To Thread - Forum Home

The Mudcat Café TM
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9304
65 messages

Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away

23 Feb 99 - 05:45 PM (#59892)
Subject: Lyrics needed:
From: graham@ossen.nrl.navy.mil

at the end of most episodes of "Sharpe's Rifles" there's part of a song being song by Sharpes soldiers with a refrian/chorus of:

Over the hills and far away, For King George commands and we obey, Over the hills and far away

does anyone know the entire lyrics, origins, music of the song?

thanks


23 Feb 99 - 05:59 PM (#59895)
Subject: RE: Lyrics needed:
From: Bruce O.

Song and tune are on my website. Click on 'Recruiting Officer' in title list of Scarce Songs 2 file. www.erols.com/olsonw
TV's theme song for Sharpe's Rifles series. [Pills to Purge Melancholy, 1706, but here from reprint of 1719 edition, V, p. 319.]

The Recruiting Officer: Or, the Merry Volunteers: Being an Excellent New Copy of Verses upon raising Recruits.

To the foregoing Tune. [Over the Hills and far away = Jockey's Lamentation, comm: Jockey met with Jenny fair. Here, tune B360 in file BM3. And JACLP- Jack the Piper in S2.]

Hark! now the Drums beat up again,
For all true Soldiers Gentlemen,
Then let us list, and march I say,
Over the Hills and far away;
   Over the Hills and o'er the Main,
  To Flanders, Portugal and Spain,
  Queen Ann commands, and we'll obey,
  Over the Hills and far away.

All Gentlemen that have a Mind,
To serve the Queen that's good and kind;
Come list and enter into Pay,
Then o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

Here's Forty Shillings on the Drum,
For those that Volunteers do come,
With Shirts, and Cloaths, and present Pay,
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

Hear that brave Boys, and let us go,
Or else we shall be prest you know;
Then list and enter into Pay,
And o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

The Constables they search about,
To find such brisk young Fellows out;
Then let's be Volunteers I say,
Over the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

Since now the French so low are brought,
And Wealth and Honour's to be got,
Who then behind wou'd sneaking stay?
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

No more from sound of Drum retreat,
While Marlborough, and Gallaway beat,*
The French and Spaniards every Day,
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

He that is forc'd to go and fight,
Will never get true Honour by't,
While Volunteers shall win the Day,
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

What tho' our Friends our Absense mourn,
We all with Honour shall return,
And then we'll sing both Night and Day,
Over the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

The[n] Prentice Tom he may refuse,
To wipe his angry Master's Shoes;
For then he's free to sing and play,
Over the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

Over Rivers, Bogs, and Springs,
We all shall live as great as Kings,
And Plunder get both Night and Day,
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

We then shall lead more happy Lives,
By getting rid of Brats and Wives,
That Scold on both Night and Day,
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

Come on then Boys and you shall see,
We every one shall Captains be,
To Whore and rant as well as they,
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

For if we go 'tis one to Ten,
But we return all Gentlemen,
All Gentlemen as well as they,
When o'er the Hills and far away;
  Over the Hills, &c.

* Henry de Massue, French, created Earl of Galway by the English in 1697, reviving extinct title. In 1707 he lost the battle of Almanza. The tune, presumeably Irish, "Lord Gallaway's Lamentation", probably refers to him. [D. O'Sullivan's 'Carolan', II, p. 128-9]

Play: B360- Over the Hills and Far Away Click to play


24 Feb 99 - 03:33 AM (#59962)
Subject: RE: Lyrics needed:
From: Steve Parkes

As a matter of interest, did you know that the sig. tune was recorded by the guy who plays the long-haired ex-poacher crack shot (Daniel??). Can't remember the actor's name, but he's a bona-fide folkie when he's not at work.

Steve


24 Feb 99 - 06:31 AM (#59973)
Subject: RE: Lyrics needed:
From: AndyG

For those interested the definitive pages are The Sharpe Information Pages Where info about the CD can be found:
I quote:
"A Collection of Twenty Songs, Orchestral Themes and Regimental Marches Featuring John Tams (Rifleman Hagman), Dominic Muldowney and the Band of the Light Division"

AndyG


24 Sep 07 - 05:12 AM (#2156134)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Mr Happy

John Tams here:


http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=rcydJjNKfF8


24 Sep 07 - 06:21 PM (#2156598)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Dead Horse

Many verses to this one, some authentic, some cobbled together by Mr Tams et al.
There is also a Scottish version "Twa Recruiting Sergeants" I believe its called.
Worth looking up and comparing.
Probably mentioned on previous threads listed above.


24 Sep 07 - 06:29 PM (#2156603)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Richard Bridge

Fist fights have been known over whether it's Queen Anne or King George though...


24 Sep 07 - 06:32 PM (#2156607)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Dead Horse

Twa Recruiting Sergeants


25 Sep 07 - 03:06 AM (#2156864)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: IanC

Richard

Check in the other threads ... 1706 is a bit early for King George.

:-)


25 Sep 07 - 03:50 AM (#2156874)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Dave Hanson

Martin Carthy sings ' Queen Anne Commands and We Obey '

eric


25 Sep 07 - 05:56 AM (#2156908)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: stallion

That was because the original is from "The Beggars Opera" and that was set, if not written, during the reign of Queen Anne and adapted, probably by Mr Tams, for the prog., or maybe had been "folked" over the years to suit whichever campaign. Ask Mr Tams


25 Sep 07 - 06:38 AM (#2156923)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: IanC

The earliest known printing is in the 1706 edition of D'Urfey's "Pills To Purge Melancholy", though an excerpt of this version is also printed in George Farquhar's play "The Recruiting Officer", also first performed in 1706.

:-)


26 Sep 07 - 07:22 AM (#2157606)
Subject: Lyr Add: OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY (John Tams)
From: Mr Happy

Here's the full John Tams version from 'Sharpe'

Over the hills and far away.

Here's forty shillings on the drum.
To those who'll volunteer to come.
To list and fight the foe today.
Over the hills and far away.

O'er the hills and o'er the Main.
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain.
King George commands and we obey.
Over the hills and far away.


When duty calls me I must go
To stand and face another foe
But a part of me will always stray
Over the hills and far away

O'er the hills and o'er the Main.
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain.
King George commands and we obey.
Over the hills and far away.

If I should fall to rise no more.
As many comrades have before.
Then ask the pipes and drums to play.
Over the hills and far away.

O'er the hills and o'er the Main.
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain.
King George commands and we obey.
Over the hills and far away.

Fall in lads behind the drum
With colours blazing like the sun
Along the road to come what may
Over the hills and far away

O'er the hills and o'er the Main.
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain.
King George commands and we obey.
Over the hills and far away.

O'er the hills and o'er the Main.
Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain.
King George commands and we obey.
Over the hills and far away.


26 Sep 07 - 07:43 AM (#2157618)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST,LTS pretending to work

Put it down to the old tradition of changing the words to fit the era/situation.

I'm pretty sure I read somewhere (maybe on the sleeve notes to the Sharpe music CD?) that Mr Tams "tweaked" a few of the traditional songs to fit the Peninsular War and the Sharpe storylines, but he wouldn't be the first and he's certainly one of the more sympathetic "tweakers".

LTS


27 Sep 07 - 05:48 AM (#2158348)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Fliss

"Can't remember the actor's name, but he's a bona-fide folkie when he's not at work."   

..Steve, think you find that John Tams is at work as a rather special folk artist, its the acting that is the add on extra.

fliss


27 Sep 07 - 03:59 PM (#2158760)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Genie

This is the one song I always ask my audiences NOT to request when I perform.

That is, I tell them, "I'm open to requests as long as you don't request that I sing "Over the Hills And Far Away."

Interesting to know such a song actually exists and to find the words and history of it.

; )

Genie


27 Sep 07 - 04:58 PM (#2158805)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: M.Ted

I think D'Urfey's first publication was in 1719--


27 Sep 07 - 07:26 PM (#2158905)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Scotus

Tom Spiers sings an excellent alternative Scots version called 'List Bonny Laddie'. I think the source is the Greig-Duncan collection.

Jack


28 Sep 07 - 01:58 AM (#2159054)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Malcolm Douglas

No, IanC is right about Pills. In fact two songs set to the tune appeared both in the 1706 edition and the edition of 1719-20. The tune itself was in a number of publications of the period, including Playford (II, 2nd edn., 1714), Walsh (1719, II, 74) and so on.

Both Pills texts are in the DT (see links above): also the 'origins' thread which contains more detail than this old thread recently revived.

'The Beggar's Opera' used the tune for the song 'Were I laid on Greenland's Coast'; the 'Recruiting Officer' song doesn't appear.

See Simpson, The British Broadside Ballad and Its Music, 561-3, and Bronson, Traditional Tunes of the Child Ballads, I, 14-16, for more on the history of the tune.


28 Sep 07 - 06:05 AM (#2159139)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Liz the Squeak

See now, when I was little, I'd never heard of the Flanders, Portugal and Spain version... I knew it as:

When I was young and had no sense,
I bought a fiddle for eighteen pence.
The only tune that I could play
was 'Over the hills and far away'.
Over the hills and a long way off,
The wind is blowing my topknot off.

to a tune similar to 'Old MacDonald's Farm' or 'Bingo was his name-o'.

Anyone else heard of that version or was my dad completely puggled?

LTS


28 Sep 07 - 07:01 AM (#2159167)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Long Lankin

Might be worth separating the song from the tune in terms of where it first appears.

The tune "Over the Hills & Far Away" was very popular and was used for a number of 17th and early 18th century ballads.

The origins and dating of the song is another matter. The "Twa Recruiting Sergeants" mentions Gibralter, France and Spain which suggests it refers to the Wars of the Spanish Succession (1701-14) as Gibralter was captured by the British in 1713. However as it refers to these it could well have been composed after that war rather than during it.

Although an important Naval base Gibralter was not used as a military base by the British army in Spain during the Napoleonic Wars - the army was supplied through Portugal and the Northern Spanish ports which were closer.

As for George - there were four of them so you can take your pick, and that is before Mr Tams "tweaked" the words to make it fit as a theme for a series set in the Napoleonic Wars.


28 Sep 07 - 07:10 AM (#2159171)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Keith A of Hertford

A verse refers to Marlborough and Galway, both figures of the Spanish Succession war.
No more from beat of drum retreat,
While Marlborough and Galway beat,
The French and Spaniards every day,
Over the hills and far away.


28 Sep 07 - 07:45 AM (#2159197)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST,Edthefolkie

Re John Tams being primarily a folk singer...

Well that's true, but don't forget that he has a long history of theatrical performances, especially in Bill Bryden productions - Lark Rise, The Mysteries etc. Not to mention err.."Sharpe".

My wife and I used to crack up over the fact that Private Hagman had ever more lines to say and appeared higher and higher up the credits each week!

Funnily enough I channel hopped to Sharpe last night - Tam seemed to have written quite a bit of an episode where our heroes had returned to England and became embroiled in a combination of the Peterloo Massacre and the Luddites. Tam's moustache appeared but "Over the Hills and Far Away" did not.   

Somewhat irrelevantly but joy of joys, Dick Sharpe's half brother turned out to be Philip Glenister aka DI Hunt from "Life on Mars". Sean Bean accordingly got fitted up, but regrettably no Mk III Cortinas featured.


28 Sep 07 - 08:30 AM (#2159221)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Mr Happy

The tune's popular for Morris Dancing.

Way back in the mists of time, I danced with Erleseye Morris with this tune accompanying 'The Garland Dance'


Ouch! Me knees!


28 Sep 07 - 09:58 AM (#2159279)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Snuffy

LTS,

As a child I learned a similar version, but we sang it to the "Over the Hills" tune.

Tom he was a piper's son,
Learned to play when he was young.
But all the tunes that he could play
Was 'Over the hills and far away'.
Over the hills and a great way off,
The wind shall blow my topknot off.


28 Sep 07 - 10:53 AM (#2159316)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: The Walrus

To add to the pre-Napoleonic case, there is a verse from the time of the death of the Duke of Marlborough which runs (roughly).

Come Grenadiers, now change your song
And sing no more of battles won,
No victories shall grace us now
Since we have lost our Marlborough...

W


28 Sep 07 - 12:19 PM (#2159381)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Nigel Parsons

The version mentioned by Snuffy (above) was included in the BBC Broadcasts to Schools for Spring Term 1961, and appears in their publication "Time & Tune" for that term.
As Snuffy quoted it, but with a second verse, and a slight variation in line 3:

OVER THE HILLS
Tom he was a piper's son,
Learned to play when he was young.
The only tune that he could play
Was 'Over the hills and far away'.
.       Over the hills and a great way off,
.       The wind shall blow my topknot off.

Tom with his pipe made such a noise
That he pleased both the girls and boys
Who always stopped to hear him play
'Over the hills and far away'
.       Over the hills and a great way off,
.       The wind shall blow my topknot off.


CHEERS
Nigel


29 Sep 07 - 06:42 AM (#2159820)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Mr Red

<PEDANT>I though "Pill's to Purge Melancholy" was published between 1698 and 1720 By Mr Thomas D'Urfey also. or as Wiki puts it " in 1719 Thomas D'Urfey reordered and added to the work to produce a new edition</PEDANT>

Anyways there is also confusion because there is a book called "Wit & Mirth or Pills to Purge State Melancholy" which I requested at the Bodleain by mistake (obvious mistake) and got a 280 year-old copy to caress. It was too late to request the"Pill's to Purge Melancholy" for but there was a Dover facsimilie on open shelves. Two large volumes - (6 in one original edition) there is no way to take-in more than the song I was after "A Trooper Watering His Nag" - I got another verse for my pains.


29 Sep 07 - 08:43 PM (#2160202)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Kevin Rietmann

Francis O'Neill prints this as a march in Waifs and Strays of Gaelic Melody (1922), listing himself as the source, and includes a verse:

Gay Robin was a piper young, and many an air he played and sung,
But sweetest far the love fraught lay, 'Over the Hills and Far Away.'

What's this Sharpes' Rifles? I know what a Sharp's Repeating Rifle is.

Read up on the show, Napoleonic era, eh?


29 Sep 07 - 08:57 PM (#2160213)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: irishjonty

same experience as genie pm


30 Sep 07 - 02:42 AM (#2160284)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Fliss

'Sharpe' is a very popular British TV Drama series based on the books of author Bernard Cornwall. Sean Bean plays the leading role and the song 'Over the hills and far away' has been modified for use in the series. It is set in the Napoleonic wars. Its well worth watching.

Hope that clarifies things for you Kevin. Suppose you live the 'other side of the pond':)

fliss


30 Sep 07 - 03:03 AM (#2160287)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Liz the Squeak

To expand on 'Sharpe' - the series is a collection of 14 whole stories condensed into an hour long programme each. The books are all called 'Sharpe's XXXXXX'. There are various titles, Sword, Battle, Eagle, Rifles, Regiment, etc. and they follow the fortunes of Richard Sharpe as he makes his way up through the ranks of Wellington's Army to become a Colonel. The TV series starts with the Peninsular war, but Sharpe's career and Cornwells' first books start in India and spread right through to Waterloo, via Mysore, Badajoz, Talavera and Trafalgar (don't ask!).

John Tams and Dominic Mulholland were responsible for the music in the TV series and it's available on a CD, well worth a listen.

LTS


30 Sep 07 - 03:14 AM (#2160291)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Fliss

mmm Sean Bean... drool..... stop it now.

Ive read all the books too. Some are 'prequals' ie written after the others to tell of Sharpes early adventures.

fxx


30 Sep 07 - 07:25 AM (#2160336)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Rumncoke

Wasn't Sean Bean an icon and occasional fantasy interlude in Dawn French's comedy series where she played the vicar of Dibley?


30 Sep 07 - 11:44 AM (#2160431)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Fliss

oh and I spelt it wrong its Cornwell not Cornwall.


30 Sep 07 - 07:03 PM (#2160697)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: The Walrus

I still think there is the material for another book - either
"Sharps Llama" - Sharpe joins Bolivar's 'Army of Liberation of the Andes' or
"Sharpe's Kebab" - Sharpe gets involved in the Greek War of Independence (Byron and all that).


30 Sep 07 - 08:37 PM (#2160752)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Nigel Parsons

I can't find the reference on-line at present, but I seem to remember reading that Cornwell's character 'Starbuck' (American Civil War) was one of Sharpe's illegitimate children.


01 Oct 07 - 12:38 PM (#2161209)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST,Missing Verse

John Tams sang another verse during the series, here it is..


Though I may wander far from Spain
A part of me shall still remain
For you are with me night and day
Over the hills and far away.......


02 Oct 07 - 08:39 AM (#2161810)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Liz the Squeak

Re Starbuck

Sharpe was in and out of so many ladies beds that it's highly likely. The timing is a bit off though, more likely grandchildren.

He has a daughter with his first wife Teresa, who is brought up in Spain when she's killed, and I daresay he had a child or two with Lucille, the French lady he ended up with in 'Sharpe's Siege'.   The only woman we can safely say he couldn't have had a child with, was his wife Jane. She got pregnant to her lover Lord Rossendale.

LTS who really ought to start reading something else!


02 Oct 07 - 08:43 AM (#2161815)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Mr Happy

A brief 'Sharpe' TV prog. history here:
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=2d-z57eEJGk


02 Oct 07 - 04:58 PM (#2162289)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Dazbo

Not Starbuck but a minor character was a French officer 'observing' the war and he is Sharpe's son by his French 'wife'


03 Oct 07 - 11:10 AM (#2162753)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Fliss

Not read that series of books. Have got several others. Harlequin etc; The Winter King (The Warlord Trilogy.)

BTW John Tamms is at Hope Village Hall near Minsterley, Shropshire, soon.


27 Aug 09 - 04:24 PM (#2710109)
Subject: Lyr Add: OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY (John Tams)
From: Reiver 2

My wife and I have been watching the Sharpe's TV series on DVDs and can't seem to get enough! Going through the whole set for about the 4th time right now. I'm not sure why Genie dislikes the song -- my wife and I love it and catch ourselves singing snatches of it frequently.

Liz the squeak's comment is a little out of date since she posted it. There are now 16 episodes plus an additional "retrospective" summary called "Sharpe's Legacy" narrated by Rifleman Cooper {who mysteriously "disappears" during the series - the others, except Sharpe and Harper are all killed off during the series}. After "Sharpe's Waterloo" which originally ended the 14 part series there are now 2 more, "Sharpe's Challenge" and "Sharpe's Peril." "Peril" is not yet available in the U.S. as far as I know, but is in the UK, I believe.

Kevin Rietman asked what is a Sharpe's Rifle? The name Sharpe is that of Sean Bean's character, not of the gun. In the TV series the riflemen are using Baker Rifles. [Except for Harper's 7 barrel heavy gun.]

Now to the main concern: Over the Hills and Far Away. Mr. Happy posted only some of the John Tams verses, and Guest has added one more. Here's what I've cobbled together: [The "Chorus" is sung after each verse and sometimes twice at the end.]

OVER THE HILLS AND FAR AWAY - [John Tams' version from Sharpe]

Here's forty shillings on the drum
For those who volunteer to come.
To list and fight the foe today,
Over the hills and far away.

   Chorus: O'er the hills and o'er the main,
          Through Flanders, Portugal and Spain
          King George commands and we obey,
          Over the hills and far away.

Then fall in lads behind the drum,
With colours blazing like the sun,
Along the road to come what may,
Over the hills and far away.

CHO:

When duty calls me I must go,
To stand and face another foe,
But part of me will always stray,
Over the hills and far away.

CHO:

Through smoke and fire and shot and shell,
And to the very walls of Hell,
But we shall stand and we shall stay,
Over the hills and far away.

CHO:

When evil stalks upon the land,
I'll neither hold nor stay me hand,
But fight to win a better day,
Over the hills and far away,

CHO:

Though I may travel far from Spain,
A part of me shall still remain,
For you are with me night and day,
Over the hills and far away.

CHO:

Let kings and tyrants come and go,
I'll stand adjudged by what I know.
A soldier's life I'll ne'er gainsay,
Over the hills and far away.

CHO:

Old Wellington, he scratched his bum,
Says, "'Boney, lad, thee's had thy fun.
My riflemen will win the day,
Over the hills and far away."

CHO:

If I should fall to rise no more,
As many comrades have before,
Then ask the pipes and drums to play,
Over the Hills and Far Away,

CHO: [twice]

************

As far as I know there is no set order for the verses. I've arranged them arbitrarily, in the order that makes the most chronological sense to me. Starting with the volunteer enlisting and ending with his final wish if he should die. But that's my very linear mind at work. I don't think it really matters in what order or sequence they're sung. Oh, yes, someone asked which King George is referred to in the chorus. I think that would be George III, although if my memory serves me there was a regency of his son along about that time. But I think George III was still considered the King during the Napoleonic Wars [1805-1815]. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. [I live on the wrong side of the "pond."]

Reiver 2


27 Aug 09 - 04:40 PM (#2710124)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: dick greenhaus

In the Colonies, during the French and Indian War, they sang:

By Lake Erie's banks we stand
Sword and bayonet in our hands
To drive the French without delay
Over the hills and far away.


28 Aug 09 - 09:20 AM (#2710567)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Rumncoke

The tune used on Sharpe by John Tams is slightly different from the one I use - mine has more what I have heard described as ornamentation - shorter notes and more of them, plus the beat is more emphatic and the effect less wistfull.

Plus the words are less philosophical.

I learned 'Queen Anne' in the chorus.

Sean Bean was indeed the pin up of the Vicar of Dibley, and I remember at least one daydream (of hers) in which he figured.

Anne Croucher


28 Aug 09 - 11:30 AM (#2710688)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: MGM·Lion

Interesting how old threads keep being revived & one finds uncorrected errors from - literally - years back. Right back near the beginning of this thread, someone asserted that the song under question 'originated' in The Beggar's Opera which dated from the reign of Queen Anne. Out by 14 years, I fear: Anne died 1714, The Beggar's Opera took the Town by storm in 1728 — early in the reign of George II. And of course the song under discussion here did not 'originate' there: The Beggar's Opera was a ballad opera which set new words to well-loved airs of the time, from Chevy Chase to Greensleeves to Sally In Our Alley to One Misty Moisty Morning to Lilliburlero to Handel — to, yes: Over The Hills And....

Sorry to rake over ancient errors - but 'ACCURACY MATTERS' shall ever be my watchword: and Better Late Than Never.


28 Aug 09 - 01:31 PM (#2710802)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: dick greenhaus

Has anyone access to a copy of Farquhar's "The Recruiting Sergeant"? I'm told that that's the source of the military words set to the tune.


28 Aug 09 - 05:35 PM (#2711031)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Reiver 2

I'm not sure about "Farquhar's 'The Recruiting Sergeant." But I have a CD with Alex Beaton singing "Twa Recruiting Sergeants" which seem definitely related to "Over the Hills and Far Away." It goes:

TWA RECRUITING SERGEANTS


28 Aug 09 - 05:58 PM (#2711055)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Joe_F

Heard in Scotland, 1959 or so:

Black Watch soldier, do not weep:
'Twas not you who shagged my sheep.
Over the hills and far away
Comes the...

I would be delighted to know the last line.


28 Aug 09 - 07:01 PM (#2711127)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Reiver 2

Sorry -- hit the wrong key - I'll try again with:

TWA RECRUITING SERGEANTS

Twa recruiting sergeants cam frae the Black Watch
To markets and fairs some recruits for to catch
And a' that they 'listed was forty and twa
So 'list, bonnie laddie, an' come awa'

    CHO: It's over the mountain and over the main
          Through Gibralter to France and Spain,
          Put a faether to your bonnet and a kilt abune your knee
          An' 'list my bonnie laddie an' come awa' wi' me

Laddie, ya dinna ken the danger that you're in
If your horses wis tae gleg, an' your ousen wis tae rin
This greedy auld fairmer winna pay your fee
So, 'list bonnie laddie an' come awa' wi' me.

    CHO:

It is intae the barn an' oot o' the byre
This auld farmer thinks ye'll never tire
It's a slavery job of low degree
So 'list bonnie laddie an' come awa wi' me.

    CHO:

Laddie, if you've got a sweetheart an' bairn
Ye'll easily get rid o' that ill-spun yarn
Twa rattles o' the drum an' that'll pay it a'
So 'list bonnie laddie an' come awa'

    CHO:


This is pretty much to the same tune and has several very similar lines, but is a recruiting song [ 'list is a contraction for enlist] and not a song about military exploits or brags.

The song "Arthur McBride" also involves a recruiting sergeant, as is "Fighting For Strangers" which goes:

FIGHTING FOR STRANGERS

    CHO: What makes you go abroad, fighting for strangers,
          When you could be safe at home, free from all dangers.

A recruiting sergeant came our way.
To an Inn nearby at the close of day.
He said, "Young Johnny, you're a fine young man,
Would you like to march along behind a military band?
With a scarlet coat, a big cocked hat
And a musket at your shoulder?"
The shilling he took and he kissed the book,
"Oh.poor Johnny, what'll happen to you?"

The recruiting sergeant marched away
From the Inn nearby, at the break of day.
Johnny went,too, with half a ring,
He was off to be a soldier, he'd be fighting for the King.
In a far off war, in a far off land,
To fight the foreign soldiers.
"But how'll you fare when there's lead in the air?
Oh, poor Johnny, what'll happen to you?"

    CHO: [repeat as at beginning]

Oh, the sun shone high on a barren land,
As a thin red line took a military stand.
There was sling shot, chain shot, grape shot, too,
Swords and bayonets thrusting through.
Poor Johnny fell, but the day was won,
And, "The King is greatful to you,
But your soldiering's done and we're sending you home,
Oh, poor Johnny, what have they done to you?"

Oh, they said he was a hero and not to grieve
Over two wooden legs and an empty sleeve.
They carried him home and they set him down
With a military pension and a medal from the crown.
"You haven't an arm, you haven't a leg,
The enemy nearly slew you.
You'll have to go out in the streets to beg.
Oh, poor Johnny, what have they done to you?

    CHO: [two or three times]

Obviously a very different song. Of the same genre and reminiscent of the better known "Johnny I Hardly Knew You."

Reiver 2


28 Aug 09 - 08:31 PM (#2711190)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

Dick Greenhaus- "By Lake Erie's Banks we stand"- Source?


28 Aug 09 - 08:57 PM (#2711212)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: dick greenhaus

Q-
Source--Burl Ives
Farquhar--ca 1730. Recruiting Seargent was a ballad opera, on the order of Beggar's Opera


28 Aug 09 - 09:54 PM (#2711268)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: MGM·Lion

In interests of accuracy: George Farquhar's play was called The Recruiting OFFICER [not'Sergeant']; it was a straight stage comedy, not a ballad opera; it was first produced in 1706, not 1730. {For additional interest, it is the play·within·the·play being produced by the Australian transports in Timberlake Wertenbaker's distinguished play of 1988, Our Country's Good, based on novel The Playmakers by the Oz novelist Thomas Keneally, later a BookerPrize·winner with Schindler's Ark [Oscar winningly filmed by Spielberg as Schindler's List.]} Versions of Over The Hills occur interpolated into Farquhar's text; At one point e.g the recruits sing "We all shall lead more happy lives By getting rid of brats and wives That scold and brawl both night and day; Over the hills and far away - Over the hills etc"[act ii sc iii]: presumably a creative reworking by Farquhar himself rather than an actual current variant of the song, but it would be hard to be sure of this. It does however I think demonstrate that this was at the time the song concerning the ongoing wars for which the officer in the play was supposedly recruiting, which Farquhar would have expected his audience to recognise as such and respond to.


28 Aug 09 - 09:56 PM (#2711269)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: MGM·Lion

...which would have been [1706] in the reign of Queen Anne, who would therefore have been the one commanding "and we'll obey", rather than any of the Georges.


28 Aug 09 - 10:04 PM (#2711275)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

No evidence of any version sung by the colonists.


28 Aug 09 - 10:27 PM (#2711281)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: dick greenhaus

Thnx. is there a copy of The Recruiting Officer available anywhere?


28 Aug 09 - 10:33 PM (#2711284)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Q (Frank Staplin)

See post by the late Bruce O. near the beginning of this thread for "The Recruiting Officer" lyrics.


28 Aug 09 - 11:42 PM (#2711302)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: MGM·Lion

I think there is an edition in print of Farquhar's The Recruiting Officer in Oxford World's Classics paperback - according to Whitaker's list of Books In Print &c.


14 Sep 14 - 10:45 PM (#3660286)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST,Geoff Boxell

My 14thC version:
Over the Hills and Far Away

Hark now the drums beat up again
For all true archers - yeomen
So let us list and march I say
N' go over the hills and far away

Chorus:
O' the hills, and o'er the plane To Flanders, France and now to Spain Prince of Wales commands and we obey
Over the hills and far away
Chorus:

There's forty shillings on the drum
For those that volunteer to come
'Tis archers all shall win the day
Over the hills and far away
Chorus:

Come yeomen that do have a mind
To serve a King that's good and kind
Come list and enter in to pay
N' go over the hills and far away
Chorus:

When duty calls me I must go
To stand and face another foe
But part of me will always stray
Over the hills and far away
Chorus:
O' the hills, and o'er the plane To Flanders, France and now to Spain Prince of Wales commands and we obey
Over the hills and far away

If I should fall to raise no more
As many others have before
Then ask the drums and pipes to play
Over the hills and far away
Chorus:

So fall in lads behind the drum
With colours blazing like the sun
We'll feather the foe come what may
Over the hills and far away
Chorus:


15 Sep 14 - 08:49 AM (#3660395)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: bubblyrat

I think it is "oer the PLAIN" , actually. Anyway, I recently (August) watched and listened to Bill McKinnon and my old shipmate George Wilson , performing as "Nine Mile Ride", and they confidently and , indeed,stridently , even with great conviction, sang "Queen Anne Commands " , so that is good enough for me (but then it always was !).

Yours Aye ,"Bomber" Mills .


15 Sep 14 - 09:24 AM (#3660414)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: Lighter

Shouldn't that be in Middle English?


15 Sep 14 - 11:01 AM (#3660465)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST,SqueezeMe

I first heard this song almost 50 years ago at a folk club in the West Country. Can't recall the singer (no, not Mr Tams!)

What is interesting (or not) is that I can vividly recall the second line of the chorus sung as:

"Through Flanders, Portingale and Spain"

Presumably, "Portingale" was a corruption of "Portugal".

Some years later, I became aware of the song "Fathom the Bowl", sung by a different singer, with the second verse, second line:

"Sweet oranges and lemons from Portingale come"

Any one else heard the word "Portingale" substituted for Portugal in song, or in any other context?

There doesn't seem to be many English folk songs mentioning Portugal, which is perhaps surprising considering it was one of England's major trading partners for many years. Wonder if there are any Portuguese songs mentioning England???

Answers accompanied by a nice bottle of Quinta most welcome....


20 Dec 15 - 05:06 AM (#3759833)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST,Guest Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight Rifles used "Over the Hills and Far Away", with appropriate lyrics, as their marching song but the lyrics have been lost and the regiment was "absorbed" into the Hampshire and IW Rifles following disastrous losses at Suvla Bay and Gaza 100 years ago.

Folk here keeps their memory alive and if anyone can help to restore this missing link - heartfelt thanks


21 Dec 15 - 03:41 AM (#3760009)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST

Reight! I'm goin' t' learn 't bugger.

That's t' last time them smart sods ask me to sing "Over the hills and far away!" Any road, the land is flat around these parts f' bloody miles.

AND Sean Bean is a Blades fan, so a' waint watch the bugger.


23 Dec 15 - 06:45 PM (#3760575)
Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Over the Hills and Far Away
From: GUEST,LIGHTER

Chaucer in the 1300s knew the country as "Portingale."

It was the usual English name for centuries.