To Thread - Forum Home

The Mudcat Café TM
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46426
18 messages

Origins: Crockery Ware

12 Apr 02 - 12:30 PM (#688607)
Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: CROCKERY WARE (from Hammond-Gardiner
From: DMcG

I posted this to another thread and then released I had breached etiquette both both hiding the song so people couldn't find it easily and by creeping that there thread. As punishement I have had to type all the blumming line breaks again

The Crockery Ware - from Marrowbones (Hammond and Gardiner Manuscripts)
Gardiner H.240/H.605. Isaac Hobbes, Micheldever Hants, May 1906

CROCKERY WARE

In Mansfield town there lived a spark
He courted a girl both gay and smart
He asked of her one favour right
If he could sleep with her that night

To my right-fol-lol-lol-lol-liddle-lol-the-day
Right-fol-lol-lol-liddle-lol-the-day

Now this young girl she did contrive
How to fix a joke that night
So on the landing placed a chair
And on it place the crockery ware

This young man rose in the middle of the night
Thinking to find his hearts delight
He banged his shins against the chair
And upset the old woman's crockery ware

The old woman arose in a terrible fright
And loudly she did call for a light
Says she "Young man, how came you here
Capsizing of my crockery ware?"

Miss Betsy lay in the very next room
A-laughing at the game going on
Says she "Young man.I do declare
You must pay my mother for the crockery ware"

The bobby was sent for without delay
The money down I had to pay
I paid three shillings, I do declare
To buy the old woman some crockery ware

Come all you wild and rambling sparks
That loves to ramble in the dark
Don't bang your shins against a chair
Or upset the old woman's crockery ware

Here's the ABC. I don't know if I've put breaks in all the required places, so could some expert clean it up if necessary?

X:1
T:Crockery Ware
I:Gardiner H.240/H.605. Isaac Hobbes, Micheldever Hants, May 1906
Q:1/4=120
V:1
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:F
A3/2E/ |FD D/E/F EC C3/2C/ |FF/F/ F/G/A AG G3/2G/ |AA/B/ cA/G/ FD D3/2D/ | BA GF EG cA/G/ |FD/D/ DF/F/ DC C2 |FF/F/ Gc/B/ AG F2 |]


12 Apr 02 - 12:39 PM (#688614)
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Crockery Ware
From: DMcG

The two ABC players I have disagree about the speed of this - one plays it about half the speed it should be. Keep it fairly fast, there, folks


12 Apr 02 - 12:46 PM (#688618)
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Crockery Ware
From: MMario

There are also three versions in the DT which can be found by searching on "crockery ware"


12 Apr 02 - 12:54 PM (#688624)
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Crockery Ware
From: Fortunato

You'd think I'd remember to search by now...


12 Apr 02 - 03:20 PM (#688714)
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Crockery Ware
From: Mrrzy

I am reminded of something with "fine costly ware-O" - not the same song, but there is a sailor in it... thread creep, anybody know what I'm thinking?


12 Apr 02 - 03:27 PM (#688720)
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Crockery Ware
From: MMario

'Maid on the shore' - "she robbed them of silver she robbed them of gold - she robbed them of cost-ly wares-oh!"


12 Apr 02 - 09:32 PM (#688910)
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Crockery Ware
From: GUEST,Pavane

Nic Jones recorded this one as well


15 Jul 17 - 12:21 AM (#3866188)
Subject: Lyr Add: THE CROCKERY WARE (trad. Isle of Wight)
From: Jim Dixon

Another version, from A Dictionary of the Isle of Wight Dialect by William Henry Long (London: Reeves & Turner, 1886), p. 163:

THE CROCKERY WARE.

In London town once dwelt a spark,
Who courted a girl both gay and smart;
One night her company he did crave,
And at the last she gave him leave.

Whack fol lol the diddle lol the day,
Fol lol the ri de o.

Miss Kitty began for to contrive
How she her sweetheart might deceive;
In the middle of the room she placed a chair,
And loaded it with crockery ware.

Whack fol lol the diddle lol the day, &c.

This young man rose in the middle of the night,
Thinking to go to his heart's delight,
But he missed his way, I do declare,
And fell right over the crockery ware.

Whack fol lol, &c.

Her mother arose in a terrible fright,
And called out loudly for a light;
Said she, " Young man, how came you here,
A breaking of my crockery ware?"

Whack fol lol, &c.

"Old girl," said he, " don't be surprised,
For I had great reason for to rise;
But I missed my way I do declare,
And I've broke my shins with your crockery ware.

Whack fol lol, &c.

Miss Kitty lay laughing at the fun,
And seeing how the joke was carried on,
"If you missed your way, I do declare,
You must pay my mother for the crockery ware."

Whack fol lol, &c.

Now all you gay young rambling sparks,
That love to ramble in the dark,
If you miss your way, I do declare,
You'll have to pay for the crockery ware.

Whack fol lol, &c.


15 Jul 17 - 07:27 AM (#3866219)
Subject: Lyr Add: CROCKERY WARE (Bodleian)
From: Jim Dixon

From a broadside in the Bodleian collection: Roud number 1490:


CROCKERY WARE.

In Belfast town there lived a lad;
He courted a lass both fine and gay.
One favor of her he did crave:
He asked and she gave him leave.

Pretty Polly went home for to contrive
How she might plan this joke at night:
In the middle of the room she set a chair
And on it fixed some crockery ware.

[The] young man 'rose in the middle of the night
Thinking to go to his heart's delight,
But he missed his way, I do declare,
And broke his shins o'er the crockery ware.

Her old mother rose in a terrible fright
And loudly called for a light.
"You rogue!" says she. "What brought you here?
For you have broke my crockery ware."

Pretty Polly lay laughing at the fun
To think how well this joke was done.
"You rogue!" says she. "What brought you here?
Come and pay my mother for her crockery ware."

Come all you wild and rambling sparks
That love to ramble in the dark.
You will miss your way, I do declare,
And break your shins o'er the crockery ware.


15 Jul 17 - 04:11 PM (#3866289)
Subject: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Joe Offer

Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

Crockery Ware

DESCRIPTION: A merchant wants to lay with a girl one night. She puts dishes on a chair near her bed. In the dark he breaks the dishes and chair and wakes her mother. She calls the police and he has to pay for the crockery ware and broken chair.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1930 (Wiltshire-WSRO)
KEYWORDS: sex trick bawdy humorous mother rake nightvisit courting lover police
FOUND IN: Britain(England(South)) Canada(Mar,Newf,Ont) US(MW)
REFERENCES (8 citations):
Wiltshire-WSRO Mi 679, "Pretty Polly and Her Crockery Ware" (1 text)
Palmer-ECS, #66, "The Crockery Ware" (1 text, 1 tune)
Peacock, pp. 257-258, "Crockery Ware" (1 text, 1 tune)
Leach-Labrador 119, "Old Woman" (1 text, 1 tune)
Ives-DullCare, pp. 129-130,243-244, "The Crockery Ware" (1 text, 1 tune)
Fowke-Ontario 11, "A Young Man Lived in Belfast Town" (1 text, 1 tune)
Grimes, pp. 138-139, "Crockery Ware" (1 text)
DT, CROCKWAR CROCKRY*

Roud #1490
RECORDINGS:
O. J. Abbott, "A Young Man Lived in Belfast Town" (on Abbott1)
Everett Bennett, "Crockery Ware" (on PeacockCDROM)

BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, Harding B 28(37), "Crockery Ware," unknown, n.d.
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "The Frolicksome Farmer" (theme: the hazards of sex in the dark)
NOTES: At least one source claims that the Crockery Ware wasn't just random pottery but the chamber pot. Not sure I believe it; that sounds awfully messy. - RBW
Last updated in version 3.7
File: Pea257

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Up top, MMario says there are three versions in the Digital Tradition, but I find only two. Maybe one was a duplicate that was removed. This first DT version was submitted by AG. Who's that? It was added to the DT in October 1997. Can anybody figure out the source for this version?

THE CROCKERY-WARE

In Nottingham Town there lived a spark,
He courted a girl both gay and smart,
He asked of her one favour right,
If he could sleep with her that night.

To me wop fol the diddle fol the di do day,
Wop fol the diddle fol the di do day.

Now this young girl she did contrive,
How to work a joke that night,
So on the landing she placed a chair,
And on it she put the crockery-ware.

This young man rose in the middle of the night,
Thinking to find his hearts delight,
He banged his shins against the chair,
And overturned the crockery-ware.

The old woman woke in a hell of a fright,
And quickly she turned on the light,
She said young man what do you do there,
Capsising of my crockery-ware.

Young Betsy lay in the very next room,
Laughing at the joke going on,
She said young man you must take care,
You must pay my granny for the crockery-ware.

Well the police were called for without delay,
The money down I had to pay,
I paid three shillings I do declare,
To buy the old bugger a new crockery-ware.

And if you hadn't guessed the Crockery-Ware refered to is the
chamber pot. AG

Trad: English (Derbyshire ?)
Performance & Recording:
Harry Boardman
@seduction @trick
filename[ CROCKRY
TUNE FILE: CROCKRY
CLICK TO PLAY
AG
oct97




This second DT version was submitted by Susan Friedman. It's from the Folk-Legacy recording by Margaret Christl.

CROCKERY WARE 2

In Bristol did a merchant dwell
He courted a girl and he loved her well
And all he craved in his delight
Was to lay with her one night

To me rye whack fol the diddle I gee oh
To me rye whack fol the diddle I gee oh

As this young maid on her bed she lay
A-thinking on the tricks on him she'd play
And in his way she put a chair
And on the chair placed crockery ware

As this young man come in the dark
A-thinking to find his own sweetheart
He hit his toe against a chair
Upsetting all of the crockery ware

The old woman ran downstairs in a fright
And there she called for a light
She said, "you villain, what brought you here
A-breaking all of the crockery ware?"

He said, "Old woman don't look so cross
I missed my way and I fear I'm lost
I missed my way and I do declare
I broke me shin on your crockery ware"

As this young maid on her bed she lay
A-laughing at the tricks on him she played
She said, "Young man, don't look so queer
And pay me mother for the crockery ware"

The police were sent for right away
And, sure enough, I had to pay
A dollar for the broken chair
And one pound ten for her crockery ware

So come all you rakes and rambling sports
That goes a courting in the dark
Don't hit your toe against a chair
Or else you'll suffer for your crockery ware.

@courtship @nightvisit @trick
recorded by Margaret Christl, Folk Legacy
filename[ CROCKRY2
SOF


YouTube has lots of interesting recordings. Here's a link: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=crockery+ware


15 Jul 17 - 05:23 PM (#3866298)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Jim Dixon

Well, I guess I can beat the "earliest version" that the Traditional Ballad Index knows about. I'll send them an email. I've done this several times before and they're always glad to get news of recently-discovered older versions.


15 Jul 17 - 10:38 PM (#3866336)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: GUEST,Julia L

Two versions here in Maine


15 Jul 17 - 11:17 PM (#3866340)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Joe Offer

In the first message above, DMcG posted lyrics he found in Marrowbones (Hammond and Gardiner Manuscripts). Frank Purslow edited Marrowbones and three other books of songs from the Hammond and Gardiner Manuscripts, and those four books have been revised by Malcolm Douglas and Steve Gardham. Seems like a good time for the Traditional Ballad Index to include these four books (Constant Lovers and The Foggy Dew were recently released by Francis Boutle Publishers as a single volume, titled Southern Harvest).
The Ballad Index does have The Everlasting Circle, (1960) [James Reeves, editor] with this explanation: NOTE: Reeves-Circle has 142 numbered and 4 unnumbered dated S. Baring-Gould, H.E.D. Hammond and George B. Gardiner manuscripts.. Does that mean that the Reeves book contains all of the songs found in the four Purslow volumes?
-Joe-


16 Jul 17 - 01:49 AM (#3866343)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Reinhard

No, since the four Purslow volumes have a bit more, comprising 356 songs.

Frank Purslow index
James Reeves index


16 Jul 17 - 03:30 PM (#3866433)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Steve Gardham

Reeves' 2 books, E Circle and Idiom utilise the manuscripts as do the Purslow books but are certainly not exhaustive. However the manuscripts that survive are all on the EFDSS website under what was 'The Full English' archive.


16 Jul 17 - 06:29 PM (#3866456)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Steve Gardham

BTW many thanks to Jim for flagging up the Isle of Wight book. A very interesting tome I didn't have in my collection. One or two not so common songs in there. I couldn't get it from the site Jim gives a link to but just by Googling I found a free copy at Bartiesworld.co.uk.


17 Jul 17 - 03:36 AM (#3866486)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Reinhard

Isle of Wight natives, The Dollymopps did a very nice CD, Long Songs, in 2011 with songs from W.H. Long's Isle of Wight book.

Thanks for the link to the book, Steve.


17 Jul 17 - 09:28 AM (#3866576)
Subject: RE: Origins: Crockery Ware
From: Steve Gardham

I came across the Dollymops when I was researching for the new editions of the Purslow books. I quoted some of their tracks in the notes at the back if I remember rightly.