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BS: The other recipe thread is too long

07 Mar 21 - 01:08 PM (#4096510)
Subject: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I can't even load it enough to make a blicky to it without going away and coming back.

Blicky.

I did something different with my rabbit: when I cut it up usually I put it all in the stew, then do the take-meat-off-bones bit for the messy pieces.

This time I put all the messy pieces into a small pot with an unpeeled onion, some whole peppercorns, and some sea salt.

The plan had been to take the meat iff those bones and add it to the stew with the rest of the rabbit. Instead I stood there over the sieve and ate all that meat while the stew cooked.

And I ended up with an exact ice-cube tray-full of rabbit broth now freezing up for later cooking.

The stew involved browning the big pieces (dredged in onion powder, garlic powder and paprika, forgetting the salt, oops) in goose fat, deglazing with white wine, adding in onion and lost of garlic, put rabbit back in pot, cover with chopped cabbage, add some chicken broth, into oven. It is smelling marvelous. It will be finished with thyme and parsley.


07 Mar 21 - 02:14 PM (#4096517)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Rabbit can take a largish amount of garlic without it being too much.

The best paté I ever had was a rabbit paté bought in a small shop near the Mont-Saint-Michel. Next time, if you can resist eating it all, you could try making paté with those fiddly bits of meat.


07 Mar 21 - 02:23 PM (#4096519)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Bonzo's recipe was moved over here to make more sense than being a one-off, and in order to still let Mrrzy's post start this recipe thread I've transcribed Bonzo's chronologically earlier post and am adding it here.



Subject: How to prepare Argentine Asado!!!
From: Bonzo3legs - PM
Date: 07 Mar 21 - 03:28 AM

How to prepare Argentine Asado!!!


07 Mar 21 - 05:43 PM (#4096545)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ooh I love living alone:

When my stew was done (I totally forgot the thyme and parsley) I fished out the flanks and ate'm, fished out an arm and ate it, and then stood there and, with my fingers, ate all the cabbage off the top.


07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM (#4096559)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Yeah, Mrrzy. The things you get away with.

I, for example, just ate a Sunday dinner of smoked oysters and crackers.


07 Mar 21 - 07:09 PM (#4096560)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I looked out of the bedroom window this morning at the heavy hoar on the grass and thought to meself: "pot roast."

I had a hunk of brisket weighing in at one kilo. Now I know you yanks like to cook a brisket weighing about ten pounds, but there are only two of us, and my hunk yields enough for two meals.

So I get my smaller Le Creuset, whack up the heat, melt a big knob of butter and brown the meat all round. I stick that to one side and then fry for five minutes some big hunks of carrot, celery and onion. I put the beef on top of that and insert into the pot a bouquet garni (a bunch of fresh parsley, bay leaf and lemon thyme, all tied with string), and add half a pint of beef stock from a cube, half a pint of the soaking water from a handful of dried porcini and half a pint of some home-made veg stock I happened to have lying around. Something of a variable feast, but I reckon you can use whatever liquids you happen to have. It just needs to come well above half-way up the piece of meat. A touch of seasoning, then at least four hours in a very low oven (120C, yanks go figure).

We had that with me home-grown, well-frosted parsnips, roast spuds, cauliflower and a few carrot batons. The gravy in the pot was exquisite, though I extracted enough for two and thickened it ever so slightly with flour. It was a feast to remember, and I have enough beef left for tomorrow with a very buttery jacket spud and some roasted tomatoes.

Good living!


08 Mar 21 - 03:08 AM (#4096593)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL

beef stock from a cube
Steve, whose cubes do you use? I gave up on Oxo cubes and their ilk after examining the ingredients list: nowadays I use Knorr Stock Pot, which my aging taste buds find not bad.


08 Mar 21 - 04:34 AM (#4096601)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I use the Kallo organic ones, not because I think they have the best flavour (I don't know) but because they're organic. I always make my own veg stock and I usually have enough of my own chicken stock, but I rarely get the chance to make beef stock.


08 Mar 21 - 08:16 AM (#4096621)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I like Better Than Bouillon. Glop, not cubes. Analog rather than digital amount calibration.


08 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM (#4096637)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I find all stock cubes to be too salty. By the time you've used enough cubes you've got too much salt... I used the beef cube in that recipe along with the porcini water, enabling me to use just half of the cube. And I think that Marigold bouillon powder is the spawn of the devil.


08 Mar 21 - 12:22 PM (#4096665)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Things to do when you live alone but cooked a whole rabbit:

Take all the meat off the other arm and put it on a salad. Lettuce cukes almonds, vinaigrette.

Take all the meat off one leg and stuff a pepper.

Eat one leg cold, like cold fried chicken, outdoors in the sunshine, like a picnic.

Make an entirely different stew, curry or something, with the saddle and the liquid from the original stew.


08 Mar 21 - 07:37 PM (#4096735)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I made the traditional Portuguese soup caldo verde tonight. I had about 150g of dolce chorizo, which I skinned. I chopped up two-thirds of it small and fried it for five minutes in some extra virgin olive oil in my big sauté pan. Then into that pan went some sliced onion and a couple of cloves of smashed garlic (squashed with the flat of a knife blade). While that was softening up I peeled about six good-sized spuds and cut them up into 3/4 inch cubes. The spuds went in the pan along with about a litre of stock (I used half-strength home-made chicken stock, but you can use just water).

After about 15 minutes the spuds were cooked. I carefully fished out about half of them, then I whizzed everything else in the pan until smooth. Then I put the reserved chunks of spud back in along with half a pound of very finely-shredded greens (I had a sweetheart organic cabbage, but anything leafy will do). While that was simmering away (do a seasoning check), I cut the rest of the sausage into thin circles and dry-fried them until quite crispy in a separate frying pan.

Once the greens were cooked I ladled the thick soup into bowls, topped it with the chorizo slices and sprinkled extra virgin olive oil on top. Delicioso!

So far, fairly authentic, though I confess to having cheated in order to make this a hearty meal and not just a big bowl of soup. In Portugal they'd have it with corn bread, but instead of that I threw in a can of cannellini beans with the cabbage. Not exactly purist but begod it did the trick.


09 Mar 21 - 07:04 AM (#4096802)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

We don't cook on Wednesdays. It's cheese night, so we have cheese (duh) with matzo crackers (me) or Bath Olivers (she). I must have a neutral crunchy vehicle for my cheese. I can't understand anyone wanting weird herby or seedy crackers which detract from the beautiful cheese. Bread would be a bit too bulky in consideration of the other stuff we eat with the cheese. We have a hunk of Montagnolo d'affine, a soft blue German cheese which is far superior to the dismal Cambozola, and some Wookey Hole cheddar. We scoff that with a selection of nuts, nocellara olives from Sicily (our favourites), caperberries and cherry tomatoes, maybe with a few thin slices of mild chorizo or salami or a sweet potato falafel or three.

But Mrs Steve has a potentially dodgy dental appointment tomorrow, so the crunchy stuff might not be apropos. I have some caldo verde left over from last night which can only improve with keeping. I'll be able to bulk that up quite easily for a bowl of comfort food if she's been under the drill/pliers. The cheese can wait until Friday night, but the wine can't (we're definite wine weekenders with just the Wednesday oasis, which is sacrosanct, a tradition I'd say).


09 Mar 21 - 07:40 AM (#4096806)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I always eat cheese with bread, ever since I lived in France. It has to be decent bread, of course. I can't understand anyone wanting to eat cheese with any kind of biscuit or cracker.


09 Mar 21 - 08:11 AM (#4096811)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well I love cheese with bread too. My abiding memory of that was one evening after a tough day's teaching in the summer of '76 (remember that one?). A mate and I toddled down to the Angel in Rotherhithe. A couple of pints, crusty bread some home-made pickle and a big slab of strong cheddar - bliss. He hardly drank anything so he was driving. You need mates like that. I slept for twelve hours that night!

We might have bread with cheese of a lunchtime, but there's too much else going on on our cheesy Wednesday night. Matzo crackers are just flour and water, very thin, no salt, no fat, light a feather, 19 calories each - I love 'em!


09 Mar 21 - 02:02 PM (#4096876)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

He who controls the Spice controls the Universe

perchance a bit of cheese caused dreams


09 Mar 21 - 02:09 PM (#4096877)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I wasn't suggesting that you should set fire to a feather whilst eating your cheese. The burning smell would put you off your food.


10 Mar 21 - 06:24 AM (#4096982)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

By the way:

"I can't even load it enough to make a blicky to it without going away and coming back."

I just click on the little d next to the number. You have to read upwards but I've got used to doing that after fifteen years...You get the most recent page quickly, no matter how long the thread is.


10 Mar 21 - 08:28 AM (#4096997)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Back to the bread or crackers bit.

Blues or a soft ones like Brie don't usually work too well on bread for me.

I recently found that I liked the combination of Danish Blue on Ryvita but, more generally, I think the plain old cream cracker is as good as anything. I'm not a fan of the "biscuits for cheese" type boxes I sometimes see at Christmas. Most of their contents detract from the taste of the cheese.


10 Mar 21 - 09:52 AM (#4097010)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

For softer blue cheeses, I go for St Agur and Montagnolo, which in m'humble are far better than Danish Blue or Cambozola. A nice lump of Gorgonzola hits the mark too, or even Dolcellate, though that's a good one for making a creamy chicken pasta sauce. Last time I went to Gloucester Services they had a huge wheel of Gorgonzola that was so ripe that it could be scooped out with a ladle into a pot. I'm not a big fan of Stilton because it's far too variable and not always that good. A superb blue, which must be freshly cut before it starts to blacken, is Bath Blue. Then there's Stichelton, which is made near where Stilton is made and made in the same way except that unpasteurised milk is used. It's very classy and better than any Stilton I've ever tried.

I find Ryvita to be a real ordeal, like eating a dried loofah. Jacob's crackers are so-so, and you could try Bath Olivers instead (Waitrose?) - they are a bit softer, neutral in taste and uncoloured, a real treat with any cheese.


10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM (#4097012)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Nigel Parsons

Mrrzy:
You've probably been on here long enough to know, but I thought I'd just comment.
If a thread is too long to load/retain, you can load just the first 50 comments by clicking on the blue 'number of messages' number opposite the title.
Better yet, clicking on the blue 'd' beside that number gives you the most recent 50 messages (in descending order).
These options were introduced to make it easier for people whose systems had problems loading long discussions.
Hope this helps, and that I'm not 'preaching to the converted'.
Cheers.


10 Mar 21 - 09:59 AM (#4097013)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I have been wondering how to get back to eating cheeses, without bread or crackers to convey them...


10 Mar 21 - 10:10 AM (#4097016)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Thinly slice an onion, cut a hunk of cheddar into small pieces and put that lot into a baking tray with a splash of milk. Grill for 10 min until all is sloppy and oozy. Nirvana. Failing that, eat the cheese with some cherry tomatoes and some olives and a few slices of salami. For soft cheeses just scoop some up on to a stick of celery or slices of red pepper, cut lengthways.


10 Mar 21 - 10:37 AM (#4097022)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

You could eat the cheese with a baked potato - not too hot so as not to melt the cheese rather than just softening it.


10 Mar 21 - 11:46 AM (#4097028)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator

I've got some sea bass fillets. Any suggestions about what to do with them?


10 Mar 21 - 12:01 PM (#4097030)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Hadn't included chilli in my "One-Pot Cooking" for ages but, yesterday, came home from my grocery shop with a Tesco stir-fry medley that included one - half of which I added to the pot (beginning by sautéing the mix, as usual).

Could be quite some time before I add another as, with a tingling stiff-upper-lip (waste not want not), I quietly coughed and burped my way through the pottages - barely noticing the spice mix that I usually enjoy.

In other words, I don't like chilli because I do like spices and veggies/non-chilli non-carne!


10 Mar 21 - 12:24 PM (#4097039)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I've sometimes been tempted by those stir-fry bags but I always vow never to buy them again, as I have to pick over the contents to get rid of all the woody chunks of cabbage stalk.


10 Mar 21 - 12:36 PM (#4097042)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...the rest of the above medley was okay, Jos - baby corn, mangetout, broccoli and salad onion.


10 Mar 21 - 01:11 PM (#4097043)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

SPB, your sea bass fillets. When we have sea bass or another tasty slab of fish we sometimes have it on a bed of lentils. Chop up an onion and some celery and fry until softened in extra virgin olive oil with some herbs (thyme and a bay leaf is good) and a clove of garlic that you've squashed with the flat of a knife blade. Add a glass of white wine and let it bubble for a minute. Stir in some green or brown lentils, a small handful of porcini mushrooms that you've soaked and chopped up, a big glug of tomato paste and some vegetable stock. Simmer it all until the lentils are done, half an hour maybe. Adjust the seasoning and add more stock if needed. When you're nearly there with that, cook the fish very simply by frying it in hot olive oil. Skin side down for about four minutes (hopefully you'll get the skin crispy) then flip it for two more minutes. Lay the fish skin side up on top of the lentils on plates. If you've got some fresh parsley, chop some up and sprinkle over the grub. Lovely job.


11 Mar 21 - 01:38 PM (#4097168)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

When it comes to food preparation I am utilitarin and cheap. It has to be instant or quick and easy like chocolate or peanut butter and fruit sandwiches. So for lunch today I noticed a nice avocado. I smashed it together with about 1/3 tangy tarter sauce and spread it on open faced pumpernickle. One slice got color and heat with a light sprinkle of spiracha and the other a mild smoked paparika. Slice into squares. Salt to taste.
I thought it was good with horse radish cheese and a can of Lemomatta.

Steve if you eat alot of fish, your carbon 14 test will indicate you are a hundred years older than you are. But why do they call it brain food?


11 Mar 21 - 02:54 PM (#4097180)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I eat a lot of fish because I like fish. Tomorrow we are having Skrei cod, the best cod I've ever had. Our lovely fishmonger Tracey gets it in every Thursday in season (Jan to April) and she saves the thickest fillets for me if I ask her. Mrs Steve is in a delicate buccal state, having just had a somewhat complicated extraction, so it's soft food for now. But soft food does not mean bland. I'll simply fry the fish, in butter I should think, and we'll have it with fluffy mash instead of chips. Greens of some kind, not too crunchy, and I'll make some parsley sauce á la Delia Smith. I've been known, when the mood takes me, to marinade white fish for a short while in a mix of extra virgin olive oil, freshly-squeezed lemon juice, fresh thyme and a touch of fresh garlic. When the Skrei goes out of season I'll be waiting with bated breath for the red mullet to come in. We also eat mucho tuna and smoked mackerel. Hake, halibut, skate, dabs, anything. Even Alaskan pollack, which tastes great although it goes a bit off-white when baked. And salmon. Only ever wild red Pacific salmon. I will not buy any fish that has been farmed.


11 Mar 21 - 03:21 PM (#4097182)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jack Campin

The oldest recipes in the world


11 Mar 21 - 06:10 PM (#4097210)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Only a few millennia, forsooth!

No, but, fun article.


11 Mar 21 - 07:38 PM (#4097224)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

I'll pass on the carob but the chicken looks great.

Licorice and citron what a blast!


12 Mar 21 - 09:56 AM (#4097298)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Among the few things I regret about moving from Ottawa to Stratford is the lack of a decent fishmonger anywhere in sensible driving distance. Ottawa is a big city with an airport, so ocean fish is flown in every day; here, not so much. Now, fish comes in two kinds: farmed and frozen, with the exception (in season) of lake trout and pickerel from Lake Huron. Even the mussels and oysters are farmed, raised in the coastal waters of Prince Edward Island.

It's enough to drive one to canned sprats. Almost.

A friend from the gym gave us a "paleo" cookbook a couple of years ago, but I have yet to try any of the recipes. When I flipped through it, I was discouraged by the many dishes with ingredients I would have to hunt and gather in faraway places such as Kitchener and London, Now that I'm usually feeding only myself (and the cats), such expeditions are vanishingly unlikely. I have a hard enough time moving my arse to Sobey's once a fortnight for oranges, yoghourt, milk, and frozen veg.


12 Mar 21 - 07:15 PM (#4097378)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I remember what that self-sufficiency guru, John Seymour, said about raising free-range pigs, in as happy an environment that we could provide for them (which he did). I can't recall the exact quote, but he said that the good-life pig he'd grown for food that he was about to kill was happily munching away on roots one minute and in heaven the next. That's how we should think, I suppose, about wild ocean fish. I guess it takes them longer to die than John's pig, but it's hard to see how we could do it better. For me, it's no farmed fish, only wild, and fish only caught by sustainable methods that don't involve by-catch or wrecking the sea floor. That'll do me. Suit yourself.


13 Mar 21 - 05:03 AM (#4097417)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Not sure if Chinese wet-markets, where fish, etc., are kept alive for freshness (photos from a Either way, for those who have never tried tofu, or not had it a second time because it was "too bland", I challenge you to try this:

Heat some vegetable oil in a frying pan before adding some soft tofu, then soy sauce. Place that mix atop some toast and, perhaps, mop up the remaining oil/sauce with another piece.

Imagine the most creamy scrambled egg you ever had and a chook with a sore rear...


13 Mar 21 - 06:23 AM (#4097421)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well I wouldn't buy fish that way, but you don't know that that's where coronavirus came from. For scrambled egg for just me, I beat up three eggs with salt and pepper. No milk. The beating is gentle only. I get a nonstick small frying pan (£3.99 Lidl) and melt a big knob of butter on high heat. In goes the egg mix, then straight away off goes the heat but leave the pan on the ring. Mush that around mercilessly with a spatula until it's underdone. Then go over to your buttered toast and slap it on. The eggs are in the pan for less than a minute. They should be soft and creamy with no runny bits. We all have our own way. I've never eaten tofu and probably never knowingly will. Make sure they didn't chop down too much rain forest to produce the soya beans.


13 Mar 21 - 06:39 AM (#4097423)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Yes, Steve - much of the sad slash-and-burn that has destroyed large areas of rainforest in South America has been for growing soya beans...but not sure how much of the produce is for livestock vs. human feed..?


13 Mar 21 - 07:08 AM (#4097427)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I'm doing a risotto tonight. For two of us, very generous portions, I use 300g risotto rice (I have carnaroli). I need about 700 ml stock, which will be half home-made chicken stock and half the water from boiling the veg I'm going to include. So I'll start by boiling some tenderstem, some peas and some green beans, a handful of each, in unsalted water, keeping that water and setting the cooked veg aside.

I'll dry-fry 100 g of chopped pancetta until nearly crispy in my smaller Le Creuset casserole. To that I'll add some thinly sliced onion and a bit of butter if there's not quite enough fat. I want the onion soft but not coloured. Then I'll add some fresh thyme and the rice, stirring to coat the grains with fat. Then in goes a small glass of white wine. I'll turn up the heat to get that bubbling, and then...

...And then I cheat shamelessly. I'll add 600 ml of my hot stock all at once, stir it in, get it to a simmer then put the lid on and forget it for 15 minutes.

The next step is crucial. I'll remove the lid and stir and beat the rice like a lunatic for about three minutes. This gets it nice and creamy, as though I hadn't cheated at all. It also very reliable in getting the rice perfectly al dente every time, not the easiest thing with risottos. And it means I get to sit down for 15 minutes, preferably with an aperitif (come on, it's Saturday), instead of standing over the stove adding bits of stock and stirring until my arm nearly drops off.

In goes some seasoning and the reserved veg to heat through. Then in go a big dollop of creme fraiche (butter if you like), two big handfuls of grated Parmesan and a good sprinkling of fresh parsley (or not, Maggie). If it's all a bit too stiff add a bit more hot stock.

It can sit for a few minutes while you pour out the vino, then ladle into bowls and eat it in front of the telly. Good living!


13 Mar 21 - 08:20 AM (#4097435)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Alpro, who make soya milk as well as lots of other stuff, mostly get their soya beans from Europe or Canada. They have claimed in the past not to get them from felled rain forest areas. If I were buying tofu (unlikely, as I only eat actual food), I would be checking its source. Incidentally, I buy lots of their unsweetened oat milk but not the soya milk. On offer in Sainsbury's for a quid at the moment.


13 Mar 21 - 08:29 AM (#4097436)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...in terms of limiting food-miles, oat milk (which I didn't like a few years ago but should probably try again) is more environmentally friendly for us in England...although, I seem to recall a Country File article looking at growing a variety of soya bean here..?


13 Mar 21 - 09:07 AM (#4097437)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Tofu here is mostly from Twin Oaks, one of the few remaining working communes. But no, I don't eat it either.


13 Mar 21 - 09:42 AM (#4097441)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I saw someone on the telly making Parmesan crisps the other day. I'm going to make some this evening. They look like the kind of thing I would eat 50 of in an unstoppable frenzy. I'll keep you posted...


13 Mar 21 - 10:13 AM (#4097447)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator

Steve,

lentils don't appeal to me, but cooking in white wine + a medley of wild forest mushrooms does. I have two jars of dried mushrooms from a Czech forest.....


13 Mar 21 - 10:16 AM (#4097448)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: SPB-Cooperator

The cooking times are important.


13 Mar 21 - 11:52 AM (#4097467)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The biggest danger is overcooking fish because you're not confident that it's cooked through. With fish the price it is, that would be a tragedy. Total frying time for sea bass fillets would be no more than 5-6 minutes in all at medium heat. I fried two very thick cod fillets last night. Five minutes skin side, two minutes top side. It was perfect done like that.

There are lentils and lentils. I usually fall back on the little brown puy lentils, but what I really want is the Italian green Castelluccio lentils. I've had trouble finding those. The green jobs that seem to come from Canada are not a patch.


13 Mar 21 - 11:53 AM (#4097468)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I tried the lentil recipe (adapted to suit what I had to hand) with my sea bass last night. I wasn't sure about the lentils but it was surprisingly good. Thank you Steve.


13 Mar 21 - 12:08 PM (#4097473)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Mine were brown lentils, but I'm not sure if they were Puy ones as they were in an unlabelled jar as the previous wrapping had split.


14 Mar 21 - 11:30 AM (#4097602)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Not sure if others have a better memory for the taste of foods than events, etc., but I just had my first (stoned!) date for what must be at least 3 decades, and the toffee-like taste was most-familiar and not unpleasant.

Got them as a change from sultanas on my shop last week - but honestly can't remember why..?!


14 Mar 21 - 11:47 AM (#4097604)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...I remember now - it was seeing groves of date palms on cycling's UAE Tour.


14 Mar 21 - 02:29 PM (#4097622)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I keep misreading Puny Lentils.


14 Mar 21 - 04:37 PM (#4097637)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

After a cock-up last night, I've perfected my Parmesan crisps. Heat the oven to 180C. Get a big baking tray and cover it with baking paper. Grate Parmesan finely. Put heaped tablespoons of cheese on it at regular intervals. They can be quite close together because they won't spread. Persuade each blob of cheese gently into a disc about two inches across. Don't sweat it but make the discs roughly equally thick all the way across. The cooking time is crucial. Ten minutes, too much, burnt flavour. Eight minutes, pretty good. I might try seven next time, but eight was good. Very nice with the Prosecco aperitif. In fact, we devoured them. I can just see me of a summer night by the barbie, burgers and bangers a-sizzling, quaffing the fizz with a plate of Parmesan crisps and a bowl of nocellara olives... Nirvana calling!


14 Mar 21 - 04:52 PM (#4097641)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...not sure if that can be done with any of the vegan cheeses currently available, but I know Violife (with coconut oil) slices make a pretty good grilled cheese on toast - sometimes sprinkled with mixed herbs but always with tomato sauce, for me.

Maybe you could try a sprinkle of herbs next time, Steve..?


14 Mar 21 - 05:01 PM (#4097642)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I'm not talking about cheese on toast. This is Parmesan on its own, made into crisps. Whatever "vegan cheese" is, and I won't be looking it up, it isn't cheese. Incidentally, Parmesan can never be vegetarian. If calf rennet isn't used, it can't be called Parmesan. I will not be consuming cheese with herbs added any time soon. The reason for this, as hundreds of my posts here will testify, is that I seek out the best cheese I can find, and I will not adulterate good cheese. Even if I have it on toast.


17 Mar 21 - 12:56 PM (#4098066)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Mad household panic yesterday as our kitchen floor was inundated with water from an extremely inaccessible leaking pipe. Our plumber, after mucho turning of the air blue* - we're well used to him, and Mrs Steve knew him as a little lad in the primary school she taught in :-) - he managed after several hours to fix it, a few traumas on the way but without dismantling the whole kitchen.

So. I grabbed a bag of my bolognese sauce from the freezer, fried a chopped-up red pepper and some cherry toms and threw them into the sauce along with some dried ancho chilli and a dusting of hot chilli powder. A good dose of dried oregano also went in. We had that with boiled basmati rice, a blob of creme fraiche (we didn't have any soured cream or guacamole) and a sprinkling of El Paso green jalapeños from a jar.

Delicious. We'll be doing it again, panic or no panic!

Plumber quotes:

*"Oh f**k, I haven't got half the f**king kit I need to do this..."

"What the f**k have I f***ing done with that f***ing pipe bend..."

"Sh*t, I f***ing hate water...I'm a f***ing plumber and I f***ing hate f***ing water..."

"B***ocks, I can't f***ing do this b*st**d, what the f**k am I gonna f***ing do?"

"Jesus, it's a right f**king game is this..."

etc...


17 Mar 21 - 04:10 PM (#4098090)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Things not to want to hear, like Oops from you surgeon, during surgery.

Did a lazy thing: got a container of lobster bisque from Wegman's soup bar, and some salmon and some tuna from the sushi counter. Fried an onion in butter with some cayenne, added the fish, deglazed with a smidge of white wine, added the bisque, brought to almost-boil. Chopped the daikon radish garnish on top. Yum.

Saved the hot mustard and ginger.


17 Mar 21 - 05:09 PM (#4098106)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...re the language, you don't mind telling me to put a plug in it, Steve!


17 Mar 21 - 06:16 PM (#4098113)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I don't recall railing against your language...?

That's right, Mrrzy, not quite what one wants to hear, but, as I said, we're used to him, and we know it helps him to fight through and get the job done...


17 Mar 21 - 07:06 PM (#4098119)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Yesterday I was at my discount gourmet grocery and they had some large lovely unsliced loves of some kind of French bread, wrapped two to a parcel. I bought two of these, thinking I'd keep one for myself and donate the other three loaves to the community fridge I help stock. When I got to the fridge I realized I couldn't unwrap the pair without leaving the other one looking exposed or not professionally packaged by the store. So I donated both double packages and this morning made myself a loaf of my usual whole wheat/white flour mix bread. And on this bright but cool windy day I've finally started a pot of lentil soup for myself. I've been meaning to make some for a while, but kept putting it off. It smells wonderful! I'll probably have some pollock (floured, sauteed in butter, with lemon) along with my soup and a salad and another slice of bread.


17 Mar 21 - 08:58 PM (#4098133)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Gotta keep eating the fish! We eat tons of fish, smoked mackerel from the supermarket, unsalted tuna sandwiches, tuna with pasta, that lovely sockeye wild salmon from the cold Pacific, at least one dollop per week of (usually) chunky white fish from Tracey, our lovely fishmonger half a mile away at the beach house shop... It costs us, but bejaysus, if we didn't support the local fishmonger, we'd lose her... I'll eat any fish with relish...

In the last nine months I've had two really serious bouts of cellulitis, which totally pees me off. On Monday I have to have a blood test at my doc's behest to see if I have diabetes, which I haven't got. Sheesh. I shall eat fish and eschew puddings the night before. And no booze. I have cod. I have peas to mush. I have organic spuds to chip. I feel really well. Bugger the medics, eh...? Grr...


18 Mar 21 - 01:24 AM (#4098154)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Neat new St Paddy idea: arrange fruit on round platter into concentric arcs of colors for the rainbow, with a little pile of golden something to one side for the pot of gold.


18 Mar 21 - 03:25 AM (#4098164)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL

Mustard?????


18 Mar 21 - 05:22 AM (#4098168)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

What will you use for the blue fruit?

A rainbow salad might be easier. A bit of cold cooked red cabbage goes a lovely clear blue.


18 Mar 21 - 09:18 AM (#4098187)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Carrot and ginger soup today. It’s spring, so the onions are sprouting in their bin — time to use them or lose them.

The beer fridge has gone to the town dump, so my cache of frozen soup stock is now in the chest freezer. When moving it, I noted two litres of ham stock. The last time I boiled up a ham bone was well before the pandemic began, so I guess I had better use that.


18 Mar 21 - 10:44 AM (#4098194)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Blueberries.

Not sure what the little orange fruit were. Smaller than grapes, bigger than blueberries. Had a kind of dark spot at one end, like a stem scar or strawberry seed thingie.


18 Mar 21 - 11:01 AM (#4098201)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

The fish was disappointing. I tried every way I could to see the contents of the box and it just said wild-caught pollock, but I think it was treated with that sodium tri -long name stuff that holds water. It was a sodden mess once it thawed. I'm going to have to thaw on a wire rack and see if that helps the liquid drain from the fish. One of the most dishonest treatments of fillets is to soak them in water with this chemical then freeze them and get a lot more per pound for that extra water.

The soup was great. The Lebanese restaurant where I first ate it serves it with some toasted strips of pita bread that I'd like to figure out how to fix next.


18 Mar 21 - 01:53 PM (#4098223)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri

Mrrzy, kumquat? They look kinda like "honey, I shrunk the oranges."


18 Mar 21 - 02:00 PM (#4098225)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri

I can't stand repeating things too much, but I'm stuck on one recipe for sea bass.
Let it sit for a while with granulated (this is dried and chopped/ground/little-ized. It IS garlic, so THERE! And fresh doesn't work when coating the fish with it) garlic and salt. Let it sit, then fry it. I melt some butter, and add lemon, and pour it over the fish, and take 30 seconds to eat it. (Really, it's longer than that.)
The problem is that's so good, I don't want to try anything else. I love the fish. It's a very non-fishy fish.


18 Mar 21 - 03:41 PM (#4098242)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Bingo, Jeri!


18 Mar 21 - 04:12 PM (#4098248)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

If I'm going to bake fish in the oven uncovered, I make a marinade containing extra virgin olive oil, fresh lemon juice, sprigs of fresh lemon thyme, a tiny dash of Tabasco and a clove of garlic that I've bashed with my fist. The fish gets a garlic kiss which is just right, but you're not eating bits of actual garlic. The marinade is just for about half an hour. Just before baking I might get a piece of kitchen towel and soak some of the marinade off the top of the fish, which avoids too much liquid sitting in the fish after cooking. It doesn't matter if you're frying and flipping. I don't want salt anywhere near the fish until it's in the pan, and even then not much.


18 Mar 21 - 07:44 PM (#4098282)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Sounds like ceviche, Steve Shaw. Yum.

I seared a steak and while it was resting put some white wine to deglaze then added the mushroom sauce I had made with some onion garlic cayenne pickles and some Dijon mustard. Served with sour cream. Strogonoffesque. Yum. Some rabbit broth cubes to add a little liquid.


18 Mar 21 - 07:46 PM (#4098283)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Forgot ... The mushrooms were sautéed in snail butter, of course.


18 Mar 21 - 08:00 PM (#4098286)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

..and the steak was seared in duck fat..


18 Mar 21 - 08:15 PM (#4098289)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Ceviche? Er, did you see the bit at the beginning of my post when I said I did it before baking the fish??


18 Mar 21 - 09:47 PM (#4098297)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri

I was wondering why you baked the ceviche'd fish, but decided not to get involved. Your fish. :)


18 Mar 21 - 10:04 PM (#4098299)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

It was just a marinade! Anyway, as I've often said, one man's fish is another man's poisson. If the oven's on anyway, if you're doing home-made oven chips for example, open-baking a chunky piece of skin-on fish (as opposed to wrapping it in foil) is an excellent way of cooking it, and that bit of marinade adds subtle flavour and stops the top from drying out. You can even push the chips to one side (or put them on another tray), once they're nearly done, and just sit the fish on the oily tray for six or seven minutes. And come on, folks. Why are you using garlic dust on your fish when beautiful fresh garlic is so easy to obtain and use? A house without lovely, plump garlic bulbs is like a pub with no beer!


18 Mar 21 - 10:44 PM (#4098302)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ceviche IS just a marinade. The lemon cooks the fish.


19 Mar 21 - 05:25 AM (#4098320)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Ye gods...

A MARINADE FOR CHUNKY FISH (cod, hake, haddock, etc.)

Sufficient for two skin-on fillets. Mix together the juice of half a lemon, a glug of extra virgin olive oil, a sprig or two of lemon thyme (leaves picked if you can be arsed), three drops of Tabasco and a peeled clove of garlic that you've squashed but not chopped. Put this into a shallow bowl and put the fish in it for half an hour before you bake it, turning once or twice. Only season the fish, lightly, immediately before cooking.

Viola!

I will devour smoked mackerel, but smoked salmon in this country is invariably an inferior product made from farmed fish and I avoid it. I will not eat other forms of raw fish.


19 Mar 21 - 06:37 AM (#4098325)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I'd been wondering what "snail butter" was (it sounds revolting), so I looked it up. I am relieved to discover that it neither contains nor originates from snails. It's just garlic and herb butter.
What a relief.


19 Mar 21 - 07:20 AM (#4098327)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I can't imagine what I'd ever use that for. The only time I'll ever "mince" garlic is when I make pesto, and then only half a clove.


19 Mar 21 - 07:43 AM (#4098328)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

You should try gravadlax Steve, I make my own along with pickled herrings, the gravadlax recipe was originaly a salmon recipe but you can use it for any oily fish and it's always great I use it for sea trout and rainbow trout which I catch myself. Although I catch brown trout [ not on purpose ] I never kill them.

Dave H


19 Mar 21 - 12:28 PM (#4098358)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I can't think that I'd ever want to sully a lovely bit of wild red salmon by doing that to it. I don't buy any other kind of salmon. Can't say that I fancy it, Dave.


19 Mar 21 - 04:26 PM (#4098389)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Jos, sorry! Yeah garlic parsley butter *for* snails. I make and freeze it in a long log, so when I want some I slice off a round. A Kerrygold butter amount usually lasts a couple of months.


19 Mar 21 - 04:52 PM (#4098396)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Kerrygold? Grease.


19 Mar 21 - 08:04 PM (#4098422)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I cooked a big pot of Elizabeth David's boeuf en daube today, to be consumed tomorrow evening with our bubble friend. Any stew or daube is ten times better the next day, which is the aim. That was enough cooking for one day, so we fraternised a new fish and chip outlet, Potters, in Bude tonight. Cod in beer batter, chips triple-fried in beef dripping and, of course, mushy peas. It's a restaurant which can't open right now, so they've done the enterprising thing of temporarily converting to a chippy takeout. It was superb. The daube tomorrow, probably untraditionally, will be consumed with mash and some greens. Despite the lack of liquid additions in the recipe, lots of rich gravy is always produced. The recipe is in her book French Provincial Cooking. You really must use the right beef, top rump, cut into little steaks about two or three inches square. The dish is easy, and it's a masterpiece.


19 Mar 21 - 08:09 PM (#4098423)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

You don't have to buy the book just for that. It's on the Guardian website if you google something like "Guardian Elizabeth David daube." Scroll down the rather lengthy article until you reach Rick Stein's bit!


19 Mar 21 - 08:42 PM (#4098427)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri

There's a cultured butter out of Vermont I'm currently in love with. Kerrygold isn't bad, but the Vermont stuff is out of this world. (Maybe we should have a butter thread?)

The weirdest/best thing I did with salmon (it will surely offend someone) is poach it in liquid, the contents of which I don't even remember. I know there was scotch in it. Talisker 10-year old.(Iif the poaching doesn't offend, that surely will.)


19 Mar 21 - 08:55 PM (#4098430)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've poached cod fillets in milk many times. It's wonderful with mash, home-made parsley sauce and something green. Best thing on earth if you happen to have toothache. The only thing I ever do with salmon is fry it in butter or cut it into small chunks and add it at the last minute to a spicy arrabbiata sauce, in which it's cooked in under two minutes. I'm never going to be buying pink salmon or any farmed salmon, and I always ask.


19 Mar 21 - 09:27 PM (#4098435)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jeri

I should stay out of these recipe threads. I'm really craving a nice piece of wild-caught salmon right now. I watch the TV show "The Last Alaskans", and they catch a massive amount of salmon to FEED THEIR SLED DOGS over the winter! Even when I was younger, I'd be crap at pulling a sled, but...


19 Mar 21 - 09:36 PM (#4098436)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

It's expensive, but you don't have eat it that often.


20 Mar 21 - 12:54 PM (#4098532)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I am trying something different because my farmer's market had duck eggs.

Fried some onions in snail butter and hot peppers. Into bowl.

Fried some mushrooms in same pan, with thyme. Into same bowl.

Fried some bacon. Decided it was too sweet, set aside, wiped out pan.

Wilted spinach in the pan. Ate bacon while doing that. Into bowl.

Mixed contents of bowl, then into over-safe dish previously greased with some goose grease.

Beat 2 duck eggs in bowl, poured over veg. Used utensil to push sticking-up bits down into egg.

Grated some cheddar for the top.

Into toaster oven at 350°F.

Not sure if it is a crustless quiche or a frittata or what.

Will report back.


20 Mar 21 - 01:11 PM (#4098536)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Checked: it is pouffy but not browned yet. Smells marvy.


20 Mar 21 - 02:38 PM (#4098556)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Just reminded of this whilst watching Jane McDonald cruising in Australia, and stopping for a pie topped with mashed potato, mushy peas, then gravy in a kind of well made by first pressing the ladle into the pile.

I used to work making wire ware in Adelaide, South Australia, with a chap who, every lunchtime, would follow the same routine so closely it may impress a Geiko in Kyoto practising chado/the Japanese tea ceremony:

He would neatly cut off the top of his pie, drench it with tomato sauce, before neatly placing the pastry lid back on.

(And I bet I've made your weekend with that bit of info!)


20 Mar 21 - 03:36 PM (#4098559)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

It was meh. But fun to make. I think it was closer to a frittata than a crustless quiche.


21 Mar 21 - 01:01 PM (#4098660)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Took a bite of the leftovers on my way to make something yummy, and it was WAY better. Go figure.


22 Mar 21 - 11:05 AM (#4098735)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

I know that daube, Steve. "French Provincial Cooking" was my first really good cookbook (still have it), and Elizabeth David is up there in my pantheon with Marcella Hazan.

I made a batch of carrot-and-ginger soup yesterday that will do me for lunches until maybe Friday. The kitchen was still deliciously scented with onions sauteed in butter when I got up this morning. Great way to start the day.


22 Mar 21 - 11:29 AM (#4098739)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I made a Spanish tortilla last night, more or less following Jamie Oliver. The spuds I used were all wrong, too soft and grainy. But I ate the leftovers for lunch today and it was thoroughly delicious. I haven't been and gone and figgered yet...


22 Mar 21 - 08:05 PM (#4098798)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I know this isn't a recipe, but I've just eaten a guilty late-night tablespoon of Morrison's crunchy peanut butter straight from the jar (own up: it isn't just me...). I read the label: no added salt, no added sugar, no palm oil, 100% peanuts. That'll do me, I thought. Then I read the back label: "ALLERGENS: may contain nuts..."

"May." Bwahahaha!


22 Mar 21 - 09:58 PM (#4098810)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: keberoxu

Boeuf en daube:

I can never see the words Boeuf en daube
without thinking of
To The Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf:


The boeuf en daube was a complete triumph.


22 Mar 21 - 11:08 PM (#4098814)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

During the afternoon I considered the contents of the refrigerator and was planning to make pasta and put a sauce with meat and cheese over it. But then it got really stormy and rainy and I decided to keep it simple. I have homemade bread from over the weekend so I made a couple of thick slices of French toast (bread soaked in egg and fried) and bacon. Comfort food.


23 Mar 21 - 12:39 PM (#4098906)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

I wanted to have a play in the kitchen so I've made Rum Babas for my good lady and have some to take to my son and his family. Complete with Chantilly Cream.


23 Mar 21 - 01:58 PM (#4098918)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

As usual a prosaic recipe
for tuna salad;
I found that two very strong flavors sort of cancel each other out.

I mix 2 tbl spoons of strong horseradish with four cans of albacore tuna and mayo equivalent to 1/2 the mixture. I add diced and equal amounts of ; thick onion slice, colored peppers and 1/2 dill or half sour pickle equivalent to the whole mixture. I add a teaspoon of Coleman mustard or a bit more of another kind of mustard. Mix well. The taste is veggie dominant and the tuna is the smooth almost bland protein. Experiment with a seasoning like Peruvian chicken or spiracha for a kick.
Tricking the pallette is even more dynamic by eating Miracle Fruit followed by drinking lemon juice which then tastes sweet with no sourness whatsoever.


07 Apr 21 - 09:26 AM (#4101148)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Have a giant yak steak. Salted it, fried it in a cast-iron pan with a smidge of goose fat. Ran out of patience, so ate the 4 rare edges and kept the way-too-rare insides.

Today will thinly slice some of that too-rare meat and marinate it for a while, then put it on a salad for my lunch. I am thinking lime-citrus, à la ceviche, for the marinade. With hot peppers of course. Garlic.

Have not decided what to do for the next 2-3 meals. Maybe a stroganoff, and a stir-fry, and a soup. Ideas welcome...


07 Apr 21 - 11:43 AM (#4101178)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

About that label, Steve. Peanuts are not actually nuts. The allergen warning means that the peanut butter may contain traces of true nuts from equipment in the plant.


07 Apr 21 - 11:51 AM (#4101182)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Grrr, you'd have thought that I should have spotted that, with my botany degree an' all... :-( Although I can't help thinking that most people wouldn't know that peanuts are not really nuts...


07 Apr 21 - 12:34 PM (#4101189)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Severe food allergies are now so common that you'd have trouble finding a Canadian who can't tell you precisely how a peanut differs from a tree nut. Anyone who cooks is gonna know, likewise anyone who shops for groceries, anyone who works in a restaurant, anyone who works in food preparation of any kind, anyone who has children or routinely spends even a little time with children ... That's a lot of people.

Brit mileage may vary, but I doubt it.


07 Apr 21 - 01:58 PM (#4101201)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I am truly humbled.


08 Apr 21 - 08:48 AM (#4101347)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Knowledge tells you a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

There is likely a similar couplet about peanuts and nuts...


08 Apr 21 - 12:13 PM (#4101384)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

We had barbecued pork last night. Well, faux BBQ'd pork.

I'm tired a lot, and now I cook so as to save time and clean-up. So about two weeks ago I put a 9-pound pork shoulder roast in the oven at low heat and cooked it until it was flavorful, moist and exquisitely tender. Timing was mostly a matter of dumb luck - I'll have to do something about that.

The day I roasted it, I was eager to get to the Mudcat singaround, so I didn't put a single thing on the meat. I cut it in half for easier handling. No salt, no garlic, no herbs, no parsley.... I simply lined a big pan with parchment paper (for easy clean-up), put in the meat and forgot about it from 1:30 till 7 pm. It was delicious.

The DH helped cut it up, and we froze most of it. Last night I grated the peel off an an orange with my nifty microplane and added it to a bottle of BBQ sauce from a favorite restaurant. Thawed some of that pork, added the orangey sauce and roasted it at 300 F for about 2 hours. This heated the meat, melted the fat and browned the outside just enough.

Parchment paper under the meat made clean-up a lot more fun. Whole-wheat rolls from the grocery store, homemade cole slaw and avocados completed the ensemble. Only the cole slaw took an effort, but that wasn't much, so it was a delicious and easy meal.

I could have made my own BBQ sauce, but I'd already used the tomato paste to make Chicken Cacciatore in the slow cooker, another easy recipe.


09 Apr 21 - 04:10 PM (#4101584)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ok, now I am *really* hungry!


12 Apr 21 - 12:38 AM (#4101939)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

heh heh (chuckles evilly)


12 Apr 21 - 08:39 PM (#4102038)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Which would you have chosen, farmed never frozen, or wild defrosted, salmon?

Put sone snail [garlic parsley] butter on tin foil, put salmon on butter and more butter on top, into tpaster oven at 350F for 12 mn. Meanwhile sautéed some pearled cauliflower in more snail butter (using up tail end) with a little salt and hot pepper. Served fish on veg with squeezes of lemon and a handful of almonds.

Glass o' kir to go with. My state liquor store had some locally-produced crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to my amazement. It doesn't taste quite *right* but is nonetheless delicious, and it has *the* most amazingly *beautiful* color I have ever seen in a drink. I mean almost a shame to drink it, it is so pretty.


12 Apr 21 - 08:57 PM (#4102041)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

If you buy any farmed fish you are contributing big time to pollution of our oceans. You will also be buying inferior fish that most likely has been treated against the parasites that overcrowding causes. Defrosted frozen fish is just as good as the fresh version. I won't buy any fish that I suspect is not wild fish.


13 Apr 21 - 04:05 PM (#4102117)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I am with you on that, Steve Shaw. I got the wild-caught. Curious about others' thoughts on the taste, too.


21 Apr 21 - 02:48 PM (#4103009)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Serendipity strikes...

Put some oil on a tinfoil square with the edges turned up, and put a bunch of spinach on it. Put a frozen swordfish filet on top, buttered on top and bottom. A sprinkle of hot pepper on top, into toaster oven @ 350F. After 15 mn flipped the fish, after another 10 put the fish on a plate and covered it with the spinach I had expected to be wilted, like every other time I have done this.

It wasn't.

It was crisp. It was crunchy. I have never encountered *crunchy* spinach. It was marvy. What did I do and can I do it again?


22 Apr 21 - 08:54 PM (#4103172)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Put the toaster oven on 450, not 350? When you think back, did the dish seem extra hot when you removed it from the toaster oven?


22 Apr 21 - 11:09 PM (#4103182)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

No, and the fish was cooked as if it was at its usual temp...

Has anyone made crispy cooked spinach?

I tried pommes anna tonight to feed to someone and have a bite of, it wasn't flippable without coming apart because I wanted to use my cocotte which was too deep, but yum.


24 Apr 21 - 12:53 AM (#4103301)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Curiouser and curiouser. I just had flounder at a French restaurant, and it had crispy parsley on top. So you're not alone, Mrrzy.

Yesterday I watched Gordon Ramsey make an "authentic Italian dish" on YouTube. A sort of fritatta I guess. Onions, eggs, Italian sausage, parmesan cheese and mozzarella in a skillet.

The comments were all "oh wow!" except for mine. I wrote, "How much salt is there in this dish? There's salt in the eggs, sausage and both cheeses, then you added salt yourself."

When I cook, I don't put salt in anything. The DH doesn't like it, and he worries about his blood pressure. So I leave it out. If a diner wants salt, there's a salt shaker on the table. I may put a little on my meat, but not on the other dishes. Nobody seems to miss it, neither guests or family.


24 Apr 21 - 02:50 AM (#4103302)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

"There's salt in the eggs ..."

Do you mean he put salt in the eggs as well as adding salt himself?
Eggs re not naturally salty - unless US eggs are somehow produced differently from what English hens lay.


24 Apr 21 - 09:50 AM (#4103332)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well I do most of the cooking in our house. I have a low tolerance for overly salty dishes (though I'll make exceptions for bacon and salted pistachios). If I'm boiling pasta or potatoes, I taste the cooking water just before draining. If I think it's too salty I'll replace some of the water with freshly boiled water. Everyone gets served up food that's seasoned to my taste. I can't remember the last time anyone added extra salt. Manufacturers of ready meals use salt to disguise their inferior quality ingredients. If you use only good quality ingredients you don't need much salt added and it's amazing how some fresh herbs can "replace" salt. But you do need a bit of salt a lot of the time if the food's going to taste good.


24 Apr 21 - 10:48 AM (#4103341)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I agree. A bit of salt. Of course, we need a certain amount simply to survive. I know of people who have been hospitalized because they lacked salt.

However, I don't like the typical YouTube chef's habit of picking up a tiny bowl with looks like a tablespoon of salt in it and plopping it unmeasured into a dish.


24 Apr 21 - 10:52 AM (#4103343)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

"According to the American Heart Association (AHA), the minimum physiological requirement for sodium is less than 500 mg a day — or less than the amount in one quarter of one teaspoon of table salt. For most Americans, eating this little sodium is near impossible."

The Food and Drug Administration says to limit salt to 2300 mg per day. I wonder about children though. How much is too much for them?


24 Apr 21 - 11:04 AM (#4103347)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Another exception is parmesan crisps. In fact, I've just made a tray of them to be nibbled with our aperitif ce soir. Get a big baking tray and line it with greaseproof paper. Put little piles of grated Parmesan, heaped tablespoon-size, all over it. Big gaps not needed. Bake at 180C for seven minutes. Maybe eight. Careful - a minute too long and they burn. Very nice with a bowl of olives and an Aperol spritz.


24 Apr 21 - 11:10 AM (#4103349)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Leeneia - you reminded of something I really dislike about some television chefs (I don't bother with YouTube chefs).

They have all their ingredients laid out ready in little dishes, and then add about four-fifths of each into whatever they are making. Why? Why not put the right amount in each dish to start with? I imagine all those left-over bits just get thrown away.


24 Apr 21 - 04:34 PM (#4103395)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/trisha-yearwood/strawberry-rhubarb-crostata-5171696
Its good with some crushed almonds or a few drops of almond extract.


25 Apr 21 - 02:05 PM (#4103484)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Jos, I agree. I've always thought the wee dishes are twee. I haven't noticed the waste. Maybe it doesn't go on all the time.


26 Apr 21 - 08:31 AM (#4103557)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I agree with Jos too. And they should taste their food, too.


28 Apr 21 - 07:35 PM (#4103910)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

What salt will do in older people is to stop elasticity in blood vessels of all sizes. The complications should be obvious.


01 May 21 - 09:24 AM (#4104173)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Time to collect all Epicurious beef recipes, eh?

Meanwhile anyone have a new idea for pork chops?


01 May 21 - 10:16 AM (#4104180)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Delia Smith's way with pork chops is hard to beat. You need thick-cut chops with most of the fatty rind removed. Get a big frying pan and brown the chops all round in butter. Put the chops on a big piece of tinfoil on a baking tray and season. Add a sprig of fresh thyme (fresh, d'you hear?). I use two layers of foil. Fry some chopped mushrooms in the chop pan, adding a bit more butter. After five minutes throw in a tablespoon of plain flour and the juice of 3/4 of a lemon. Stir into a sticky mess and cook the flour for a minute. Put the mix on top of the chops then pour about 120 ml double cream over them. Wrap the chops in the foil very securely but not too tightly. Make a sort of tent. Bake for one hour in an oven set to 160C. You don't get much juice but what you do get is big flavour. Goes very well with a buttery jacket spud and some greens. We think of it as winter food. My amounts are for two nice big chops, one each.


01 May 21 - 11:05 AM (#4104185)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Instead of removing the fat, I would render it by propping the chops up, vertically with the fat lying in the pan, until it is browned and the pan has a layer of runny fat in which to cook the chops, instead of butter. Or cut the fat off, if you must, and render it in the pan before cooking the chops in it.
Then proceed following Steve's/Delia's instructions.
Don't worry about your fat consumption - you are going to cook the mushrooms in butter anyway, and then add cream.


01 May 21 - 12:16 PM (#4104194)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

I do mise en place with wee dishes for ingredients in small quantities and bowls and jugs for large quantities. My galley kitchen does not have room for two kinds of work -- and two lots of mess -- under way at the same time.

I made nearly four litres of rather good ham and bean soup yesterday. Three-quarters of the batch is now in the freezer for future reference.

* One smoked ham hock
* Two to three litres of chicken stock (Canadian recipe -- both metric & Imperial measures in use!)
* A little olive oil
* Six cloves of garlic, chopped
* One large onion, chopped
* Three stalks of celery, chopped
* Black pepper ad lib
* Two or three bay leaves
* A goodly amount of dried oregano
* One pound of dried white beans (navy or Great Northern)
* Half a cup or so of split dried peas or lentils
* One teaspoon ground cumin
* A pinch or two of crushed dried chilis
* Salt (only at the end, and only if necessary)

Put the ham hock in an Instant Pot or similar programmable pressure-cooker. Add enough chicken stock to more or less immerse the hock, usually about two litres. Close the lid and set the controls for 15 minutes at high pressure. Let the pressure release naturally, then set the hock on a plate to cool. Pour the pot liquor into a large jug or bowl.

Turn the Pot to its Saute setting and let it heat to its max. Then add the olive oil, the garlic and onion, and cook and stir until the onion is light brown and translucent;don't let the garlic scorch. Add the celery and continue cooking and stirring until it begins to show signs of browning. Grind rather a lot of black pepper into the Pot, then add the beans and peas, the bay leaves, and the oregano, cumin and crushed chilis. Pour in the stock in which you cooked the ham hock. Clamp on the lid, close the vent, and set the controls for 30 minutes at high pressure.

While the beans are cooking, take the meat off the ham hock and dice it fairly small.

Allow the Pot to release its pressure naturally, then open the lid and add the diced ham. Stir well and taste. Then, and only then, decide if it needs salt. It probably won't.

Serve with whole-wheat toast and maybe some nippy cheese.

NB: When made in an Instant Pot, this takes about half the afternoon, with only about 45 minutes of actual chopping and stirring. It can be made in an ordinary soup kettle on the stove, but that way takes hours and hours, and you have to remember to set the beans to soak the night before.


01 May 21 - 02:33 PM (#4104207)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've tried that, Jos, and found it to be an added faff. I don't waste the rinds. I put them in the freezer and use them to add savour to my boeuf en daube, Elizabeth David style.


02 May 21 - 09:10 AM (#4104305)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

Recipes are a choice but you don't have a choice when it comes to plastic and micro plastics. You eat the equivilent of one plastic credit card per week. So do I.
The health hazards are as yet unknown*.
Apples had one of the highest microplastic counts in fruit, with an average of 195,500 plastic particles per gram, while pears averaged around 189,500 plastic particles per gram. Broccoli and carrots were shown to be the most contaminated vegetables, averaging more than 100,000 plastic particles per gram.Jul 21, 2020
Then there is water, sea salt, shellfish, beer, carrots, broccoli and virually everything else in the alnd and sea.
You see micro plastics are consumed by the smallest organisims and we eat them be they nemotodes or others.
Don't drink the water and don't breathe the air. 8^/


*There seems to be an abundant number of GI conditions lately but who knows.


02 May 21 - 09:52 AM (#4104309)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Donuel, the most important cause of the rising incidence of irritable bowel syndrome is the abundance of antibiotics we all consume. Acidophilus capsules help with that. Stomach and bowel cancers kill so many people because most of us fortunate residents of the developed world live long enough to develop them. So have your colonoscopy already.

Is plastic in the food supply your latest bugbear?


02 May 21 - 12:33 PM (#4104334)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I like to think that this is a recipe and food enjoyment thread. I'm doing a risotto tonight. It will feature broad beans, French beans, peas and pancetta. It will contain the usual suspects such as chicken stock, onions, Parmesan and butter (for the initial frying), but for the mantecura step I'm using creme fraiche instead of butter. I'll use the veg cooking water to contribute to the stock. I'll finish it with fresh parsley.

Last night I did Yotam's baked cauliflower. You put all the ingredients except for one into a big bowl, mix them well with your bare hands and put them on a big baking tray lined with greaseproof paper. Into a hot oven (200C) for half an hour, stirred half way through. The ingredients for two of us are one big cauliflower cut into florets, 30g pumpkin seeds, 30g chopped green olives, one 150g chorizo peeled and cut into 1cm rings (dolce or piccante, you decide), two teaspoons of sweet smoked paprika, a roughly-chopped onion, three cloves of garlic smashed with your fist or a knife, salt and pepper and several big glugs of extra virgin olive oil. It's all on one tray and you can clear up while it's cooking. When it's done, stir in some fresh chopped parsley. You can eat it off your knee in front of the telly and the only washing up is your two bowls and two forks.


02 May 21 - 01:48 PM (#4104344)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

Charmion's tiny bugbear


02 May 21 - 05:00 PM (#4104377)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Risotto. I miss risotto.

Now that I cook only for myself, risotto is a restaurant thing. And all the restaurants have been closed since Christmas and will stay that way for at least another two weeks.

I miss risotto. With a nice glass of Soave, and a clever little green salad to follow ...

Sigh.


02 May 21 - 06:07 PM (#4104390)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

My risotto was very good. It followed a day which started with my bad back playing me up summat rotten and Mrs Steve suffering side effects from her second jab. Every year we do the bluebell walk in the woods at Brownsham, between Hartland and Clovelly. It was a lovely day but it started badly, with parking near the start of the walk a massive problem (we've done this walk every year for 34 years and we still haven't learned to avoid bank holidays). I eventually parked hard by a roadside hedge and scratched my leg on a protruding blackthorn twig that I hadn't spotted.

However.

My new Black Diamond Trail hiking poles were a total revelation. I've tried cheap ones before and they put me off the whole idea. But these were a miracle. I did the whole strenuous walk without back pain and the poles were absolutely superb. The sun was out, the bluebells were wonderful, the sea sparkled, God was in his heaven and all truths were universal. Who'd have thought it, on a day that started so fretfully, and we came home and I did a great risotto. The Prosecco and Argentine Malbec were great too...!

Then you watch the news about India...


02 May 21 - 06:17 PM (#4104392)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Charmion, cook your risotto for two, eat half of it and use the leftovers to make arancini the next day. Mrs Steve, foolish woman, won't let me have a deep fat fryer, so I can't follow my own advice...She thinks I want to just make chips...

By the way, my amount for two, which is generous (you piggie, Steve...), is a sparse 300ml (yep, measured in a jug) of risotto rice. I always use carnarolo, by the way. That needs about 700ml stock, with a bit to spare in case it thickens up too much. Life is good!


03 May 21 - 08:21 AM (#4104455)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

Steve how do the hiking poles help? Does it take weight of knees and hips? I had a friend who used those amputee curved springs on hiking poles for extra propulsion.


03 May 21 - 09:36 AM (#4104464)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Those chops sound yummy. Thinking of stuffed cabbage, too.


03 May 21 - 10:15 AM (#4104476)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Not down by Bluebell Grove where wild flowers grow then Steve, (I guess you know Nancy Spain)...

Not sure what any of this has to do with cooking but for a different flower, a local church has a snowdrop day where that flower grows abundantly in the grounds. Not a long walk in this case but a nice sight.


03 May 21 - 11:43 AM (#4104495)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well there were plenty of trees in grove-like assemblages and bluebells and wild flowers, and (odd that you should mention it...) I did happen to be singing along to Christy's Nancy Spain in the car yesterday!

The hiking poles work out your upper body, especially arms and shoulders. They help to maintain a good, upright posture,good for the back, and they take the strain off your knees and hips, especially when walking downhill. They give you stability and confidence on uneven terrain. I'm a novice and I'm still researching good technique, but one thing I have learned is that cheap poles are a complete waste of money which will have you thinking that poles are useless. Also, you don't need poles with built-in shock absorbers, any more than you need a springy mattress saddle on a bike.

On the food front I'm starting to try to shed a stone. It'll be Mondays and Thursdays on very frugal rations. I'll be aware of, but not counting, calories and the only thing I'll be cutting out is snacking. In the long term I'm expecting portion control to be the key to keeping it off. And those hiking poles. I did this before, but over the years I've put about a third of my lost weight back on.


04 May 21 - 04:52 PM (#4104752)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Why are my meatballs always *tough* (I can't think of a better way to describe them)?


04 May 21 - 05:01 PM (#4104753)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I've added some more pics to my poem "My Diet" recently - e.g., a full (vegan) English using slices of tempeh; sweet and savoury avocado sandwiches; and a vegan cheese platter.


04 May 21 - 05:08 PM (#4104754)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ok details: I have made meatballs in the oven, pan-fried them, cooked them from the start in broth, and browned them and cooked them the rest of the way in broth. Tonight's were made from ground lamb with grated onion, parsley, berbere spice, cumin, cinnamon, smidge of salt, and garlic powder, browned in lamb bacon grease, then cooked in a broth of beef stock with a bit of tomato paste and fresh thyme. The broth is droolworthy-good, as is the *flavor* of the meatballs.

I don't put breadcrumbs in. Is that the problem? Thanks.


04 May 21 - 06:01 PM (#4104765)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

You may be overcooking them. Make them smaller and cook for less time. Another possibility is that you're squeezing the bejaysus out of them when you make them, for fear of their falling to bits. Roll them in your hands without pressure and employ an ever-so-gentle touch. And blimey, all those herbs and spices. Don't you trust your meat? My way is to make them small, fry them in oil just to brown them, maybe for five or six minutes, not cook them through, then let your chosen sauce finish the cooking, maybe for ten or fifteen minutes. For me, it would be a spicy tomato sauce made with extra virgin olive oil. By spicy, I mean with chopped garlic, no onion and some chilli flakes to taste. I always tear in some fresh basil leaves at the very end. That goes really well with crusty bread, or some home-made oven chips. I'm not a fan of spaghetti meatballs...

And leave the breadcrumbs in the store cupboard. I've tried meatballs made with a mix of minced steak and crumbled black pudding, or a mixture of minced steak and minced free-range pork. A touch of chilli always goes well. One I got from Gino d'Acampo is beef mince with a bit of caramelised onion chutney mixed in. It sounds like it shouldn't work, but they are delicious. I usually find that you need a tad more salt in the seasoning than you might expect. Small is beautiful.


05 May 21 - 12:00 PM (#4104893)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Definitely pressing too hard. Definitely cooking too long. Aha.

And not a *lot* of any spice. A shake or so of each. The cinnamon makes everything savory taste north African.


05 May 21 - 01:13 PM (#4104905)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I like most herbs and spices in small doses (though the possession of dried basil should be an arrestable offence), but I'm not a fan of cinnamon and if the recipe has it I leave it out. Mrs Steve demurs, but then we never have coriander/cilantro because she says it tastes like washing up liquid. So we're evens.


05 May 21 - 01:21 PM (#4104906)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I like cinnamon on toast or porridge.


05 May 21 - 02:43 PM (#4104914)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

A repeat but, just now on the Beeb, the Hairy Bikers on their Med Adventure were cooking Spanish meatballs or albondigas, with - more to my taste - patatas bravas.


05 May 21 - 05:23 PM (#4104937)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I missed that, probably because I was watching Chelsea triumph over Real Madrid. I'll be catching up with that one. The Hairy Bikers are not to be ignored!


05 May 21 - 05:55 PM (#4104943)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Agreed - I think they actually met while working behind the camera, but have gone on to do a lot of good stuff in front of it.

We get the gist of the area they are in, some good humour, and the food they prepare certainly looks good.


05 May 21 - 06:20 PM (#4104946)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Agreed!


06 May 21 - 08:54 AM (#4105014)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Details on albondigas?


06 May 21 - 12:03 PM (#4105039)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Without going to google, definitely paprika/pimenton as the key Spanish spice, Mrrzy; but, once Steve looks into it, I'm sure he can give the culinary details better than I...

Mostly vegan, in 2018, I enjoyed patatas bravas, with a glass of sangria, at one of many nice tapas bars in Barcelona. Fried chunky potato chips (I recall the Hairy Bikers boiled them first), again with paprika.

The other dish I enjoyed on that trip was vegetable paella - it always seemed to be second down on restaurant lists, after the seafood option.


06 May 21 - 12:22 PM (#4105040)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I googled and found this:

Hairy Bikers Moorish lamb meatballs

Is that the one?


06 May 21 - 12:28 PM (#4105041)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

If I were making Spanish tapas-style albondigas I'd use a mixture of beef and pork mince and make them small. I don't use eggs (though a yolk in the mix is unobjectionable) and I definitely wouldn't use breadcrumbs. I'd be inclined to make them quite spicy so I might add a bit of smoked paprika and a pinch of dried chipotle chilli flakes, to taste, as well as salt and pepper to the meat mix. Smoky is good. Make them into small balls as mentioned earlier and brown them for four or five minutes only in hot oil. Set the meatballs aside, leaving the oil in the pan. For the tomato sauce I'd use good-quality canned plum tomatoes (don't buy ones with salt added). Slice a couple of cloves of garlic and sauté them in the meatball pan. Add more oil if needed, which it probably will be. No cheap oil please. To be authentic, use a Spanish extra virgin olive oil. Get the garlic sizzling but don't let it go brown. You could add some chilli flakes too, bearing in mind that you've already spiced up the meatballs. A pinch of dried oregano make evverthang super. Add the tomatoes and some salt and a scant teaspoon of sugar. Break up the tomatoes a bit and let it simmer without the lid on for half an hour or until you see the oil wanting to float. After the first fifteen minutes or so, throw in the meatballs. For a tapas table you could have the meatballs, padron peppers fried in hot oil (I do them outdoors as they spit and smell) then sprinkled with sea salt, some strong blue cabrales cheese and, to start with, a little bowl each of well-chilled salmorejo with some cold crumbled hard-boiled egg yolk and some little slivers of jamon iberico on top. Maybe a bowl of olives and some crusty bread for the cheese. Get your guests in the mood with a bottle of Cava and have a nice Rioja to hand as things get going. Good living is that!


06 May 21 - 12:30 PM (#4105042)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Oh yes, and some of those big chunky spicy wedges...


06 May 21 - 12:39 PM (#4105044)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Certainly the one, Jos, as there is also the patatas bravas on the plate; as ever, Steve's option also seems good and thorough.


06 May 21 - 12:45 PM (#4105045)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

also, if you'll pardon the pun, I find sangria, along with sherry, can at times be a bit too moorish!!


06 May 21 - 02:56 PM (#4105063)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Thanks for the meatball advice.

Had some leftover salmon so I made some bacon to go with my omelette, flaked the fish into some spinach wilting in the bacon grease, and added a duck egg in the middle. Ate the bacon while the rest was cooking. I am bad at keeping bacon around.


08 May 21 - 09:02 AM (#4105261)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Did not finish my salmon thing. Next day did not finish a big salad. Breakfast *next* day was leftover salad with leftover omelet which was somehow better than either dish had been, and both had been yummy...


09 May 21 - 05:19 PM (#4105424)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I find that left-over omelette makes a tasty sandwich.
(I have taken to making my omelettes far too big, just so as to have some left over.)


10 May 21 - 05:19 AM (#4105466)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

If you want really good eggy leftovers, make frittatas instead. Plenty of variations are possible, and they are often even better eaten cold the next day. Very nice to take for picnics and you have tomorrow's lunch with no effort at all.


10 May 21 - 06:06 AM (#4105474)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Yesterday's omelette was a Spanish omelette, so today's left-overs are very like a frittata.


10 May 21 - 02:33 PM (#4105537)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I was reading an article from US interpretive naturalists talking about using this invasive (in the US) weed for pesto. It occurs to me that for some of you, this is a native delicacy.

Do nothing about invasive plants

Until recently, ignoring problems in hopes they’ll go away hasn’t served me well. However, a decade-long study done by Cornell University researchers has clearly shown that avoidance is the best way to manage garlic mustard (Allaria petiolata), a pernicious exotic plant. Evidently I’ve been doing a great job in the fight against this aggressive and troublesome invader.

Native to most of Europe and parts of western Asia and northwestern Africa, garlic mustard is in the cabbage and broccoli family (Brassicaceae), and indeed was imported to North America as a culinary herb in the early 1800s. It’s not entirely evil, as it has the spicy tang of mustard with a hint of garlic, and can be used as a base for pesto and sauces, and to flavor salads, soups and other dishes. Unfortunately, eating it has not worked well as a control strategy.


10 May 21 - 06:11 PM (#4105570)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

It's a benign native here. I don't eat it myself, but I believe that the young leaves are very nice sprinkled in salads. If I want a garlicky hit from a wild plant I'll use the young leaves of ramsons, confusingly often referred to as wild garlic (Allium ursinum). It's at its best right now, but it goes to bed for the summer.


10 May 21 - 07:13 PM (#4105583)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

It's "Alliaria," by the way. It means "like Allium," a reference to its garlicky aroma, not to any relationship with Allium. Allium and Alliaria are wildly unrelated genera.


11 May 21 - 10:50 AM (#4105680)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

It is interesting how some flavors span species. Like the lemon (citrus fruit) duplicated to a degree in Lemon Balm (mint family) and other plants. Licorice flavor in both ferns and umbels (fennel). Root beer in sassafras and in something else I just read about recently. Chocolate mint plants, or cacao.


11 May 21 - 03:56 PM (#4105710)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've just potted up three nice lemon thyme plants. It's the only thyme I use these days. Brilliant in risottos, brilliant with fish.


11 May 21 - 05:54 PM (#4105723)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

If one can not cleanse the pallet with wine the order one eats different flavors is importnt. I can not taste oranges if preceded by licorice.


11 May 21 - 06:10 PM (#4105727)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I can't imagine cleansing my palate of licorice by drinking wine. I'll try anything once but I might save my favourite Rioja for something else.


11 May 21 - 06:25 PM (#4105729)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Star anise also tastes like licorice.

I just bought samphire, I think for the first time in my life, and fried it with tofu and some soya sauce, before placing them on toast - not bad.

I guess I could also add it to my pottages...any other ideas..?


11 May 21 - 08:16 PM (#4105738)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Taking the hint from Jos, I made us a big Spanish omelette tonight. I got the idea from the BBC Good Food website. You need a couple of shallots sliced up, a red pepper chopped up, 500g of unpeeled Jersey Royals sliced a bit thicker than a £2 coin, a good handful of chives and nine eggs.

Boil the sliced spuds in salted water for 15 minutes. Fry the shallots gently in butter for ten minutes (your frying pan needs to be about 10 inches across and needs sloping sides), adding the pepper after three or four minutes. Beat the eggs with the snipped chives and a goodly amount of seasoning. Drain the spuds and put them in with the shallots and pepper. Pour in the egg mix. Keep the ring fairly low. I put a lid over my pan. After ten minutes, put the pan (lid off!) under a hot grill for three minutes. I wrap tinfoil round my pan handle to protect it. Don't forget how hot it might get. Viola!

That made enough for two of us to have a nice big wodge for tea (we had greens with it) and some good eating for lunch (cold) tomorrow. I make a lot of frittatas but I haven't done this before. It was very good, but the slight tweaks needed will be more butter and more seasoning next time. To get things like this right, you really do need to know your pan and your cooker very well, otherwise it'll either take too long to set or you'll burn the bottom, or both. Best to keep the heat fairly low but not too low.

I'm making meatballs tomorrow for two separate feasts in a few days' time. I'll use three pounds of minced steak, a pound of minced pork and about six tablespoons of caramelised onion chutney. Enough for eight portions. That all goes into a bowl with some salt, mixed together and made into balls slightly bigger than bite size and quite a bit smaller than golf balls. Formed gently without squeezing. They open-freeze nicely. To cook them, I'll fry them for about six minutes in extra virgin olive oil to brown them, then throw in two cans of plum tomatoes (best you can get is paramount). I'm adding a bit of salt to that and enough chilli flakes to really spice up the sauce. Get the heat up to simmering and let them bubble gently for about 20 minutes. Right at the end, I'll be tearing a handful of fresh basil leaves in (no fresh? Leave it out, or a sprinkle of dried oregano would be good). That's it, so simple. We have it with home-made oven chips but it also goes well with plain boiled rice or some crusty bread to soak up the lovely sauce. No onion, no garlic, in case you think I'd forgotten.


12 May 21 - 09:35 AM (#4105795)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The Spanish omelette was delicious eaten cold. I'll be doing that one again.

We don't cook on Wednesdays. It's been cheese and wine night for us for decades (otherwise it's wine at weekends only). I have a lump of Montagnolo d'affine for tonight, a soft German blue cheese with a delicious grey furry rind, and some Wookey Hole cheddar. I put out little bowls of nutty things such as cashews, pistachios and/or sweet almonds, with some cherry tomatoes, nocellara olives and some Marché-style garlic cloves (you can eat twenty of those without effect - don't ask me how they achieve it). I have a jar of pickled caperberries, which I love, but Mrs Steve isn't so keen. We have a glass of white to start with then it's red the rest of time. I refuse to divulge how long that means... ;-) We've discovered some very nice little sourdough crackers, made by Peter's Yard, great with cheese, though I'm also a fan of Matzo crackers, one ingredient only, white flour, 19 calories per cracker and a superb vehicle for cheese. Mrs Steve is a big fan of Bath Oliver crackers, also made with white flour but soft-baked with no browning on them. I love them too, but they are far more calorific, and I'm currently trying to convince my doc that my weight is heading inexorably downward...


12 May 21 - 12:53 PM (#4105806)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Not sure if it's a Wednesday but, from work trips, I know some hotels have meet-the-staff cheese and wine nights, Steve.

Good tip re tinfoil to protect pan handle.

More spice next time with the omelette - I've repeatedly heard Spanish love their paprika..?

And further to the above on samphire: on the negative side, as with some herbs, like rosemary, it can be a tad woodie; but, on the positive side, a slight taste of the sea for vegans.


12 May 21 - 05:16 PM (#4105831)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I'll eat samphire but I do have to wonder whether it's less than the sum of its parts. I thought about adding paprika but as it was my first time with that recipe I thought I'd stick to orders this time.


13 May 21 - 09:07 AM (#4105895)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Snicker... The Spanish love Hungarian paprika, no?

Having appeased the shade if my Hungarian mom, I can say that I like the Spanish smoked paprika too. But for hot, Hungarian is better, imho.


13 May 21 - 10:31 AM (#4105903)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Sunny and a bit warmer in southwestern Ontario, so it's time to break out the barbecue. I have invited the rest of my bubble to dinner tomorrow, and thus ensured that I will not procrastinate.

Chicken and ribs, with cornbread and a crisp green salad. Rosé is on special at the liquor commission, so we might get a bit squiffy.

If the warmth of the day persists to suppertime, I’ll put the guests to work burning deadfall branches and my husband’s old client files while I finish cooking. Then we can toast marshmallows over the coals for dessert.

After more than a year of pandemic restriction, we are easily amused.


13 May 21 - 10:42 AM (#4105904)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

There used to be a npr show that challenged a female chef to devise a meal from what was in the fridge and pantry. My great omlette this morning was like the show. Some of her challenges were impossibly difficult.


13 May 21 - 11:05 AM (#4105908)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Lynne Rossetto Kasper. The Splendid Table. That was always a fun game. A caller would name the things in their fridge and pantry and sometimes Lynne suggested something good. Sometimes it was dreadful, but she usually managed a "less is more" dish.

She retired a few years ago. She had a perfect radio voice.


13 May 21 - 12:20 PM (#4105919)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Pantry supper, also known as day-before-payday supper, is less of a challenge if you typically have pasta and a tin of tomatoes in the cupboard and capers, olives and anchovies in the fridge. Puttanesca!

Way too often, Edmund would come home with something strange he bought on the way home from work. "What do you think you could do with this?" I think that's the Iron Chef Challenge.


13 May 21 - 12:57 PM (#4105927)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Paprika in goulash, Mrrzy?

Or sprinkled on those marshmallows for an extra smokey flavour, Charmion?!


13 May 21 - 01:02 PM (#4105928)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

We call puttanesca whore's spaghetti :-) but, in addition to your list of ingredients, I start by sautéing some garlic and chilli flakes. And no cheese!


13 May 21 - 11:26 PM (#4105982)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Think Outside the Banana. Eat the Peel.

After the British chefs Nadiya Hussain and Nigella Lawson developed recipes using banana skins, the British cooking public is perplexed.

In November, the British cookbook author and food personality Nigella Lawson shocked her nation when she demonstrated a recipe from her latest cookbook, “Cook, Eat, Repeat,” on her BBC television show of the same name. It wasn’t royal family-level scandalous. Still, based on public reaction, you’d think she’d caused a major controversy.

And all because she’d prepared a fragrant dish of cauliflower — and banana peels.

“I certainly didn’t expect newspaper headlines about it!” she said in an email. “It’s hard to overcome the cultural assumptions about what is and is not edible, and to start eating what we have customarily regarded as waste.”


14 May 21 - 03:07 AM (#4106001)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL

The skin is mightier than the banana.


14 May 21 - 06:41 AM (#4106012)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I'll swear that as a teenager I read somewhere that you can dry banana skins and smoke them and they're even better than pot...

Don't try this at home! :-)


14 May 21 - 11:32 AM (#4106040)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

An urban myth long-since debunked. https://theuijunkie.com/smoking-banana/


14 May 21 - 12:37 PM (#4106047)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

From a reliable source (TV programme on Kew Gardens), I learnt yesterday that the banana plant is a herb.


14 May 21 - 03:44 PM (#4106062)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Heheh. I love that photo of an old lady trying to light a banana :-). Banana plants are botanically herbs simply because they're non-woody. Not suitable for sprinkling on your pasta dishes... :-)


14 May 21 - 04:03 PM (#4106069)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...although in Ethiopia, ensete is a staple.


14 May 21 - 04:33 PM (#4106070)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Bananas are herbs *and* berries, I just found out. I had known they were an herb.


15 May 21 - 04:10 AM (#4106107)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The meatballs with caramelised chutney that I mentioned a couple of days ago were a big success last night. I should have said that the amount of tomatoes I mentioned was for four people, not all eight! They are SO simple, just meat, the chutney and salt. No mucking about with onion, garlic, breadcrumbs, egg... The fewer ingredients, the less chance of messing up. By the way, Mrrzy, I formed them with gentle rolling in the palms, no squeezing, and not a single one fell to pieces in the sauce, and their texture was perfect.


15 May 21 - 09:51 AM (#4106135)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I will try that next time.


15 May 21 - 10:45 AM (#4106139)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I've never tried currywurst, but heard it is basically just adding curry powder, instead of mustard, to ketchup as a sausage dressing.

I have both in the kitchen so gave it a go - not a bad combination, one feels.


15 May 21 - 10:49 AM (#4106141)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I have never tried German mustard, either, but apparently it is quite sweet; I have however tried English, French and American and, on this occasion, I prefer the latter.


15 May 21 - 12:14 PM (#4106153)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...but, as I say, not sure if German is wurst..?


17 May 21 - 10:52 AM (#4106365)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Having been brought up on Keen's dry mustard mixed into a paste by my English-raised Dad, I found German mustard bland and boring. Dijon mustard works because of its vinegary bite, but the American version isn't worth the trouble.

The curry sauce that makes currywurst of any ol' sausage (but usually bratwurst) is a Dutch confection originating in their long-gone Indonesian colonies and adopted by the Germans in the 1960s for their nascent fast-food industry. I first saw it on "Schnell Imbiss" counters when I was a young soldier in the 70s.


If you like that kind of thing, it's the kind of thing you like. I never liked ketchup so curry sauce held zero appeal for me, but I know many people who became firmly addicted at first taste, usually experienced within hours of arriving at Schiphol Airport.


17 May 21 - 03:01 PM (#4106392)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...so currywurst has nothing to do with English soldiers being stationed in Germany after WW2, Charmion?


17 May 21 - 03:59 PM (#4106401)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

British soldiers, WAV. I'm sure some of them were English, but the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish were not.

Of course it has to do with soldiers, not just British but also Americans and Canadians, and air force people too, the whole benighted NATO garrison in what was then West Germany -- including me. But civilians travelled in Europe, too, and by the 1970s there were a hell of a lot more of them.


17 May 21 - 04:24 PM (#4106404)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I don't remember currywurst from my visit to Berlin in 1988; as I've mentioned before on Mudcat, I do remember and wrote a poem about signing the reunion book when I came back from East Berlin through Checkpoint Charlie...but, despite a couple of attempts, including emails to museums there, I can't find what happened to that book.

Maybe I will manage a return visit to Berlinnext year and find it then..? That poem is here if you wish to look.


18 May 21 - 09:18 AM (#4106496)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I don't think of German mustard as sweet. It is Dijon-like but grainy, in my US experience.


18 May 21 - 10:37 AM (#4106508)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

The mustard I remember from Germany (more than 40 years ago, mind you) had much the same texture as Dijon mustard, but it was less vinegary and sometimes blended with honey. I found the version labelled "Feuer Senf" disappointingly bland. I see the same brands of German mustard for sale here in Stratford, and they seem even blander now.

Whole-seed mustard was not popular in southwestern Germany in the 70s, and I first encountered it in France where it was served with pot-au-feu. In Canada, you could buy it at gourmet shops, and by about 1995 it had made the leap to supermarkets. The French brand Maille is most popular, and it has the same piquant, vinegary flavour profile as Dijon. German whole-seed mustard is also sold here, but I never buy it so I don't know how it differs from the Maille version.


18 May 21 - 12:26 PM (#4106520)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I used to live not far away in Walthamstow, Charmion, and one of the positives was the wide variety of foods available.


18 May 21 - 12:31 PM (#4106524)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

In the US we have mustard out the wazzoo these days. And the discount gourmet warehouse grocery where I shop has a aisle of fancy mustards. I get the ground whole seed varieties instead of things like "honey mustard" that are too sweet. And I stay away from anything with horseradish. Way too hot.


18 May 21 - 12:40 PM (#4106525)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I might have mustard (though rarely) on a ham sandwich, or to spice up a mackerel pâté or something, and it's great in piccalilli, but I never want it unadorned on my plate. I regard mustard with seeds in to be greatly overrated... Horseradish sauce is a sine qua non on a roast beef butty.

Which Stratford are we talking about here? I taught in Walthamstow from 1980 to 1986 in a terrible school...


18 May 21 - 01:35 PM (#4106532)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...there was no mention of "upon Avon", Steve! Never lived there but have enjoyed visiting.


18 May 21 - 04:09 PM (#4106554)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I think Charmion is in Stratford, Ontario.
No doubt she will correct ne if I'm wrong.


18 May 21 - 04:22 PM (#4106557)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

I am, indeed, on the other side of the Herring Pond, in deepest Perth County, Ontario.

It’s not humble, but it’s home.


18 May 21 - 04:42 PM (#4106562)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ooh I *love* horseradish. I have neen putting some in everything lately.

I love good [Dijon-style] mustard, grainy or no.

Every once in a while I have an actual hot dog, in which case that yellow goop Americans call mustard is actually good.

If there is sauerkraut, though, which I ptefer, *then* Dijon or German mustard. The yellow is only good on otherwise plain hot dogs.


18 May 21 - 04:50 PM (#4106566)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Sincere apologies, Charmion...I'll see if I can get hold of a hair shirt in Manchester, England.

When I occasionally break my veganity, Mrrzy, and stop at a hot dot stand, I like it with onions, ketchup and what seems to be American mustard.


18 May 21 - 07:36 PM (#4106597)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

You can find town names from all over the British Isles in Ontario, but we don’t have a Walthamstow.

I checked.


18 May 21 - 08:15 PM (#4106600)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

Horseradish is more than a tasty cocktail sauce. When used liberally in tuna salad it becomes a new dish along with mustard.


19 May 21 - 02:30 AM (#4106632)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

Horseradish is great on smoked fish and beef.

Dave H


19 May 21 - 02:58 AM (#4106633)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

I quite like horseradish sauce but I don’t think it’s ever been anything we’ve felt we’ve needed to have in the cupboard. We did have some horseradish just left to grow in the garden for a couple of years though. Had the devil of a job getting rid off it.

English mustard for me. We’ve got both powdered and ready made in the cupboard.

It had to be Coleman’s of course. After all it was made in Carrow, Norwich and Norwich City play at Carrow Road. But maybe one day, I should look for something else as Unilever in 2019 ended 160 years of mustard production in the city...


19 May 21 - 04:13 AM (#4106635)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

In general, I'm not a fan of having a strongly-flavoured sauce or relish on my plate with food that is otherwise mild in flavour. For example, whilst I like the taste of cranberry sauce I don't want it on my turkey dinner. A bit of mint sauce on roast lamb is good because the lamb has a fairly assertive flavour itself. Piccalilli is grand on a sandwich which contains a nice tangy cheese. Horseradish on a roast beef butty is a challenge to get right. If you're too timid with it, you can't taste it. A smidgeon too much and your eyes are a-watering - not good. Tommy K can be good on a bacon butty or with a spicy sausage but I usually leave it off. I can't stand apple sauce - sour and sloppy (I never eat apple pie either). I regard things such as Branson Pickle as devil's vomit. One man's fish is another man's poisson...


19 May 21 - 04:29 AM (#4106638)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL

Now I could never stand horseradish myself, nor English mustard. They both have unpleasant and overpowering flavours, even in near-subliminal quantities, which ruin anything to which they're added. At least they do so for me - some things must just taste different to different folks I guess.


19 May 21 - 05:23 AM (#4106639)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Different things but both Branston pickle and cranberry sauce are things I'll eat but would rather not have on the plate.

Apple sauce (sorta). We've got a few cookers and mum wants to make a crumble with them. I have to help these days (putting in and out of cooker and maybe reaching something from a cupboard) but I look forward to it. And our own small Bramley tree is looking quite good so far this year..


19 May 21 - 07:09 AM (#4106643)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I found this confusing:

" We've got a few cookers and mum wants to make a crumble with them. I have to help these days (putting in and out of cooker ..."

until I realised that, while "putting in and out of cooker" was referring to the cooking stove, "a few cookers" meant a few cooking apples, rather than too many kitchen appliances.


19 May 21 - 07:12 AM (#4106644)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Apple sauce is often served with roast or grilled pork in these parts. Like Steve, I find it too wet and not right in the flavour department. I make a kick-ass chutney that does the job much better for me, but is probably too spicy to pass the Shaw taste-test.

The best use for apple purée, in my opinion, is in baking. I have some American recipes for cake, muffins and other soda-raised bready items that include apple sauce instead of milk, and they work very well — tasty, moist and with a nicely textured crumb. Now, if only I could figure out a vegan substitute for egg I could feed them to my fussy nephew.


19 May 21 - 07:54 AM (#4106653)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

English mustard on a good pork pie, sublime, nowt else will do.

Dave H


19 May 21 - 09:59 AM (#4106665)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

LOL, Sorry Jos. I tend to think of apples as "cookers" and "eaters" and one tree we still have but no longer fruits as a "juicer" (and a few years back, we'd juice loads and store the juice in a freezer).

I gather that we in the UK are a bit unusual in having things like Bramleys just for cooking. I think Australia for example uses the Granny Smith as "multi-purpose", ie. "eater" and "cooker".


19 May 21 - 12:02 PM (#4106675)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I like Bramley apple pie with single soya cream...not sure if suchlike or tofu would work with your baking, Charmion..?

There is a pic of my, alternative, scrambled tofu on toast here.


19 May 21 - 12:29 PM (#4106680)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The good Lord made apples to pluck from the tree and immediately sink your teeth into. I have no use for apples aside from that. I don't even like cider...


19 May 21 - 12:42 PM (#4106682)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I got 3 galas on my last shop and enjoyed them - with a knife (without this aid, some of my teeth would probably end up in the apple - no porkies).

In the summer/when thirsty, I like a cider but, otherwise, I do love a sherry.


19 May 21 - 12:57 PM (#4106683)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Of course cider can use a different type of apple again... I believe West Country ciders are made from from bitter cider apples but a Norfolk cider can use sweet dessert apples. I'm not sure what Bulmers (Hereford) use.

Then there are the white ciders like Diamond White and Omega that at least used to be cheap ways of getting pissed (UK usage, Americans can think that means angry even without the "off" added) but could leave one debating whether they had known a real apple in their production.


19 May 21 - 02:43 PM (#4106690)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Ontario craft brewers have taken up cider-making in a big way. I buy only the kind with the ingredients listed on the can, and only if the list consists of one item: apples. I am spoiled for choice.

The Gravenstein apple is popular here, originally for juice but now also for cider. It’s not much good as an eater (i.e., raw in the hand), but it’s also excellent for cooking.

The Northern Spy is a late bearer, so it is now less popular than the Gravenstein, but in my opinion it is the best cooking apple available in this part of the world.

Ontario cooks (like me) can go on for hours about apple varieties.


20 May 21 - 08:50 AM (#4106768)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've just made a big pot of caponata, following the Ottolenghi recipe (it's online). I let it mature for a couple of days and we're having it with some crusty bread this evening. I did include a chopped courgette and I left out the raisins (I don't care for them at all in savoury things such as kofkas and pasta con le sarde). It tastes very promising. The aubergines don't half soak up the oil, and if we find it a bit oily I'll use a different method next time. Jamie Oliver's recipe is much-praised and it's easier to do, though, oddly, he leaves out the celery, which would make many a Sicilian hopping mad...


20 May 21 - 09:35 AM (#4106772)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Cider just tastes like the apple juice went off, to me.


20 May 21 - 12:37 PM (#4106788)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...and cheese like off milk, Mrrzy?!


20 May 21 - 05:21 PM (#4106822)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The caponata was gorgeous. It's very filling and we have enough left for a pasta sauce tomorrow (Yotam's recommendation). Caponata is vegan and low in carbohydrate (though high in oil, thanks to those aubergines soaking it up). To go with it I bought a ciabatta and made some garlic bread in the end. My way is to chop up a garlic clove or two and marinate it in extra virgin olive oil. I then brush the oil on to both sides of the ciabatta slices and toast 'em. No butter, no cheese. We are happy!


20 May 21 - 05:50 PM (#4106825)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I visited Sicily in 1988 (I seem to recall the Olympics was on a TV in a cafe), Steve, but sadly didn't come across caponata - sounds delicious with either bread or pasta...but which pasta..?


20 May 21 - 06:27 PM (#4106828)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Short pasta for me. Funnily enough we've been debating just that this evening. I think that the best pasta in the world comes from Gragnano in the Bay of Naples. Happily, several varieties are available these days even in supermarkets. They are generally around £1.70 for a 500g bag, so even expensive pasta is cheap (as with good rice). There's a lovely short tube pasta in Sainsbury's called (I think) mezze rigate, one shaped like little curly trumpets in Tesco called gigli and one made of coiled thin hollow tubes in Waitrose called bucati spirali, all made in Gragnano and all wonderful. Whatever pasta you choose, make sure it's been made using bronze dies, which makes for a much better texture for holding the sauce. It might say "bronzo" on the pack. Pasta water should be as salty as the Mediterranean and should never contain oil. In Italy, it's a mortal sin to leave the kitchen once the pasta pan is on. And the pasta is added to the pan containing the sauce along with some pasta water, never vice versa and generally not drained in a sieve (if you do that, catch some pasta water in a jug). The most abject sight on earth is a pile of spaghetti on a plate with a heap of sauce dumped on top. That is just so English. Even worse, accompanied by a tub of months-old ready-grated Parmesan.


20 May 21 - 06:57 PM (#4106832)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Yes - I think we've said that before: bolognese sauce is certainly (northern) Italian, and spaghetti is certainly (southern) Italian; but spag bol is an English invention.

In Bologna they would have their sauce with a fresh pasta like tagliatelle.


21 May 21 - 12:46 PM (#4106875)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Your abject sight is also very Canadian, Steve. You have just reminded me of a certain kind of cheap restaurant that used to be found on the main street every Ontario town. The sign out front offered “Italian & Canadian Specialties”, and the special on Friday was always fish and chips.


22 May 21 - 09:41 AM (#4106996)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I remember Louis Wu avoiding cheese as if it were spoiled milk...


22 May 21 - 10:04 AM (#4107001)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The leftover caponata as a pasta sauce was a triumph. I did top up the capers, added a sprinkle of dried oregano and threw in a handful of lightly-roasted cherry toms. We used the mezze rigate pasta from Gragnano, little tubes half the length of rigatoni. Cheese on top not needed. Perfect. The caponata has been so good that in future I'm sticking to Yotam's way. A few years ago we discovered Marché-style garlic cloves. The brand is D'Amico Specialíta. They are marinaded in oil and herbs. I haven't a clue what they do to them to eliminate the hot, garlicky taste, but you can eat them by the dozen, nice and crunchy, with impunity. Gorgeous gorging. They're like those whole cloves that you sometimes get in garlic-stuffed olives. So it's Eurovision tonight and no cooking. Cheese, falafels, olives, garlic cloves, tomatoes, crisps...Prosecco, red wine...


22 May 21 - 10:12 AM (#4107003)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

You sound like a ' gourmand ' Steve.


Dave H


22 May 21 - 12:13 PM (#4107023)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ok finally made good meatballs.

Saw a recipe that said Add *pureed* veg to the meat. So I food-processed some celery green pepper onion garlic with a bunch of spices, put half the ground meat flat into the bowl, half the veg, repeat, mixed minimally then used a scoop rather than making balls in my hands. Browned in goose fat with very slight effort at turning, added broth, some tomate paste and cauliflower, simmered till cauliflower cooked. The spices went nicely into the broth, the meatballs maintained integrity and had a great texture. Beef only, this batch.


23 May 21 - 06:10 AM (#4107141)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I keep checking on here and hoping that Steve will put his good skills into our own good English fare.

The Two Fat Ladies (RIP) had no problem championing English dishes and found plenty of variety therein.

However, their programmes were very much the exception to the rule in modern multicultural England - as I've tweeted many times, most of the BBC's Saturday Kitchen, e.g., is foreigners presenting their cuisine and English presenting foreign fare, very sadly.

...


23 May 21 - 06:40 AM (#4107144)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well tonight I'm roasting a free-range chicken from a farm near Crediton in Devon. The carrots and the spuds I'm roasting are Scottish, the cauliflower is Cornish. The stuffing will be made from local sausage meat that I buy from a butcher in Bude who also has a farm (he rears the best lamb you could ever get your hands on and his sausages are to die for). I grew the parsnips myself, which I'll baste with Cornish butter (from Trewithen dairy, the only brand of butter we've bought for about 15 years) and home-grown fresh thyme and parsley, and we make our own gravy from the roasting tin juices. I bought the chipolatas in Waitrose and they say Duchy Originals on the packet. When we have cold chicken tomorrow it will be with Jersey RoyaIs and broad beans I grew myself. Is that good enough?

The wine will, however, be Italian...


23 May 21 - 06:53 AM (#4107146)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Yes, thanks.


23 May 21 - 10:03 AM (#4107185)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I didn't know that Clarissa Dickson Wright had died, so I checked and yes, she died in 2014.
What I also found was her full name - Clarissa Theresa Philomena Aileen Mary Josephine Agnes Elsie Trilby Louise Esmerelda Dickson Wright

That must have made filling in forms a bit difficult.


23 May 21 - 10:17 AM (#4107191)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Apparently, they didn't always get on but were equally strong minded, such that I'd imagine if a BBC producer started saying they need to promote diversity more, they'd both reach, equally quickly, for a rolling pin!


25 May 21 - 08:56 PM (#4107585)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

12,ooo years ago rock paintings around the world depicted the things they liked to eat, kinda like this thread.


20 Jun 21 - 05:30 PM (#4110802)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I've missed the potato pies I used to occasionally buy from a SPAR store (not all stock them) on the way to work, but got a good tip from James Martin on TV this morning:

After frying mushrooms and other vegetables in a pan (he added chicken also), simply roll out a sheet of pastry over the top, crimp it to the pan edges, then place in the oven for about 25 minutes - if, as with mine, the frying pan is not all metal, from Steve (above), tinfoil may be used over the handle.

I shall give that a go shortly...

(As Donuel suggests, we have discussed pies here a couple of months or so ago.)


20 Jun 21 - 06:29 PM (#4110812)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

At a moment of particular poverty, more or less the only meat we ate was either rabbit or kid, roasted whole over vegetables in a pot on the hob, or else roasted whole then stewed with added stock and vegetables. Both were very cheap from a butcher that got them from the leather and fur trade.
I can't remember which it was that was cooking when my teenager came in, lifted the pot and said, "Ah, abortion again", and wandered off. I relented and started buying the odd 'normal' meat!
I find rabbit much enriched by about half a bottle of a deep-flavoured red wine.
One of the chefs interviewed in The Irish Times last week about where he buys his ingredients said he used coconut vinegar from one of the oriental shops, which sounds like a very interesting concept indeed.


21 Jun 21 - 06:18 AM (#4110866)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Marinate the rabbit in the wine, herbs, and A LOT of garlic. It's surprising how much garlic rabbit can take without it being too much.


21 Jun 21 - 06:38 AM (#4110872)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Dunno whether it's just us, but we neither eat rabbit nor fancy eating it. I had it once when I was a teenager and found it to be somewhat bland and lacking in bite, a bit like immature chicken.


21 Jun 21 - 07:27 AM (#4110876)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

Wild rabbits taste very strong, toyrs must have been farmed Steve.

Dave H


21 Jun 21 - 10:28 AM (#4110891)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

No human who isn't starving should eat an Ontario cottontail rabbit. Very gamey, and so lean as to provide little food value. They're much better left for the native predators -- lynxes, foxes, coyotes and wolves. And the odd Cooper's hawk; they like to swoop down and grab baby bunnies out of the grass.

I think my new bed of thyme has settled in to bear consistently, but the parsley is probably doomed, thanks to the thrice-damnable rabbits. They don't touch the sage, oregano, mint, thyme or chives, but they bloody love parsley. Every plant is nibbled almost to the dirt.

I'll have to grow parsley in clay pots arranged on a rack on the patio. I have never seen a rabbit climb.


21 Jun 21 - 12:08 PM (#4110902)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

On my tiny juliet balcony, I grow thyme and mint and, occasionally, have chives, parsley and other annual herbs inside.


21 Jun 21 - 02:04 PM (#4110907)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I spent an hour with the weed whacker trimming grass and weeds around the edge of the vegetable garden and part of the front yard. The tomatoes are huge but green, though starting to shift in hue that tells me soon I'll see some pink. The eggplants are also weighing down the stems, the peppers are robust and numerous, and the okra is almost ready to start picking. Tomorrow will be the first couple, and I'll accumulate a few a day until there are enough for a meal or a jar of pickled okra. Or to give to my next door neighbor who adores it.

Since a week ago I started using home grown peppers in my cooking, and though I harvested garlic last week it's not dried enough, but I have tons left from last year (and the year before).

We're supposed to get some rain, a small chance today, better tomorrow, then I have some more planting to do. It will be time to make some babaghanouj as soon as the eggplants are a little bigger. Rain always gives everything a better push than just watering with a sprinkler.


21 Jun 21 - 03:12 PM (#4110914)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion's brother Andrew

Rabbits will stand on their haunches and even on their toes (like cats) to nibble on things to which they are particularly drawn.


21 Jun 21 - 04:52 PM (#4110921)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Last year, I had some spare parsley plants after filling up their allotted space in the veg plot. I planted the spares in a couple of old plastic troughs that were lying around. I put the troughs on an old wooden ex-picnic bench, about three feet above the ground. Rabbits ate every single plant to the ground in the veg plot, but I got a magnificent crop from the troughs. All my plants will be off the ground this year.


23 Jun 21 - 12:10 AM (#4111082)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Last night I wanted to make a new vegetable dish, I found a nice recipe for carrot salad with an Indian flavor. The DH loved it! Here's the link:

Bombay carrot salad

Apparently carrots are more healthful if cooked, so I cooked the whole carrots in the microwave for two minutes. Then I let them cool and sliced them thin with my salad shooter. I was supposed to grate them, but I couldn't find the right attachment. I like them better sliced, anyway.

I left out the raisins and the red pepper.


23 Jun 21 - 08:01 AM (#4111100)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Oh, did I make a huge mess trying not to have to clean my food processor.

Decided to try grating cauliflower into riced cauliflower. It went EVERYWHERE. Then decided to follow the advice of wringing out the extra moisture. It all STUCK to the towel and I made even MORE of a mess trying to get it off.

Food processor next time.


23 Jun 21 - 08:12 AM (#4111102)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I like cauliflower the way it is. I can't see the point of trying to turn it into pretend rice.


23 Jun 21 - 08:44 AM (#4111104)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

How nice for you, Jos.

People who try ricing cauliflower typically do it because they (a) like cauliflower and (b) are seeking creative ways to cut back the amount of carbohydrate in their diet.

I have never tried it at home because I am lazy, but a local restaurant serves a “keto bowl” made up of riced cauliflower, quinoa and zippy grilled veg with poached eggs on top. It’s obviously labour-intensive, but delicious and therefore worth paying somebody else to make it.


23 Jun 21 - 09:05 AM (#4111107)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I'm definitely more with Jos here on the cauliflower front. They're just as keto left in nice big chunks are they are messed about with. Steamed cauliflower, lightly salted, is a thing of beauty as long as the cauliflower is (a) firm and fresh, (b) cooked to just the right level of bite. It's also very nice roasted in bite-sized florets with olive oil, green olives, onions, paprika, pumpkin seeds and chorizo slices for half an hour, with a sprinkling of fresh parsley at the end. I tried cauliflower steaks once. Waste of good cauliflower in m'humble. It amuses me to think that anyone would try to make something that isn't rice into fake rice, just because they won't eat the real thing. I once saw some vegan "lamb chops" in a supermarket that were the same shape and colour as real lamb chops. I mean, do me a favour...

Incidentally, smashing your raw veg into smithereens does absolutely nothing for its vitamin content.

Still, whatever stirs yer loins...


23 Jun 21 - 09:10 AM (#4111108)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

I agree with you, Steve, because l like cauliflower pretty well any way it can appear on a menu, starting with raw in a hunk. But I also get that some people want a ricy texture and bulk in a dish without the carb load of real rice.

Lots of diabetics in my family, see.


23 Jun 21 - 12:50 PM (#4111126)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

You can eat rice if you have diabetes as long as you don't overdo it.


23 Jun 21 - 03:32 PM (#4111139)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion's brother Andrew

Steve, Charmion comes from a family in which she had to compete with her siblings for pieces of raw cabbage core.


23 Jun 21 - 04:20 PM (#4111141)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

"It amuses me to think that anyone would try to make something that isn't rice into fake rice, just because they won't eat the real thing" (Steve)...Italians have done it with orzo, of course...but I much prefer fusilli pasta.


23 Jun 21 - 05:19 PM (#4111146)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

If there's a jar of mixed pickles in my house, and I get there first, there is the severe danger that anyone hoping to find pickled cauliflower therein will be severely disappointed...


23 Jun 21 - 05:29 PM (#4111147)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Orzo serves a different function to rice in Italian cuisine, though I do make a devastatingly tasty "orzotto" with bacon, peas and Parmesan. I don't think that rice-avoiders, on the grounds of carbohydrate content, would gain much succour from orzo...

I'm not a fan of fusilli. Get thee to a Waitrose and buy a bag of bucatini spirali (it's a pasta from Gragnano). I think it's far superior to fusilli and can be used instead of it every time.


23 Jun 21 - 05:31 PM (#4111148)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I eat so much cabbage/cauliflower/broccoli core when I'm chopping the veg that I'm often in danger of spoiling my appetite.


23 Jun 21 - 05:49 PM (#4111150)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Ditto.


23 Jun 21 - 08:05 PM (#4111156)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I don't eat riced cauli as rice but as cauli that takes mere seconds to cook.

I am not a fan of raw cauliflower. But I love the texture of it riced, especially in soups.

I love cauliflower steaks, roast whole cauliflower, pretty much any form thereof, including riced. But not grating no more.


24 Jun 21 - 08:25 AM (#4111197)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I much prefer cauliflower to broccoli.

The cheapest & quickest meal I prepare is with a 14 pence packet of curry flavoured instant noodles from Tesco - with the curry powder first stirred in a mug of boiled water, into a pan with some sautéd veg, soy sauce plus tofu for protein; total cost would have to be below 50 pence/63 cents.


24 Jun 21 - 09:53 AM (#4111212)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I prefer cauli to brocc too.


24 Jun 21 - 11:54 AM (#4111235)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I'm not a fan of the calabrese type of broccoli, but (given careful cooking) I do like tenderstem and purple sprouting broccoli, both of which I grow. I'm also fond of that new veg which started off being called flower sprouts but which the commercial chaps now dub "kalettes," presumably because "sprouts" in the name might have put off sprout-haters, of which there are many (more fool them: simply choose only tight sprouts and watch them like a hawk in the cooking - and no cutting crosses in the bottoms!).


27 Jun 21 - 01:06 PM (#4111601)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Orzo doesn't replace rice, it complements it. I first learned how to use it from a Lebanese friend who browns the orzo in olive oil then adds the rice to heat it up a bit then adds the liquid. You have the classic browned pasta amongst the rice (I use Basmati most of the time now). Those in the US (at least) think "Rice-a-roni the San Francisco treat" for a similar boxed approach to this.

Cook orzo and rice with chicken broth and it's almost a whole meal like that. In winter I make that mix (adding the browned pasta and rice to my rice cooker) with lightly sauteed chicken breast and sliced mushrooms and it comes out a perfect comfort food.

Today I have the carcass of last week's chicken simmering to make a rich broth. I'll freeze some of it and use the rest this week.


27 Jun 21 - 01:16 PM (#4111604)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...never tried them together - a test for the taste buds, maybe..?


27 Jun 21 - 04:07 PM (#4111632)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Make it like vermicelli and rice but use orzo instead. Not a tough "test" - it tastes like rice but has the added color of the browned pasta.


27 Jun 21 - 04:21 PM (#4111634)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

...if it "tastes like rice" (SRS) it would be a "test for the taste buds" (me) to distinguish between them.


27 Jun 21 - 07:10 PM (#4111653)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Browned pasta sounds like burned pasta to me. I don't know why you'd mix rice and pasta. I agree about basmati. I use it for everything (except risottos) that calls for rice. By the way, there is a lot of tosh written about how to cook rice. Here's a method guaranteed to work every time with basmati:

Measure out the amount you need. Put it into a capacious pan and rinse it in cold water at least three times (crucial). Don't bother sieving it, as the rice stays on the bottom and you can just decant out the water. Boil a kettle of water and turn on the ring full. Salt the rice to taste, then add *an excess* of boiling water (you can check the saltiness later). As soon as you pour in the water, set your timer for twelve minutes. Get the pan to a simmer, give it a stir to prevent sticking and put on the lid. After exactly twelve minutes, strain the rice in a sieve, put the sieve over a pan and wait for one minute minimum. There you go. Perfect rice every time, nice and fluffy, no stickiness. Ignore those recipes that have you measuring precise amounts of water-to-rice. They are received wisdom from people who don't cook but who just copy from ancient, outmoded gurus!


27 Jun 21 - 07:32 PM (#4111656)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Or, you can rinse the rice (because the package says to) then add it to your rice cooker, add whatever ingredients you want, add the amount of water the rice cooker instructions say and wait until the little lever flips from red to green. Perfect!


27 Jun 21 - 08:21 PM (#4111663)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

My rice-cooker is a "saucepan-with-lid."


28 Jun 21 - 06:08 AM (#4111692)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

For just myself, I place half a mug of rice in the pan, rinse it a few times, then add a mug and a bit of boiled water from the kettle, similar to Steve. Let it boil for a bit then turn the heat down for the rice to gradually absorb all the water - all done by eye rather than a timer.

Rather than salt, I may add a bit of vinegar to the hot water, similar to what some Japanese do - sushi is vinegared rice.

The three of us are using slight variations of the absorption method.


28 Jun 21 - 06:15 AM (#4111693)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Absorption methods use measured quantities of both rice and water? Steve, like me, uses a plenty of water and boil away (OK before draining and standing) version?


28 Jun 21 - 06:36 AM (#4111694)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

Sorry - I didn't read Steve's post carefully enough - "strain the rice in a sieve" is not the absorption method, as you suggest Jon.


28 Jun 21 - 06:50 AM (#4111697)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

What Jon and I do is far more chilled than using careful rice-water measurements. Different batches of rice, different amounts of water. Not for me! The only measures are the amount of rice needed for one or two or three or four people (a bit left over is great next day, fried up in butter with an egg and some peas and mushrooms) and that exact twelve-minute boil. I stopped measuring the water years ago after many irritatingly-inconsistent results. The only other thing is to never buy cheap rice. There's a lot of dishonest "basmati" around that's been cut with other (and inferior) long-grain rice. Even expensive rice is cheap. It's the big brands only for me when it comes to basmati.


28 Jun 21 - 06:55 AM (#4111698)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Another thing is that I never freeze cooked rice or any dish containing it, even though it's sometimes recommended. Freezing does something to the texture of the rice that I'm not keen on. If it's a soup with rice in it, I'll freeze the soup without rice, then cook some rice when I thaw the soup and throw it in for a minute of two. Much nicer.


28 Jun 21 - 06:58 AM (#4111701)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

As with Steve, I do get good quality rice. Usually Tilda, but I've also found Kohinoor good. My own feeling is that getting the consistency with rice is more a factor of this than choice of cooking method.


28 Jun 21 - 07:18 AM (#4111702)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: WalkaboutsVerse

I've forgotten the name but, from quite a while ago, I recall trying something other than basmati (a long-grain home brand, I think) and it was not good.


28 Jun 21 - 08:42 AM (#4111708)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

In the same vein, there's also a lot of inferior risotto rice around. I have yet to find a decent supermarket own-brand version. My go-to is Gallo carnaroli rice. It's often on offer somewhere for a shade over two quid, and a box gives two of us two generous risottos. At that price it's not worth economising and risking chalky or drop-to-bits rice!


29 Jun 21 - 02:23 PM (#4111835)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ok tried two new things at once.

I have read that ground nuts can sub for breadcrumbs.

I also read several recipes for sardine cakes.

So I ground 1T pecans 1T walnuts 2T almonds to a fine powder.
Food-processed an onion, the oil from the sardines, a clove of garlic, some paprika and cumin. Shoulda only used some of the oil, it was way too runny. But I thought to do the nuts first at least.

Mashed the tinned sardines with the goop and added about half of the crushed nuts. Made patties (ish) and used the rest of the crushed nuts to coat the outsides of the 4 patties.

Toaster-ovened at 400, turned down to 350 after 10 mn for burning the tops, took out after 20 mn total.

Ate on a bed of cherry tomatoes with lime juice and a blob of sour cream.

Totally yummy.


30 Jun 21 - 12:47 PM (#4111907)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Now that's a totally new recipe, Mrrzy. Thanks for posting.


30 Jun 21 - 02:22 PM (#4111916)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

What does ' 1T ' mean ?

Dave H


30 Jun 21 - 05:08 PM (#4111928)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

I assumed that 1T means 'one tablespoonful'.
I could be wrong.


30 Jun 21 - 05:31 PM (#4111933)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

T=Tablespoon
t or tsp=teaspoon

My mom used to make totally delicious salmon croquettes that I've never managed to duplicate. There were a lot of other things that weren't so fabulous, but those were. (For example - she often burned the grilled cheese sandwiches when making the total comfort food lunch of cream of tomato soup and grilled cheese - perhaps it's because she was making the meal for 4 kids and had distractions?)


02 Jul 21 - 12:07 PM (#4112121)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

Mods, oops wrong thread


03 Jul 21 - 12:51 PM (#4112204)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I invented a tangy side dish to go with meat loaf.

Black bean salad

Drain but do not rinse one 15-oz can black beans
Make dressing: Put in a medium-size bowl and whisk well.
2 T veg oil
1 T apple cider vinegar         
1/2 t dried leaf oregano
a few grinds of black pepper
1/4 t mayonnaise (optional, aids mixing)


Chop finely 1/4 cup yellow onion
Chop coarsely 6-8 cherry tomatoes or one medium-size tomato

Mix all together. It is better to make this ahead so the flavors can blend.

The DH really liked this.


03 Jul 21 - 02:13 PM (#4112207)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Yes, sorry, 1 T = 1 tablespoon.


05 Jul 21 - 11:42 AM (#4112390)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Made an odd salad by julienning a yellow squash and sitting it in parsley lemon juice garlic for an hour, then adding mostly defrosted green beans and a bunch of cucumber, letting that sit another hour, then adding a bunch of riced cauliflower and some olive oil. Yummy.


08 Jul 21 - 12:07 PM (#4112713)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

The first of the big garden cooking productions came last night with the weighing in of ripe tomatoes, green bell peppers, poblano peppers, and garlic, all from the garden, plus onions, cilantro, salt and apple cider vinegar from the store rounding out the mix for homemade canned salsa. "Zesty salsa" the recipe is called in the Ball Blue Book and it's many shares on the Interwebs.

It's a slow motion marathon, back and forth between the sink, counter, and stove, and I started out dicing peppers by hand but soon shifted to the food processor to speed the job. Peeling and coarse dice of all of those tomatoes much be done by hand (in my opinion - otherwise you're going to make tomato sauce in the processor). The only glitch in the operation was that I sat down at the table to read on the phone as I waited for the timer to signal 15 minutes of processing. Some time later I realized the timer not only hadn't gone off, it no longer retained the setting I had given it so I don't know if it needs new batteries or is on the fritz. I *think* the Rachel Maddow Show was just starting when I sat down and it was about 22 minutes in when I turned off the pot and removed the salsa. Processing an extra 5 minutes isn't a problem, I just don't want to under process it.

The kitchen sink was piled high with the large pots and bowls and food processor parts, so this morning my first job as tea brewed was to put all of that away. At least it goes pretty quickly - the pile looks huge but each item is large so putting just 3 or 4 away makes the sink look much better. Mind games to get through a job.

The house smells wonderful. I worked my way through most of the peppers I'd picked so far (I went out to pick a fresh bell pepper when I realized a couple of the ones I intended were getting a little wilted - always try to used the freshest best crops when canning). Those wilted ones will be diced and frozen later today, they won't go to waste. I have a large cardboard flat (Costco's 35 can sparkling water packaging) full of ripening tomatoes and the window sill is holding another dozen at least. I'm visiting the garden two or three times a day and picking any that have started a rosy color - they are officially vine ripe at that point and I hope to keep them from the sharp eyes of birds and squirrels.

The recipe offers diced measurements as well as approximate weight of ingredients (cups vs pounds), and this time I weighed everything. The recipe output says six pints, but having weighed all of the ingredients to be precise I got eight pints in the hot water bath and another pint and a half unprocessed in jars in the fridge.

After finishing cleaning the kitchen I did a victory lap around the kitchen. I need to head out to the garden to pick more tomatoes and my next decision - canning diced or sauce? And the next batch of peppers will go into jars with okra for Lady Bird Johnson's Pickled Okra recipe. You can look it up. Simple and delicious. I'm collecting a few okra a day, and soon it will be dozens a day since I recklessly put in six plants.


12 Jul 21 - 09:01 PM (#4113131)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've been growing potatoes for the last forty years or more. I gave up on maincrop ones because I've always had blight every year, nearly always in late July or August, and the maincrops haven't reached a decent size by then. Besides, the slugs become a menace after the end of July.

For many years I've grown only Sutton's Foremost as my first early. We've been eating them now for a couple of weeks. They have a wonderful flavour, they bulk up well (given enough water), they keep their flavour and texture for a long time and they generally crop early enough to beat the blight (as soon as I see it I cut off all tops straight away, which means I'll get all the tubers in good condition).

The second early I've settled on for years is Nicola. It's waxy and dense with a great flavour, better than Charlotte in m'humble. It stores well and it makes superb oven chips (made with groundnut oil) or Mediterranean potatoes (made with extra virgin olive oil, a big sprig of rosemary and a big scattering of unpeeled garlic cloves) and fantastic jacket potatoes (they are not good for mash, but it's summer, dammit). I do get blight on it but not before the tubers are a decent, but not massive, size. Some shop potatoes aren't too bad and I rely on them through the winter as I can't grow anywhere near enough of my own to keep us going. But home-grown are incomparable when it comes to texture and flavour. I'm strictly organic with my spuds, by the way.

I have filleted red mullet (my all-time favourite fish) in the freezer and we'll be having that with my thinly-sliced Nicola at the weekend, the slices brushed with extra virgin olive oil, seasoned and baked in the hot oven in a single layer on greaseproof paper for fifteen minutes while I fry the fish in butter. The fish, with its skin well crisped, goes on top of a little mound of the potatoes skin side up, and we have that with a little scattering of black olive tapenade round the edges. That's easy to make but it's just as easy and just as cheap to buy a decent jar of it, enough for two, from M&S. We got the idea from a Rick Stein episode.

Tonight we had some Alaskan sockeye salmon (fried in butter) with some green beans and my Foremost potatoes, simply boiled. Plenty of butter, salt and pepper on that lot and it's food fit for the gods. And it was!


13 Jul 21 - 12:37 AM (#4113139)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

All those food sound so good!

Safety thing:

Some recipes say to crush a clove of garlic with the blade of a knife, but I've thought of another way to do it. There's a tool called a bench scraper which I really like - not that I've ever scraped a bench with it. We call it the lifter, because after we chop food, we use it to lift it into the pot.

It occurred to me that I could use the lifter to crush garlic. I put the garlic under the lifter, make a fist with my right hand, step slightly to the left of center and WHAMMO! There's plenty of room for the blow, there's no knife blade, and if I do it twice, the garlic is well and truly crushed. And then the lifter can go in the dishwasher.


13 Jul 21 - 04:13 AM (#4113155)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Point taken re knife blade (though I still live dangerously). I have several broad-bladed silicone-coated gizmos I suppose I could use instead. Squashed cloves are my go-to for stews and other slow-cooked things, but for those quicker tomatoey pasta sauces I slice the peeled cloves into thin slivers (using my thumb as an anvil - more danger!) which are sautéed for two or three minutes in olive oil ((often with chilli flakes if called for) before adding the tomatoes/parsley/capers/whatever. What I never want is for the garlic to go brown. I haven't used my garlic crusher for years. I'm not a kitchen vandal...


13 Jul 21 - 05:00 AM (#4113161)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

Wild Salmon are on the west coast of Ireland at the moment. I bought a whole Salmon for 12.50 Euro last week ($14.86 or £10.79)

Last night at a bar I was asked if I wanted a any Salmon, an acquaintance could get me some so I asked for two more to cut into stakes to freeze. That will keep my good lady very happy!!


13 Jul 21 - 05:30 AM (#4113173)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

In 1977 we stayed near Cloghane, over the Conor Pass from Dingle, for two weeks at the wonderful Nellie O'Neill's B&B. We laughed out loud at breakfast every morning when I got two fried eggs with my fry-up but Mrs Steve, "the little woman," only got the one! We didn't need any more food until the evening! Her sister ran Murphy's Bar, four miles down the road at Brandon. One evening Nellie asked us furtively if we'd be going down to the pub. We said we would be, so she asked us to deliver a huge parcel wrapped in thick, plain brown paper, to be handed to no-one except her sister, no names, no pack drill, ask no questions get no lies. We complied, of course, increasingly suspecting from the odour that the parcel contained something, er, fishy. The sister was very grateful, gave us a free Guinness and disappeared off with the hefty parcel into the back room. A while later she emerged with a huge tray of paper plates and forks, each holding a generous chunk of the finest salmon I've ever tasted, before or since - free of charge to the couriers. We didn't ask...


13 Jul 21 - 08:44 AM (#4113200)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

Nora Murphys bar !! Run then by Mary Murphy the nearest thing to an Angel on this earth.!!!

The bar itself has to have the finest location in the world, it is now run by Mary's newphew.

I could regale you with loads of stories about Mary's kindness and generosity, I still get a Christmas card every year.


13 Jul 21 - 09:08 AM (#4113205)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Mrs Steve has confirmed that it was Nora who had the place at that time (I'm not good with names!). It was/is indeed a superb pub. The old boys always sat on wooden benches drinking Guinness straight from the bottle, and a small girl regaled us one evening with some of the finest tin whistle playing you'll ever hear. The weather didn't play ball that August, we got three punctures in the Morris Minor in four weeks, and I became infested with over thirty sheep ticks sucking me dry, but hey ho!


13 Jul 21 - 09:36 AM (#4113208)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

Yes Steve, in 77 it would have been Nora, my first visit there was 95.


13 Jul 21 - 07:41 PM (#4113259)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

You're making me feel like I should be planning a sentimental journey...

Now I have to confess that I used an Old El Paso fajitas kit for tea tonight, the hot and fiery one. I fried up some onion, a red pepper and some strips of free-range chicken breast, added the seasoning from the kit (not all of it, as there are just the two of us), laid it on the warmed-up tortillas with a bit of lettuce, spooned on the salsa provided and rolled 'em up. We had a little bowl of soured cream and a little pot of guacamole to optionally spoon on (which we did, to add to the mess).

I tell you, that was utterly messy to eat (I think I overloaded the tortillas) and utterly delicious... And I have three tortillas left over. I might stuff a couple with scrambled eggs for breakfast in the morning...


14 Jul 21 - 08:35 AM (#4113323)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

If you ever go on that sentimental journey give me a shout, I'll join you there for a pint .................... or several!!


14 Jul 21 - 05:19 PM (#4113363)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Nellie was 77 at the time we stayed with her at the B&B, so she'd be 120 by now! We never booked ahead anywhere on our travels, and after three days' leisurely driving in the Morris Minor across the south we ended up by chance at Nellie's place. We stayed for a few nights then decided to move on, via Galway Bay to Clifden. But we missed the "Nellie experience" so much that we haretailed back the next day and stayed for summat like another two weeks! Each morning Nellie's granddaughter Ellen knocked on our bedroom door and piped up in her singing voice "The breakfast 'tis ready!"

Solid gold, going into my autobiography if I ever get round to it!


15 Jul 21 - 11:53 AM (#4113433)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I was poking around in Google Earth to do with the archeology thread, so I querie "Nora Murphy's bar Dingle" and got a hit. Now it is Murphy's pub, bed and breakfast if the business on Strand St in Dingle is the one you're discussing.

Steve, I think the only way to eat fajitas is in an over-stuffed tortilla. There is a store north of me that has a tortilla bakery inside so I buy them when they're still warm. Both flour and corn are available. A trick that is helpful in particular for the corn tortillas is to lay two of them down with a huge overlap. Maybe an inch on each end being a single layer, the rest of it doubled. Put your ingredients on there and it's easier to eat before it falls apart. I suppose you could do that with flour tortillas but they're larger and thicker and that's a lot of carbs.


15 Jul 21 - 12:27 PM (#4113438)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

Not the same bar SRS, here is a link to the bar

Murphys

It really is very basic, door into the premises, bar to the left, fire to the right and a door opposite the front door out to the toilets. The floor is uneven there is little furniture but you will never find a better bar anywhere in the world.

The view from the front door looks over a (very) small harbour right up Bay of Tralee with a range of mountains which form the "spine" of the Dingle Peninsula to the left and is absolutely stunning.

It is said that St Brendan who Brandon is named after sailed to America even before the Vikings got there. His voyage was recreated by Tim Severin in 76/77 and if you can find his book "The Brendan Voyage" it is well worth the rad.


15 Jul 21 - 12:50 PM (#4113442)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Ah, St Brendan's Voyage


15 Jul 21 - 12:58 PM (#4113444)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Raggy, that link won't load - my Internet Provider's software says it isn't safe to surf there. I suppose like a lot of bars it's "enter at your own risk." :-/


15 Jul 21 - 01:08 PM (#4113446)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

Cannot imagine what it can find wrong with the site, it is just a quite basic advert for the bar.


15 Jul 21 - 02:42 PM (#4113448)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

The link opened for me without any warnings, but it wasn't a bar advert. It was a YouTube of Christy Moore singing 'St Brendan's Voyage', illustrated with photographs of Ireland, a view from space, and images of Saint Brandan, a sailing boat, the Pope apparently asleep on the job ... (some recurring again and again).


15 Jul 21 - 02:49 PM (#4113450)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Oops - sorry, I opened the most recent link, which wasn't about the bar.
I have now opened the Murphy's bar advert link, which also worked OK with no warnings about it being unsafe.


15 Jul 21 - 06:07 PM (#4113467)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The B&B was at Cross Cloghane, which is about four miles from Brandon - not in Dingle. I'd be amazed if it were still there. Nellie was Nora's sister, which we discovered only via the fishy parcel incident. Raggytash's description of the bar is just as we remembered it. The atmosphere in Nora's time was truly magical. The salmon trafficking incident ensured that Mrs Steve and I were never treated as tourists! We did climb to the top of Brandon Peak while we were there. Sadly, it was a bit foggy on top, but the cliff scenery is majestic.


15 Jul 21 - 06:43 PM (#4113470)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

That's a good tip, Maggie. Thing is, I made the mix to go into the tortillas and wanted Mrs Steve to have her fair share of it (I'm that kind of chap, don't you know...). But she wanted only two (I wanted three...) so I think I over-stuffed hers somewhat. To be honest, just get in there with your hands, sit over your plate and gorge. Life's too short!


16 Jul 21 - 05:07 PM (#4113565)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

My okra plants are growing large (chest high at this point - they can reach upwards of 8-10 feet) but they aren't making as many pods as plants in the past. Maybe they're waiting for the heat of August. I made brine for picking and cut up a 4" poblano pepper and one of my homegrown garlics and trimmed the skin off of the tops of the okra (leaving them closed so seeds don't float out). I packed on pint jar and filled with brine then processed it for 10 minutes in my asparagus steamer pot. There was another equivalent amount that I took next door to my neighbor who loves this fried, boiled, etc., (I eat it fried and sometimes use it stir-fried - I'm not a fan of the consistency of boiled okra). I'll pick more as the plants keep growing and next time I have enough I'll warm the brine, cut up another pepper and peel another garlic, and do it again. This works so much better than trying to save a bunch to make a big recipe, so much gets too old and goes to waste.

I'm thinking about making another batch of the Ball Blue Book Zesty Salsa. It has been a hit with the family members who have gotten a taste. I made a gallon before, but it goes fast when divided among several households. This time it depends on if I have enough peppers or have to supplement my supply from the grocery store.


17 Jul 21 - 11:52 AM (#4113620)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I got a lot of fresh herbs today... Parsley, mint, dill. Gonna make my noncarb tabbouleh with cuke tomato cauliflower rice parsley dill and some mint with lemon juice and olive oil, and mojitos with the rest of the mint.

Also ran into a friend whose *name* is Parsley, whom I had not seen in years, but I did not bring him home.


17 Jul 21 - 02:30 PM (#4113633)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Parsley was sandy.


17 Jul 21 - 10:00 PM (#4113660)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

This evening I used tomatoes that were imperfect (so I couldn't use them for canning) in a favorite dish called Hirino Me Melitzanes (Pork with Eggplant)

I went poking around online and found the recipe transcribed on a cooking site, it comes from the same cookbook. They didn't use US measures (2 cups of diced peeled tomatoes, 2 pounds of pork) but it's the same recipe. I didn't have mashed potatoes, but I have red lasoda potatoes from my garden that I cut up and pan fried the other day and I used leftovers with the pork. Amazing!

Hirino Me Melitzanes.

If you want a marvelous cookbook, The Complete Middle East Cookbook by Tess Mallos is it. She offers techniques and, where needed, substitutions. I go to this book all of the time. I made hummus last week, I'm going to be making babaghanouj next week. I make some of her rice dishes and her lamb dishes and her vegetarian dishes. I use Bookfinder.com to find copies. I always keep extras here to give to people when the urge strikes) and you can find used hardcover copies much cheaper than a new perfect-bound (soft cover) volume. And though it doesn't make sense, if you search on the title with "The" at the beginning you get much better results (the search database should filter that out, but it doesn't.) Don't search on "Complete." Search on "The Complete."

Anyway, its a great book. Mallos is a cookbook author from Australia. Her ethnic background is Greek, and I don't know much more about her than that.


18 Jul 21 - 04:54 AM (#4113676)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: JennieG

Tess Mallos

Her books have been popular here for a long time. I bet if you checked the local Rotary Club used book sale (just down the road from me) you would find several; I don't know if they are still being published though.


18 Jul 21 - 11:46 PM (#4113763)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Thank you for the link!

Sad to see she isn't still writing - died 9 years ago. The book I sent links to appears to still be in print, or at least in stock, for sale new in bookstores. On Wikipedia looking at her oeuvre, and oooooh! She has a filo pastry cookbook! Now that might be a real treat!

Just today my ex was over to deliver some groceries and taste test the next batch of salsa. It's a mild recipe, and it seems this Puerto Rican has developed a taste for some heat (I used to have to make "false alarm" chili for him), so I advised that he mix in a couple of teaspoons of Tabasco sauce when he opens the next jar. (There is some in the recipe, I'll make a note to add a little more - I also like a bit of heat in the salsa). While he was here I pan fried a few cut up small potatoes from the garden and gave him a bowl of the eggplant and pork dish to try with them. He loves it - "could you make this with lamb?" - I'm sure you can. I've seen variations on My Fitness Pal, people make it with beef and lamb is bound to be good also.

As far as the heat, I think both of us over the years have broadened our willingness to have heat as part of a dish. I grew up in a no-heat world at the time in the Pacific Northwest; recipes spread and restaurants flourish with lots of stuff up there now. And elsewhere. We talked about that - I won't hold back on the heat in some of the things I make that I know he's going to want some of. We'll see what happens. (I hear from my son, who was the original picky eater, that he goes full-tilt on the Thai food with curry paste and peppers. And he's in the Pacific Northwest where, as a kid, I remember it being a big deal with a few places started carrying bagels.)


19 Jul 21 - 03:20 AM (#4113767)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL

Whilst we are on the subject of cookery books, does anyone have a particular book (or books) without which they would be lost? About half-a-dozen in my overlarge library fall into that category.

Among them is a disintegrating paperback by Bon Viveur (Fanny & Johnny Cradock), which I regard as akin to Holy Writ. Which does not, BTW, mean infallible.


19 Jul 21 - 02:51 PM (#4113826)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Among my cookbooks are Nora Ephron's Housekeeping and all the Edward X. Delaney novels...


21 Jul 21 - 11:58 AM (#4113992)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I have a few that I always seem to cook from, though I have several shelves of them because I inherited cookbooks from my mother. The first book I bought for myself was the Fanny Farmer cookbook, eleventh edition (the one I grew up with at my mother's house), the Joy of Cooking (one I found in the shelves at my dad's house when doing his estate), and the Better Homes and Gardens loose-leaf book from about 1974, given me by one of my best friends who knew I was going to be setting up my own apartment soon and needing to cook. That was the first book I had until Fanny Farmer came along in 1978.

I ended up with mom's Mastering the Art of French Cooking and have made a few of those recipes. She does chicken like nobody else. I have a little wooden card box mom gave me when I was maybe 11 - with home recipes I used to make, cookies, cakes, frosting, and as I got older, a few dishes like chicken teriyaki, casseroles I liked, etc. I have a larger plastic box probably intended for storing the large floppy disks (6" x 6" or so) that I put in folded printouts of online recipes and quite a few I've printed from Mudcat cooks. That box is a history of what I've been making because I use the recipe then tuck it into the front, so flipping back through the sheets shows me what I've made lately. My turkey brine and roasting recipe, cranberry sauce, Martha Stewart's pizza dough recipe that is my favorite, Puerto Rican rice and pigeon peas is in there, folded pieces of notebook paper with hand written recipes from watchin my mother-in-law cook and literally catching her hand to measure what she was putting into the dough or filling for things like empanadillas. My jelly making recipes are in there, as is Lady Bird Johnson's pickled okra recipe. And much more. I probably cook out of that box as much as I do the other cookbooks combined now.


22 Jul 21 - 01:32 AM (#4114034)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Hi, SRS. I too have my boxes, full of the recipes we like best. I have two for my own recipes, one for meat dishes plus bread, another for everything else, mostly salads and desserts.

When my husband's parents passed away, we accepted their collection of recipes. There are the old favorites - beef in red wine, coq au vin, quiche Lorraine, Hungarian goulash. Another favorite is chicken thighs roasted with lime juice and paprika. It's very tasty.

My father-in-law was a great one for clipping recipes out of the newspaper and then never cooking them. That recipe for chicken was probably one of those. It looked like it had sat in the box for thirty years.

Often I cook those old European recipes in a slow cooker. There's less fuss and the meat gets very tender. I put the herbs and spices in at the end, so they don't get cooked to death.


22 Jul 21 - 05:54 AM (#4114047)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

Two books formed the basis of my cooking years ago

1. Practical Cookery by Cesarini & Kinton

2. Reportoire de la Cuisine by Gringoire & Saulnier

The latter is a brilliant book


28 Jul 21 - 07:13 PM (#4114671)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

For a change, I found some rather tasty shop-bought full-size tomatoes this week. My own tomatoes are nowhere near bearing as yet, so this was a bonus. I made a batch of salmorejo, a tapa that we've had many times in Granada, Córdoba and many a little village bar in Andalucía. I had to battle with Mrs Steve even to make this, as she associates it exclusively with sitting outside Spanish bars on hot August evenings with a glass or five of the best local red... However, just for once I prevailed.

Salmorejo is the thicker, creamier and tastier cousin of gazpacho, and must be served very cold and in small dishes or wine glasses. It's very easy to make, as long as you have those really good tomatoes. Here goes:

You need (for four):

a pound and a half of the best full-size tomatoes
Two fat garlic cloves, peeled
100 ml of the best extra virgin olive oil you can get your hands on. Compromise is not possible.
A really good glug of sherry vinegar
A teaspoon of sugar
Salt
The bread from a smallish baguette, crust removed

Blend everything except the bread to a fairly smooth paste. Crumble up the bread and put it into the tomato paste and let it sit for ten minutes. Blend again, achieving a pretty smooth consistency. You're done!

Now you really must chill this thoroughly. And here are two golden rules: first, don't bother peeling your tomatoes. Absolutely not necessary. Second, soak your bread in the tomato sauce you've made and ignore those stupid recipes that have you soaking the bread separately in water. I mean, why would you do that...

Now when you serve this as a tapa or a starter, the tradition is that you crumble a small amount of cold hard-boiled egg and a few slivers of Serrano ham on top. I find Serrano ham to be a bit chewy and the sort of thing I'm picking out of my teeth all the next day, so I substitute some crumbled-up crispy pancetta or streaky bacon. No-one's ever complained!

In Spain this is often served with little breadsticks, but I don't think you need those if you're serving it as a starter or as as part of a platter of tapas.

Finally, I made a double batch tonight, and I'm experimenting with the leftovers to see if it freezes.


29 Jul 21 - 07:49 AM (#4114705)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Yikes, my ingredients list omitted the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs (they go into the mix - the chopped eggs to serve are extra!). Sorry about that. It was well past my bedtime...


29 Jul 21 - 10:10 AM (#4114718)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Looks yummy!


30 Jul 21 - 04:53 PM (#4114852)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Janie

I rarely fix fish, because I so rarely fix it that I nearly always ruin it. For me, fixing fish and other sea foods is kind of like making bread or pastry, have to do it often enough to get a feel for it. Thing is, flour is a lot cheaper to waste while one learns than is fish or seafood.

Splurged and bought scallops - yes, frozen, but even so, still quite pricey. Enough for more than one meal for a few people. First go round turned out great. 2nd go round was ok but not as good as the first, and last night, with just enough left to feed myself, I botched it completely.


30 Jul 21 - 05:09 PM (#4114853)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Helen, When you say 'fix fish' do you mean 'cook fish'?
I am used to 'fixing' meaning 'mending' or 'putting right', so 'fixing fish' would mean sorting out the fish when something has gone wrong with it. Your post suggests that it goes wrong when you are fixing it. I am confused.


30 Jul 21 - 05:10 PM (#4114854)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jos

Oops, sorry. That was meant for Janie, not Helen!


31 Jul 21 - 07:29 AM (#4114907)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

We had a wonderful fishmonger (sadly, he died far too young) who got us into fish in a big way. From being scared of a piece of raw fish and not knowing what to do with it a few short years ago, I now cook many different kinds, and you're right, the more you do it the more confident you get. The biggest mistake possible is to overcook it because you're scared of it being still raw in the middle. Only the very thickest hunks of fish need more than five or six minutes, and thin fillets need a lot less.


31 Jul 21 - 08:18 AM (#4114913)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

Have you not tried sashimi Steve ?
Pepople often think that sushi is just raw fish but it's a lot more than that whereas sashimi is raw fish, and delicious too.

Dave H


31 Jul 21 - 08:46 AM (#4114916)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

If you served it to me I'd eat it, but I'm not attracted.


01 Aug 21 - 09:21 AM (#4115029)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've discovered that salmorejo freezes perfectly, just needing a good stir when thawed out. That means I can make it when I find the perfect tomatoes, which isn't often!


01 Aug 21 - 11:35 AM (#4115039)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I made my first batch of granola yesterday, ending up incorporating a couple of recipes. The one with the original ingredients I wanted didn't bake the mix long enough to even begin to toast it all so I turned down the oven (from 300 to 250o) and baked it for another hour, turning every 20 minutes.

Most recipes call for coconut, and often for coconut oil. It's no problem substituting oil and I simply add extra oats instead of coconut (I'm allergic - I get a wretched case of dermatitis on my hands). This batch had oats, sliced almonds, chopped pecans, and when it finished baking, adding raisins. I have some sunflower seeds (no hull) to try in the mix next time. The baking time and temperature come from a recipe from Alton Brown, who can be relied upon for good advice. He does the math and science in the kitchen.


01 Aug 21 - 08:16 PM (#4115068)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I mentioned on another thread that I tried Marcella Hazan's "chicken with two lemons" (page 347 if you have the book). I happened to have a fairly small organic chicken in the freezer (I got it half-price). The method is ridiculously simple: two lemons, salt and pepper and nothing else. The timings and temperatures are so different from my usual roast chicken ones, so I was worried...

We had it with my own new spuds and my runner beans, with lashings of butter and the rather sparse juices from the lemony chicken. It was the best thing I've cooked in months. Marcella, God love yer, gal!


01 Aug 21 - 08:32 PM (#4115070)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I was so enthused by the success of Marcella's chicken recipe that I was moved to look her up on wiki. I discovered that she died, at a ripe old age, when Mrs Steve and I happened to be on holiday in Sorrento, one of the finest holidays we've ever had. Dammit, it seemed appropriate to me anyway... :-(


12 Aug 21 - 10:02 AM (#4116296)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Raggytash

Yesterday I bought have a leg of Lamb from our local butchers, who supplies superb meat. Today I have studded it with Anchovy fillets, and sprinkled a selection of herbs on it ...... no salt ..... the Anchovies will provide that. Tonight it will be served new new season potatoes and a rather nice glass (or 3) of Red wine.


12 Aug 21 - 10:32 AM (#4116301)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

We had the family round for a shoulder of lamb roast last weekend. Just salt, pepper and rosemary, into the oven mid-morning at 110C then forget it until spud-roasting time in the evening. It fed seven of us and there was enough left over for cold meat for five next day. It weighed in at 8lb and came from the farm of our butcher, five miles as the crow flies.


12 Aug 21 - 10:40 AM (#4116303)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Imma try that lemon chicken with my game hen later.


14 Aug 21 - 10:23 PM (#4116591)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I invented this today.

EGGPLANT WITH TOO-HOT ITALIAN SAUSAGE

Recently we bought some I. sausage which proved to be too hot. (Why do they make that stuff?) I had cooked it in a conventional way - onion, garlic, tomatoes. You know the drill. This is what I did with the second half of the batch.

Get out half a small box of dairy sour cream to come to room temp.
(Don't use the fat-free; it won't get the spices off your tongue.)
Peel some of the skin off an eggplant.
Slice it diagonally into half-inch slices.
Put a handful of flour on a plate.
Heat the sausage and sauce in a saucepan.
Heat 1/4 cup olive oil in a big skillet over medium heat.
Dip the eggplant in the flour, fry for about 5 mins per side.
You want it browned but not burned.

To eat:

Put an eggplant slice on your plate.
Slather it with sour cream.
Spoon the Ital. sausage plus tomatoes mixture on top.
Slice bite-size pieces vertically with fork and steak knife. The sour cream will neutralize the hot-pepper in the sausage.

It's good.
Spread sour cream on the eggplant. Be generous.


15 Aug 21 - 06:45 AM (#4116610)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

At Jersey Mike's my wife asked what the tiny pimiento-stuffed thing in my cheddar-bread sandwich was. Without thinking I said: Maybe a "Wee olive in my yellow sub, Maureen."


16 Aug 21 - 08:46 PM (#4116805)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Cod fillets, nice thick ones (no skin)
Home-grown french beans
Home-grown Nicola potatoes unpeeled
Butter
Groundnut oil

Apart from seasoning, that was it!

I turned the spuds into oven chips in 35 minutes by cutting into wedges, parboiling, roughing up and baking in a very hot oven in groundnut oil. I fried the cod in butter. The beans were topped and tailed, snapped in half then boiled for ten minutes. No sauces, just extra butter on the table. So simple, so healthy and so damned tasty!


19 Aug 21 - 09:18 AM (#4117073)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Sounds good, Steve.


19 Aug 21 - 06:22 PM (#4117131)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Now here's one you can whip up in 15 minutes and it's lovely. Using the best, freshest ingredients is paramount.

For two of us I used a jar of albacore tuna (aka yellowfin, I think) in olive oil that yielded 150g drained weight. I won't buy canned or jarred tuna that isn't in oil and I won't buy it if it has added salt.

The other ingredients are:

Two cloves of garlic, chopped (not minced)
A pinch of dried chilli flakes (to taste: I want a good lift, but not my mouth on fire)
225g, or half a pound, of the best cherry tomatoes you can lay your hands on
A big glug of extra virgin olive oil
The juice of half an unwaxed lemon and the zest from all of it
A big handful of freshly-chopped flat-leaf parsley
Salt and pepper
250g spaghetti that's been made with a bronze die (DeCecco is grand)
Parmigiano reggiano, freshly grated

I cut the tomatoes cleanly in half and drained the tuna. I broke the fish into large flakes with my hands. I heated the olive oil gently in my big Le Creuset casserole pan and added the chilli flakes and garlic for a gentle sauté for five minutes. Meanwhile, I got the spaghetti on the go in water as salty as the Mediterranean Sea. Once the garlic pan was sizzling (brown garlic? Start again...), I threw in the tomatoes, the parsley and some seasoning. A few minutes later, when the tomatoes were softening and the pasta had two minutes to go, I threw the tuna and the lemon juice into the sauce and turned off the heat. I drained the spaghetti, retaining a mugful of pasta water, and threw the spaghetti into the sauce, mixing well. It needed just a bit of the pasta water just to loosen the sauce a tad. Into two bowls it went and it was finished off with a sprinkling of lemon zest and a grating of Parmesan (optional, and to be sneered at on a fish dish by true Italians, but hey ho...)

This was really quick to do and was absolutely delicious. You need to aim to get the tomatoes just softening but not so soft that they create a tomato sauce. I can't think why I haven't tried this before. My little sister (who's only 56) is coming for a week next week and I'll be doing this one again. One more arrow in the quiver!

Only the best ingredients you can lay your hands on now...


20 Aug 21 - 07:45 PM (#4117289)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well we've finally ditched our ancient (and in several regards malfunctioning) cooker (which had a ceramic hob) and bought one that has an induction hob. This is new to me, and I can hardly believe how good it is. No more pans boiling over, no more waiting for your pasta pan to come back to the boil for five minutes after adding the pasta. Totally controllable, totally powerful. We had to ditch a non-magnetic pan or two and buy a couple of replacements, but it wasn't too bad, as most of our stuff had magnetic bottoms (I've heard that said about me...) No more apologising to the assembled company because my massive pan of potatoes was taking forever to come to the boil. I made some cheesy omelettes tonight and I think I was a bit too cautious with the hob temperatures, but they were tasty, if a bit ruffled, and my oven chips and french beans (both from my veg plot) were superb. I'm getting there. It exactly a low-calorie repast, but sod that... I also made a massive batch, mostly for divvying up into portions for the freezer, of bolognese sauce, and that was a learning curve (I'm not a bad learner!). More of that later...


20 Aug 21 - 07:47 PM (#4117290)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Grrr. NOT exactly...


21 Aug 21 - 05:25 AM (#4117332)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

I've never used one have liked to have tried to have persuaded my parents into an induction hob cooker earlier this year when our sealed plate hob cooker was dying. I couldn’t find a 50cm model available and widening the gap to take a 60cm one wasn’t on so I never got as far as proposing this. We would have been almost ready for one in terms of pots and pans. My frying pan is a non stick coated aluminium one but I think everything else here is a suitable stainless steel.

The ceramic hob part of the cooker we bought isn’t much change from the sealed plates. The rings do react quicker to changes in setting (preferred by me but mum liked slow hobs) but, if you are talking in terms of providing energy to boil your big pan of spuds, I don’t think it offers any improvement at all.

In other parts of the UK, I would have also looked at the gas hob/electric oven options but mains gas isn't available here.


21 Aug 21 - 05:45 AM (#4117334)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I have three cherished stainless steel pans that are no longer any good. Not all stainless steel is magnetic. It pays to check the pan base with a magnet, otherwise you might be spending the first few days with your induction hob with not enough pans!


21 Aug 21 - 06:12 AM (#4117339)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Sure, that's why I said "I think suitable". Never worked with them there but I learned from browsing a Dormer tool booklet on drills given to me back when I was a trainee setter operator making track rod ends for cars - early 80s - that there are magnetic martensitic alloys and non-magnetic austenitic ones. I've not put mine to the magnet test.


21 Aug 21 - 10:38 AM (#4117364)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Dave Hanson

What the feck are you talking about ? martensitic ? what the feck does that mean ?

Dave H


21 Aug 21 - 11:10 AM (#4117368)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Come on, Dave you should know: they make Aston Martins out of martensitic alloys and Austin Allegros out of austenitic ones! Tsk!


21 Aug 21 - 01:59 PM (#4117383)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

And, outside cookware, the bits (just the odd fastener) of stainless I buy now are known as A2 and A4 - routes to drive these cars along?

Back to pots and cookers. I got a bit frustrated with the time it took me to get my first attempts at jam making to setting temperature with our (old) cooker last year. I know some of this comes down to patience and, also may not be worthwhile for the limited use it would have, but, any thoughts on a stand alone gas ring I could place in the porch and run from say a small propane cylinder?


24 Aug 21 - 11:37 AM (#4117701)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I'm interested in your induction hob, Steve, and I've done some reading which leaves me confused.

1. Does your unit take special wiring or do you just plug it into the wall?

2. If I have a pan and a magnet sticks to the bottom, does it qualify as a magnetic pan, or do I need something specially sold for induction?

The speed and the efficiency certainly appeal to me. On the hot days of summer, we don't want to use the stove much.


24 Aug 21 - 02:06 PM (#4117713)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

We're recommended here to have a qualified person wire it in. The delivery chaps at our local shops are qualified for the job. It took him two minutes to wire it into our existing, old-fashioned cooker point. As for cookware, the magnet test is the one to go for. If a magnet sticks to the bottom of the pan, said pan will work on an induction hob.


25 Aug 21 - 11:26 AM (#4117823)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Thanks for the info, Steve.

Other news: last night I made this recipe for Morrocan white beans.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=moroccan+white+beans

I simplified it by using a can of Great Northern beans. I also used cut-up cherry tomatoes from my garden. They were good.


25 Aug 21 - 11:32 AM (#4117825)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I have been spooning generous amounts of my fresh salsa over scrambled eggs. Good for breakfast, lunch, or dinner!


25 Aug 21 - 11:36 AM (#4117826)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

oops I spelled moroccan wrong. This looks like a better URL, anyway.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kfe50CzNcfY

I had to use a French translator to tell me that curcuma is turmeric. I suggest only 1/4 teaspoon of it for a can of beans.


26 Aug 21 - 07:58 AM (#4117918)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Leeneia’s question got me wondering if there were plug in worktop induction hobs in the UK and whether such a thing would be an alternative to the stand along gas ring I’d wondered about about in a previous post.

We bought this single induction hob which arrived this morning. I feel it does bring water to the boil quite a bit faster than the rings on the cooker ceramic hob but I’m a bit bothered by the heating pattern I see in the water. This is most noticeable when, having boiled the water, the setting is reduced to a simmer as the hob seems to work by giving max power pulses followed by off periods. There appears to be a ring OD about 8cm, ID about 4cm that receives high power heating and not a lot else. I’ve tried two different pans of different makes and get similar results so I think the pattern is from the unit. (Are your rings similar, Steve?)

I have some ripe plums to pick and aim to have a go at some jam making over the weekend when I get some sugar. I may find things are OK but I do wonder if I’m going to find I have hot spots where the jam sticks and burns.


26 Aug 21 - 09:45 AM (#4117924)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The four cooking zones are three different diameters, one large, two medium and one small. Almost all our pans fit very tidily on one or the other of them. From all I read about induction hobs, matching the pan base to the cooking zone is pretty important for efficient cooking. I'm not sure how well it would work for a single hob and a number of pan diameters.


26 Aug 21 - 09:54 AM (#4117927)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Thanks. There was a customer question asking about the size of pans to which the seller replied the recommended sizes were between 12 and 26cm. The pans I tried were 18cm and 24cm with the larger one being the one I'd use for jam. I'll just have to see how it goes.


26 Aug 21 - 09:57 AM (#4117928)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I've considered getting one of those portable induction cooktops to take outside for cooking in really hot weather. And I need to rework the guts of my barbecue grill (we live in an area with lots of mud dauber wasps and I fear there is mud packed into one of the tubes needed to make it run - the last time I used it I barely got heat.) You can still find the old hotplates with the electric coil, or the electric pad, and they're on the cheap end. And you can buy some of these induction units that come close to the cost of the entire stove (four burners on top and a robust oven below).


26 Aug 21 - 11:39 AM (#4117937)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Had a lot of crab at my beach week, but several had some empty legs, how is that possible?


27 Aug 21 - 10:08 AM (#4118021)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Yesterday I invented a new sandwich. We went to Harvesters to package food for food pantries, and I wanted to take a sandwich along. The sandwich had to fit in my belt pouch, which would get warm from my body, so it had to be meatless.

So I cut open a bolillo (a kind of bun from Walmart. Delicious) and put Smart Balance ""butter" on it. Spread on apricot jam and nestled roasted pecans in it. Buttered the top, wrapped, packed and enjoyed later after sealing packages of ham with our team of senior citizens. It was quite good.
===========
Mrrzy, that's baffling about the empty legs. I'd be interested to know why that happened.


27 Aug 21 - 10:49 AM (#4118024)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Bolillo goes beyond Walmart - they come from Mexico and points south. As a kid I remember making a lot of picnic sandwiches on hard rolls, those were the big deal in the Pacific Northwest at the time. Down here in Texas, lots of things go on bolillos. And they're also great for making garlic bread. The local Hisapnic grocery stores often have panaderias inside. And I get tortillas in a Mexican grocery, made fresh the day I buy it and often times still warm. Life is good here if you like all of those Mexican breads! And Mexican bread goes beyond that, the biggest (as far as I know) cookie and bread maker from Mexico is a company called Bimbo Bakeries, and they own the big company from Fort Worth called Mrs. Baird's Bakery. (The big plant is near me and at night when the wind is blowing from the east I can smell bread baking.)


28 Aug 21 - 11:36 AM (#4118108)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Thanks for the info, Stilly. The bolillos at my neighborhood Walmart seem to be the most popular bread, and the whole-wheat bolillos sell out faster than the white ones.

The last time I was there, I bought the last bag of ww bolillos. The entire in-store bread rack was full, except for the space where the bolillos had been sold out.
============
If you can smell the bread from Mrs. Baird's, perhaps you are acquainted with a website called "Drumbeats" where you can watch the cars of silly people being towed in Deep Ellum. After the news, which so often tells of scoundrels and fools getting away with things, it is soothing to watch Drumbeats.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXRAS7H52-s


28 Aug 21 - 11:43 AM (#4118109)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Back to recipes.

Last night the DH and I returned to the past, having spaghetti frittata for supper. I used whole-wheat spaghetti and grated cheese (six kinds of Italian) from a bag. I am not a cheese snob.

This recipe from the New York Times tells you how.

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/6791-pasta-frittata

When you get bored with your recipes, spaghetti frittata offers a new and different texture.


28 Aug 21 - 03:50 PM (#4118126)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Deep Ellum is Dallas, I'm near the big Fort Worth plant. Bimbo Bakeries is huge, it owns several other name-brand bakeries. It's a baking empire that's rolling in dough. :)


29 Aug 21 - 12:14 PM (#4118185)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

Well I made the plum jam. The induction thing provides plenty of power to the pan, 2KW better spent..., I found it difficult to control as the seconds of on and off cycles it gives, say at 600W can bubble a drop of jam over before cooling again in an attempt to get a simmer or faster but controlled boil. Maybe I just have to learn to live with this or maybe one day, we find a better model but, overall, having one more efficient and faster ring I can pull out reasonably easily isn't a bad place to be.

On a different subject, was it someone (Steve?) in this thread who suggested Nicola potato? As well us as being late planting, I pulled the tops off because of what I think was blight on the leaves but we have been very pleased with them. It's worked out around 1 root for our three portions, parents have liked them and (I'm, rightly or wrongly, leaving them in the ground till required) have another 5 roots to go. Very firm and very tasty spuds.


29 Aug 21 - 05:05 PM (#4118197)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

As it happens, Jon, I lifted all my Nicola crop today to make way for my spring cabbage plants which are looking impatient in their little modules. I too cut the tops off, around the end of July, because of blight. The crop from just a few square yards was around 30kg of spuds. Fantastic! I've sorted them this afternoon into three batches: "premier" (big spuds with no blemishes); "chip-sized" (medium size, a touch of trimming of green bits needed on one or two); and "smallish" (best for Mediterranean-style roast potatoes with rosemary and garlic). The premiers are by far the biggest batch, and tomorrow I will put them into a mini-clamp in one corner of a veg bed, with just a touch of organic slug protection. The chip ones and the the smallish will go into a dark cupboard in my utility room, to be used up first.

They are indeed lovely spuds, of a quality you simply can't buy in shops. I grow them strictly organically and we never use them for recipes that need peeled potatoes. That would be a crime! In fact, their one weakness is that they don't make great mashed potatoes, but in a way that isn't a weakness at all. If I want mash, it's off to the shops!


31 Aug 21 - 02:43 PM (#4118392)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Spaghetti frittata sounds great. Also saw a recipe for pizza salad, which also sounded great.

What with the no carbs thing I find I *think about* food all. the. time.


31 Aug 21 - 04:43 PM (#4118400)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Over the years I've had the garden in the front yard alongside the driveway, and when people are walking by they sometimes stop to talk. When there are children in those groups I invite them to visit the garden - pick a tomato or an eggplant or pepper, or if it's the right time of year "what do you think grows on this plant?" and when they can't figure it out, suggest sweeping away some dirt below. Little kids are so charmed when they see things in the ground that they are accustomed to from the grocery store. Digging potatoes is kind of like hunting for Easter eggs - always a surprise!

The potatoes I have the best luck with here are the red lasoda, and Beauregard sweet potatoes.


31 Aug 21 - 05:50 PM (#4118404)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've grown potatoes every year since 1979, when I got my first allotment. I've had blight in every year bar one. There is no control for blight available to UK gardeners. The lesson I've learned from this is to grow first earlies and second earlies only, and to get them in the ground in good time, which generally means early to mid-April here in Cornwall. Any earlier and I risk a late frost killing off the tops. One horrible year I got blight before the end of May, but generally I get hit around late July. Maincrop spuds rarely grow big enough before the blight strikes. A double whammy is that late July is when the slugs kick in. So I want my spuds finished by early August at the latest. If I've had blight, I cut the tops off (it's safe to compost them as blight spores can't overwinter - they survive on spuds that have been missed), then leave the spuds for a couple of weeks before lifting, which allows the spores to wash harmlessly away into the soil. I've lifted my last spuds now and the bed is planted up with spring cabbages. I'm hoping that our new cat will deter the bloody woodpigeons.


31 Aug 21 - 06:12 PM (#4118406)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I tried spaghetti frittata once and found that cutting it and eating it to be a major tribulation. I think I did it wrong.

We had Italian-style sausages (bought from Marks and Spencer) with lentils and chilli tonight and all was lovely. I can't find the Castelluccio lentils that I want in this country, but the puy lentils worked beautifully. You could just use good quality pork sausages, but the Italian-style ones, which use little or no bread and which contain fennel, are the gold standard.

I made a soffritto with shallots, carrot, celery and diced pancetta. A small sprinkling of dried chilli flakes also went in. Once that had softened, I fried the sausages separately for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, once the soffritto was done, I added to it a glass of white wine, some pepper and a splash of stock. I added about 300g of pre-cooked lentils (I swear by the Merchant Gourmet brand) and chopped the cooked sausages into bite-size chunks (you can leave them whole, but then you need to use a knife as well as a fork and sit at a table instead of in front of the telly). I threw in the sausage chunks and heated the whole lot gently to get the ingredients to blend. Off the heat, at the last minute, in went some chopped fresh parsley. Begod, I excelled meself tonight...


31 Aug 21 - 10:26 PM (#4118434)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

Congratulations, Steve! That sounds very good.

We didn't cook tonight. Instead we watched a historic steam engine go buy, then we ate a Viennese restaurant.


31 Aug 21 - 10:53 PM (#4118436)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

You can slow blight by spreading whole ground cornmeal on the soil when you plant, by making a "tea" of that same cornmeal in water and spraying the liquid on the plants, and by using store strength (3%) Hydrogen peroxide, full-strength, as an occasional spray on the foliage. All of these things suppress fungus, which is what blight is. It may not eliminate it, but it will reduce it considerably. Start this as soon as you plant the potatoes.


01 Sep 21 - 07:07 AM (#4118458)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Call me Mr Sceptical, but I don't see how spreading something on the ground can deter airborne fungal spores (the only way blight can reach your spuds) from landing and germinating on leaves. From what I read about hydrogen peroxide, there's little evidence of its efficacy apropos of blight and at what concentrations. And as soon as it leaves your sprayer, it's turning into water and oxygen... I think I'll stick to choosing early varieties that evade the worst of midsummer attacks, and remove the tops as soon as I see blight infection. Look hard enough and you'll find myth-busting articles on cornmeal on the web.


01 Sep 21 - 07:29 AM (#4118459)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

I grew 2 potatoes this year. The other one was just 4 (2 per tub) Aran Pilot I wanted to try to see how it worked out. I'll try to organise our tubs a bit better, possibly adding another 2-4 tubs to our collection. They were a very nice new potato and worth expanding on for this easy plant way of getting a few early samples.

The planting of the Nicola was delayed due to a combination of the weather and the availability of our (usually once a week) gardener. I leave the heavier preparation and digging to him. I think that we in North Norfolk have a similar situation to Steve in Cornwall in that later plantings of potatoes are more at risk of late blight.

As for this year, a found a site that had a UK map predicting the likelihood of blight and showing where there were known infections. It also mentioned it's method of prediction and our spell of very high humidity with cool temperatures didn't look good. As with Steve, I don't think there is any protection available for UK home gardeners. I think all you can do is keep an eye on the leaves and cut the tops off if you find a problem. That should save the potatoes that are in the ground.


01 Sep 21 - 08:55 AM (#4118473)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I get blight every summer, but, because of my policy of promptly cutting off all the top growth (I use sharp shears), I rarely lose any actual spuds to blight. I grow tomatoes in a biggish greenhouse (I grew them outdoors in Essex but it doesn't work here), and, despite what all the pundits tell us about greenhouse toms being safe, I get the blight in there as well, every year. Tomatoes are just that bit smarter at fighting off the disease so it's still a worthwhile pursuit. My favourite tomatoes are Sungold, little orange cherry toms. The plants have the added advantage of being resistant to all the soil-borne tomato wilt diseases as well as leaf mould, so I grow them in the greenhouse soil (hugely enriched with my garden compost every spring) year after year, no problem.


01 Sep 21 - 06:14 PM (#4118542)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've made a determined effort to keep my veg beds filled with something or other at all times from now on. As soon as my broad beans came out, I planted the bed with purple sprouting broccoli plants that I'd raised from seeds and held in small pots. I can expect them to crop from December through to March or April. I had a bit of room at one end of the bed so I planted some young french bean plants. They may be a bit too late, but I'm giving it a whirl. I've also interplanted the big gaps (for now) with some Little Gem lettuce plants that I sowed four weeks ago. The big spud bed, now cleared, is now full of young spring cabbage plants. I've planted them rather close, hoping to be able to thin them out for some early greens in winter whilst leaving some to form large heads. My choice is Durham Early, a really nice variety. I'm going to sow some Aquadulce Claudia broad beans next month, which can go in where the early french beans are coming out and in any other gaps I have. Some of these ideas may fail, but at least I'll have even more greenstuff for composting for next year. For now, I still have plenty of runner beans, a few french beans, herbs of all sorts including an embarrassingly-huge amount of flat-leaved parsley (which freezes magnificently) and those lovely spuds. Chives and rocket are "weeds" in my garden. I never have to plant or sow them and I have bucketloads of them, which I like. My parsnip bed is luxuriant but I refuse to use them until we've had a frost on them...


01 Sep 21 - 06:23 PM (#4118543)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Oh, and my Autumn Bliss raspberries are fruiting magnificently. They freeze beautifully too, and they don't seem to get that horrid reversion disease that afflicts summer raspberries. My raspberry bed is now 25 years old and I have to be very stern with it in order to stop it from turning into a jungle!


02 Sep 21 - 11:20 AM (#4118600)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I like Then we ate a Viennese restaurant.

I had a thought today but when I looked it up, it is apparently a thing: Sardines and ratatouille.


02 Sep 21 - 01:59 PM (#4118612)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

To go back to the spaghetti frittata, it's easy to eat. Make it in a skillet, and cut the finished, pie-shaped frittata into wedges, like a pizza. [I forget whether I used kitchen shears or a serrated knife.] Eat the wedges with a knife and fork.

Mrrzy, I ate sardines in Italy once, and they were nothing like the sardines we get in cans. The Italian fish were fresh and delicious, and they were several times bigger than canned sardines. The fuselages were a curious triangular shape, and the scales were beautifully bright and silver. I wonder if your recipe is for that kind of sardine.


02 Sep 21 - 02:09 PM (#4118615)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

There is a great deal of research out there if you look in the right places. Hydrogen peroxide sprayed on the leaves in the 3% form (grocery store strength) will take out a lot of fungus. A spray with the cornmeal tea will also do that. The fungus overwinters in the soil, it gets to the plants later. Treating the soil doesn't hurt and it will generally help with fungal diseases.


02 Sep 21 - 04:02 PM (#4118623)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Blight spores don't overwinter in soil. They can survive only in living tissue, "volunteer" spuds for example (the ones missed during the lifting), or in blighted tomato fruits.


02 Sep 21 - 05:28 PM (#4118631)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Leeneia, yeah, anchovies too, very different.

My ratatouille with tinned sardines in hot oil was marvy.


03 Sep 21 - 05:19 AM (#4118679)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I made a big pan of lovely, tangy tomato sauce last night using my glut of Sungold cherry toms (just extra virgin olive oil, a gently-fried chopped onion, seasoning and a pinch of sugar and a last-minute whiff of fresh basil). I rarely bother to skin tomatoes, and it wouldn't be practical in any case to try to skin a couple of hundred cherry toms! To avoid too much skinniness in the sauce I chopped the toms into quarters first. If the sauce still looks a bit too skinny when I check it later on I'll push it through a coarse sieve, whizz the skinny residue and put it back in. We've going to have the sauce tonight with some "meatballs" made from cooked puy lentils, those little brown ones, which I'll season and to which I might add a pinch of chilli flakes and a bit of chopped fresh parsley. The idea is to fry the "meatballs" then simmer them in the sauce, as I do with meat meatballs, then devour them on top of some long pasta. Maybe Parmesan. Never tried anything like this before, though we used to give our kids a sauce made with red lentils and tomatoes on spaghetti when they were little. That actually went really well with grated cheddar. I'll let youse know how it goes...


03 Sep 21 - 06:20 AM (#4118686)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

The skinny residue has been duly whizzed! I could have whizzed the whole lot, but I do like my tomato sauce a tad chunky...


03 Sep 21 - 06:03 PM (#4118756)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well the lentil meatball thing didn't work. You can't make meatballs out of a pouch of lentils. I tried a different recipe that involved adding sautéed onions, Parmesan and oats to the mix. It did make "meatballs," they did fry nicely but as soon as I added them to the tomato sauce they disintegrated. So I made it into a sauce with tomatoes and lentils and we had it on spaghetti. Not bad, but the oats made the whole dish slippery. I might make some lentil and bacon soup with the leftover sauce...


05 Sep 21 - 11:36 AM (#4118911)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

Humble but yummy. I whisk my eggs with a bit of riccota til smooth for my scrmbled eggs , no milk.


05 Sep 21 - 05:27 PM (#4118926)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Right, yanks. Just yesterday I heard for the first time in my life about creamed corn. So I made some today to go with my barbecued maple-cured bacon and sausages.

This is how I did it, for two of us:

I took three corn cobs. I cut the grains off half of the cobs with a sharp knife. I grated the rest into a bowl with a coarse grater. I then ran the back of the knife up and down the stripped cobs to get as much juice out as possible.

Next, I sautéed a chopped shallot in butter, along with a goodly portion of fresh thyme leaves. Once the shallot had softened (not coloured) I threw in all the corn. I added a good splash of water along with a touch of seasoning and simmered it for seven or eight minutes, until the grains were cooked and the liquid was thick. At the last minute I added a blob of cream.

Well I thought it was pretty good. Come on, yanks. This is one of yours. Did I do it right? Should it be stiff or floppy (I'm still talking about the creamed corn...)? Would you eat it with barbecued stuff?


07 Sep 21 - 11:50 AM (#4119105)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

It's definitely suitable with barbecued stuff, though in summer I would be much more likely to buy corn on the cob. If hosting a formal dinner, where cobs are unthinkable, I buy frozen corn.   

I have never heard of anybody preparing creamed corn. We buy a can of it and heat it up. Butter optional. Actually, I haven't seen it in years.

I'm sure your own creamed corn was much better than ours. It sounds like a lot work, though.

As for consistency, it's between mushroom soup and mayonnaise.


07 Sep 21 - 01:09 PM (#4119110)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I've seen cooking show hosts make creamed corn several times - it involves cutting the kernels off the cob and getting some of the "corn milk" from the cob as well, then simmering for quite a while.

This Southern Living video gives you the most important part of it - how you remove the corn from the cob. There are various manufactured and homemade gadgets out there that cooks use for removing corn from the cob.

But I'm with Leenia, I get it from a can (and those don't have cream or butter, just a little added salt and using corn starch as a thickener). If I have fresh corn here at the house I eat it off the cob (after 2-3 minutes in a pan of boiling water.) I grew up buttering and salting it first, but now I eat it straight, no toppings.

When I was a kid my mother used to do a once-a-summer meal with a bushel of corn and she'd boil it and keep bringing it to the table and we'd fill up on corn on the cob for dinner.


07 Sep 21 - 01:15 PM (#4119111)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I made falafel on Sunday for lunch with friends, and it came out very well. It's easy to make if you have a food processor large enough to put the whole batch in. I requested one on my xmas list a couple of years ago after comparing models. I was tired of fussing with several batches in a small processor. This is one of the few foods that I get out the small deep fryer for. Because of the fryer's small size it uses only a few cups of oil and there isn't the splatter problem.

I also make the tahini sauce. The pita bread came from a local halal grocery store bakery, and we added cut up iceberg lettuce and chopped cucumbers. I have made pita bread before, but in some ways the name of the bread spells out the making process - it can be a pita - pain in the ass. Good to know how to do it, but better from the local bakery for $1.19 for six.


07 Sep 21 - 01:25 PM (#4119112)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well we'll be having what's probably going to be our last BBQ off the summer this evening. 28.5C today (83F). That's rare and it isn't lasting. We've been out for most of the day so it'll be a burger in a bun, some sausages and....corn on the cob. I might grill a slab of halloumi too, though Mrs Steve hates the squeaky-tooth thing. Some rocket and some cherry toms from the garden and some onion chutney, and I'll be a happy man.

I had never even heard of creamed corn until I read about it in the Guardian, let alone knew it came in tins! You'd think from the blurb that accompanies some of the recipes here that it is all the rage in the States. You lot don't half disappoint me!


07 Sep 21 - 01:41 PM (#4119114)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I don't know that creamed corn on its own is "the rage" - though corn (look up elote) is coming into it's own again in various recipes because it has always been a popular Mexican street food, and those recipes have traveled north with immigrants (or evolved here with native North Americans who grew it in the American Southwest, in particular).

The creamed corn variety I've always thought of as a New England dish, but that video clearly lays a southern claim to it (I think they might best claim the adding milk and butter part of it.) It was always something we had a few cans of when I was a kid - it was treated like a vegetable, but of course, maize is a grain. It was an addition to a meal that needed something more. Canned whole corn also was on the shelf, and I always have a large bag of frozen whole corn handy for various uses.


07 Sep 21 - 05:25 PM (#4119134)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Our supermarkets sell corn cobs in pairs that are called "supersweet." Generally they're not too bad. My favourite way with them is to shove them on the barbie, uncovered, for about 20 minutes. Failing that, boiled in a big pan for ten minutes. There's something a bit caveman-ish about picking up a buttery cob and viciously stripping away the kernels with your teeth...


07 Sep 21 - 05:29 PM (#4119135)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I've never made falafels, but at one of our supermarkets (Waitrose, Brits) you can buy sweet potato falafels that are extremely good. They freeze perfectly too.


07 Sep 21 - 07:06 PM (#4119145)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Fajita soup. One ghost pepper in the vat. Funny how the Spanish Ay ay ay sounds just like the French aïe aïe aïe...

Slice onions beef bell & ghost pepper as for fajitas. Smash a lot of garlic. Heat olive oil, infuse with ghost pepper, then garlic, then onions, then some salt, then beef, sauté till no visible pink, turn down, add thyme marjoram, touch of worcestershire, mushroom broth to cover, simmer a half hour. Serve with biiiig sour cream dollop.


08 Sep 21 - 09:35 AM (#4119190)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Why is cold leftover spicy so much spicier than reheated leftover spicy?


08 Sep 21 - 10:27 AM (#4119199)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Jon Freeman

When the veg plot was a bit bigger and mum was an active gardener, she
used to grow a bit of sweet corn. Not much, maybe 3-4 meals, but it was nice and sweet corn is at its best cooked straight after picking. We just used to boil it.

I don't think any of us have the teeth to munch into it on the cob these days.


08 Sep 21 - 10:43 AM (#4119200)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Boiling corn on the cob for 10 minutes was the rule of thumb when I was growing up but kitchen science has moved along and it is enough to simply heat it really well in that water for 2 or 3 minutes.


08 Sep 21 - 10:51 AM (#4119201)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Ten minutes does it for us. Mind you, ours is always supermarket stuff, so perhaps it needs a bit longer than ultra-fresh....?

I'm sure there was a saying once, Jon, that you cut the cob from the plant and then ran to the pan of boiling water...


08 Sep 21 - 01:12 PM (#4119218)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Microwave corn 2mn in husk. It husks more easily and the corn is cooked perfectly. 2mn per ear, no reduced time for lots of ears. No pot. No boil. No flavor dilution.


08 Sep 21 - 01:39 PM (#4119223)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I have a microwave but I'm not a fan. It was a top Panasonic model with all the bells and whistles, about 25 years ago. The only things I ever use it for are to soften butter in winter to make it spreadable and to make emergency porridge in a hurry. I have a granite slab about an inch thick and six inches square in a plastic frame that I can microwave on full for four minutes. That gets it hot enough to stand a dish on when I want to keep my bowl of Mediterranean-style potatoes warm for a useful period of time. Otherwise it sits in the corner, sadly and deservedly neglected. I've been campaigning to replace it with a deep fat fryer, which would take up less space and allow me to make croquetas and arancini, but Mrs Steve won't let me because she thinks I'll just use it to make chips. A scandalous accusation...


08 Sep 21 - 06:26 PM (#4119250)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Cuban shrimp creole, from WashPo. My whole house smells deliciously of shrimp heads.


09 Sep 21 - 03:40 AM (#4119268)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL

Three cooks were discussing the best way of cooking corn on the cob for it to be really fresh.

First cook: "Get the water boiling, go to the corn patch, cut a cob and run with it (not walk) to the kitchen. Time from picking to cooking, less than a minute."

Second: "Set up a portable stove next to the corn patch, get the water boiling, cut the cob and throw it straight in. Time from picking to cooking, two seconds at most."

Third: "Set up a portable stove right there in the corn patch, get the water boiling, then bend the plant so that your chosen cob dangles in the water. That way it's cooking even before it's picked."


09 Sep 21 - 11:18 AM (#4119332)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

There was a Nero Wolfe mystery in which fresh corn on the cob was a major plot point.


10 Sep 21 - 06:30 PM (#4119496)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I called into our fishmongers today (the beautiful Linda also sells lamb they've raised themselves as well as other meat and veg). I wanted a chicken and I got a beautiful free-range chicken from Creedy Carver, not far away in south Devon. I'll be cooking that the two-lemon Marcella way on Sunday. But Linda happened to be filleting some ultra-fresh sea bass which was certified line-caught (I saw the certification!). It was a bit pricey, but I bought two good-size fillets which Mrs Steve and I will have tomorrow, on a bed of puy lentils cooked with a soffritto of carrot, shallot, celery and pancetta. There'll be plenty of fresh herbs in the mix too (though I'll be leaving out Yotam's turmeric: personal taste...) I got the idea from Yotam Ottolenghi in the Guardian. Yotam can do no wrong.

The usual trawling method of sea bass destroys the sea bed so I won't buy it, even though it's much cheaper. I'd rather just have proper line-caught sea bass as a rare treat. No farmed fish will ever knowingly pass my lips. Dammit, I'm looking forward to a weekend of good living!


14 Sep 21 - 12:11 AM (#4119900)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Yesterday I used jars of last summer's canned whole tomatoes along with peppers and garlic from this year's garden to make myself two quarts of spaghetti sauce. It is the veg part without meat or cheese because I use a hot water bath to process, not a pressure canner.

This is the Italian tomato sauce recipe in the back of the Ball Blue Book, for those of you who cook and can. I filled two pint jars and four half-pint jars and had a little bit left over. That went onto a 1/4 of a tandoori bread to make a small personal pizza this evening. The flavor is amazing!


14 Sep 21 - 08:56 PM (#4119978)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Aparently the secret to gazpacho is to make it very late at night when you are really full. That is the only way to let it sit long enough to turn into gazpacho. Otherwise I make, and immediately eat, a liquidified salad.


15 Sep 21 - 04:49 PM (#4120059)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I like to blanch and freeze garden tomatoes, putting them in one-quart plastic bage. Then, on a cold winter night I whizz them in the blender with some nice oil. (You have to use your judgment on how much juice to keep in.) Add optional flavors such as basil, black pepper or garlic powder. It makes an incredible salad dressing - the taste of summer.   

However, you need to eat by candlelight, because the red dressing looks funny on green lettuce.

I also make the beginning of tomato sauce by sauteing onion and garlic, adding sliced garden tomatoes, simmering for a while and freezing. This is not much more work than preserving the plain tomatoes, and it saves time and dirty dishes later on.
=====
We husk our corn and put it on a pie plate with 2 T water. Nuke 4 mins in our very small microwave. It's safer than trying to take off corn husks with steam trapped inside. Modern varieties of corn stay sweet from field to market.


15 Sep 21 - 06:55 PM (#4120073)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I haven't got the room to freeze whole tomatoes. I make tomato sauce which I freeze in portions enough for two, in plastic bags that I can flatten to save space in the freezer. The tomato sauces I use in cooking may contain onion (a small amount), or garlic (never, ever both), chilli and basil. To keep my options open, I don't put any of those in my basic sauce for freezing. Just extra virgin olive oil, tomatoes and seasoning. I may or may not skin the tomatoes, though I think I usually do. I nearly always want garlic and fresh basil in there, but I rarely want onion, which makes tomato sauce claggy. Even so, I always reckon that I can add any of those things later. The sauce needs simmering for half an hour or more, until you see the olive oil separating and floating on top. Once thawed, it's just a matter of reheating the sauce then adding anything else you want in there that you've sautéed in a separate pan. I've often frozen Marcella's onion and butter tomato sauce, which needs nothing added except spaghetti and fresh parmiggiano reggiano. With that one, you make the sauce with a whole onion cut in half which you discard at the end. Perfect.

But if you stick loads of onion and garlic in your sauce, not to speak of dried basil, then you and I have parted culinary company...


16 Sep 21 - 12:57 PM (#4120126)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Accidentally made a version of shakshushka (?) - I was sautéing my last bell pepper in snail butter and some hot pepper, added sliced last tomato, was intending a scramble but when I cracked my eggs on top I just left them there, turned the burner off, lidded the pan, and voilà, 4 mn later had yumminess. Oh, a little salt just on the eggs. The yolks were just-barely-not-runny. If only I weren't out of milk...


16 Sep 21 - 02:14 PM (#4120137)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Charmion

Shakshuka, Mrrzy.

Definitely a dish fit more a caliph.


16 Sep 21 - 03:16 PM (#4120138)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I made something different last night chicken with jerk seasoning.
I juiced and orange into a round glass dish along with the segments and stirred 1 tsp Jamaican jerk seasoning into it. Then I added dark-meat pieces. Baked it in the oven at 350. I can't give you the timing- long story.

I made the mistake of putting the cover on the dish, so that the chicken boiled more than roasted. I have further work to do to keep the orange juice from being boiled away before the meat is done.

Strangely enough, the hot part of the jerk seasoning wound up in the orange segments, and the meat was mild. Go figure.

On the side we had corn on the cob and green beans with almonds. Fruit for dessert.


26 Sep 21 - 04:31 PM (#4121050)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Steve, you've told us several times about the food in Naples. Do you have any quick recommendations at the moment, a restaurant (affordable) or a dish (traditional, typical of the area)?

Passing it along to a traveler who just landed there.


26 Sep 21 - 06:09 PM (#4121054)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well the last time I was in Naples was in 2013! We had passed through Naples on the Metropolitana railway a couple of days before, to go to Pozzuoli, to see the Solfatara crater. On the day we spent in Naples we had a tropical deluge. We'd been to the amazing archaeological museum (definitely not to be missed), then went to a pizzeria for lunch. That's the only time we ever dined in Naples. It was wonderful and it was very inexpensive. It was full of locals, except for us, always a good sign in Italy. Neapolitans claim to have invented pizza and they are very proud of their tradition. I can't tell you where to get the best pizza, but I'd say several things: first, brilliant pizza in Naples is cheap. Second, seek out the pizzerias that locals use. I understand that the most cherished ones are in the Centro Storico. I'd say that the antennae should be honed in order to eliminate the tourist ones, and Trip Advisor could be useful...

By the way, after the pizza we went to the Duomo, where, we saw the bones of San Gennaro, the patron saint of Napoli, in the crypt. He was beheaded in the Solfatara crater in the fourth century. There's no skull in the urn. Decidedly optional, I'd say...


26 Sep 21 - 09:18 PM (#4121063)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

By the way, the traditional Neapolitan pizzas are Margherita and Marinara. Naturally, other confections are available, but those two are the ones.


30 Sep 21 - 09:52 PM (#4121492)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I rarely post photos as public, but this one of a pizza in Naples should show up.

Whatever it is, it looks delicious!


01 Oct 21 - 10:26 AM (#4121554)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Did an excellent pork chops salted and browned in olive oil, remove chops, butter, one ghost pepper, a bunch of smoked paprika, half a head of cabbage, the last garden tomatoes into pan, deglaze with lemon, lime and a smidge of white wine. When fried up put the chops back in the pan under the cabbage, added the garlic I forgot, covered and into preheated 350°oven for 45 mn. Marvy, warmed my cockles right up.


02 Oct 21 - 01:13 PM (#4121668)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I have some apples that need cooking because they're mealy now, and found a recipe I don't think I've made before (in my ancient Fanny Farmer Cookbook). A "Dutch Apple Cake" that involves making a simple coffee cake batter and slicing and submerging the apples, wedge edge down, in the batter. I will share this if it turns out well (because eating it all by myself isn't a good idea.)


02 Oct 21 - 02:40 PM (#4121674)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Share the recipe, at least!


02 Oct 21 - 03:34 PM (#4121679)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Well I obtained six Italian-style sausages, the ones with lots of meat, not too much rusk and plenty of fennel and herbs. I fried 'em in olive oil for 15 minutes to get 'em brown then removed 'em from the pan. Same pan, bit more oil, I fried some onion and sliced (not minced) garlic, and threw in a sprig of fresh rosemary (never dried). After a few minutes I threw in a small glass of white wine and let it sizzle, then threw in half a pint of my veg stock (no bloody cubes), a bit of seasoning, a pile of cooked pinto beans (which I'd soaked from scratch, not out of a tin) and a slug of wholegrain mustard. While that was simmering I chopped the bangers into bite-size pieces and put them back in the pan, along with a big pile of chopped-up greens fresh from my garden. Once the greens were softened I served it up. Begod, it was wonderful. I think it needs the herby and spicy Italian bangers, which leak out their beautiful flavours as long as you've chopped them up, and not just ordinary pork ones, which would mean you'd have to spice up the sauce a bit. Another tool in the armoury!


06 Oct 21 - 11:14 AM (#4122060)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I am dogsitting so not in my own kitchen. I have done some strange things.

*Sizzled some salmon to crunchy-skinness in sesame oil, don't remembee how I ate the main course but the next day I put the leftovers with spice, bok choi and onions into a yummy chicken-broth soup. Yum.

Then I made a different soup with ground yak and cauliflower. And spices. Yum.

Then I put the


06 Oct 21 - 11:17 AM (#4122061)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Tried to edit and hit submit prematurely. I was going to say, the yak soup had a tomato-ey broth. Made yak meatballs with a tiny tomato in the middle of each.

Then I put the 2 leftover soups together and *that* was yummy.

Today I browned the rest of the yak with the rest of the cauliflower chopped tiny, let that cool, and made salad with avocado tomatoes and the ground meat mess with mustard vinaigrette. Yum, again.


06 Oct 21 - 11:18 AM (#4122062)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Handful each of almonds and pistachio on the taco-esque salad.


06 Oct 21 - 05:10 PM (#4122113)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Well, it came out, but it took a lot longer to bake than it should have. I have misplaced my metal 8" square pan so I used a glass one. I made the cake batter with the odd name of "Cottage Pudding," and the Dutch apple cake but modified it. The Dutch apple cake calls for 5 apples - I could barely make two fit into the batter. I had to bake it close to an hour to get all of the batter to finish baking.

So - what would I do differently - use a metal pan. Forget the apple wedges and cut the peeled apple into small pieces and stir it into the cake. The sugar and cinnamon on top was too much. The raisins were good.

Here are the instructions:

Cottage Pudding

Set the over at 400o. Butter a shallow cale pan, 8x8 inches, a small angel cake pan, or cupcake tins.

Sift together
    1 1/2 cups flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup sugar

Mix
    1 egg, well-beaten
    1/2 cup milk
    1/2 cup butter, melted

Stir gently into the flour mixture. Pour into the pan. Bake until brown and crusty (20 to 25 minutes.)

Dutch Apple Cake
Spread Cottage Pudding . . . batter 3/4 inch thick in a buttered round or oblong pan. Pare 5 tart apples, core, cut in eighths, and press the sharp edges of the apples into the batter in aprallel rows. Sprinkle with 1/2 cup sugar mixed with 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, also 2 tablespoons currants of seedless raisins, if liked. (I would use 1/3 cup sugar at most.)

Bake 350o until apples are tender (about 25 minutes).

The recipes both suggest sauces and such that can be served with the dish, but talk about gilding the lily. This is plenty.

I would peel and chop 2 medium apples and mix into the batter. Bake lower (325o) to give those apples time to soften. You might even want to simmer them for a few minutes in shallow water and let them cool before you add them to the cake.

The result I have here is edible, but it took a long time and wasn't well-tested. I've now tested it. This is the 1965 edition of the Fanny Farmer Cookbook.

When I look at my instructions I think I'm probably looking at what my mother decided to do to make that coffee cake for us.


06 Oct 21 - 09:42 PM (#4122130)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I microwaved a piece of this after dinner this evening and it was perfect - the apples weren't hard any more. Since I baked it for a long time and it sat cooling it may have finished baking - but if you want a more predictable baking time, maybe microwaving or steaming the apples for a minute would help speed the process.


07 Oct 21 - 11:08 AM (#4122169)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

It occurs to me that I made this cake in the pan the Cottage Pudding recipe recommended (8x8"), not the larger pan with the shallower 3/4" batter the Dutch Apple recipe recommended. My bad. I have a longer oblong pan that isn't the full size of a cake pan - maybe next try I'll use that. And try three apples.

Waiting for Mrrzy's response.


08 Oct 21 - 11:47 AM (#4122298)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

iTS THE TIME TO EAT PAW PAW. Its an American temperate tropical fruit that is like a mango mint banana. Its huge and can be eaten off the tree since it has no shelf life. Washington Jefferson and Adams ate paw paw with glee. Its recipes include ice cream, popsicles and fresh with a spoon. There are several species and differ only in the appearance of the fruit. Some are assembled like gigantic grapes and others in a dual display like testicles. MD has immense paw paw orchards. It has 8 seeds
that you can spit out like watermelon. Today it is almost like a red neck secret. 40 years of research has not advanced its shelf life. It is close to eating rich and creamy ice cream without being cold.


08 Oct 21 - 01:51 PM (#4122314)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I've heard about those often and they grow in North Texas. Finding the plants is the challenge.


08 Oct 21 - 07:28 PM (#4122343)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

If you don't like a whisper of wintergreen you may not like them.

Not an academic source hurd mentality


08 Oct 21 - 07:42 PM (#4122346)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Ooh sounds yummy.

I invented, I think, garlic-lemon asparagus with pistachios.


08 Oct 21 - 08:11 PM (#4122347)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

On our trips to Andalucía I've always enjoyed the concept of tapas as the full evening nosh. In the village bars we went to, we'd order a glass of wine, then be offered tapas, all for €2. Well you can't eat and drink at home cheaper than that (and we never found a bar that exploited us by giving us bad wine).

It's easy enough to put out a plate of cured meat slices such as jamon Iberico and a bowl of olives, but I've wanted to make things myself as well. I've more or less mastered salmorejo, the tiny bowl of chilled breaded tomato "soup" made with sherry vinegar and a topping of slivers of jamon and a bit of chopped hard-boiled egg (like gazpacho but thicker and much richer). Tonight I got myself about 100g of chorizo (it was a spicy one and cut off one of those shaped like a horseshoe). I skinned it, then made a little foil boat on a baking tray into which I put the sliced chorizo, extra virgin olive oil, a thinly sliced banana shallot and a sprinkling of smoked sweet paprika. That went into the oven at 180C fan for about twenty minuets. Begod, that was damn good...those crispy edges...


08 Oct 21 - 08:29 PM (#4122349)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Had I played twenty minuets the chorizo would have been immolated ...


08 Oct 21 - 11:48 PM (#4122358)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I'm not going to fix that typo, that stays right there for others to chuckle over!

In the US in the 1960s fondue dishes were all the rage. Everyone had the chafing dish (usually a wedding present) for parties. Then it literally went away. There are modern dipping fads (can anyone say "chocolate fountain?") but mostly it went away. I'm curious to see if there is a little resurgence in North Texas - my daughter sent photos of a fondue lunch she and friends had during a side trip to Switzerland. They were enraptured. I have some ancient cookbooks my mother collected, and I'm sure fondue is in at least a couple of them somewhere. I'll have to pull them out.


09 Oct 21 - 04:19 AM (#4122369)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: BobL

A stainless steel fondue pot is also good to use for a steamboat meal. Very conversational as you have to wait for the food to cook. An extra set of forks is advisable.


09 Oct 21 - 05:49 AM (#4122377)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

And NO double-dipping!


10 Oct 21 - 06:49 AM (#4122484)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

A slight cheat last night, though it still needed work. I had in my freezer a huge hunk of shin of beef on the bone (big bone!) that had already been slow-cooked for 12 hours. I'd bought it on special offer a few months ago from the Scottish online butcher Donald Russell. Once thawed, it needed 75 minutes in the oven at 180C. I use diced shin a lot in winter for beef stews, so I know that it has a lot of sinewy bits that need slow rendering, so I was a bit worried. It was gorgeous, tender and flavoursome. Once it had cooled slightly I was able to pull the chunks away with my hands, no carving needed. Five of us had generous portions of that with peas, steamed organic carrots and hearted cabbage, roast potatoes and gravy (always home-made with leftovers assiduously frozen in portions-for-two) enhanced by the meat juice.   Not one scrap was left on any plate, which I love to see more than anything. Mrs Steve had made a semifreddo with dark cherries and lots of chocolate for pudding, and that masterpiece also vanished rapidly (she always does the puds, though I can be a devil with the ice cream scoop...) It was a birthday nosh for one of our friends, so that was just great. Naturally, as ever in our house, the wine flowed freely. There's enough cold meat left for the two of us tonight. I think I'll reheat it (thoroughly!) wrapped in foil and serve it up in bite-size chunks with mash, greens and the leftover gravy and we'll eat it out of bowls in front of the telly.

I've put that huge bone back in the freezer for now, but I'll roast it and make beef stock, which I could then use to make the real McCoy French onion soup...


10 Oct 21 - 10:41 AM (#4122506)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

BobL those are popular in Japan also. My daughter has put up photos during some of her past visits of restaurants with that setup. She didn't go to Japan this year (last year's trip was cancelled) because Japan has been slow to vaccinate the population. She and two friends (all vaccinated, all wearing masks) went to Italy where they've done a better job vaccinating (and last year in the spring it sounded like the entire nation had COVID so perhaps there is natural immunity at work now.)


16 Oct 21 - 11:34 AM (#4123156)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Nuked some cauli rice, set aside.

Browned some chicken thighs, dredged in hot pepper, ginger and smoked paprika, in sesame oil.

I am dogsitting so not my kichen.

Put the browned thighs into a pot. Sautéed onion and garlic in the leftover oil, deglazed with lime juice, into the pot.

Added somw chicken broth and simmered.

After 15 mn added mushrooms and thyme.

After another 15 mn added spinach and oregano. Turn off as soon as wilted.

Put caulirice in bowl under soup, top with almonds and pistachios.

Yum, yum.


16 Oct 21 - 01:14 PM (#4123167)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

That sounds wonderful, Mrrzy. Healthful, too.
------
Yesterday I wanted to make something new, so I invented a dish with baked turkey wings. Results were mixed. I sauteed shallots in butter and added 2 tsp smoked paprika. I put the wings in a roasting pan, made a broth of 1 cup water

buy cut-up turkey wings or cut them up yourself.
saute some shallots in 2 Tbsp butter (maybe this step could be skipped
)
add 2 tsp smoked paprika
Make a broth of 1 cup water plus 1 tsp chicken glop.

Remove the shallots from the butter with a slotted spoon. Add the shallots to the "broth".

Preheat oven to 375.

Spray a deep roasting pan and line with parchment paper for easier clean-up. Place the turkey pieces in, in one layer. Dribble the melted butter with paprika over the pieces.

Carefully pour in the broth plus shallots so as not to knock off the paprika.

Bake at 375, covered, for one hour. Bake uncovered for 45 mins more. That ought to do it.

=========
About the mixed results: The DH loved it, said the paprika was strong, just the way he likes it. I couldn't taste the paprika and thought the dish was nice but kind of bland. Go figure.

Warning: the butter-paprika mixture stains everything it touches.

Maybe I should just cook this in a slow cooker. What do you think?


17 Oct 21 - 09:03 AM (#4123290)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Never skip a sauté-in-butter step.

I don't use slowcookers so have no advice.


23 Oct 21 - 10:39 PM (#4123960)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I invented a new dish tonight.

SUMMERTIME SUMMER SQUASH

Heat some olive oil in a medium-size skillet.

Cut up some shallot or garlic and saute.

Mash* some cherry tomatoes out of the garden. Add to the skillet.

Add some black pepper and 1/2 tsp dried rosemary or some rosemary from the garden.

Allow all this to cook for a while to develop flavor. Maybe 10 mins.

Spiralize a zucchini or a summer squash into the pan. Finely chop what doesn't spiralize and add it to the skillet.

Cover and cook gently until squash is cooked, maybe 15 minutes.
=======
* To mash cherry tomatoes - make a little slit in the skin by poking with the point of a knife. Place cherry tomato under a bench scraper and hit with the fist one or two times.

This was fun to eat - new texture and nice flavors. It went nicely with meatloaf and a salad. If you don't have cherry tomatoes, you can seed and chop up a regular tomato.


24 Oct 21 - 01:12 AM (#4123964)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

I sauté onions and bell peppers in olive oil with seasoning and garlic (oregano, salt, pepper) and then add some browned crumbled Italian sausage then add chunked up yellow squash. I also add a pint of diced canned (or thawed) tomatoes and a handful of pasta. Sprinkle in some grated Parmesan cheese and let the squash cook till soft then there you go.


24 Oct 21 - 06:12 AM (#4123994)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Decades ago we got our kids (now in their 40s) to eat lentils by pretending that the sauce we made for spaghetti was called "pulse bolognese." :-). I resurrected it last night for old times' sake. It's the easiest thing:

To make enough for three or four people you need 250g split red lentils, rinsed, don't bother soaking (dirt cheap!), an onion, a garlic clove, dried oregano (to taste: I like it), half a teaspoon of ground cinnamon (don't overdo it), a good knob of butter, 400 ml of veg stock (I make my own, so it's unsalted), a decent-quality tin of tomatoes (400g size), a glug of red wine and seasoning. All you do is sauté the chopped onion and garlic (don't mince it) in the butter for a few minutes then throw in everything else and simmer it for about 25 minutes. We had it with wholemeal spaghetti (we don't usually have that, but that's what we did in the olden days). Then we committed the mortal sin of piling the buttered spaghetti on the plate and just heaping the sauce on top, finishing with grated strong cheddar. All the things we used to do...

Begod it was good, and just think how healthy it is!


24 Oct 21 - 08:53 AM (#4124011)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I love anything in the ratatouille family for zucchini/summer squash. Slice squash onion tomato thinly, make a flavorful mush of more tomatoes with whatever you like, I am big on garlic olive oil and herbs, put glop in dish, arrange slices standing on their sides in alternating colors... The glop will help them stand up. Bake covered till really cooked. Serves one as a main.


24 Oct 21 - 02:38 PM (#4124065)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

It's time to roast some vegetables. I have onions, potatoes, and carrots, but could use a few more. Toss in some olive oil, salt and pepper, an herb of some sort (rosemary, oregano), and bake (low temp if things like carrots and parsnip and potato, hotter if things like broccoli, squash, eggplant, etc.)

The house always smells so good and they reheat well to go with various meals through the week.


24 Oct 21 - 03:57 PM (#4124079)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

I like the sound of all these new recipes.


25 Oct 21 - 09:32 AM (#4124149)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Donuel

On the common sense side of things as Fall and Winter approach the temperature of food and beverage should become warmer. Tea drinkers rejoice. Taste, texture and cold refreshment have their place but cold salads should be replaced by steamed vegetables and warm drinks should replace ice cold beverages.


11 Nov 21 - 01:56 PM (#4125893)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

A couple weeks ago we cut down the tomato vines and collected the green tomatoes. Some have ripened nicely, but I found something interesting to do with those that seemed to green to do that.

Cut the tomatoes in half and coat them with oil. Place them on a cookie sheet, flat side up and put them under the broiler till the top surfaces are nicely browned but not burnt black. Maybe 8 minutes.   (This was easy for me, since I can see watch the broiling through the glass door of my new range.) If you can't see them, stick around, listen and smell.

Freeze and use as needed to add a rich smoky flavor to foods. I chopped some of them small and added them to a bland bean soup I had made. They helped. I also plan to add them to chili and possibly other Mexican favorites I make.


12 Nov 21 - 09:59 AM (#4125960)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

I am still totally in salads, even in the cold. But soups are getting thicker, like winter coats.


12 Nov 21 - 12:25 PM (#4125969)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

I'm looking to perfect a chicken piquante version - with just chicken, lemon and capers, possibly a dash of Parmesan…


12 Nov 21 - 01:53 PM (#4125985)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: leeneia

That sounds good, Thompson, but my husband (the DH) hates capers, so I can't join you in the venture.
=======
The other night I woke up with a knee hurting pretty bad. I tried to withstand it, but finally woke the DH up and asked him to bring some ice. We wrapped it up, elevated it and iced it. (The RICE system.)

In the morning I looked for the ice in the bedding, and it turned out to be a package of sugar-snap peas, thawed but still cold. So, sugar-snap peas were on the menu that night.

After checking out a lot of dewy-eyed recipes involving sauteing sugar-snap peas from the owner's garden, I found one that I could use thawed, soaking-wet peas in.

Drain peas in a colander, at least 30 mins ahead of time.
Pat dry with a paper towel. Just one - there's a limit.
Mince one clove garlic.
Saute garlic in oil of your choice, or in butter.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Put peas, garlic and oil in a glass baking dish. Stir to coat.
Bake 8 - 10 minutes.
While peas bake, zest a lemon.
Just before serving, stir the lemon zest into the batch.

It was delicious.

The leg is much better.


13 Nov 21 - 12:23 AM (#4126017)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

That sounds delicious!

This is the season for making jams and jellies, so I've started making some Christmassy spiced apple jelly and quince jelly. Here's the method. It's a two-day job, with a couple of days' gap between the days. Another tip: all jam and especially jelly is much easier to make if you do it about a litre at a time, no more.

Apples:
First day. Do this bit in the morning. Preferably using crab apples, or sour apples, wash them, chop them, put them in a normal cooking pot, hold your hand on the top of them and fill with fresh water till it's up to your hand. (I don't know what the quantity I use in, but it's enough to fill a biggish pot about a third.)
Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for an hour or so, giving the odd mash down with a potato masher.
Take off the heat and pour the mush into a mesh bag and let the syrup drain off the apples. (If you're lazy like me, use a strainer first, then a bag.) Let them drain all day. If you have room and no mice, let them continue to drain for 24 hours.
Put the syrup in the fridge in a glass or ceramic container. I find that leaving it for three days or so works much better. If you have hens or know anyone who has, they love the discarded apple mush.

Second day. After the syrup has been aside a couple of days, take it out and assemble your tools: preferably a conserve pan (flared and heavy-bottomed), a chopping board and sharp knife, citrus squeezer, strainer, measuring jug, long wooden spoon, jam thermometer which you'll hang on the side of the pot, bowl and scales for weighing sugar, jamjars, beaked (preferably) ladle, skimmer, citrus zester (microplane), hot water ready to wash lids and ladle in near-boiling water, enough jars (heating in a 100C oven), paper to rest the jars on while you fill them. Labels for the jars.
Put the lids and the ladle into the hot water.
Assemble your ingredients: syrup, sugar (I prefer Demerara sugar and use 600 grams to a litre of syrup), a washed lemon, a washed orange, cloves, cinnamon.
Put your syrup in the conserve pan and bring it slowly to the boil. At the same time, put your jamjars into the oven at 100C (I usually have around five jars at a time); put your sugar into a shallow dish like a roasting pan and put it in the oven with the jamjars to warm. As it warms, occasionally open the oven and give the sugar a stir with your fingers.
When the sugar is warm, add it to the syrup and stir it in. Add the zest and juice of the lemon and the orange. Add the cinnamon (half a stick for a litre of juice) and cloves. Bring the syrup to a boil, then a raging, foaming boil, stirring occasionally so it doesn't catch. When it's at 105C on the jam thermometer, set a timer for 15 minutes. Keep it at the foaming boil, stirring occasionally.
At this point, you can test the set. Traditionally this is done by putting a few drops on a cold plate or spoon, leaving it a minute and then giving it a push with a finger to see if it wrinkles. I'm not great at this, so I just cross my fingers; if it turns out not to be perfectly set, you can always put it back in the pot and give it another hard boil for five minutes. At this stage you can skim the jelly to take out the cinnamon and cloves. I usually leave them in, though.
Put off the oven and take the jars out onto the door or onto a metal surface; I put paper under them so any dribbles land on it and don't have to be wiped up. Take your lids and ladle out of the hot water, and ladle the jelly into the jars. (If you don't have a beaked ladle for this, a clean wide-mouthed funnel helps) Go away and have a cup of your preferred beverage for a while. Screw the caps on and put the jars of bright red jelly on the windowsill where you can admire it with the light shining through it.
Assuming it's jelled perfectly, when it's cooled, label it (I use the name - "Apple jelly" - my name and the date, or at least 11/21.) You can also get fancy-dancy and put adorable gingham caps held with ribbons on the jars so they make nice presents.

It's also currently quince season. You can use quinces from the Japanese quince bush, or from a proper quince tree. At the moment they're dear - €2.50 in the cheapest local greengrocer I've found them in - but if you go to the fruit and vegetable market it's possible to buy them at a much cheaper wholesale price. Quinces store well, and are also delicious roasted instead of apples if you're having roast pork, being pleasantly astringent.

If you're making quince jelly, do more or less the same as with the apples. However, there's a secret: you can also make delicious quince paste/ quince cheese/ membrillo with the mush. To do that, rub off the nap from the surface with a thick cloth, chop and core the quinces, discard the core and pips and then continue with the jelly-making in the same way as with apples; I also add some cardamom seeds to the mix - about a quarter teaspoonful.

When you've made the jelly, put the mush into a heavy-bottomed pot (I use the conserve pan) with the same proportion of sugar - 600 grams to 1 kilo of mush - and bring it to a boil. Simmer it fairly fast, giving the odd stir with a wooden spoon, for 30 to 45 minutes, until it parts like the Red Sea when you draw the spoon through it. At this stage put it in a flat baking pan with baking parchment under it, stroke it down, and leave it to cool for a couple of days. (I use a couple of pizza pans, one under, one over). You can then wrap it in greaseproof paper with foil around it, or put it in jars. It's very nice as a relish, especially with cheeses, and most especially with manchego cheese.

If you don't want the palaver of coring but do want to reuse the mush, in either apples or quinces, you can pass the mush through a mouli instead. And if you don't have hens available, you can also make apple sauce with the apple mush.


13 Nov 21 - 07:03 AM (#4126038)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

I made a big batch of Marcella Hazan's minestrone alla romagnola (the one she calls, in her book, "vegetable soup, Romagna style"). I followed the ingredients and amounts exactly as in her recipe, the one difference being that I used the stock I had, which was home-made chicken stock. You can get the list online quite easily as long as you're prepared to put up with all that American "cups" nonsense. Some food bloggers can't help messing about with recipes. I ignore ones that suggest adding rice or pasta (this one definitely doesn't need bacon either). Marcella doesn't, the soup is hearty enough as it is without, and if you do use such things you have to add them afresh every time you serve up the soup. No thanks. There's nothing worse than soup that's been sitting overnight with pasta or rice in it, and nothing better than soup that's been sitting overnight without... We managed nicely with some crusty bread...

It did us for two evening meals, the veg heaped up in bowls. There was quite a stack of delicious liquid left over (I served the soup with a slotted spoon). I heated it up, threw in a handful of red lentils and let them cook for 20 minutes, then threw in half a pound of baby spinach. Five minutes later I whizzed it with my hand blender. The result was four big mugs of delicious soup that did us the next two lunchtimes. Cucina povera!


13 Nov 21 - 10:17 AM (#4126048)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

I've found a bunch of alleged Hazan recipes, but they vary wildly - for instance larger amounts of potatoes or smaller amounts of tinned tomatoes. Can't find an original.


13 Nov 21 - 10:23 AM (#4126049)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Steve Shaw

Get Father Christmas to bring you the book! It's called The Essentials Of Classic Italian Cooking.


13 Nov 21 - 10:45 AM (#4126053)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Thompson, the way to avoid a lot of that fruit processing fuss is to use a steam juicer. The juice comes out clear, not needing to be strained even once. I went looking for YouTube videos and the top ones are of people who are using them for the first time and making mistakes. I'll come back later and find better instructions and send along. I make grape juice for jelly (from wild grapes), strawberry juice for jelly and use the fruit leftover for jam, I make tomato juice and sauce, cranberry juice (and use the leftover pulp for other stuff), etc.

Yesterday I packed several jars with fresh cucumbers and added garlic pieces, spices, and brine and they're in the fridge for a couple of weeks before I start eating those pickles.


13 Nov 21 - 11:34 AM (#4126056)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

Thanks, Stilly - looking at steam juicers now; I'm also wondering if the juice so obtained is as delicious and as nourishing as that from the older method…?
Steve - Mother Library is bringing me the book as soon as my request goes through.


13 Nov 21 - 12:15 PM (#4126059)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

Hm. Watched a couple of videos of steam juicers; in one, the videoer was making apple jelly from juice extracted with a juicer like this, but the jelly wasn't the rich cherry read you get with my old-fashioned method but a kind of fawn colour. Mind you, I think she was using added pectin, maybe that makes a difference?


15 Nov 21 - 03:24 AM (#4126202)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

Still wondering… Stilly, have you made apple jelly with juice produced from a steam juicer?


17 Nov 21 - 11:13 AM (#4126488)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Mrrzy

Added some leftover salmon to my crab-and-asparagus soup. That worked a treat...


19 Nov 21 - 02:33 AM (#4126673)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

Made a stir fry with a new mix of saucing: coconut vinegar, soya sauce, sesame oil. And we've taken to removing meat from its packaging and dividing it in half before storing it in the freezer, so we use half the amount. It actually makes a nicer stir fry.
This was a definite hit: a julienned leek, 3 julienned carrots, a julienned courgette, a stick of chopped celery and a chopped bell pepper and 300g diced beef for 2 people), and to accompany it a pot of quinoa simmered with a chicken stock pod and a low-salt vegetable stock cube, and then about half a pomegranate's worth of arils added. It was a big hit.


23 Nov 21 - 07:11 PM (#4127123)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Stilly River Sage

Thompson, yes, it is superb. I'm going to be steam juicing some cranberries and will see about setting up the camera and I can post it for you to see.

I'm ready to make some green tomato relish, and the recipe is incredibly imprecise. 24 large tomatoes, three red bell peppers, three green bell peppers, 12 large onions. So subjective! last summer I had some huge tomatoes that were almost a pound each, so I'm going to be conservative and assume that a standard large tomato weighs about half of that. And going from there to calculate the number of peppers, onions, etc to put into this. And if I did this math the last time I didn't leave myself any notes, so I'll jot down the calculations this time.

Green tomato relish is wonderful, and it gets made this time of year when the cool weather slows the ripening. They're picked before the first frost (you're not supposed to can tomatoes that have had the plants touched by frost - there is some chemical change that is a problem). I can let these sit in a flat box with a few sheets of newspaper or a paper bag over the top and they'll ripen slowly, but this is a higher use. The season of ripe fruit was during the summer, now is the season of relish.


26 Nov 21 - 04:14 AM (#4127269)
Subject: RE: BS: The other recipe thread is too long
From: Thompson

Oh, that sounds delicious, Stilly!
Here's a recipe that's fancier-dancier, but because it's precisely measured might give you an idea of what the heck a large tomato means!