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A Song That Moved You?

12 Mar 98 - 07:40 PM (#23652)
Subject: A Song That Moved You?
From: Baz

I heard an old song of Ewan McColl's on the radio last 'The Joy Of Living' and it stopped me dead in my tracks. Ralph Mctell was presenting the program and he said that this had been written by Ewan when he knew he was ill and thought he might die soon. By the time the last verse was playing Ralph was sniffing and his voice was shaky and there wasn't a dry eye in our house. (The words are on the database).
I was wondering if anyone out there has a song that moved them the way this one did me ?

Baz


12 Mar 98 - 08:06 PM (#23656)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Rodney Rawlings

The Londonderry Air, with the "Danny Boy" words. One of the best tunes in the world, and moving lyrics.

Rodney Rawlings
Stop the Persecution of Bill Gates and Microsoft - Stop the Punishment of Success for Being Success


12 Mar 98 - 08:23 PM (#23659)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Richard

If you are close to the land, or can feel for those who are, then try listening to Fred J Eaglesmith's Go Out and Plough and not weeping. I was "given " the song by a friend who had to pull his car off the highway while it played and wait to calm down. My wife and I perform it, but it took us literally weeks before we could sing the whole song. Maybe only us farmer's can relate to it, but I think not.

Richard


12 Mar 98 - 08:59 PM (#23662)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Geordie

I couldn't find "The Joy of Living" on the database. Did Ewan McColl record this on an album? And what radio station broadcasts Ralph McTell? Does anyone know of a Houston station that carries this program?


12 Mar 98 - 09:41 PM (#23664)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bruce O.

I pulled "Londondery Air/ Danny Boy" up. Original of the mis-noted tune, and the original Irish song to it (my contribution) are at the website noted in the other thread.


12 Mar 98 - 11:39 PM (#23670)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: rosebrook

On their CD "Out and About", Cherish the Ladies recorded a song entitled "The Missing Piece", written by their lovely lead vocalist Cathie Ryan. The song depicts an Irish couple who come to America and yearn for homeland Ireland. After three years of hearing this song, I cannot listen to it without tears. Sadly, there's not a chance in hell I'd ever be able to perform this song. I love it, but wouldn't be able to sing through the tears.


13 Mar 98 - 12:20 AM (#23671)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bojangles

Geordie--Try again. I just printed out "The Joy of living" by Ewan MacColl from the database, so I know it's there..in the second ten selections, I believe. If all else fails do a search on some weird words in the song that probably no other song has...like "Glidderfach" or "Coolbegs." Good luck!


13 Mar 98 - 12:30 AM (#23672)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: nobbler

There's a few time honoured songs such as "Danny Boy" that are usually good for fetching a tear or two, and my mother loves to hear me play and sing "Hard Times Come Again no More". Personally I'm sick of doing these songs but none the less, they are emotional.

Recently I had the pleasure of hearing Martin Simpson's version of "Hard Love". This one really moved me. Check it out if you see it going cheap anywhere, and keep that tissue box handy!


13 Mar 98 - 01:37 AM (#23676)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: therapon

Go Down Old Hannah, as sung by Leadbelly. There's no point in trying to put the feeling into words, but there it is.


13 Mar 98 - 10:38 AM (#23692)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bert

Listen to Allen Damron singing "The Heart of the Appaloosa"


13 Mar 98 - 11:41 AM (#23696)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Whippoorwill

It's not folk (whatever that is), but -
Bill Gaither's "We Have This Moment Today."


13 Mar 98 - 12:05 PM (#23702)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Jon W.

"The Death of Queen Jane" from the Bothy Band's live "After Hours" album (also on their "best of" album). But I'm a hard-hearted cuss so I think I'll eventually be able to perform it (especially if I can figure out the chords).


13 Mar 98 - 12:39 PM (#23706)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bill in Alabama

We were never able to perform Old Shep on stage because my daughter couldn't get through it (nor could I, sometimes). At the Memorial service for Alex Haley at Museum of Appalachia, I had trouble making it through "Meeting in the Air." We tend to choose for our performances songs which touch us deeply in some way, so I could go on and on; but I won't.


13 Mar 98 - 12:56 PM (#23707)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: lesblank

In reference to Allen Damron above, there are two more of his that that really punch a hole for me :

Corey Snow and If I can't get it with a broomstick ...

Allen is a Texas treasure and a mainstay at Kerrville each year. He and his wife, Connie, are two of the finest people I ever met !!


13 Mar 98 - 03:17 PM (#23716)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Art Thieme

"The Master Of The Sheepfold", a song collected in Maine by Bill Bonyan, taken to New York Pinewoods Camp in Mass. and sung there for me by Jerry Epstein. Jerry has recorded it with Jeff Warner and Jeff Davis and David Jones (see Camsco Music for that recording). I included the song on my _On The Wilderness Road_ LP, now only a cassette on Folk Legacy. (But it will be on a new CD am putting together from old, but good, tapes from early concerts when I could still pick.

The reason I love the song is that, to me, it says emphatically, that there is ROOM FOR EVERYONE--- from atheist to devout whatever in the scheme of things. Grand to see that in our overly judgmental world of "them" vs. "us" !!

Art Thieme


13 Mar 98 - 03:34 PM (#23717)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Ireland O'Reilly

A song that greatly moves me is "Christmas in the Trenches". I heard John Mcdermott sing it, and it left me crying for the utter beauty of the Christmas ceasefire, and the utter cruelty of the war. This is a wonderful song, and I'm moved every time I hear it.


13 Mar 98 - 06:03 PM (#23723)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Helen

I know that this song can get groans of "oh no, not *that* song again" but I think that the Eric Bogle song about the aftermath of war really says it for me about the stupidity and futility of killing people to solve problems on a national, international or global scale.

....sorry, lost the title, is it Green Fields of France?

It starts, Well how are you doing, Private Willie McBride, Do you mind if I sit here down by your graveside, etc

His other one called The Band Played Waltzing Matilda also tells of the effects of war on individual lives. Kind of an updated version of When Johnny Comes Marching Home, I guess.

Helen, in Oz


13 Mar 98 - 06:49 PM (#23730)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: BAZ

Geordie
It is there somewhere. Ewann recorded it on 'Black and White' in 1986 according to the info. The Ralph Mctell programme is here in Cornwall. Radio 2.

There seems to be great response regarding these songs and I.m going to have to come back and ask for some words ror some of them.
I don't think there is any need to worry about groans at Wiilie McBride, We always get asked to sing it on remembrance day in our village.
Regards baz


13 Mar 98 - 07:10 PM (#23734)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Barry Finn

Ewan MacColl wrote, I think for his 'radio ballads program', a song lamenting the passing of the age of sail & the last of the tall ships. I don't know exactly when he did this but since the 1976 tall ships parade the passing never came to be. I don't even know the song's title, but here's the last verse.

Goodbye ya square riggers your voyage has ended
Farewell to the days of sail
Goodbye ya Cape Horners & every tall ship
That ever did fight a gale
Goodbye to the shellbacks that romed the winds
In a world of sea & sky
Your voyage is over, your journey has ended
You mariners all goodbye.

I quess the sea is my soft spot. Barry


13 Mar 98 - 07:26 PM (#23738)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Barry Finn

Sorry, it's been in the DT. Ewan wrote it for the film 'Before the Mast'. I searched Ewan MacColl & got 71 hits, unbelievable what he (& Peggy) accomplished. Barry


13 Mar 98 - 08:50 PM (#23745)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Will

Patti Smith's "Gone Again".

And Simpson's "Hard Love" is wonderful.

I snuffle a bit to Stan Roger's "Lies", too.


13 Mar 98 - 10:10 PM (#23747)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Alice

"SOMETHING IN THE RAIN" ©1992 by Tish Hinojosa, one of the best, (in my opinion) American singer songwriters around today.

1.Mom and Dad have worked the fields,
I don't know how many years,
I'm just a boy, but I know how,
And go to school when work is slow.
We have seen our country's roads,
From Bakersfield to Illinois,
And when trouble comes our way,
Oh, yeah, I've seen my Daddy pray.

2.There's something wrong with little sister.
I hear her crying by my side.
Mama's shaking as she holds her.
We try to hold her through the night.
Mom says, "Close your eyes, mijito (mee-hee-to, my son)
Dream of some place far from here.
Like the pictures in your school books,
Someday you can take us there.

chorus 1: There must be something in the rain,
I'm not sure just what that means.
Abuelita (grandma) talks of sins of man,
Of dust that's in our hands.
There must be something in the rain,
Well, what else could cause this pain?
Those airplanes cure the plants so things can grow,
Oh, no, it must be something in the rain.

3. Little sister's gone away.
Mama's working long again.
And me, I think I understand,
About our life about our land.
Well, talkers talk and dreamers dream.
I will find a place between.
I'm afraid, but I believe,
That we can change these hurting fields.

chorus 2: 'Cause there's something in the rain.
But there's more here in our hands.
Abuelita's right about the sins of man,
Whose profits rape the land.
And the rains are pourin' down,
From the growers to the towns.
And until we break the killing chains,
There's something in the rain.

makes me cry every time. alice in montana


13 Mar 98 - 10:31 PM (#23751)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: leprechaun

I once stood in a funeral with a two lines of macho cops in uniforms all standing in a semiicircle around the outer edge of the chapel while a fine Irish tenor sang Danny Boy. There were some soaking wet uniforms that day.


14 Mar 98 - 06:29 AM (#23763)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Timb

A song that can give one chills is Del McCourey singing "High on the Mountain". That high tenor and lyrics to that song is one that i never get tired of.

Tim

(old rock and roller turned bluegrass)


14 Mar 98 - 07:19 AM (#23768)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: nobbler

Barry, are you a Ewan fan?? There's a question about Ewan MacColl I'd like to ask that might make me look a little daft, but hey here goes anyway.

I've seen Christy Moore perform many times, and I know he's never been reluctant to play the odd Ewan MacColl song here and there. He's also never been reluctant to use the odd member of the MacColl family on one or two of his recordings. Here's the question;

Whilst watching Christy play, he picked up a bass guitar, and soley on bass and vocal he performed a song called "Green Island". To this day I could swear that he announced prior to performing this song that he stated that it was a song that Ewan had written, but I've never been able to verify it. Through the internet I've been able to verify that Christy performed the song and also that Ewan had perfomed the song prior, but I've never been able to pin who actually wrote the song. Anyone offer any input??

Sorry if this a dumb question that I really should know the answer to, but I would like to know.


14 Mar 98 - 01:30 PM (#23772)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: S.P. Buck Mulligan

Helen - the "Willie McBride" song of Bogle's is called "No Man's Land." It (and "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda" have the same effect on me.


14 Mar 98 - 01:42 PM (#23773)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Joe Offer

Here's a link to The Joy of Living and No Man's Land. At about this point in a thread with lots of good songs listed, Dick usually breaks in with a gentle request that people post lyrics if the songs aren't in the database. Ain't that right, Dick?
-Joe Offer-


14 Mar 98 - 01:44 PM (#23774)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bill D

5 or 6 of Utah Phillips songs can do it to me...."Enola Gay"..."Yuba" "Larimer Square"...etc...I guess it depends on my mood...being 'moved' does not always mean 'to tears'...some of Utah's move me to anger or depression.(just as I assume he wanted them too!)

and yes, the Eric Bogle songs mentioned are among the best crafted songs of their type ever written...


14 Mar 98 - 01:51 PM (#23775)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Claire K.

Kilkelly, by the Jones brothers, sung by Moloney, O'Connell and Keane.


14 Mar 98 - 06:20 PM (#23790)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Sir

I always get choked when I hear the "She's Too Fat For Me Polka"...(no, just kidding!)

A lot of songs put me in a melancholy mood and the latest was not folk...Is there a father of a little girl out there who doesn't wax sentimental when listening to Bob Carlisle's "Butterfly Kisses"?


14 Mar 98 - 09:19 PM (#23801)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bill D

Just finished listening to my wife playing the zither and singing "Faded Coat of Blue" *snffff*....(she also does "The Vacant Chair"...*sssnnnnnffff*) ...some of the civil war songs really are among the most moving I know.


15 Mar 98 - 12:21 AM (#23819)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Sheye

Fell in love with Kris Kristopherson when I was but a babe (yesterday?!?). Just about anything off the Silver Tongued Devil album. I call The Epitaph my theme song, and am quite partial to Breakdown.

Of the new, up, and coming, take a listen to Amanda Marshall's "Trust Me, This is Love". Very insightful for such a young soul. As always, comments change with the mood and in two days I'd have a different choice.

I was sitting in a beach-side bar in Tamarindo, Costa Rica, last week with what seemed to be the United Nations. The bar musician played and sang the latino rendering of "My Way". Talk about music being the Universal Language!! Swiss, Austrians, French, Ticos, Argentinians... Everyone but everyone knew the song word for word in their own language as recorded by however their country's version of Frank Sinatra is. This is a classic world-wide and after much debate, consensus was reached that it was an American, Sinatra song (not sure whether this is right or not, but we all decided it was). Interesting to me, I was the only person at the table, which included two young Americans, who remembered Elvis Presley doing the piece!

I'm rambling again... does it show that I'm bored on a Saturday night??


15 Mar 98 - 01:15 AM (#23821)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Barry Finn

Nobbler, I don't know of the "Green Island" song that you asked about, never heard it, but Ewan wrote over 300 songs (which should be out soon, if not already). The song I was refering to above, which I neglected to give the title of after I found it in the DT was the "Shellback Song". And yes I am a great fan of both Ewan & Peggy's. I met them at a house concert in L.A. about 20yrs ago. I had just finished crossing the Pacific from Hawaii, headed home to Boston & the sign in sheet showed I had come the farthest so people make a small deal of it & I guess it got to Peggy & Ewan talking to me. What a nice pair, warm, friendly & very accessible & approchable. We talked at length of his working as a stone mason & me as a roofer, & the passing of different trades, I felt like I was in their kitchen, not at a concert. Barry


15 Mar 98 - 03:35 AM (#23823)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: nobbler

Nice to hear that they made you feel comfortable Barry. Obviously I don't know your character, but I do know from experience that those situations can become awkward when the person famous for his trade doesn't particularly want to chat to a complete stranger, no matter how strong that strangers personality or character may be.

Let me tell you something neat now, I hope you shook his hand! My reason for saying this may well be remote but here goes. I met Steve Lillywhite and his wife Kirsty in Leicester, England a few years ago whilst playing at the local university. Mrs. Lillywhite is, as you may well know, Kirsty MacColl, daughter of Ewan. I briefly chatted with the couple for a while and obviously I shook their hands. So, we could say that you've shaken the hand that's held the hand of a persons hand that I myself has shaken!

Please to meet you Barry. :-)

Back to the "Green Island" song. I still can't say for sure that Ewan wrote the song. The version I heard was by Christy Moore (I hope you've heard some of Christy's performances, nice guy/great performer), but Christy has covered many Ewan songs and as I've said above, I have a nagging feeling that I heard Christy say that Ewan had written the song.

I'm actually becoming frustrated, because I've spent over two hours on the net today trying to pin this down. I'm unable to get conformation of the writer, despite finding the lyrics to the song in a few different locations.

Can anybody direct me to either a good Ewan bio OR a precise Christy Moore bio on the web anywhere???

nobbler@bigfoot.com


15 Mar 98 - 05:12 AM (#23825)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: alison

hi,

I cried the first time I heard "Kilkelly". Henry Lawson's "Do you think that I do not know", can have the same effect too, if it's done well.

Slainte

Alison


15 Mar 98 - 07:55 AM (#23827)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: hanrahan

Michael Smith-"I Took My Father With Me"


15 Mar 98 - 09:24 AM (#23835)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Alice

"Kilkelly". definitely. alice


15 Mar 98 - 10:34 AM (#23839)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: northfolk

All of you singers, musicians, performers, can make the same claim, that all of your songs move you, from club to club, bar to bar, or festival to festival. I have been moved by this music also. While I have shared the same emotional experience that most of the messages have described, (particularly the lyrics of Bogle, Moore, Phillips....) I recall with clarity the day that I first heard Pete Seeger sing "Talkin' Union". I have moved. Most recently from bucolic northern Michigan, to industrial Southeast Michigan. Best life I ever had!!! and now I am within walking distance of the ARK. Go Workers, Beat the Boss.


15 Mar 98 - 11:42 AM (#23840)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Art Thieme

A while ago I was recovering from hospital time and was bored so I went through my entire recorded music collection to make a 90 min. tape of my favorite songs---songs that moved me ! When I'd finished making the tape I had TWENTY-FOUR of them. THIRTY-SIX HOURS! One of those songs lately is Michael Smith's "Elizabeth Dark". The coffeehouse he's talking about I've sung at for 37 years! (Brian and Sue--the 4th owners----just put it up for sale again.) The "L" he mentions---our "elevated train" in Chicago----I rode thousands of times. For me, there was a real life Elizabeth Dark. That wasn't her name, but she was real. Yes, as Michael said, "I'm a beatnik lost in the future." Also, "Had spaghetti with Ferlinghetti and wine with Jack Kerouac." Still very into Kerouac. (Our cat is "Jack Kerouac"----Wacky for short.) Art


15 Mar 98 - 12:31 PM (#23841)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Alice

"We shall, we shall, we shall not be moved...." ;-)


15 Mar 98 - 01:58 PM (#23843)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Art Thieme

Charlie Poole"s "It's MOVIN' DAY"

Art


15 Mar 98 - 02:02 PM (#23844)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Richard

So often it is the singer and their heart, not the song, that moves us. I remember years ago hearing Salome Bey(sp?) sing her version of Mr. Bojangles, from his wife's point of view. Never heard it again but it moved me. And "Circle be Unbroken". Often doesn't do much for me, but when a friend sang it as his brother's memorial service, with his sister standing behind for strength, everyone wepte. Years alter I asked why he had done that, it must have been so hard. "Richard, I knew everyone needed a reason to cry and I decided I was going to give it to them." He did. And it still brings back strong memories. So when Eaglesmith sings "Go Out and Plough I weep because he sings it from his old farmer's heart. Others try but just don't get it.

It the signer, not the song.

Richard


15 Mar 98 - 04:02 PM (#23846)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: dick greenhaus

Re Ewan MacColl-- I'm told that Peggy Seeger, his widow, has a web page now. She'd be a good one to ask.


15 Mar 98 - 06:34 PM (#23849)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: BAZ

What a brilliant response!.
I shared this list with some folks I play with this afternoon, but they can't figure out how we can manage to communicate with each other yet let alone swap this sort of information. Now to compile a list of the songs mentioned and go looking for the words.
regards Baz


15 Mar 98 - 07:00 PM (#23855)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bill D

.....memories....sitting, in 1964, in a crowded room of the McComb, Mississippi office of SNCC (the Student Non-violent Co-ordinating Committee), listening to the 'staff' sing the civil rights protest songs 'from the heart'. "Wade in the Water" ,"Go Tell it on the Mountain", "Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me 'Round", "Oh, Freedom" etc...and one little thing called "In the Mississippi River", which is a sort of chant/song which recites a list of martyrs
"In the Mississippi River (x3)
"You can count them one by one
....'Medgar Evers'
"You can count them two by two
....'Michael Schwerner'br> "You can count them three by three
....'Andy Goodman'

etc..(One of the few times I actually had the hair on the back of my neck stand up.......)


16 Mar 98 - 05:57 AM (#23891)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Wolfgang Hell

When I saw the thread title and fourty odd responses already I stopped before opening the thread and made up a short list. Then I thought if I had to name but one of them for this thread which it would be and came up with "Joy of living". Yes, BAZ, this song did the same to me as it did to you. I first heard it sung live in London by an old man with a nearly failing voice and I started crying at once. The old man was Ewan McColl. I'll never forget that.
It is on a Ewan McColl LP called Items of News.
All other songs of my list have been mentioned except Scraps of Paper by E. Bogle.
Wolfgang


16 Mar 98 - 12:14 PM (#23895)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bert

My Dad used to sing While London Sleeps to us when we were kids. The last verse still gets to me.

I wrote Goodbye when my second wife was dying of cancer, never could get to write any more verses.


16 Mar 98 - 01:33 PM (#23901)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Peter T.

Dear Richard, Lyrics or album reference for "Go Out and Plough"? I have some farmer friends who might like to hear it. Yours, Peter


16 Mar 98 - 03:30 PM (#23908)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Jack (who is calle jack)

I could list dozens, but here's a few of the top of my head.

Schoolday's Over - Ewan Macoll

A Better Voice - Joel Mabus

The Great Storm is Over - Bob Franke

Bob Dylans's dream - (This ones on PPM album 1700, does anyone know the author? Was it Dylan? It used to knock me out me when I was a kid with its longing for lost times.)


16 Mar 98 - 03:54 PM (#23914)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Alice

BAZ and all, the web page for Peggy Seeger is

http://www.pegseeger.com/html/ewan.html

alice in mt


16 Mar 98 - 07:22 PM (#23921)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Pete M

"joy of living" definitely comes top of my list. Another not so far mentioned is "The Ladies go dancing at Easter" I havent heard it recently, perhaps you need to know someone of that age (born around 1900 -1920) to really appreciate it.

Just a small point Dick, when you have a spare moment, would you update the first verse of "Joy of living" as follows (changes enclosed in asterisks):

Farewell you northern hills, you mountains all goodbye Moorland and stony ridges, **crags** and peaks goodbye **Glyder Fach** farewell, **Cul Beag, Scafell**, cloud bearing **Suilven** Sun warmed rock and the cold **of Bleaklow's frozen sea** The snow and the wind and the rain of hills and mountains Days in the sun and the tempered winds and the air like **wine** And you drink and you drink till you're drunk On the joy of living

sorry to be pedantic, but these names on their own have much thesame effect on me as the song! One of the problems of capturing lyrics phonetically! Incidentally if you have access to a copy of "The Classic walks" ed Ken Wilson and Richard Griffiths, the picture on page 173 shows Bleaklow as Ewan was describing it here.


16 Mar 98 - 11:31 PM (#23932)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Charlie Baum

"I'll Love You Forever" by Al Powers, sung by Priscilla Herdman.

It's hard to listen to without a tear in my eye. One of these years I may even get to the point of trying to be able to sing it myself.

-Charlie Baum


17 Mar 98 - 01:54 AM (#23943)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Joe Offer

I really like Where've You Been, as recorded by Kathy Mattea; and Love at the Five and Dime, by Nanci Griffith.
-Joe Offer-


17 Mar 98 - 10:17 AM (#23965)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Slant

Riding home late one night (or very early in the a.m. I should say) I caught Lotte Lenya on the radio singing 'Mack the Knife' in German, the language of its author. This was not the Bobby Darin glitzy, jazzy version but was done at a much slower tempo. The combination of the tempo and glutteral German lent an air of quiet but immediate impending danger and threat to the tune while actually raised the hair on my arms and neck...


17 Mar 98 - 05:04 PM (#23999)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Richard

Peter T.

Go Out and Plough is on Fred J. Eaglesmith and the Flying Squirrels, There Ain't No Easy Road, Sweetwater Records General Delivery Alberton, Ontario, Canada. I don't know who is distributing while Fred is on the road. Festival Records have some of his later recordings: email fdi@festival.bc.ca Toll free 1-800-633-8282 Web: http://www.festival.bc.ca

If that fails let me know at: rtwright@wlake.com

It's great stuff.

Richard


18 Mar 98 - 01:17 AM (#24036)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Grubby

Have a listen to There Were Roses wrtitten by Tommy Sands & sung by Kathy Matea.

There is a lovely song written by Brian Bedford called Wings & performed by Vin Garbutt

I'm sure these songs will have a lasting effect on you emotions

regards


18 Mar 98 - 03:12 AM (#24041)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Eric

Two that still get to me are "Home From The Forest" by Gordon Lightfoot and "Bobbie Jean & Billie Lee" by Seals & Crofts. The first I relate to my father and the second is just a beautiful song they wrote to their wives. When I first heard these songs years ago, I was a long haired heavy rocker. Funny how they stuck.

I appreciate the Eric Bogle tunes too. I perform them in the pubs occasionally and people get pretty choked up.

This (site) is a very nice exchange of meaningful thoughts. How refreshing! Take care, all.


18 Mar 98 - 04:00 AM (#24044)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: steve t

Gosh...songs that moved me. I guess that means they put me in a mood, but not necessarily a teary-eyed mood.

When I sing 'em: Mr. Tanner. Singing just made him whole. So great. Planxty's Musgrave. Runs the gammut of emotions. Mary Ellen Carter. Didn't grow on me till repeat 200. Shenandoah. I'm bound to leave you... Deep Blue Sea. Can't explain this one. It just works. Fair Flower of Northumberland. Incredible ending. Jenny Bryce and Kilkelly. Both so tough to sing. Night Rider's Lament. And They've never seen the Northern Lights.

When others have sang 'em: Ferron's Testimony sung by four women once. Incredible. Bogle's Leaving Nancy. About leaving his mom at the train station when he heads off for Austrailia. Please post the lyrics someone. White Sport's Coat. I'm always idiotically happy after hearing this one sung by a few friends who ham it up.

When heard on recordings: The Furey's Night Ferry. Heard 1st while away from home. Lover's Lullaby by Janis Ian = automatic night mood Three Babies by Sinead O'Connor. No real idea what it's about but it still pulls me into its mood every time.


18 Mar 98 - 08:59 AM (#24062)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Jaxon

Four Green Fields by Tommy Makem is another that gets to me every time I sing it. It was the first song I played for my mother, when I learned to play guitar, and she had tears in her eyes. It was the first time she cried over what I was singing and not because I was singing.

Jack Murray


18 Mar 98 - 10:20 AM (#24069)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bill D

Jean Redpath got "Sheath and Knife" from Helen Schneyer, and Jean says it took her a long time to find an approach to the song after hearing Helen sing it....having heard Helen sing it a number of times, I understand why. Jean's version is great, but Helen simply transports me....

just reading the verses is 'heavy' enough, hearing them sung well is special...


18 Mar 98 - 10:34 AM (#24070)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Peter T.

Dear Richard, Many thanks. I will "Go Out & Buy". Yours, Peter


18 Mar 98 - 01:51 PM (#24088)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Barbara Shaw

Have you ever heard the Dry Branch Fire Squad recording (Suzanne Thomas singing lead) of "Long Journey" about someone saying goodbye to their loved one at a funeral? Incredibly moving.

"Auction at the Home Place" is a very moving story about a family losing their life's possessions.

Recently heard Bryan Bowers performing his new song "Friends for Life" (coming out soon on a new recording, apparently) which left a huge impression of the power of music.


18 Mar 98 - 01:51 PM (#24089)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Bill (Scotland)

One of my favourite songs has to be the "Norlan Win" also sometimes known as "I Sa' the Wild Geese Flee". It is a song in Scots attributed to Jim Reid (ex Foundry Bar Bandmember). Jim put the tune to the beautiful poem by Flora Garry. If you heard it you'll know what I mean. Some great songs mentioned in this thread.

Bill Buchan


18 Mar 98 - 04:24 PM (#24095)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Pete M

Changing the emotions around a bit, but all with the same effect, I still can't listen to McColl's "Moving on song" without alternating frustration, anger and despair. The whole Travelling People radio ballad, is incredible, I never thought I would hear "the final solution" openly advocated on a public media so soon after the war. (I was young and naive of course) Makes you wonder how the human race has managed to survive.

"Joe Hill" by Paul Robeson, and "Dirty blackleg miner" give me new strength to battle "the system" in this wonderful free market led country (New Zealand)

A song I heard only once many years ago "Rohallion" I think, I've never seen it written down, for nostalgia and missing home.

More MacColl numbers "Freeborn man", "Manchester Rambler" and Patey's "Bound for the Mountains and the Sea" for memories of days and weeks in the mountains climbing and singing with good friends.


18 Mar 98 - 04:33 PM (#24096)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Richard

The mention of Bryan Bowers reminded me of his "Prison (or Prisoners) Song". A great 6 min song that even Bowers finds hard to sing. It is a song that needs to be sung, often.

Richard


19 Mar 98 - 05:04 PM (#24153)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Andrew M. Austin

Three songs immediately come to mine (although I could think of many more).

"Culloden's Harvest" - as performed by Deanta

"The Jeannie C." - by the late great Stan Rogers

"Frankie and Johnnie" - by Garnet Rogers (one of the greatest song writers performing today)

Thanks, Andrew


19 Mar 98 - 05:12 PM (#24158)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From:


19 Mar 98 - 06:20 PM (#24167)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: wolf

long black veil house of the rising sun by bob dylan-these words he sings were originally written in 1858-if any would like i can give a copy of the words


20 Mar 98 - 02:58 AM (#24186)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Charlie Baum

I remember when Stan Rogers died, and they played some of his songs as a tribute, and I heard him sing, "I just want to see your smiling face 45 years from now." And I realized he wouldn't be around in 45 years, or even tomorrow.

And Bill D reminds me of Helen Schneyer--almost anything she sings other than her "hideobilia" moves me greatly, but I was most taken by her version of "There Is Fountain Filled With Blood," which Joan Boyd adapted from the old hymn tune and turned into a miner's protest song!

--Charlie Baum


20 Mar 98 - 04:28 AM (#24188)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Claire K.

Another song comes to mind. David Massengill's Rider on an Orphan Train is similar in theme to Kilkelly, in that families are torn apart by circumstance and time. I prefer his simpler arrangement of vocal and minimal dulcimer accompaniment. This can be found on Treestar Revue.


20 Mar 98 - 08:52 AM (#24198)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Barbara Shaw

"Louise" by Paul Siebel.


20 Mar 98 - 05:57 PM (#24210)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Sheye

I knew a man, Bojangles, and, he'd dance for you....


21 Mar 98 - 01:07 AM (#24236)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: RonU

Almost every version of Jon O' Dreams I have heard has moved me.


21 Mar 98 - 07:24 AM (#24245)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: May1916@aol.com

Sometime back I heard on Irish radio "Green Fields of France" and was saddened by the words and music. Recently Phil Coulter recorded it and the melody still haunted and touched me. Thanks to your database I now have the correct title "No Man's Land", and the words to this haunting melody of the oft futility of war and young lives wasted on foreign soil.


21 Mar 98 - 09:24 AM (#24248)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: KickyC

I have worked with, and still do, many wonderful children of migrant farm laborers, and Woody Guthrie's "Deportees" says it all. It's in the database.


21 Mar 98 - 02:42 PM (#24270)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: leprechaun

My brother and I were discussing this thread on St. Patrick's Day. He noted that songs can move us for different and personal reasons. We often listen to Bing Crosby singing "The Same Old Shillelagh," a whimsical song which was never intended to be lacrimose. But that song moves us because my father did bring a shillelagh from Ireland, and as fine a war club you never saw. He did carry it on St. Patrick's Day and twirl it 'round his mitt. And divil a man was prouder than he as he walked with it in his hand. There are several other lines in that song that apply to my dad, my brother and me, though my dad never used the shillelagh on us to make us understand. He was nearly seventy when he realized his lifelong dream of going to Ireland, a journey he completed to honor his own father. And now that he's gone, his shillelagh is a family heirloom.


22 Mar 98 - 01:02 PM (#24331)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Dan Keding

Several songs come to mind that have moved me.In live performance I remember two incidents the best. Both happened about twenty years ago, both happened in Madison, WI. The first was at a small coffeehouse where the great ballad singer Louis Killen was performing. He sang a long ballad called "The Flying Cloud". It was brilliant. The other was at a folk bar concert with Eric Bogle where he sang "Scraps of Paper". Both performances were stunning. A good story does it for me every time.


22 Mar 98 - 04:48 PM (#24346)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Helen

Another singer/songwriter worth checking out is an Australian Aboriginal called Archie Roach. His song called "They Took the Children Away" is very topical at the moment here in Australia because the forcible removal fo Aboriginal children from their families "for their own good" was happening here until only a few decades ago. There is a big debate going on about whether the Australian government should make a formal apology to the Aboriginal people, but being politicians, they are afraidnthat saying sorry means that they will get lots of law suits and it will mean paying out a huge compensation bill. So "sorry" is the hardest word for the government to say.

I found this at the All Music Guide site http://205.186.189.2/cg/amg.exe

Archie Roach

More than anything else, the music of Archie Roach is that of a man who refuses to be a victim. An Australian aborigine, Roach was forcibly adopted at the age of three and lodged with a White family as part of an assimilation project. Told that his parents had perished in a fire, Roach only discovered as a teenager that his parents had not died at that time, but had until very recently been alive. Crushed by the news, Roach descended into alcoholism and spent most of the next ten years living as a vagrant. Playing the guitar was at first simply a way for Roach to earn money for alcohol, but as time went on, he began to play for pleasure, and then as a way of staying off alcohol. Roach's music, like that of fellow adoptee Kev Carmody, is an angry exploration of what it means to be a dispossessed minority in Australia. Roach's message is not wholly negative, however; he has spent much time writing songs to alert aborigines to the dangers of alcohol and sexually transmitted diseases. His first two albums are Charcoal Lane and Jamu Dreaming. -- Leon Jackson 1992 Charcoal Lane Hightone 1993 Jamu Dreaming Hightone 1997 Looking for Butter Boy Hightone


23 Mar 98 - 06:25 AM (#24392)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Frank in the swamps

Helen, I heard a review of Archie Roach on public radio here in the States one time, they played an exerpt from a song about being a street wino. I kept a lookout for a recording, but eventually it slipped from my ever slipping memory. Thanks for the reminder. We had an incident here in Florida a few years ago. One of the children raised by a couple of "loving, white, christian missionaries" ended up raping & strangling a young woman here. His natural mother managed to scrape up the funds to appear at his trial and appeal for mercy, his adoptive parents apparently couldn't be bothered. I believe he got the chair (it's a death penalty state, as I type this we are one hour away from another execution). At the time I was hopping mad, I wanted to send him back to Australia with an M-16. Sort of a "You made him, you deal with him" response.

Anyway, this all brought me around to an Australian convict song I heard way back, and don't remember very well. I think it was called "Moreton bay". It was a song that made me sad & angry at brute government policies.

Frank I.T.S.

P.S. I'm glad we didn't send the killer back, sometimes I just lose my temper.


23 Mar 98 - 07:35 AM (#24395)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Helen

Frank,

I wished that they had sent him back here to give him a second chance at life, or even to give him a chance to tell his story to the government.

The Moreton Bay song is in the DT database. It's sung to the tune of Boulavogue, an old Irish tune. It was written by a convict called Frank McNamara, aka "Frank the Poet". He spent some time here in the penal settlement that was in Newcastle, New South Wales, where I live. Some of the convicts had to carry the coal from the coal mines out through the surf to the ships, and if they were sick or dying they just got carried off by the waves. It was less than 200 years ago, just recent history really.

There are also a lot of tunnels under the older part of the city, which was built on a hill. The tunnels were originally the coal mines, but they were later used in WWII by the soldiers, so we are walking around above our history without thinking about it most of the time.

Helen


23 Mar 98 - 11:04 AM (#24406)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Gregory K. from a distance

Hi Buck, Are you sure? I saw it in a tune-book and it was called "Green fields of France", really... ;-) By the way, the begining goes this way:

Well, how do you do young Willie McBride, Do you mind if I sit here down by your graveside And rest for a while 'neath warm Summer Sun I've been working all day and I'm nearly down... (I see by your gravestone you were only 16 when you joined the great fallen in 1916...)

Are we talking about the same song?

Sincerelly: Greg


23 Mar 98 - 11:05 AM (#24407)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Gregory K. from a distance

Hi Buck, Are you sure? I saw it in a tune-book and it was called "Green fields of France", really... ;-) By the way, the begining goes this way:

Well, how do you do young Willie McBride, Do you mind if I sit here down by your graveside And rest for a while 'neath the warm Summer Sun I've been working all day and I'm nearly down... (I see by your gravestone you were only 16 when you joined the great fallen in 1916...)

Are we talking about the same song?

Sincerelly: Greg (BTW.: I like this song.)


09 Mar 99 - 10:20 AM (#62073)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: matt

I took my dad to see Bob Dylan. An old hippie, he was a pretty happy puppy. We had front row seats, and during the "watchtower" I looked back to find him sitting in his seat, with his eyes closed, as he had done for much of the concert. When I asked him why his eyes were closed, he said that to see Dylan again was something that he had never thought we would do -- and that he was savouring the moment. Whenever I hear the "watchtower" I can still see my dad -- sitting their with his eyes closed, in the best seat in the house, seeing more than anyone could ever know.


09 Mar 99 - 10:41 AM (#62075)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: BeesWing

Kiri's Piano by James Keelaghan It's a song about the unjust interment of Canadian citizens of Japanese origin. (Pearl Harbour fallout). This song is found on James' MY SKIES album.


09 Mar 99 - 11:55 AM (#62079)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Rick Fielding

Wow, just reading this thread reminds me why I let folk music (and it's people) take over my life so many years ago. Many of the songs mentioned meant SO much much to me at various times in my life. I'm struck by just how spot-on Ewan MacColl was in his songwriting..and Eric Bogle...what a legacy these and others leave us. I've been trying to think of the ONE song I could add to the list and it's absolutely impossible! Two moments (in a lifetime of special moments) come to mind though. At a mariposa Festival in 1967 at about 11pm, under the stars near Orillia Ontario, the Rev. Gary Davis sang "Death Don't Have No Mercy",.....and I have no words to describe it. A few years later at Massey Hall Cat Stevens (an astonishly original artist) sang "King of Trees", and once again I knew why I had chosen the path I did.


09 Mar 99 - 04:21 PM (#62112)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: jets

when a boy I learned La Paloma on the accordion.I never knew the lyrics for 40 yrs but just the melody pulled me Mother said that she always knew when I was about to look for a ship and go off to sea again.You always went up stairs and would play La Paloma over and over and then you woud be gone ,off to sea again.I only knew the song as The sailors song.After finding the words I understood why but the music alone conveyed the sentiment of the song. On a more recent note Eric Bogl's Now I am resting Easy and especialy that line about having his aons buried on the Burma Railway realy get me.


09 Mar 99 - 04:46 PM (#62118)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Liam's Brother

There are some great songs mentioned above and I'd have to cast a vote for a few of them. I first heard "The Flying Cloud" sung by Ewan MacColl about 1962. I learned it the same day. It is, in my estimation one of the very finest of all broadside ballads. Lou Killen's version comes from Ewan, by the way. Many other of Ewan's composed songs such as "The Shoals of Herring," "Dirty Old Town," "My Old Man" and "Sweet Thames Flow Softly."

Speaking of Lou, his rendition of "When Fortune Turns The Wheel" is simply sublime. He is a great singer held almost universally in the highest regard.

I always loved The Battlefields rendition of "It Was All For Our Rightful King" on their first, splendid self-titled Topic LP.

There is a great tenor by the name of Joe "Banjo" Burke. Banjo is "World Famous in the Pubs of New York" and the finest "unknown" singer I've ever heard. His version of the ballad of "Bagnall Harvey," the Protestant landowner who risked and gave up everything in the 1798 Rebellion is incredibly moving. I've been listening to him sing it for 25 years.

Frank Harte recorded "Bagnall Harvey" last year on his 1798 CD and did a very nice job. There is another remarkable, moving song on that recording, "Bodenstown Churchyard," written about Wolfe Tone. Arguably Frank's best performance ever.

"Edward Connors" the emigration song on "Farewell to Eirinn" by Keane & Faulkner is astounding.

I can't spell the Gaelic title but I can say it... the translation is "The Old Brown Cow"... On the first first Moloney, O'Connell & Keane recording, it is one of the most touching. Out of poverty, the farmer has to sell his faithful old brown cow... what is the future for either of them after that? Break my bloody heart!

Of songs I sing myself, I would single out "Pat Maguire" which always raises bumps on my back, "The Leaving of Liverpool" collected by our friend Bill Doerflinger and "The Shady Woods of Trugh."

All the best,
Dan


09 Mar 99 - 04:58 PM (#62121)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Liam's Brother

Lest I be seen as entirely ethnocentric, I should add that I heard Robert Pete Williams sing "Levee Camp Blues" at the Berkley Folk Festival in 1966 and it continues to electrify me. I should add too just about anything by Robert Johnson and Johnny Shines.


09 Mar 99 - 08:08 PM (#62139)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Terry

"The Year of the Drum" is a very moving song about the losses an Australian family and town suffered in the 1914-1918 War. I heard that during both World Wars, this one small town lost more men (percentage-wise) than any other area in the world! No matter how many times I hear it, I'm sobbing by the fourth verse in which the soldier leaving to fight in WWII says good-bye to his wife, who lost both of her parents in the previous war. I forget who wrote the song but Martin Wyndham-Reed recorded it.

Martin also sings another moving song called "Past Caring" about a farm family's hardships. Every verse ends with the singer's strident assertion that he is past caring -- except for the last, when he prays that he will someday become past caring. That last verse always does me in. Again, I don't know who wrote it or if Martin recorded it. If anyone does know of a recording, I'd appreciate you pointing me in its direction.

Thanks, Terry


09 Mar 99 - 09:01 PM (#62149)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Ronn

"Tomorrow Lies In The Cradle" by Fred Hellerman. The film "Wasnt That A Time" was shown as a public TV fundraiser the night after my son was born, and I was stunned.

"Witness To Joy" by Vance Gilbert (a duet sung with Patti of Tuck and...), although the words didnt strike me until about the third listening because their singing was so amazing.

"Teenie Weenie Meanie" by Reverend Billy C Wirtz. I never actually fell down laughing until I heard this the first time. (Nothing was said about IN WHAT WAY we were moved.)


09 Mar 99 - 10:07 PM (#62161)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Barbara Shaw

Last summer at a festival in Vermont, we had just finished a jam at our campsite and decided to take one last walk around to see what else was going on. A few aisles away, there was a lone guy with a guitar and a pretty good crowd of young people milling about quietly.

The guy started singing "Let Me Walk Lord By Your Side" (a Carter Stanley song) into the still night silence (about 3:00 am). Gradually voices joined him in harmony, softly, and then with more and more passion and volume. By the end of the song, the field was ringing with what seemed like 1000 voices and 1000 different harmonies. A truly moving, epiphanal experience.


09 Mar 99 - 10:38 PM (#62164)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Sandy Paton

Ewan MacColl's "Springhill Mine Disaster" (We'll live on songs and hope instead!). Bob Coltman's "Weaver's Reverie." Gordon Bok's "Mrs. MacDonald's Lament" (still, to my mind, one of his best songs) and "Turning Toward the Morning." If "Peter Kagan and the Wind" can be considered a song, throw that one in, too. I can still get choked up when "Down through the smoking seas she comes, over the side of the boat she comes, laughing, to his arms."

And so many more! I have to agree with Rick Fielding's observation above. You're right, Rick. We made a good choice!


09 Mar 99 - 11:56 PM (#62175)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: DonMeixner

I am often moved by songs.

Reedy River and Do You Think That I Do Not Know by Henry Lawson, Outward Bound and About the Children by Tom Paxton, When I'm Gone by Phil Ochs, Lies, William of Orange, and Last Watch on the Midlands by Stan Rogers and a million more... I'll be Seeing You, Hard Times, My Old Man, Childs song, all these move me to tears.

But I gotta say, Butterfly Kisses moves me to the bathroom, that song would bolt a buzzard off a gut wagon. (About as strong an opinion as I'm likely to express)

Don


10 Mar 99 - 01:23 AM (#62190)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Lonesome EJ

Great thread. I find all of the best music moving, but some of my favorites(and an eclectic batch it is)The Fireside Largo from Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. It is a Thanksgiving tradition in my family to play the Four Seasons as we relax after dinner.I don't know if it's the memories of all the other Thanksgivings that flood back, or the exquisite note of beauty and longing in this piece, but I get tears in my eyes every time I hear it."The Healing has Begun" by Van Morrison.I feel healed listening to it."Sleepless Nights" by the Louvin Brothers. My favorite version is by Gram Parsons and Emmy Lou. I am also quite partial to Dusty Springfield singing "The Look of Love." And old Hank Williams singing "I'm so Lonesome I could Cry."


10 Mar 99 - 01:24 AM (#62191)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: ddw in windsor

the list could go on all night, but Phil Ochs's Crucifixion, Ralph McTell's Streets of London, and of Eric Bogle's WWI tunes or Billy Bragg's Picadilly Rambler are sure bets to set me off. Followed closely, of course, by civil war tunes like All Quiet Along The Potomac Tonight or Two Brothers or The First Battalion. All of which take weeks of practise before I can sing them in public without choking up.

Just as an aside, am I wandering into the twilight zone here, or is there something weird about the dates on this thread. Most of the postings are dated from March 198. Say what?!

Nice thread... some good tho'ts ...

ddw


10 Mar 99 - 01:55 AM (#62192)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: j0_77

Uncle Dave - any song welll nearly - I fell over the first time I heard him singing about a guy who got a job holding a cow for a butcher. I laughed all that week every time I imagined what the song described.


10 Mar 99 - 02:01 AM (#62193)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: catspaw49

What a thread. But isn't that what the music is about to begin with? I've read this thing three times and am amazed at the quantity and quality. Songs move us in every emotional way; joy, sadness, new love, old love, lost love, hope and hopelessness.......and on and on. I've seen songs about emmigration here covering both the loss and mourning for the old and the thrill of the new. Traditional ballads with the never changing sentiments, as alive today as ever. When you begin to see them all together like this...just amazing.

But sometimes we're moved by the combination of artist and song. It may be hackneyed and worn, but the last time I heard Peter Yarrow explain that "Puff" was about the loss of innocense and then sing it...sorry folks, it gets me. I was one of many on a weekend program at the Hindman Settlement School, but Jean Ritchie was the main feature. I've always loved her songs and that natural mountain voice that the whole family seems to share. As night fell and I listened to "Dear Companion" for the umpteen hundredth time in my life, it sounded new and beautiful and fresh as only Jean could make it.

Sometimes it's also about who we're with and where. In another thread, I told of being young and sitting up on Clingman's Dome with five good friends, listening to the snowmelt, picking and singing a bit of everything as the night passed. And the mountain songs brought me to one of those not to be forgotten moments. Now the lyrics to "Bob Dylan's Dream" are too much for me to get through.

What of the newer and composed pieces...sometimes we hear a song for years and one day it just hits us. During the past several years, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune" has become a certain favorite. Also "Prayer in Open D" is one of the few songs recently written which speaks well to taking responsibility for our actions...an all too rare commodity in this age. Tom Paxton has given us so many, but I've always enjoyed his humorous side too... Like the same guy wrote "Last Thing on My Mind" and "I Thought You Were an Arab." One makes me pensive, the other just cracks me up...and they're both favorites.

Plus so much of Woody's stuff that speaks as well today as ever, such as "I Ain't Got No Home" or to a lesser degree, "Plane Wreck at Los Gatos." And going back a few more years, Foster's "Hard Times" seems to have been rediscovered as well it should.

I gotta' stop...this could go on all night and tomorrow too. It's the music, that's the thing though. Let me end (I can hear the cheers) with something from a well known 'Catter that really struck me. The thread was on fifty songs everyone should know, remember? Frank McGrath said it would be great if everyone just new at least fifty songs, didn't matter what. Great thought!!!

catspaw


10 Mar 99 - 02:31 AM (#62197)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: --seed

I'm glad someone revived this thread. Most of it was before I found the 'cat. Sheye, I agree about the early Kristofferson stuff: I love "Jodie and the Kid" and "When I Loved Her," plus the Bobby Bare song he does on that album, "It's Hard to Be a Christian Soldier." Reba McEntire has moved me with several of her songs, notably "Whoever's in New England" and "Somebody Should Leave." Kenny Rogers came out with his odious "The Unknown Love" at the same time as Reba's "Whoever's in New England" was on the country playlists...what a range of expression there is in country music. A couple of weeks ago I heard Bob Bossin, from Vancouver Island, B.C., sing his song to an unplanned child--"Lily"--written before Bob and his wife learned the child was going to be a boy. Anyway, an incredible song, not yet released (he was live on KPFA). And just to show the range of what moves me: "Puttin' on the Ritz" as sung by Dr. Frankenstein and the monster in Young Frankenstein. --seed


10 Mar 99 - 10:44 AM (#62230)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Neil Lowe (inactive)

"Steals Of The White Man" and a song I've only heard a few times and don't know the name of, a real country twanger sung by (I think) Linda Rondstat, the refrain being "...and I'm all strung out on heroin on the south side of town."


10 Mar 99 - 11:03 AM (#62234)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Ferrara

An awful lot of my choices have been mentioned here so I'm not going to list any songs, I'll just say that music keeps us from being the (adding) machines that our current culture encourages us to be.

I've heard Helen Schneyer sing "There is a Fountain Filled with Blood," and it was moving, and it was wonderful because Helen is a truly great singer. But it was still more moving, and somehow stronger and more militant at the same time, when Charlie Baum sang it late one night at the FSGW Getaway.


10 Mar 99 - 11:46 AM (#62239)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Lonesome EJ

Neil, the line you mention is from a Warren Zevon-penned song, it's called "Carmelita".

I hear mariachi static on my radio

and the tubes they glow in the dark

and i'm there with her in Ensenada

and i'm here in Echo Park

Carmelita, hold me tighter,I think I'm sinking down and I'm all strung out on heroin on the outskirts of town

well i'm sitting here playing solitaire

with my pearl- handled deck

the county won't give me no more methadone

they cut off your welfare check

Carmelita etc

I pawned my Smith-Corona

and I went to see my man

He hangs out down on Alvarado street

By the Pioneer Chicken stand

Carmelita etc.

Regards,LEJ


10 Mar 99 - 12:00 PM (#62241)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Neil Lowe (inactive)

Thanks, Lonesome. A real tear-jerker, ain't it ? And by the way, I agree with you about the William's tune - I didn't mention it because you had already. Thanks again.


10 Mar 99 - 06:34 PM (#62299)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Kernow John

I had the pleasure of starting this thread almost a year ago and still read through on occasion. The breadth of choices is astounding. But best of all is when you go and look up someone elses list and discover a song new to you that affects you in the same way.
By the way I read a saying the other day (supposedly from Africa) it went "when an old person dies it's like losing a library", perhaps Mudcat with its threads and database prevents the same being said of old folkies.

regards Baz


29 Jan 06 - 09:03 PM (#1657631)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: GUEST

uhh . . . believe from the polar express, walking in memphis (i heard it on the x-files) by lonestar, do you hear what I hear, bury my heart at wounded knee, seasons of love(525 600 minutes) and one song glory


30 Jan 06 - 02:06 PM (#1657943)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: GUEST

Glad to see this revived again.

I'd like to add several songs recorded by James King:

"Roy Lee" written by Mel Besher and Billy Smith
"Here Today and Gone Tomorrow" written by Gaskin Castle

Jerusalem Tomorrow written by David Olney and also recorded by James King and Emmylou Harris


24 Nov 09 - 09:22 AM (#2772550)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: GlasgowCeltic88

Hmm, a song that moves me...

It's a toss-up between;

Phil Coulter ~ The Star of The Sea
and
Phil Coulter ~ Grace

The first song deals with the death of Phil Coulter's brother, Brian, who was tragically drowned in Lough Swilly, Co. Donegal, in 1984.

The second song is about Grace Plunkett, nee Gifford, who married her childhood sweetheart, Joseph Mary Plunkett, on the night of 3rd May in the chapel of Kilmainham Jail, only a few hours before he was executed by firing squad, at 0430 on the morning of 4th May for his part in the Easter Rising during Easter week in Dublin 1916.

Both of these will bring a tear to my eye...

Slán,

GC88


24 Nov 09 - 09:36 AM (#2772559)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: GUEST,Mad Spaniel

Drift by Show of hands


24 Nov 09 - 09:52 AM (#2772568)
Subject: RE: A Song That Moved You?
From: Lizzie Cornish 1

'When I Cannot Sleep At Night' by Bruce Murdoch, from his beautiful CD 'Matters of the Heart'. You can hear it on the link below:

Bruce's Myspace

Bruce's Main Site


'When I Cannot Sleep at Night' by Bruce Murdoch

"When I cannot sleep at night
And I have these thoughts of you
When I'm blinded by the light
And by the darkness too
When the world is upside down
And everything is strange
I want to take an Appaloosa, baby
And ride out in the rain
When I cannot sleep at night

When the fates turn on a dime
I hope you understand
I could face the end of time
If I knew you'd hold my hand
Like sailing ships adrift
Upon a raging sea
They're in the arms of Neptune baby
But it's up to you and me
When the fates turn on a dime

When the words get in the way
And my soul feels all undone
When I don't know what to say
Not to God or anyone
I turn my head up to the sky
And stare at outer space
It's then I'd trade the universe
Just to touch your face
When the words get in the way"



That last verse, reaches home, every time.