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BS: Another great word: pusillanimous

23 Jan 02 - 04:03 PM (#634001)
Subject: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Yes, I know you all know what it means...well, all except for maybe Cletus and Paw.

For their benefit, it means: lacking in moral courage.

But what a great word! It is probably the word most beloved of politicians, and sometimes lawyers. They absolutely love accusing each other of pusillanimous actions, statements, etc. Washington, indeed, is reputed to be a very cesspool of pusillanimity.

"Pusillanimity" Gotta love it. What a tongue twister! A word that sounds as ugly as what it is describing.

Get on the computer right now, and type out a complaint letter to the politician of your choice, accusing him of all kinds of pusillanimous and heinous (another great word) activities.

You'll be talking his language, and he will understand.

- LH


23 Jan 02 - 04:06 PM (#634006)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Amos

This Word of the Day Service is brought to you by Little Hack's Bide-a-Wee Day Care Center, where an early start on a good vocabulary is practically assured! Remember -- if you want your wee ones to get an early start on the whole world, send them to Little Hack!! He's puissant, sanguine, and pusillanimous!!!

A


23 Jan 02 - 04:14 PM (#634011)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Murray MacLeod

It is a great word. I acquired most of the Latin-derived part of my vocabulary from the novels of P G Wodehouse, and I recollect that "pusillanimous" was a favorite epithet of one of his characters, although I cannot remember which one.

Murray


23 Jan 02 - 05:34 PM (#634060)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Cappuccino

If I may be forgiven the comment, the great thing about PG was that he showed that man is the master of language, not the other way around.

It took a genius to play with words the way he did: "Jeeves, if not actually disgruntled, was certainly not gruntled..."!

Brilliant.

- Ian B


23 Jan 02 - 05:52 PM (#634065)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: gnu

Now, how did I know LH started this thread before I clicked on it ? Didja get a new dictionerrrry fer Kissmeass Hawk ?


23 Jan 02 - 05:58 PM (#634066)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

No. It was the frequent repetition of the word "puissant" in these spiritual books I've been reading. That's what got me started. The dictionary's been around here for a long time.

- LH


23 Jan 02 - 06:08 PM (#634070)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: gnu

Spiritual books ? Oh oh. Dare I ask ?


23 Jan 02 - 06:10 PM (#634073)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Amos

Ach, little Hack, turn away!! Before it's too late!! Ye'll be down the Wilderness Trail and lost to common ken before ye know it. Then where will al yer fancy words getcha? Ye dinna ken what ye're gettin' into, mon!!!

A


23 Jan 02 - 06:41 PM (#634096)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: catspaw49

Spiritual books my ass...........Hawk has been angling from the beginning for a "pussy" joke......and so far he hasn't got one.....the obvious being no fun to play.

Admit it Hawk......You're waiting for "Peter's puerile pusillanimous penis pitifully performed in penetrating Penelope's puissant, pulchritudinous pussy."

Now shitcan the vocabulary tests...........

Spaw


23 Jan 02 - 08:18 PM (#634159)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: mack/misophist

As long as wonderful words are popular around here, let me introduce you to the most wonderful, the most useless word in the English language: MERKIN. I'm going to make you work for it. The only place I know of to get the real goods on merkin is the full sized edition of the OED. Ostensibly, the word means 'a pubic wig', but not really. It was invented to meet a very peculiar need which, as far as I know has never re-arisen.


23 Jan 02 - 10:36 PM (#634258)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: ddw

I thought LH was just putting a "u" in puissant that didn't belong there....

*BG*

david


23 Jan 02 - 10:47 PM (#634266)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Spaw - Please! Do not pretend to be even more depraved and tasteless than you actually are! :-O There are sensitive minds out there. In fact, yours is a heinous accusation, and your whole position on the matter is pusillanimous in the extreme. A pox on your merkin!

Amos - That is a very good song. I'm serious. It's great. Really provides food for thought.

The books are mostly the writings of Sri Aurobindo, who was a very smart man. They are heavy going.

- LH


23 Jan 02 - 11:35 PM (#634299)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

By the way, "disgruntled" is a very neat word too. And so is "pulverize".

Can one be "gruntled"? Can something be made into a "pulver", hence pulverized? No. Very strange indeed.

Hmmm...according to the dictionary, pulverize means to make into a fine powder (or to defeat totally), so I guess that "pulver" may have once meant fine powder...

That still doesn't tell us where "gruntled" came from.

- LH


23 Jan 02 - 11:42 PM (#634302)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Crazy Eddie

Misophist,
I thought most Mudcatters were "MERKINS"? OK, there's a fair few British, & Irish; and Wolfgang & Skarpi come to mind, but I still think most are "Merkins".
USAsian-Merkin, Canadian-Merkin, Southa-Merkin. It's a pretty common word really!
As for wigs, I've always preferred a "PERUKE" (sp?) Eddie


23 Jan 02 - 11:46 PM (#634306)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: ddw

LH — I'm yet to find it anywhere else, but "gruntled" is recognized as a word in the official Scrabble dictionary. Lost a game pretty badly one time for challenging it.

david


23 Jan 02 - 11:52 PM (#634309)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Devilmaster

Hey wait a minute!

I'm a politician, and I have never heard of the word! But thanks LH, I will try and use it at my next meeting.

It'll have the media scrambling! I love it!

Steve


24 Jan 02 - 12:05 AM (#634313)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: leprechaun

And next week, pulchritude! Which alliterates nicely with priapic.


24 Jan 02 - 12:14 AM (#634317)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

You've gotta be kidding...I thought all politicians knew that word...

Well, have fun at your next meeting. As well as pusillanimous, don't forget to also use the words heinous, scurrilous, and unconscionable! These are all terrific words for attacking one's political opponents.

pusillanimous - lacking in moral courage

heinous - very wicked, very hateful

scurrilous - expressed in or using language which is indecently or offensively abusive

unconscionable - unscrupulous, unaffected by conscience

I predict that your next meeting will get great press coverage! :-)

- LH


24 Jan 02 - 03:49 AM (#634408)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Tony in Brussels

Pulverised, Little Hawk comes straight from Latin - "pulvus" meaning "a powder". These days it appears sometimes on doctors' prescriptions abbreviated as "pulv.". If you ever go into an old-fashioned pharmacy and look at the rows of drug jars, you may see quite a few with labels such as "Pulv. Ipecac." All it means is "Ipecacuahna Powder". Doctors and pharmacists used - and still use - Latin, partly because it was the international scientific language once upon a time and these days to preserve the medical mystique and cover up how little they really know. (I'm a pharmacist so I can say these things...).

Hence "pulverise" - to shatter something or make it into a powder.

There. Can I have the award for the most boring post yet, please?


24 Jan 02 - 03:58 AM (#634409)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Tony in Brussels

Oh, and another great word I have never understood or been able to find a definition of (help wanted!) - MAVEN.

Seems to be mainly used as a noun, or with a descriptor as a noun phrase, e.g. " a fashion maven". Doesn't seem to be very complimentary somehow, but for the life of me, I don't know why.

Bit like "merkin" I suppose... this rapidly changed from its original meaning to a term of insult.


24 Jan 02 - 04:13 AM (#634412)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: The_one_and_only_Dai

Mendacious. Verisimilitude. I try to use these at least once a day *sigh* :-)


24 Jan 02 - 05:12 AM (#634440)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: catspaw49

TONY IN BRUSSELS......Oddly enough, you are not alone in wondering about maven...Try This........

Spaw (Thread Maven)


24 Jan 02 - 05:44 AM (#634451)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Steve Parkes

Click here, type merkin in the box and click "Search" for some surprising etymology. And all those other funny words, while you're at it.

I recall Dr Smith addressed Robbie the Robot as "pusillanimous puppet" in one gripping installment of "Lost In Space". Isn't tv educational?

Steve


24 Jan 02 - 07:14 AM (#634477)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Tiger

Be careful! You may awaken the ghost of Spiro Agnew.


24 Jan 02 - 08:21 AM (#634501)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: gnu

Supercali... Supercala... Supercalofuckit !


24 Jan 02 - 10:50 AM (#634608)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: lamarca

For all you Word Mavens, here is the OED's "Word of the Day" page, where you can learn more than you ever wanted to know about the daily word of their choice. Today, it's "tripartite, a, (n)"

Or, you can subscribe to the OED on-line, to the tune of a mere 350 GBP(+ VAT) or $550 . . . per year!


24 Jan 02 - 12:04 PM (#634660)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Airto

- "Merkin, counterfeit hair for women's privy parts".

- Oh that's gross!

- No, Grose. He wrote Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

- That sounds even grosser.


24 Jan 02 - 12:21 PM (#634673)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Steve Parkes

And don't forget former UK PM Edward Heath, a Merkin of the First Water: they don't come much grocer than that! (Unless you count the Grocer's Daughter? But I think she probably still had all her own hair.)

Steve
(Explanations for foreigners available on request)


24 Jan 02 - 12:24 PM (#634680)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: catspaw49

I think you need to move that one to the pun thread Steve.

Spaw


24 Jan 02 - 01:11 PM (#634725)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Metchosin

Ahh! and who can't help but remember, Can Hieronymus Merkin Ever Forget Mercy Humppe and Find True Happiness?


24 Jan 02 - 05:04 PM (#634885)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

I'm not sure which is a more tasteless concoction of a supposed female name...Mercy Humppe or Pussy Galore...both absolutely ridiculous. (* Gag *) Geez, I think we could start a whole thread on such names...

If you check out the stripper and phone sex ads in the Toronto Scum...uh, I mean the Toronto Sun....you will find some other howlers like, for example...

Ineeda Mann

(my all-time favourite among dumb sexual innuendo names for women...another man is probably the last thing she needs at this point)

Imagine going through life with a name like that, taking your clothes off night after night in some disgusting establishment, beneath the jaded stares of the barely human clientele. Gaahhhh.... Almost as bad as being a travelling folksinger, and playing the bars.

James Bond was actually a step or two up for such women, although the chances of physical survival were definitely less per annum for femme fatales in his field of endeavour.

- LH


24 Jan 02 - 05:41 PM (#634902)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: catspaw49

Oh please Hawk, let's not go there..........We'd have to have talks on the Lingus sisters, Connie and Anna, and that would lead to...........no, no..........let's not go there.........

Spaw


24 Jan 02 - 06:01 PM (#634920)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Burke

The OED gives credit for "gruntled: Pleased, satisfied, contented" to PG Wodehouse as a backformation from gruntled.

Older 16th cent. words, however, include:
verb Gruntle: 1. To utter a little or low grunt. Said of swine, occas. of other animals; rarely of persons. 2. To grumble, murmur, complain.

Noun Gruntle: 1. The snout of a pig, or other animal. 1.b. transf. The face of a man, etc. 2. A little grunt; a subdued grunting sound.


24 Jan 02 - 06:15 PM (#634929)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Clinton Hammond

My favourite word is still "defenestration"

.-)


24 Jan 02 - 07:58 PM (#635009)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Yeah, that's a beauty. The practice attained some notoriety in Czechoslovakia, where a whole bunch of politicians ended their careers abruptly by being thrown out of high windows by the opposition. It makes a good case for confining parliamentary activities to single story buildings.

- LH


25 Jan 02 - 03:17 AM (#635172)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Steve Parkes

Yes, I always thought that it was a bit much to throw folks out of windows; but it turns out they were on the ground floor (or first floor as they say in the US). I expect it was a very effective way to make a point, all the same--who knew what floor they might be on next time they were defenestrated?

BTW, there's also "disfenestrated": having your windows taken from you. It happens when you don't pay the double glazing bill.

Steve


25 Jan 02 - 09:00 AM (#635215)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Tony in Brussels

Ye gods! Mudcat strikes back!

Not only an entertaining, diverting and erudite discussion about a word - maven - I've been wondering about for ages, but it all took place about eighteen months ago!

How do they do that?

(Shakes head in wonder) Thanks Spaw. And all the rest of you merkins.


25 Jan 02 - 09:27 AM (#635226)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Snuffy

"USAsian-Merkin, Canadian-Merkin, Southa-Merkin"?

I thought you were all felo-merkins.

WassaiL! V


25 Jan 02 - 01:47 PM (#635410)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Willa

Tony in Brussels; Maven (or Mavin)-expert or pundit, from Hebrew mevin-understanding. I like plangent and mellifluous.


25 Jan 02 - 02:03 PM (#635418)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Cappuccino

Glad to have my PG Wodehouse supported... but after the rest of this, I feel thoroughly discombooberated.

- Ian B


25 Jan 02 - 09:13 PM (#635732)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Plangent? Where's the dictionary...

Ah. "Making a loud reverberating sound or a loud, plaintive, drawn-out sound"

Like Spaw when they shoved the ice pick up his...

Sorry! Almost forgot where I was for a moment there...this is a public forum, eh? :-)

- LH


25 Jan 02 - 09:58 PM (#635759)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Another cool word, much beloved by H.P. Lovecraft is:

inchoate

Now, I thought, after reading Lovecraft that it meant "formless" or "shapeless", but that's not quite it...

it apparently means "in the beginning stages" or "in a primitive or preliminary form".

For some reason Lovecraft found that horrifying. Of course he found all kinds of things horrifying that would probably not horrify the average person much at all. :-)

Like giant Antarctic penguins who shoot electric bolts out of their heads and utter the hideous cry "tek-e-li-li" at frequent intervals...

I kid you not. Lovecraft was one weird character.

- LH


26 Jan 02 - 04:31 AM (#635927)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Roughyed

I don't know if you've seen Mr.Penguin on Eurotrash (British TV programme) but he scares me. There was an exam paper where a student wrote "Pusillanimity was his failing vice" and it came back marked "As obfuscation is thine."


26 Jan 02 - 06:02 AM (#635949)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Mr Red

So what song has a rhyme for pusillanimous, pusillaniminity, pusillanimology etc etc?


06 May 03 - 12:03 AM (#946687)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Let's be magnanimous, not pussillanimous! Let's join in an inchoate chorus of plangent cacophony guaranteed to drive all scurrilous scoundrels into their noisome hidey-holes!

- LH


06 May 03 - 03:25 AM (#946764)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: JohnInKansas

Straight Dope


A merkin is somebody who lives in Merika. (Har!)
They used to shave off all the pubic hair as a cure for syphillis, so the well-to-do used wigs.
Before penicillin was around to ease the lives of the promiscuous, these were used to cover up any sores prostitutes may have obtained in the line of duty.
They used to treat the syphilitic with mercury, which caused baldness.
The merkin is for women with no pubic hair. Some people just don't develop hair down there, and this can be embarrassing.
In days of old a common problem was lice. One of the ways people dealt with this was to shave all the hair off their bodies, including arms, legs, and pubes. Wigs became very popular. Pubic wigs caught on slowly, starting among the kinkier set, but eventually became halfway respectable.
A merkin is a crotch wig for both men and women and is usually worn on the outside. Have you ever seen a Scot in full regalia? That little fur "purse" in front is a merkin.
In a country of mainly dark haired people, a prostitute may wear a blond merkin to be unusual and therefore more desirable. (Got this from a dictionary of sex.)
One of the more recent uses is to allow exotic dancers to comply with local laws prohibiting full nudity. They wear what amounts to a flesh-colored panty with hair on the front, appearing to the patrons of the establishment to disrobe completely without actually doing so.
In a sci fi story by John Varley called something like "The Barbie Murders," a group of women gives up individuality (and sex) and undergoes surgery to become perfect nonsexual beings resembling Barbie dolls. This involves losing genitals, pubic hair, etc. One Barbie goes back to being a woman for a night, painting on nipples and using a merkin.


I always rather liked "osculatory" until a coworker picked up the "office name" of gluteus osculator.

John


06 May 03 - 03:47 AM (#946771)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Clint Keller

Lovecraft's nameless, forbidden lexicon really deserves its own thread.

While politicians may be squamous or rugose only a few are eldritch, at least in the Lovecraftian sense.

clint


06 May 03 - 08:10 AM (#946875)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Steve Parkes

Mrs T may be rugose, but Ian Duncan Smith isn't; still, in a few years he'll get wrinkly.

Steve


06 May 03 - 09:40 AM (#946933)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: TIA

Just make sure you're not using any of these words:

banished word list


06 May 03 - 02:53 PM (#947123)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Rapparee

Let us not forget that magnificent quote

"Ultra-liberalism today translates into a whimpering isolationism in foreign policy, a mulish obstructionism in domestic policy, and a pusillanimous pussyfooting on the critical issue of law and order."

                                                 --Spiro T. Agnew


06 May 03 - 03:06 PM (#947135)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

ROTFLMAO!!! Good ol' Spiro! Never was there a more gloriously pompous and idiotic spokesman for the far right than he. I bet if you go through old speeches by Hitler you will find these same sort of devastating critiques of the weak and mealy-mouthed people who stand in the way of world-domination by "God's Chosen Few"...those who are no doubt supported by that other great mythical constituency...the Great Silent Majority.

- LH


06 May 03 - 04:30 PM (#947236)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Uncle_DaveO

SOMEONE has to get into "the longest" thread, so here's the longest English word I happen to know:

floccinaucinilipilification.

It's a real word, not like that stupid Disneyist invention, supercali(stupidism).

Dave Oesterreich


06 May 03 - 07:06 PM (#947355)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Wow...

Gotta look it up.

Hmmmm. Not in this dictionary.

Are you sure?

I did find "flocculence" and "flocculation", though...

- LH


06 May 03 - 07:53 PM (#947382)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Q

Uncle sub DaveO has a real word by the tail, first in print in 1741, in the sentence "I loved him for nothing so much as his f------ of money." OED 1971 edition.
Oh, the meaning? The action or habit of estimating as worthless. Beloved of Eton Latin students, for obvious reasons to those who have suffered through Latin.

But why this search for seldom used words? It causes me to flodder, nay, even to grutch and finally to gry.

And someone brought up that justifiably long-discarded author, PG. Any self-respecting editor would have ruddled his back-formation gruntle, a word which already had legitimate meanings.


06 May 03 - 08:28 PM (#947406)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Uncle_DaveO

You know those little balls of yarn that form on your sweaters, that spoil the smoothness of the surface. They're called "pills".

Some people have a habit of picking at them--nay, a compulsion to pick at them.

And some people are so compulsive they pick at the pills on the sweater even if there aren't any.   That, friends, is floccinaucinilipilification.

Dave Oesterreich


06 May 03 - 08:36 PM (#947411)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Cluin

"Pusillanimous" used in a song.


06 May 03 - 09:20 PM (#947443)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Q

Uncle Dave O's new definition for the word should be submitted to the OED as meaning 2, with the following as proof of use. If it appears in a magazine or newspaper in a sentence with his meaning, it becomes legitimate and enters lexicographical history.


06 May 03 - 10:29 PM (#947468)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Matt_R

The word "pusillanimous" can even be found in a song...The Rutles' "Another Day".


06 May 03 - 10:36 PM (#947472)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Someone asked about the pronunciation. It's...

Pyoo-sil-AN-i-mus

Great word.

- LH


07 May 03 - 04:00 AM (#947617)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Joe Offer

That's how I thought you said it.
It sounds disgusting.
-Joe Offer, onomatopoetically-


07 May 03 - 10:01 AM (#947801)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Yes, it does. That's why it's so cool. That's also why people like Spiro Agnew delight in using it to attack their political opponents.

"Lascivious" is another word that has that sort of slimy sound, as it should, but it's not as disgusting sounding as pusillanimous.

- LH


07 May 03 - 01:06 PM (#947931)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: An Pluiméir Ceolmhar

I'm sure Dubya would love to work it into a speech about the old Europeans if he thought he could say it without fluffing his line.


07 May 03 - 01:17 PM (#947942)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: TIA

Oh, but I beg to differ...the longest word (in english) is

PNEUMONOULTRAMICROSCOPICSILICOVOLCANOCONIOSIS

a disease caused by breathing small, silica particles in volcanic ash.


07 May 03 - 01:18 PM (#947943)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

I think he would have real trouble with the pronunciation, and that could lead to serious embarrassment.


07 May 03 - 02:38 PM (#947993)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Rapparee

So, would the fear of compulsively picking pills off of sweaters be
"floccinaucinilipiliphobia"? I'm just wondering...Gods and Goddesses know that I certanly don't want to say it!


07 May 03 - 02:45 PM (#948001)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Uncle_DaveO

Guest,Q, I didn't make up that definition for floccinaucinilipilification. I learned that from a book of weird words I had some years ago. I forget the name of the book now, but it was highly entertaining.

Dave Oesterreich


07 May 03 - 06:19 PM (#948141)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

Uh-huh. And how is it pronounced?

FLOK-sin-o-SIN-i-li-PILL-i-fi-KAY-shun ??? That's my guess. No less than FOUR accented syllables. Wow.


07 May 03 - 07:05 PM (#948160)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Raedwulf

Can we get the damn word right, please?! It's:

Floccinaucinihilipilification

"-nihil-", not "-nil-"!!


07 May 03 - 09:48 PM (#948256)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Cluin

"Enough lubricities!"

(not sure where I heard of read that one, but it seems impossible...)


08 May 03 - 07:54 AM (#948529)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Q

Lubricity- oiliness- goes back to 1602 in print (OED). A 19th century Australian introduced us to "women's lubricious minds." Lubrify and several other lube words.

Obviously English has more words than we know what to do with.


08 May 03 - 08:06 AM (#948544)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Steve Parkes

Yes, it's the language to use if you need a mot just!


08 May 03 - 03:14 PM (#948828)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Uncle_DaveO

Raedwulf:

Mea culpa, mea culpa!!

Dave Oesterreich


08 May 03 - 03:37 PM (#948838)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Cluin

I think I may have heard it on "Flesh Gordon"...


08 May 03 - 05:24 PM (#948909)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Little Hawk

And here I was thinking that the Ojibway word "kawagashigamog" was the most complicated word out there...


08 May 03 - 05:44 PM (#948925)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: GUEST,Q

Let's say you are a doctor with a Navajo nurse and need the obstetrical forceps- béésh 'awéé' bee haha'nílígíí

OK, I am showing off. A local bookstore closing down put a $5 tag on "The Navajo Language, A Grammar and Colloquial Dictionary," latest edition, which is a very weighty tome of great price. I will take it to the Nation next time I go down.


09 May 03 - 01:09 AM (#949133)
Subject: RE: BS: Another great word: pusillanimous
From: Cluin

A tongue twister in Czech:

strc prst skrz krk
(Apparently, all 'r's are 'vocalic', whatever that is...)

English translation: 'Stick [your] finger through [your] throat'.

What's worse: saying it or doing it?
Sounds like onomatopoeia to me anyway.