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Origin: Sail Away Ladies

DigiTrad:
SAIL AWAY, LADIES


Related threads:
Lyr: Sail Away Ladies (Don't You Rock Me, Daddy-o) (20)
Lyr Req: Sail Away, Ladies (11)


Richie 31 Dec 06 - 07:45 PM
Richie 31 Dec 06 - 08:16 PM
Azizi 31 Dec 06 - 08:23 PM
Richie 31 Dec 06 - 08:42 PM
Azizi 31 Dec 06 - 09:08 PM
Richie 31 Dec 06 - 09:20 PM
Cruiser 31 Dec 06 - 09:23 PM
Richie 31 Dec 06 - 09:26 PM
iancarterb 31 Dec 06 - 09:58 PM
Azizi 31 Dec 06 - 10:01 PM
Peace 31 Dec 06 - 10:03 PM
Azizi 31 Dec 06 - 10:23 PM
Cap't Bob 31 Dec 06 - 10:25 PM
Azizi 31 Dec 06 - 10:36 PM
Peace 31 Dec 06 - 10:46 PM
Richie 31 Dec 06 - 11:02 PM
Azizi 01 Jan 07 - 09:26 AM
Richie 01 Jan 07 - 09:36 AM
Azizi 01 Jan 07 - 09:58 AM
GUEST,Hootenanny 01 Jan 07 - 10:02 AM
Richie 01 Jan 07 - 01:22 PM
Richie 04 Jan 07 - 09:52 AM
Greg B 04 Jan 07 - 10:07 AM
BanjoRay 04 Jan 07 - 10:23 AM
Richie 04 Jan 07 - 10:25 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 04 Jan 07 - 10:41 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 04 Jan 07 - 10:50 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 04 Jan 07 - 11:18 AM
greg stephens 04 Jan 07 - 12:48 PM
GUEST,Frank Hamilton 04 Jan 07 - 06:58 PM
Azizi 04 Jan 07 - 08:40 PM
Richie 04 Jan 07 - 08:49 PM
Azizi 23 Feb 08 - 10:28 AM
Azizi 23 Feb 08 - 10:52 AM
Azizi 23 Feb 08 - 11:01 AM
Big Jim from Jackson 23 Feb 08 - 11:27 AM
Azizi 23 Feb 08 - 11:41 AM
BanjoRay 24 Feb 08 - 09:06 AM
GUEST,Rob 26 Dec 17 - 11:18 PM
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Subject: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 07:45 PM

It seem the first version of Sail Away Ladies is found in Talley's Negro Folk Rymes p. 20 from 1920. It can be viewed on-line through a book search. Kuntz also includes them on-line. Here they are:

Sail away, ladies! Sail away!
Sail away, ladies! Sail away!
Nev' min' what dem white folks say,
May de Mighty bless you. Sail away!

Nev' min' what you daddy say,
Shake yo liddle foot an' fly away,
Nev' min' if yo' mammy say:
"De Devil'll git you." Sail away!

Macon's lyric version (not in the DT?) was done in 1927. The Talley rhyme includes lyrics found in Sally Ann, a very similar song. The Hill Billies in 1925 used the line "Shake you little foot Sally Ann." Since Sally Ann also includes the "Sail away" lyric it makes it difficult to separate the two songs.

Are there any earlier, perhaps minstrel lyrics, to "Sail Away Ladies"?

Richie


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 08:16 PM

This verse has been attributed to Macon but it isn't on the recording I have:

I chew my tobacco and I spit my juice.
I love my own *daughter but it ain't no use.

*should be "doney"

Anyone know?

Richie


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 08:23 PM

Hello, Richie.

I don't know about any earlier lyrics for "Sail away ladies" than the Talley one you quoted.

Here's some minor corrections:

"Nev' min' what you daddy say", is given as "Nev' min' what yo' daddy say"

This is in the 1968 Kennikat version of Fisk University's [Professor]Thomas W. Talley's "Negro Folk Rhymes, Wise & Otherwise with a Study"

The title of the book is usually given as "Negro Folk Rhymes", and was first published by The Macmillan Company in 1922.

**

I'm wondering if "sail awy" referred to dance moves [moving away from your partner] instead of actually getting on a boat and sailing away [from slavery or otherwise]. If so, the lines "never mind what your master, daddy, mama says" [to convert those lines to contemporary English}, would suggest that the girl shouldn't mind that these folks frowned upon dancing.

In this excerpt from the Study section in his now clasic book, Talley notes that

"Many Negro Folk Rhymes were used as banjo and fiddle {violin} songs. It ought to be born in mind, however, that even these were quite often repeated without singing or playing. It was common in the early days of the public schools of the South to hear Negro childern use them as declamations. The connection, however, of Negro Folk Rhymes with their secular music production is well worthy of notice...

The Negro Folk Rhymes ,then furnished the ideas about which the "old time" Negro banjo picker and fiddler clustered his best instrumental music thoughts. it is too bad that this music passed away without unrecorded save by the hearts of men."

[pps. 235; 237,238]

-snip-

I take it "declamations" means poetry or speeches. Is that correct?


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Subject: Lyr Add: SAIL AWAY LADIES (from Uncle Dave Macon)
From: Richie
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 08:42 PM

Hi Azizi,

The "declamations" were probably sung without accompaniment (group singing). Or maybe they were early "poetry slams."

Here's what I hear Uncle Dave Macon singing:

SAIL AWAY LADIES
Uncle Dave Macon and His Fruit Jar Drinkers Vo 5155
Banjo and lead vocal- Uncle Dave Macon; Fiddle- Maizi Todd;
(Fiddle w/banjo intro)

Ever I get my new house done,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
Give my old one to my son.
(Sail away Ladies, sail away.)

*[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o,
Don't she rock die-dee-o,
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/ verse]

Ever I get my new house done,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
Give my old one to my son.
(Sail away Ladies, sail away.)

[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/ verse]

Ain't no use to grieve and cry,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
You'll be an angel by and by,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)


[Three lines of chorus by fiddle]
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/verse]

Come along boys and go with me
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
We'll go back to Tennessee
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)

[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/verse]

[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental]

*the unusual thing is Uncle Dave doeesn't sing on the first line of the chorus.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LEAD A MAN and MY MAMMY STOLE A COW
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 09:08 PM

Ritchie, it's interesting that you would post that song with the die-dee-o" refrain as I was debating whether to post this song-as an example of an 19th century or earlier African American instructional dance movement songs:

LEAD A MAN *
Lead a man, di-dee-oe, lead a man, di-dee-o;
Lead a man, di-dee-oe, lead a man, di-dee-o;
You swin heads, di-dee-o, I swing feet, di-dee-o
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, walkin' on de ice, di-dee-o!

Ladies change, di-dee-o, ladies change, di-dee-o;
Ladies change, di-dee-o, ladies change, di-dee-o.
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, ain't dat nice, di-dee-o,
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, ain't dat nice, di-dee-o?

Oh my love, di-dee-o, oh my love, di-dee-o.
Oh my love, di-dee-o, oh my love, di-dee-o.
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, ain't dat nice, di-dee-o,

[title given as "Dance Song" in Dorothy Scarborough {assisted by Ola Lee Gulledge}, "On The Trial of Negro Folk Songs" { Folklore Associates edition 1963; pp.115, 116; originally published by Harvard University press, 1925}

-snip-

Since these songs were open ended, it wouldn't be difficult to imagine another verse being "Sail away ladies, di-dee-do, sail away ladies, di-dee-do".

Here's another di-dee-do song which is also found in "On The Trial of Negro Folk Songs":

MY MAMMY STOLE A COW
Steal up, young ladies,
My mammy stole a cow.
Steal up, my darlin' chile,
My mammy stole a cow.

Chorus:
Stoled dat cow in Baltimo'.
My mammy stole a cow.
Stoled dat cow in Baltimo'.
My mammy stole a cow.

Steal all around, don't slight no one,
My mammy stole a cow;
Steal all around, don't slight no one,
My mammy stole a cow.

[pg. 116, Scarborough]

Proir to giving these lyrics, Scarborough provided this explanation:

"These words to the next [song] have little coherence or ligucm evidently [they were] being used merely to bring in the directions of stealing up for the dance."
-snip-

I'm not sure what "stealing up for the dance" means. Is it an instruction movement used in square dancing or contra dancing?

Btw, Black social dance songs whose lyrics are based on what steps to do are still quite popular today as one can hear in R&B, dancehall Reggae music and other dances of the African Diaspora {and probably social music from the African continent itself}.


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 09:20 PM

Nice post Azizi,

Those songs forms closely resemble "Sail Away Ladies."

It's interesting that this song evolved into a pop/rock song in the 1950's with the title, "Don't You Rock Me Daddy-O" and even "Don't You Lie Daddy-O." Van Morrison covered it!

Richie


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Cruiser
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 09:23 PM

Interesting discussion on this old fiddle tune.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DON'T YOU ROCK ME DADDY-O
From: Richie
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 09:26 PM

DON'T YOU ROCK ME DADDY-O
Van Morrison Lyrics (from an on-line site)
Attributed to: Bill Varley / Wally Whyton.

(Traditional)

Me and my daddy was comin' into town
(Sail away lady sail away)
Round the billygoat leadin' a hound
(Sail away lady sail away)
Hound got dumped, billygoat jumped
(Sail away lady sail away)
Throw'd my brother right over that stump
(Sail away lady sail away)

*Don't you rock me daddy-o
Don't you rock me daddy-o
Don't you rock me daddy-o
Don't you rock me daddy-o

Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio

Well my old auntie promised me
(Sail away lady sail away)
When she'd die she'd will to me
(Sail away lady sail away)
She lived so long her head got bald
(Sail away lady sail away)
She got out the notes and the dimes and all
(Sail away lady sail away)

Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Aaay

(Instrumental)

Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio

I said
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio

Well my old auntie promised me
(Sail away lady sail away)
When she'd die she'd will to me
(Sail away lady sail away)
Well, she lived so long her head got bald
(Sail away lady sail away)
She didn't got out the notes and the dimes and all
(Sail away lady said away)

Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
One more time!

Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio
Don't you rock me daddio

*daddio (daddy-o)


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: iancarterb
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 09:58 PM

Ritchie- I found one slight variation - Children, don't you grieve and cry instead of Ain't no use to, and this additional verse in a book I did not note in the Southern Pines, NC Public Library a few years ago.
I got a letter from Shiloh Town
Sail away ladies, sail away.
Big Saint Louis is a-burning down.
Sail away ladies, sail away.

Otherwise all the same as the Uncle Dave lyric you cited.


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 10:01 PM

Correction:

"My Mammy Stole A Cow" is not given with a "di-dee-do" refrain in Scarborough's "On The Trail Of Negro Folk Songs"

Maybe what I was thinking about when I wrote that is that I can imagine that refrain being used in that song.

I know I was thinking that the phase "steal up,lady" sounds like it's another instructional dance "command" like "sail away lady".

**

Btw, Ritchie {as I'm sure you know} much of the "Well my old auntie promised me" verse that is included in the
"Don't You Rock Me Daddy-O" Van Morrison lyrics comes from the
"My ol' mistiss promised me" floating verse used in the "Poor Mourner" family of songs. An example of that verse is:

Mah ol' Mistis promised me
When she dies sh'd set me free.
She libed so long dat her head got bald;
Don't b'lieve old Mistis qwine die aytall.

[Source: Dorothy Scarborough, "On The Trail Of Negro Folk Songs",
p. 194]


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Peace
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 10:03 PM

I take it y'all have seen the Fiddler's Companion stuff on the song?


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 10:23 PM

Bruce, do you mean this McGuinn's Folk Den 1999 Sail Away Ladies?

I can't copy the notes and lyrics from that site. One comment made there is that Odetta sang a version of this song. That's how I first heard it. Actually, that's the only version of it I've heard.

But here's the Kingston Trio- "Sail Away, Ladies" lyrics.:

"Ain't no use to sit and cry. You'll be an angel by and by.

Chorus:
Can't she rock 'em, can't she rock 'em, can't she rock 'em, daddy-e-o (Repeat)

I got a home in Tennessee (Sail away, ladies. Sail away.) That's the place I wanna be. (Sail away, ladies. Sail away.)
If I ever get my way (Sail away, ladies. Sail away.) Tennessee is where I'll stay. (Sail away, ladies. Sail away.)

(Chorus)

Ever I get my new house done. Give my old one to my son.
Ever I finish this porch and stairs, lie around in my rockin' chair.

(Chorus)

Ain't no use to sit and cry. You'll be an angel by and by.
Won't be a long time 'round this place. So get a look at my funny face.

(Chorus) "

-snip-

Note that "di-dee-o" has changed to "daddy-o". I wonder if this is one source of the vernacular phrase "daddy-o"?

And, for what it's worth, the line "So get a look at my funny face" doesn't sound very authentic to me. My guess is that this line was written as a substitute for a line that was considered to be politically incorrect. But that's only a guess.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SAIL AWAY LADIES (northern Michigan)
From: Cap't Bob
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 10:25 PM

THEN FROM NORTHERN MICHIGAN

The old AuSable's quiet tonight,
Sail away ladies, sail away.
See the mist rising in the pale moon light,
Sail away ladies, sail away.

CHORUS
Floating down the river in my birch canoe,
Floating down the river in my birch canoe,
Floating down the river in my birch canoe,
Just like my grandad used to do.

Me and my gal and her calico cat,
Sail away ladies, sail away.
Took a float trip down to Comins flats,
Sail away ladies, sail away
CHORUS

While floating along I caught a trout,
Sail away ladies, sail away.
It went straight away into that durn cats mouth,
Sail away ladies, sail away.
CHORUS

Going to give up fishing till this float trips done,
Sail away ladies, sail away.
Cause fish'en for cats just ain't no fun
Sail away ladies, sail away
CHORUS

Now what's a poor boy like me to do?
Sail away ladies, sail away.
But play my ukulele for you
Sail away ladies, sail away.

WILD UKULELE INSTRUMENTAL
CHORUS.

Cap't Bob


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 10:36 PM

Here's a slight ammendment on my theory about the line "sail away lady, sail away" referring to a dance movement.

Perhaps sometimes "sail away" as found in that song referred to a dance movement-as the line "steal away, ladies" apparently did {given Scarborough's notes}.

However, as in the version Cap't Bob posted, that line seems to refer to actual sailing.

But, then again, could that line mean
"Get away, ladies, get away" meaning don't bother me because I'm going sailing?

Oh, I'm sooo confused...


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Peace
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 10:46 PM

Fiddler's Companion


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 31 Dec 06 - 11:02 PM

Thanks Peace for posting Andrew's info, which is fairly extensive on this song.

Here's one question. A doney (maybe pronounced dough-ner, so it sounded like daughter) is an African-American slang for "woman." It's found in many blues. So I agree with Mitchell here:

I chew my tobacco and I spit my juice.
I love my own daughter but it ain't no use.

(Paul Mitchell and others believe the words in Macon's last line sometimes heard as own daughter is really Dona, pronounced Dough-nee in the American South, a Spanish/Italian word for a mature love object, a woman.)

But where does the verse come from? Macon?

And this verse should be:

I) got the news from *Shallow (or "Charlotte") Town.
Big St. Louis is a‑burning down.

*Shiloh not Shallow


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 01 Jan 07 - 09:26 AM

With regard to the line "Big St Louis is burnin' down", I thought I've heard this line given as "East St Louis is burnin down".

I went Googling and found this sentence in The PL Yearbook of Jazz 1946, Max Jones on The Blues, p. 5

"One personal song "East Chicago Blues" carres a passing reference to that tragic race disturbance which swept across East St Louis in 1919

" East Chicago's on fire, East St. Louis is burnin' down".

Here's information about that race riot which appears to have occurred in 1917 and not 1919 as noted above [unless there was another race riot in 1919]:

"East Saint Louis Race Riot of 1917   

(July 2, 1917)

Bloody outbreak of violence in East St. Louis, Ill., stemming specifically from the employment of black workers in a factory holding government contracts. It was the worst of many incidents of racial antagonism in the United States during World War I that were directed especially toward black Americans newly employed in war industries. In the riot, whites turned on blacks, indiscriminately stabbing, clubbing, and hanging them and driving 6,000 from their homes; 40 blacks and 8 whites were killed"...

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/aaworld/reference/articles/east_saint_louis.html


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 01 Jan 07 - 09:36 AM

The song "Charlottestown is Burning Down" is related to Shiloh which is an expression found in Limber Jim and Jim Along Josie songs. Big St. Louis might be a reference to a boat/ship or a place in Charlottestown.

Richie


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 01 Jan 07 - 09:58 AM

"Big St. Louis might be a reference to a boat/ship or a place in Charlottestown".

Perhaps...but "Big St. Louis is burnin down" might also be a misremembering of the line "East St Louis is burnin down".

And that "East St. Louis is burnin down" line demonstrates how Blues & other songs includes scattered references to historial events.

That line also may demostrate how historical references in songs are often forgotten or aren't recognized as historical markers by future singers and collectors of such songs.


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: GUEST,Hootenanny
Date: 01 Jan 07 - 10:02 AM

Does the word "Doney" or in in London cockney "Dona" not come from the Spanish word for wife/girl friend the spelling of which escapes me at the moment, still haven't woken up from last night's fun.

There is a Texas song called Get Along Doney Gal among many others, and an English music hall song Liza You Are my Dona.

My head hurts.


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Subject: RE: origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 01 Jan 07 - 01:22 PM

Doney/Dony: Paul Mitchell and others believe the words in Macon's last line sometimes heard as own daughter is really Dona, pronounced Dough-nee in the American South, a Spanish/Italian word for a mature love object, a woman.

There was another thread on this/ or it was discussed in some detail.

Hope you feel better soon.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 09:52 AM

I'm wondering if "Jingle at the Window (Tideo)" is a similar song.
Lomax has a version named "Tideo."

Anyone have any lyrics?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Greg B
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 10:07 AM

To 'sail away' might also refer to using an article of clothing---
such as a long skirt or apron, as part of a dance move.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: BanjoRay
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 10:23 AM

I sometimes wonder if "Sail away ladies" might refer to covered wagons or "prairie schooners" - hence the "don't she rock, die-de-oh" line conveying the motion of said vehicle. There seem to be some references to travel in the song - going to tennessee, getting my new house done etc
Just a thought
Ray


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 10:25 AM

The verse:

I chew my tobacco and I spit my juice.
I love my own daughter but it ain't no use.

Comes from the Old-Time String Band Book. The lyrics are attributed to Uncle Dave Macon but Dave doesn't sing that last verse.

I'm curious to why it was included.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 10:41 AM

Ruth Crawford Seeger, in American Folk Songs for Children, has just one verse and refrain for "Tideo," which she calls "Jingle At the Windows":

Jingle at the window, Tideo,
Skip two windows, Tideo,
Skip three windows, Tideo,
Jingle at the windows, Tideo.

Jing-ling, jing-ling, jing-ling Jo,
Jingle at the windows, Tideo.

Her source was "Tideo," in William A. Owens, Swing and Turn: Texas Play-Party Games, Tardy Publishing Co, 1936. Haven't seen it. Unfortunately the song isn't in Owens' Texas Folk Songs, which I have seen.

The melody is not particularly close to the "Sally Ann"-style tune of "Sail Away Ladies," though it does bear some resemblance.

Bob


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 10:50 AM

On the other hand, some versions of Sail Away Ladies differ in melody and treatment, too. Parker and Dodd's 1932 "Sail Away Ladies" has a tune closer to "Tideo," and these verses. Some sound a trifle concocted, and may have been made up for the recording session; others may stem from playparty use in the singers' childhood. Interestingly re Azizi's remark about disapproval, the refrain sounds distinctly menacing.

SAIL AWAY LADIES

Christmas comin' down the road,
Christmas comin' down the road,
Christmas comin' down the road,
Gonna get married, don't you know

CHO   Sail away ladies, sail away (3x)
          God's gonna get you some day.

Cut that wood and pile it high (3X)
Winter's comin' by and by.

Possum up a simmon tree (3x)
Big fat sump'm for you an' me.

Rubbed my dog with turpentine (3x)
Now that dog is hard to find.

Cook that bacon good and brown (3x)
Saddle my horse and go to town.

Swing your partner round and round (3x)
Spit your 'backers on the ground.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 11:18 AM

Azizi, re declamations:

These were "set pieces" the grade school child was supposed to "declaim," that is, speak elegantly if possible, before the class. They were usually short, and were intended to improve the student's ability at public speaking ... analogous to book reports and such for a later generation. This was common practice in schools of both racial groups.

They might be a few lines of poetry, or an anecdote, or almost anything from the school text (or, lacking textbooks, the teacher's memory) that the child could memorize -- training memory skills was important, too, in a rural and often backwoods world where, for the most part, reference material was not going to be common. "The Boy Stood On the Burning Deck" was frequently excerpted for this, as were hokey lines from the Iliad to James Whitcomb Riley and back again.

The practice was sometimes extended into exhibitions before parents and members of the community. The best pupils would get a prize, usually something improving like a tract, or even a Bible.

This practice is humorized in the 2-part E.V. Stoneman record "Possum Trot School Exhibition," where Stoneman, his wife Hattie, Uncle Eck Dunford and others recreate the sort of thing that was done. I quote Dunford's satirical bit from memory (done in his booming foghorny Bullwinkle voice). The topic is always announced first:

"GEESE. Geese is a heavy-set bird with its legs on one end and a tail on t'other. Their legs is set so fur back on their runnin' gear that they nearly miss their body. Geese do not give milk, but they give eggs. But as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!"

Bob


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: greg stephens
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 12:48 PM

Richie, in an earlier post, gives a transcription of Van Morrison's version, and includes a couplet:
WEll she lived so long her head got bald
She didn't get out the notes or the dimes at all

This is very ingenious, but I think you'll find what he is singing is Lonnie Donegan's version:
"She's giving up the notion of dyin' at all"


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: GUEST,Frank Hamilton
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 06:58 PM

I think it should be fairly obvious that songs like "Sail Away Ladies" and many of the old-time Appalachian songs done by Uncle Dave or Gran'pa Jones, Stringbean etc. emanate from the Minstrel Show tradition and the performances of "Uncle Tom's Cabin" popular throughout the South for a short period of time. "Old Dan Tucker", "Angelina Baker" and many variants of these started on the Minstrel Show stage. The words to "O Susannah" would be unacceptable to most audiences today.

It's significant that these songs survive mainly because of white performers in blackface who caracatured the "negro" in the Minstrel Show.

It's ironic that some of those songs were entertaining...and they were and are.

Karen Lin mentions in her book on the banjo that this instrument was largely popular because of the Minstrel Show whereas the popular instrument on the plantation was the fiddle not the banjo.

Frank


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 08:40 PM

Bob Coltman, thanks for your interesting explanation about declaimations.

Your comments show what a great resource Mudcat can be for learning about history & culture.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Richie
Date: 04 Jan 07 - 08:49 PM

Bob,

Thanks for the Tideo post. It's clear there's not much difference between Tideo and Dideo.

Greg,

You're right the lyrics are wrong. Thanks. I found some other versions from the 50's but don't have the recordings.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Feb 08 - 10:28 AM

I just posted this information on another Mudcat thread on this song, but felt that it fit better on this thread:

Subject: RE: Lyr Req: You'll be an angel by and by
From: Azizi - PM
Date: 23 Feb 08 - 10:17 AM

Speaking of great versions of "Sail Away Ladies", check out this YouTube video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IJvNcm2ZvnM


Excerpt from Peter, Bethany & Rufus: The Spirit of Woodstock. Bethany and Rufus play with Mady Kouyate (kora) Bong Jean Baptiste (percussion) and Sheila Anozier (dance).
Added: February 12, 2008

-snip-

Bethany visits Mudcat and I hope she sees this post.

Bethany, that video is wonderful! I love the sound of your voice and I love the merging of the African kora and drum with the bass and the electric guitar. The instrumentation is wonderful!

Thanks so much for posting that video.

-end of repost-

Also, I failed to mention in my original post that I also liked the addition of a dancer's interpretation of the song and music.

Your version of that song rocks!

[No pun intended]

:o)


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Feb 08 - 10:52 AM

Here's the lyrics that were sung by Bethany in that video whose link is posted above:

{I apologize for any errors in my transcription}

Sail Away, Lady

Hush little baby don't you cry
Mama's gonna love you till she die

Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock-um
Daddy

I gotta home in Tennessee
That's the place I wanna be
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock-um

When I get my new house done
Give my old one to my son
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock-um
Daddy

Don't you rock um
Don't you rock um
Don't you
Don't you rock
Don't you

I got ah letter from Charlotte town
Old Saint Louey is burnin done
Sail,away lady, sail away
Sail, away lady sail away
Sail, away lady sail away
But don't you rock-um
Daddy

Hush little baby, don't you cry
You'll be an angel by and by
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock, Daddy
Don't you rock-um
Daddy

Don't you rock um
Don't you rock
Don't don't
Don't you rock um


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Feb 08 - 11:01 AM

In addition to that "RE: Lyr Req: You'll be an angel by and by" thread, I just find this thread on the song "Sail Away Lady":

thread.cfm?threadid=102897
Sail Away Ladies (Don't You Rock Me, Daddy-o)

And the funny thing is that I'm the one who started that thread on June 28th, 2007.

I'll blame my forgetting this on the Mudcat search engine which went wacky some time ago rather than admitting that I'm having any senior moments.

:o)


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Big Jim from Jackson
Date: 23 Feb 08 - 11:27 AM

Re: Richie's post of 31 Dec 06---Van Morrison was inspired by Lonnie Donegan's version of "Don't You Rock Me Dady O" Lonnie uses the same words.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: Azizi
Date: 23 Feb 08 - 11:41 AM

Here's a link to another interesting version of "Sail Away Lady":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deU6sio56BQ
rising appalachia live-Sail Away Ladies

"live warehouse show at Ghost Town Studios in Swannanoa, North Carolina"
Added: January 26, 2007


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: BanjoRay
Date: 24 Feb 08 - 09:06 AM

Here's the classic Uncle Bunt Stephens instrumental version of Sail Away Ladies which won the Henry Ford fiddle competition back in the twenties played by Rafe Stefanini and another fiddler (could be his daughter?).
Lovely stuff.
Ray


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Subject: RE: Origin: Sail Away Ladies
From: GUEST,Rob
Date: 26 Dec 17 - 11:18 PM

See this thread is pretty old and apologize if posting repeat information.

"Big" (or East) Saint Louis - I don't think this lyric has to do with anything other than what it says. Saint Louis had a massive fire in 1849 and I'd think that event would be a more likely source for folk lyrics.


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