dec 06 - 11:00 PM
Bill D 08 Dec 06 - 11:02 PM
Bill D 08 Dec 06 - 11:03 PM
Bill D 08 Dec 06 - 11:21 PM
GUEST 09 Dec 06 - 12:14 AM
GUEST,Dale 09 Dec 06 - 12:15 AM
GUEST,Jon 09 Dec 06 - 01:09 AM
HuwG 09 Dec 06 - 03:59 AM
eddie1 09 Dec 06 - 04:16 AM
Mr Red 09 Dec 06 - 06:52 AM
JohnInKansas 09 Dec 06 - 08:53 AM
GUEST,Jon 09 Dec 06 - 09:20 AM
katlaughing 09 Dec 06 - 10:12 AM
katlaughing 09 Dec 06 - 11:20 AM
Bill D 09 Dec 06 - 11:35 AM
JohnInKansas 09 Dec 06 - 11:55 AM
GUEST,Jon 09 Dec 06 - 12:11 PM
JohnInKansas 09 Dec 06 - 04:06 PM
GUEST,Jon 09 Dec 06 - 04:25 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 09 Dec 06 - 06:07 PM
GUEST,Jon 09 Dec 06 - 08:11 PM
JohnInKansas 10 Dec 06 - 05:33 AM
GUEST,Jon 10 Dec 06 - 06:02 AM
JohnInKansas 10 Dec 06 - 07:09 AM
GUEST,Jon 10 Dec 06 - 07:39 AM
GUEST,.gargoyle 10 Dec 06 - 02:10 PM
wysiwyg 10 Dec 06 - 02:13 PM
GUEST,Jon 10 Dec 06 - 02:26 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 10 Dec 06 - 10:33 PM
GUEST,Jon 11 Dec 06 - 08:08 AM
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Subject: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: katlaughing
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 08:18 PM

Is there a way to print out a list of the file names on a CD or in a folder on a hard drive? I am making CDs of photos for family and want to compare the file list of each to make sure I have not missed any and/or added duplicates. The easiest way would be to print out a list of the names; with over 200 photos, comparing from one CD to another or the various folders is tedious and difficult.

Thanks,

kat


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,petr
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 08:24 PM

dir
?


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 10:41 PM

There was a thread about this a few months ago. I can't remember if it was before or after WVA Aug/Sep (my only annual time reference).

I usually just open a DOS (Command) window and do a DIR X:\*.*>Y:\somefile.txt, and then open and clean it up in Word.

You can open in Excel for very long lists, but I find Edit|Replace in Word better for getting rid of what I don't want.

There are programs to do it, I've heard, and I think some were suggested in the earlier thread; but I'm too lazy to look one up for my own use.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 10:42 PM

oh, gee..I'm sure I have one (a program) that will do that...hold on


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 10:48 PM

here is one with many options...first you create the list according to your specifications, then you decide what to do with the output....print, sort..etc...


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 10:51 PM

The thread I was dismembering was:

Tech: Making text files of LONG lists of files

On revisiting it looks like most of the suggestions were for using DOS, but there might be more detail there.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 10:59 PM

Also...here is a file manager that will do this as part of its bag of tricks...

XYplorer


---------------------------------------------
From the help file:

"Current Folder

You have the choice here between quite different things:

Classic directory dump

Mimics the classic DOS way of listing directory contents. Additionally includes file version information for those file who actually got a version info. Example
Version Info: Additionally you can have version information included, and choose between String Version Info (which is more commonly used) and Fixed Version Info (which is claimed to be more exact). This concerns only files that have version resources (*.exe, *.dll, etc.). Note that obtaining version information takes some time: if you don't need it, select No file version.

Extended info to CSV

Export extended file informations of whole directories (or even directory trees) to CSV-formatted files. That means, you can save absolutely all file information that's available on a Windows platform in a well-defined, easily processable, and widely portable file format. It's the documentation junkie's wildest dream come true. Example
CSV stands for "Comma-Separated-Values", a very simple database format which can be read and written by any ASCII editor. CVS-files can be easily imported for example to Excel tables or Access tables or probably any table format existing. This feature makes XYplorer a superb tool for exhaustive file system documentation. Will save you not hours but days!

Tree structure only

The other type of folder report mirrors what you see in TreeView. Example

Include subfolders: report includes all subfolders (and their subfolders, etc.) of the current folder. When you do a structure report you would normally check this box.

Tip        Straight Directory Print: choose Classic directory dump, uncheck the Include subfolders checkbox and press the To printer button.
"


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: wysiwyg
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 11:00 PM

I use Karen's Power Tools, a set of freeware that includes Karen's Directory Printer. Quick, intuitive, you choose what details to include, click click and yer done. I save the text file results so I can easily find anything I've archived off onto a CD, as well as other uses. You can Google 'er up, easy.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 11:02 PM

yes! I was just about to post that
right here..*grin*


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 11:03 PM

well, not garg's 'helpful' idea...but Karenware


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Bill D
Date: 08 Dec 06 - 11:21 PM

(all you gotta do, garg, is pinch yerself once evr'y week or two)


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 12:14 AM

I have used printfolders 1.3 for years. Fast, easy, efficient and FREE. Can't ask for much more than that.

Current version is 2.21. Still free, but "the vendor cheerfully discloses that it's nagware. A nagless professional version of this program exists; that one lets you customize your lists to fit your preferences."
http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/file/fid,23030-order,1-page,1-c,alldownloads/description.html


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Dale
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 12:15 AM

And I could have added my name to that last post, but failed to do so.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 01:09 AM

On Linux, an easier way for Kat's type of problem might be:

diff -r -q directory1 directory2

That would include any subdirectories and produce an output along the lines of:

Only in directory1: thisfile
Only in directory2: thatfile
Files directory1/anotherfile and directory2/anotherfile differ


Not sure if there is any similar utility for Win.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: HuwG
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 03:59 AM

A similar diff utility exists for DOS (which can be opened from Windows) in GNU. Windiff does not work directly on directories, but if you pipe the output from two dir operations into two files, Windiff can be run on the two files to highlight differences. (This does involve three operations rather than one, but works albeit clumsily).


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: eddie1
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 04:16 AM

There is a freeware prog called Media Monkey. This lets you export tracks from a cd into a report file (XL) which I then copy & paste into Word.
You can then fancify it to suit yourself.
When downloading MM you decide which sound files you want itto open but I find for most jobs it suits me fine.

Eddie


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Mr Red
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 06:52 AM

There are freebies that will print from Win Explorer

I have Directory Opus 6 though they will try to sell you the "better version" http://www.gpsoft.com.au - it is a win explorer clone with more features.

Another way is to take Alt/Print Screen images and edit in "Paint"


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 08:53 AM

I really hate working with images rather than text, but then I have the situation of usually working with loooooong lists as cited in the other thread.

It really is not difficult to use the simple DOS ">" to send the result of a DIR command to a file, which will be a text file that Word or a lot of other programs will open. If you're minimally competent with any decent wp or spreadsheet program, and can get the text into it, it may be teedjus but it's not complicated to work the list into most any format you want.

For users who learned on older systems, there are some significant changes in the DOS commands with WinXP, and as with all Windows versions, for unfathomable reasons it's difficult to find the "instructions."

In WinXP

1. click Start|Help.

It should open a window called "Help and Support Center."

2. In the search box, type "DOS" (no quotes) and put a check in the "Search only What's new in Windows XP" box.

3. When you hit enter, it should bring up a result "Using Command Prompt" in the "Suggested Topics" window. You can "go from there" and wander to what you want, but I'd recommend clicking on the "Full Text Search" bar, where item 4 should be "New ways to do familiar tasks." Click there, and it should show you all the current legal DOS commands, along with a list of deleted/inactive ones.

4. When (if?) you find it, I would suggest that you click on the "Add to Favorites" button IMMEDIATELY, since if you're like me you'll spend hours looking for it the next time otherwise. (I usually look for a couple of hours before looking to see if I might of put it in Favorites.) You are extremely unlikely to get lucky and find this information any other way, with any search terms I've discovered.

Most commands people ever used much are still valid, but there are a few "surprises." The ones you probably remember are likely to work without special attention. In a command window, you can still type a command followed by a /? or just ? to get a description of that command, and in WinXP you don't have to /P or |MORE since you can scroll back and forth in the window to read stuff more than a single window long.

All other Win versions that I've used did have similar lists of DOS commands, just as hard to find, but not as nicely collected in one place - IFF you can manage to find them.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 09:20 AM

On Win 2000, open a "command prompt" and enter "help". If you want more details about a command type "help <command>

I'm not sure what to type to produce detail someting like this list of commands you might find on a Linux system but man <command> details what each command does.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 10:12 AM

Thanks, folks. JohninKS, it's been years since I've done anything in DOS and we do now have WinXP so thanks, doubly, for walking through it. You, too, Jon.

Susan, I like the looks of that program but my computer didn't like their download. I may try it again later.

Thanks, again!

kat


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: katlaughing
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 11:20 AM

HeyaBillD, as usual you find the neatest little programs. Downloaded the first one you mentioned and I now have my lists printed out. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: Bill D
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 11:35 AM

*grin*...I hang out where seasoned users talk about these things. Glad it worked.
(That Karenware thing is supposed to be very good...can't imagine why your computer 'didn't like it'.)


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 11:55 AM

Anyone who might choose to use Word for cleaning up a DIR list (as I usually do) should get really intimate with the Edit/Replace function. Being able to manipulate "breaks," "tabs," "chars," "nums," and such is a really big help, and there are "special notations" for many of these that you need to use in Edit/Replace.

In Word Help, for recent versions, if you type "find" in the search box, click the search button, it should bring up a choice for "find text or other items" near the top of the list. When you click that one, choose "codes for items you want to find or replace" for a list of special codes. There will be other options for using built in functions, but generally knowing how to use a few easily typed codes is the simplest:

In the "Find What" or "Replace With" boxes

^p to search/replace paragraph marks
^t to search/replace tabs
^? any character
^# any numerical digit
^$ any letter character

etc. There are quite a few others, but the ones listed let you do a whole lot with the DIR listings.

For DIR lists, replacing all series of 3 spaces with 2 spaces, "replace all" repeated until there are no series longer then two, then replace two spaces with a ^t (a tab) effectively separates things into columns. (If you go to all single spaces before putting in the tab, you may break up filenames that include a space.)

Table|Convert|Text to Table (with tab as the separator) makes it into a table where you can select a column and delete (or copy, etc) the whole column all in one shot. (Flopping easily back and forth between table and text forms is an underutilized really neat thing to be able to do - sometimes.)

Lots of little, but mostly easy, tricks to it; but learning a few tricks never hurts - unless they're malicious ones.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 12:11 PM

Just looked through the help list on Win 2000. I see recover is still there.

I don't know what it's like now but I used to think it a stupidly named command. OK, it can recover files but it used to be that if you just entered "recover" you would rename everything on your disk to its own generated names. The unsuspecting could easily wreck their installation with it.

Maybe it gives some warnings now but I don't fancy playing with it to find out.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 04:06 PM

In my WinXP, recover is described:

[quote]

Syntax
recover [Drive:][Path] FileName

Parameters
[Drive:][Path] FileName
Specifies the location and name of the file you want to recover.
/? Displays help at the command prompt.

Remarks
The recover command reads a file sector by sector and recovers data from the good sectors. Data in bad sectors is lost.

Limitation on [drive:][path]filename
You cannot use wildcards (* and ?) with the recover command. You must specify a file.

Reentering lost data
Because all data in bad sectors is lost when you recover a file, you should recover files one at a time. You can use this method to edit each file and reenter missing information after you recover the file.

Recovering bad sectors
Bad sectors reported by chkdsk were marked as "bad" when your disk was first prepared for operation. They pose no danger, and recover does not affect them.

Examples
To recover the file Story.txt in the \Fiction directory in drive D:, type:

recover d:\fiction\story.txt

[end qoute]

It appears they've covered recover so you shouldn't get any result if you just type "recover," unless it gives an error. A filename is a mandatory part of the command in WinXP.

There's a long list of old commands "no longer supported" and an even longer list for the 64-bit version of WinXP. Twinges of nostalgia for the disappearance of edlin in 64-bit - (which might be worse if I had the 64-bit version).

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 04:25 PM

That's better. Thanks John.

I can't say I've used any of the line editors. I've always managed to find something else though I'm not sure what. I do remember my first Wordprocessor though - that was Wordstar (2 I think) on a CP/M system.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 06:07 PM

With your LDS connections I am surprised you have not used PAF "Personal Ancestry File. Available at your price (free) through:

http://www.familysearch.org/

Lower right hand bottom of the page.

It permits you to link, sort, print, file, tree, view on DVD TV.

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 08:11 PM

Thinking about it John, I might not use it but I do have ed on this PC, as yes, I am on a 64 bit system. I don't know off hand whether ed is an x86_64 version though.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 05:33 AM

As a bit of nostalgia, in early DOS the RMDIR command to delete a directory (now mostly called a folder) would only work if the folder was empty. That meant you had to "drill down" to the last file in a tree, delete the file, step up a layer, delete everything, step up a layer ... etc.

Somewhere around DOS 3.5 or 4.0 a new DELTREE command was added, that allowed you to delete a folder and everything in it in one step. Joy was abundant.

DELTREE is no longer functional in WinXP, and possibly in a couple of earlier versions, which caused bitter complaints. It had to be explained to a whole lot of people, mostly one-at-a-time, that the old RMDIR command now accepted a /S switch, and that "RMDIR /S" would delete a folder and all subordinate files/folders.

Now we still have "freeware/shareware" people touting their "utilities" to allow you to use DELTREE that "those nasty Windows people" took out for no good reason, and people who load up with freeware/shareware, sometimes of questionable quality/reliability, instead of executing a simple RTFM>PIF (Read-The-F*ing-Manual, redirect-to Person-In-Front)

Some people do need something "automatic" to shelter their brains from overexertion, and those willing to write and share useful tricks deserve respect, and thanks when they actually produce something worthwhile; but I generally find that downloading and learning how to use a "special application" - and then sometimes repairing the damage it does, usually takes far more real effort than learning a new feature or two already built into what I've got. Quite often when faced with "wanting to do something" is best solved by asking "what else can I do that accomplishes the same purpose?"

One of the few cogent and useful concepts to come out of the surge in "Business and Marketing" education in the 50s was "Everybody wants to buy drill bits when what they really NEED to buy is holes."

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 06:02 AM

I certainly tend towards the lazy side but I do find I my thinking differs between using Linux and Windows and I suppose at times may be a little hard on Windows but this is how it goes.

Q: Have I already got a little utility that will do this job?

Linux: I'll bet I have.
Windows: Probably not.

As for DELTREE (which is not on Win2K either), I've never used the command but I'm not sure I would agree with it just vanishing. Would it have been possible for MS to have kept everyone happy by providing DELTREE as a simple batch file that ran RMDIR/S or perhaps just pointed them in the right direction, eg. "DELTREE is obsolete, use RMDIR/S instead".


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 07:09 AM

Jon -

A sore point with me, and a somewhat weak point with the RTFM rule, is that Microsoft publishes the worst possible user information. (Of course that's just a personal opinion, and I'm overstating it because I have seen some incredibly bad ones even compared to Mickey's.)

My idea of a useful instruction is that when you see a "command" on the screen that you can click to "do something," there should be an entry in Help that tells you what's going to happen if you click it. So far as I've been able to find, entering any "word" that appears on any screen in any Windows version (going back to Windows 1.1) as a Help search term results in "no results found for xxxxx."

See the bizarre and complex instructions for just listing the DOS commands in WinXP. You CAN'T FIND THEM by just putting DOS or COMMAND into a Help search, and they're NOT INCLUDED in any elementary or advanced Microsoft textbook I've seen. The ones I gave directions to in fact are not in Help, they're in the:

"... introduction to your new and wonderful system where we'd like to escort you on a slide show tour to show why you should just trust us and admit you're an idiot who would likely just ask a bunch of stupid questions if we really told you what we sold you.

(But they're NOT INCLUDED IN THE TOUR. They're just packaged with it, separate from the rest of the Help files.)

I don't really see any purpose in including a batch file to simulate an obsolete function. Bloat is bad enough without it. And giving out "standard batch files" is really pretty hazardous, since people who don't understand them can screw with them, and people who do will probably write their own if they can see what's in one you provide.

I don't recall whether DELTREE allowed any switches, but if it did a general purpose .bat would have to pass any legal ones, so even a .bat that was a real "substitute" instead of just a dangerous crutch would likely be as complex (and as large) as the compiled routine that was removed. If DELTREE served a useful purpose, it should have been left in. It didn't, so it was removed.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 07:39 AM

Well I wouldn't consider that blout if it did a general purpose .bat would have to pass any legal ones, so even a .bat that was a real "substitute" instead of just a dangerous crutch would likely be as complex (and as large) as the compiled routine that was removed. If DELTREE served a useful purpose, it should have been left in. It didn't, so it was removed.at but I do agree a functional batch file could have problems.

As for Win and help (apart from using progs like word, etc.), I agree.

I'd say Linux (and I'm talking a friendly one - I use suse) is harder in that respect but you can get into the ways of things, eg. man command as mentioned above - I do wish the man pages gave examples of usage though.

The other useful thing IF you know it is there on my system is the /usr/share/doc folder and its sub folders. I have actualy gone as far as setting up virtual web servers (it is easy on a sytem already set up as a server) for a couple of the more useful stuff applications put there, eg. within my LAN I have apachedocs.folkinfo.org and phpdocs.folkinfo.org as handy references.

Of course it all comes down to you have to have found out how to help yourself before you can use the available help...


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 02:10 PM

Ahhh///Waxing Nostalgic///wax on, wax off.

X-TREE earned me guru status in the DOS-2 and 3 days
http://www.xtreefanpage.org/

FOR an analysis of File Managers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_file_managers

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: wysiwyg
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 02:13 PM

Kat, if you right-click a folder now, has printing the directory added itself to the options listed?

~Susan


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 02:26 PM

I liked XTree.

I suppose my favourite of all DOS programs was Turbo Pascal.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 10 Dec 06 - 10:33 PM

Pascal - yes! The pre-Dbase from University of San Diego.

You could run some of it on a Texas Instruments programable calculator.

Sincerely,
Gargoyle


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Subject: RE: Tech: Printing lists of file names
From: GUEST,Jon
Date: 11 Dec 06 - 08:08 AM

I don't know about those bits but I liked Turbo Pascal as it was the first programming language that made sense to me to the extent I believed I could actually write some things. I'd only played about with slow clumsy interpreted line number basics before then.

This was great (to me) with its functions and procdures and units which allowed you to build your own libraries of utilities. I'm also glad it was so strict. I am a sloppy (and poor) programmer but this program did at least enforce some things on me and at least make me aware of better ways.

I did play with a different Pascal (mikroPascal) the other day btw.


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