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Origins: Heigh ho, nobody home / Ravenscroft?

31 Jul 12 - 11:16 PM (#3384427)
Subject: Origins: Heigh ho, nobody home / Ravenscroft?
From: Haruo

I was just looking through (indexing, actually) a small hymnal supplement, Sing and Rejoice (Orlando Schmidt, ed.), published by the Seventh Day Adventists in 1979, and stumbled across a four-part, three-stanza round entitled "Jesus, Jesus", the music of which bears a close resemblance to "Heigh ho, nobody home". They attribute the words to "Alf Siemens and Tom Graff", and the music to "T. Ravenscroft, 1635". I've looked at the various threads here on "Heigh ho, nobody home", and haven't found any reference to Ravenscroft as either composer or (more likely) collector/editor of the tune. And Ravenscroft died in 1635; his publications that are likely to contain such a tune appeared in 1609 and 1611.

Haruo


31 Jul 12 - 11:41 PM (#3384433)
Subject: RE: Origins: Heigh ho, nobody home / Ravenscroft?
From: Haruo

I have a parallel thread at hymnary.org, here. Feel free to post either place or both.

Haruo


01 Aug 12 - 02:47 AM (#3384469)
Subject: RE: Origins: Three Blind Mice / Ravenscroft?
From: Haruo

Incidentally, it appears from a reference in Wikipedia that Ravenscroft also was the first to publish "Three Blind Mice", again probably earlier than the 1620 cited by MMario in another thread here.


01 Aug 12 - 08:14 AM (#3384539)
Subject: RE: Origins: Heigh ho, nobody home / Ravenscroft?
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)

Haruo

See this Greg Lindahl's page: Ravenscroft Songbook - Hey, Ho, Nobody Home. The source is given as Pammelia and there's a link to the facsimile page.

(If you go to the songbook page you'll find Three Blind Mice too).
Mick


01 Aug 12 - 10:47 AM (#3384616)
Subject: RE: Origins: Heigh ho, nobody home / Ravenscroft?
From: Haruo

Thanks very much, Mick!


03 Oct 13 - 04:31 AM (#3563851)
Subject: RE: Origins: Heigh ho, nobody home / Ravenscroft?
From: Jack Campin

Ravenscroft's original was in five parts - the last line is half-length. It's not often sung that way today.