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The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'

06 Sep 19 - 02:06 PM (#4007601)
Subject: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: GUEST,Robin Tell-Drake

I'm thinking of Randy Dandy-O which I know from Tom Lewis, but I did see in similar form here: Randy Dandy Oh. "Soon we'll be driving her off down the hill," said of a ship afloat.

I feel like I heard an explanation of this phrase somewhere along the line, but I can't place what it means. Sailing a certain stretch is like going downhill because the winds are favorable, or something? Literally downhill because of a bulge in the geoid? It's just one more maritime reference that's familiar to my ear without my properly understanding it, and I keep hoping to catch up with those in the long run.

Thanks!


06 Sep 19 - 02:55 PM (#4007605)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: Backwoodsman

I’ve assumed it means directly down-wind - the most efficient and speediest point of sailing for a square-rigger.

I could be wrong though - I recall being wrong once before...


07 Sep 19 - 10:31 AM (#4007682)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: GUEST,Starship

"I could be wrong though - I recall being wrong once before..."

Yaeh but that's when you thought you'd made a mistake.


08 Sep 19 - 03:21 AM (#4007761)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: GUEST,Starship

Great site for nautical terms at the following link, but no joy regarding 'down the hill'. http://www.marinewaypoints.com/learn/glossary/glossary.shtml


08 Sep 19 - 12:13 PM (#4007805)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: Tattie Bogle

Is that why, in the song, "Three Score and Ten" it's "from Yarmouth DOWN to Scarborough" when geographically speaking it's UP?! I've often puzzled over that one!


08 Sep 19 - 02:40 PM (#4007824)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: Snuffy

Could "Down the hill" simply mean heading south (as on a map), and once you've rounded the Horn you'd be going uphill?


08 Sep 19 - 04:12 PM (#4007832)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: Lighter

I seem to recall that that's the way Stan Hugill once explained it.


08 Sep 19 - 11:17 PM (#4007965)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: EBarnacle

In three score and ten, I believe down refers to riding the prevailing wind, as in "Downeast" for Maine.


09 Sep 19 - 08:08 AM (#4008027)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: Bruce D

In general, running downhill for sailing ships means that you have the wind from behind.

Another meaning (downhill run) is the last leg of a voyage and you are heading home.

It can also mean that in heavy sea going down the back of a wave quite dangerous if the wind is coming from the other direction.

Bruce D

(21 years at sea including Tall ships).


12 Sep 19 - 12:52 PM (#4008568)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: GUEST,Robin Tell-Drake

Now you mention, that's one other spot I've heard it: David Crosby, in Southern Cross. I had a feeling I'd run across the notion elsewhere. "Downhill run."

Thanks!

R


13 Sep 19 - 08:56 PM (#4008730)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: Charley Noble

Snuffy has it right. Going "down the hill" to a deep-water sailor meant heading south to Cape Horn or the Cape of Good Hope.

Cheerily,
Charlie Ipcar


16 Sep 19 - 12:17 PM (#4009117)
Subject: RE: The nautical meaning of 'down the hill'
From: JHW

There's an advert for WWF on my screen today in this thread in the middle of the 9 Sept Bruce D post. (I'm a member anyway)
Never seen one IN a post before - see other threads on topic.