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BS: Korean neighbors

19 Jul 04 - 08:58 PM (#1229428)
Subject: BS: Korean neighbors
From: kendall

I have two neighbors across the street. They are from Korea.An old woman and her daughter. Yesterday, the young lady came to ask for some oil for her lawn mower. I gave her some. Later she said it would not start, so I went to see what the problem was.
She had poured about a pint into the carburetor, and it was impossible to turn the engine over. I removed the plug, gave it a few yanks of the cord, turned it up on its side and let the oil run out. Then it started. She insisted on mowing my lawn, so I bought her a new air filter (hers was soaked in filthy oil) and her Mother, who speaks no English, had a hard time with my refusal to take payment. We all gestured and tried to communicate, clearly they had to get even, so I said "Ok, make me some Kim Chi". Their eyes brightened up and the girl asked "You like Kim Chi"? I said "I don't know, but I'd like to try it."
The bargain was struck. I do like win win situations.
Now, a question, will a New Englander like Kim Chi? What the hell is it anyway? fermented cabbage?


19 Jul 04 - 09:04 PM (#1229436)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Bill Hahn//\\

Wonderful---and spicy as hell. You will love it. I hope. Eat it sparingly as an appetizer.


Bill Hahn


19 Jul 04 - 09:06 PM (#1229441)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Bill Hahn//\\

By the way----what a great story. There is a wonderful tradition of reciprocity in the Asian culture.   Kim Chi for Oil---sure beats other options.

Bill Hahn


19 Jul 04 - 09:13 PM (#1229448)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Peace

Kim Chi is a fermented cabbage. Layer of salt, layer of cabbage (bok choy), layer of salt, layer of cabbage, etc. Let sit until cabbage gets wilted. Takes 10 hours or so. Rince lots and lots in cold water--to get the salt washed off. Next, add scallions (cut up on a bias), carrot sliced very thin, garlic if you wish and lots of cayenne pepper. Put it in the fridge for a week. Eat.

There are as many kim chis as there are Italian sauces for pasta. Some kim chi isn't that hot (spicy), but some will certainly inspire your taste buds. Some will bring tears to your eyes. It is great with plain rice.

PS First time you make it, get the Korean lady to help you. Be sure to say 'kom say hom nay dah' when you're done. (It means thank you, and the spelling is phonetic.)


19 Jul 04 - 09:14 PM (#1229449)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Peace

Sorry, forgot to mention sesame oil. Not too much--do it to taste.


19 Jul 04 - 09:17 PM (#1229452)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Peace

In ancient times, kimchi was made of greens picked and salt or a salt and alcohol mixture. By the end of Unified Shillan ad the beginning of Koryo, sliced-radish kimchi pickled in brine became popular. Soon thereafter chili was introduced to Korea around 1500 and it was added to make kimchi as well. During the late Choson era, powdered chili, together with chotkal (fish or shellfish paste), bcame the favored ingredients in kimchi. In the southern regions, the chotkal was amde of anchovies, while in the northern regions, croaker and shrimp chotkal were more popular. The climatic differences of each region affected the taste of kimchi as well. In warm places, chotkal andchili poweder were used in abundance so that kimchi could be prevented from going bad. On the other hand, kimchi made in colder areas was less salty and pungent. Today, many firms are mass-producing kimchi.


19 Jul 04 - 09:24 PM (#1229459)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Peace

I took the above from the Internet. As an incidental thing: if you get to know the grandmom, ask her if she makes 'bee-bim-barp'. It is a mostly rice dish with all kinds of vegetables and a sauce in it, often topped with a fried egg. Vegetarian dish, and is it goooooooood!

Korean food gets my attention when I get to Edmonton. There is a restaurant there named The Bul-go-gi House. WOW. That's it for now.


19 Jul 04 - 09:33 PM (#1229468)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Bert

will a New Englander like Kim Chi?... YOU WILL EAT IT AND YOU WILL LIKE IT!!!

Yah Kendall, you're an old softie.


19 Jul 04 - 09:42 PM (#1229472)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Jeri

There's winter kimchee, and summer kimchee. I think the winter stuff is more fermented, but I'm not sure. It really does NOT taste fermented to me. My favorite instant soup these days is a Korean kimchee flavored soup. You can probably boil some Japanese-style noodles in chicken (or other) stock and throw some Kimchee in. You can toss in an egg (out of the shell) and let it cook for extra protein.

I'd guess that they'd go easy on you with the pepper. You done good, by the way. Traditionally, you refuse something 3 times. If they're still insisting after that, you better take it. Wrapped gifts are not opened in the presence of the giver.

Brucie's 'thank you' sounds more like "comm sah-HAM knee dah." I think he's speaking with a southern (US) accent.
If you say "AH-zhee(jee)-mah" aferwards - to the older woman, you get extra "Yankee tries to speak our language" points. It sort of means 'missus' or 'madam'. Younger, or un-married women are 'AAH-gah-shee'. (Don't screw this one up, as men are 'AH-dah-shee'.)

Funny...I can remember how to say "yes," "no," "thank you," and "Happy New Year," but not "hello."


19 Jul 04 - 09:44 PM (#1229474)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Peace

I learned it from a fellow who was in Korea. He was from somewhere south of the MD Line. LOL.


19 Jul 04 - 09:56 PM (#1229480)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Jeri

You'd love Bul-go-gi. Marinated beef cooked on a table-top (or floor-top) grill. You wrap the beef strips up with veggies in a grape leaf and chow-down. Yaki mandu - deep-fried meat dumplings or (can't remember the word for boiled) mandu, both with a sesame oil/vinegar/soy/probably some other stuff I don't know about dipping sauce. My favorite type of kimchee is the cucumber variety, but I haven't seen any of that for sale around here.

I stayed in a hotel in Seoul before I came home the last time. It was their Thanksgiving holiday (4? days) and the restaurant was closed. The local version of the 7-11 was open though, and I lived off sushi and other goodies. I didn't quite have enough courage to buy the Diamond brand almonds with itsy-bitsy whole dried brine shrimp in them.   ("Sea Monkeys Go Nuts"?)


19 Jul 04 - 10:02 PM (#1229485)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Jeri

Brucie, dats funny!

I lived there for a couple of non-consecutive years. I think bbc was there longer, and in one stretch.


19 Jul 04 - 10:19 PM (#1229502)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Rapparee

An-ya-hahsh-an-eeka is phonetic for hello.

I didn't care for home made kimchi, and I'm still not partial to it. But that's my own tastes. I also don't care for nucnam sauce. But again, that's my tastes.

I know a great story about homemade kimchi, but it's not for mixed company. Heck, it's not even for the old men-only smokers!


20 Jul 04 - 07:13 AM (#1229725)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: kendall

Actually, she is going to make it for me. From what I've seen here about their language, she will have to learn English!


20 Jul 04 - 10:01 AM (#1229799)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Rapparee

Or you can learn Japanese. Many Koreans also speak Japanese. And English. I used to speak to a cigarette girl at the NCO Club in French; she was far more fluent that I was.

Smile, say hello, and give 'em a lobster. Cooked would be neighborly, but they are familiar with them marine insects.


20 Jul 04 - 11:36 AM (#1229879)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Jim Dixon

You can buy kimchee in jars in any store that sells imported food, but I think it's commonly homemade by native Koreans. If you like any kind of pickled vegetable, and any kind of spicy food, you will probably like kimchee.


20 Jul 04 - 11:39 AM (#1229884)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Clinton Hammond

So what yer saying Ken...

Is that you'll work for food?

Heh...

(I know -I- sure as hell will!)


20 Jul 04 - 06:51 PM (#1230250)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: GUEST,bbc in Missouri

If it were me, I'd say ko mahp soom ni dah; it's the more polite form. I lived in South Korea for a year & have nothing but respect for the Korean people.

bbc


20 Jul 04 - 08:51 PM (#1230313)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Rapparee

Kendall, remember this: "nay" means "yes".


20 Jul 04 - 08:54 PM (#1230314)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: Bill Hahn//\\

Now if you want a great sesame noodle recipe check the NY Times archives or check with me and I shall---if I can find it from that archive---give it to you. I have made it many times to great delight.

Now--Kim Chi---love that bite


Bill Hahn


20 Jul 04 - 11:11 PM (#1230396)
Subject: RE: BS: Korean neighbors
From: YOR

I've tried it, its ok.

About 10 years ago an ex-neighbor moved about 10 blocks up in the development. The house was previously owned by a Korean family and a bunch of their friends. He had to paint the entire inside of the house, replace the formica countertop and trash a frig that was only a few years old to get rid of the Kim Chi smell. It had soaked into the plastic of the frig and couldn't be cleaned. It was overpowering.