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Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}

Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 08:41 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 08:47 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 08:55 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 09:11 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 09:12 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 09:38 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 09:44 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 10:15 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 11:02 AM
Azizi 22 Apr 07 - 08:12 PM
Azizi 08 Mar 09 - 11:28 AM
Azizi 08 Mar 09 - 12:16 PM
Azizi 01 Jun 09 - 11:59 AM
Azizi 01 Jun 09 - 12:00 PM
keberoxu 23 Feb 16 - 01:14 PM
GUEST,Larry the Radio Guy 23 Feb 16 - 08:59 PM
GUEST,Stim 24 Feb 16 - 05:55 PM
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GUEST,wysiwyg minus cookie 25 Feb 16 - 08:29 AM
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Subject: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 08:41 AM

This morning I went looking for Mudcat threads on Tito Puente and found just one: thread.cfm?threadid=22041#237093
RE: Gracias, Tito Puente

I'm starting this thread because I didn't find another one on the general topic of Afro-Latin music. If there are other threads, please post their links on this one.

Here's a definition of Afro-Latin Music that I got from this online article: http://www.texasbandmasters.org/EdResources/TBMR/2006Jun/tbmr-06-2006-Diaz1.cfm :

"Afro-Latin is a very broad term used to describe the fusion of African rhythms with the harmonic and melodic development of Latin America. Afro-Latin music is comprised of many rhythm such as son, cha-cha, rumba, bomba, meringue, samba, bossa nova, and reggaeton."
-snip-

For those who don't have broadband Internet access, I'll share other excerpts from that article in my next post.

Please join in this presentation of information, video clips, sound clips of and {hopefully} discussion about the exciting genre of
Afro-Latin music.


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 08:47 AM

As a general introduction to Afro-Latin music here's another excerpt from http://www.texasbandmasters.org/EdResources/TBMR/2006Jun/tbmr-06-2006-Diaz1.cfm :

"The jazz ensemble is the best vehicle to work with students in the area of Afro-Latin rhythms. In recent years the amount of published charts in the area of Afro-Latin jazz, or Latin Jazz as it is more commonly called, has increased tremendously. Although there is great information on performance practices of Afro-Latin music, many compositions do not say specifically what Afro-Latin style or rhythm is needed.

The following is a brief suggestion that can be used to develop an understanding of cha-cha and mambo which are the most popular of the Afro-Latin rhythms used in jazz ensemble music.

The most popular of these rhythms used in Latin Jazz are cha-cha and mambo. In order to understand these Cuban developed rhythms, one must develop an understanding of clave. Clave is a two-bar rhythmic pattern that occurs in two forms: forward clave also known as 3-2 and reverse clave, also known 2-3. In 3-2 clave, or forward clave, the accents fall on the first beat, the "and" of the second beat, and the fourth beat of the first bar, and beats two and three of the second measure. In 2-3, or reverse clave, the pattern is inverted. There is also another clave called the rumba clave. In the rumba clave, the last note in the "3" bar of the rumba clave is delayed a half beat and played on the "and" of the fourth beat. Every component of Afro-Cuban rhythm - drum pattern, piano montuno, bass lines, melodic phrasing, and horn lines - has to be in sync with clave...

Styles in Afro-Latin music are sometimes interchanged adding variety to the music. This creates a sort of tension and release within a given tune. For example, a composition may start as a Bolero for sixteen or thirty-two measures and change into Salsa or Samba. Styles are interchanged with discretion. Many mixes are made as intros, interludes, verse or body of a tune, or as an ending section within a piece. Four, eight or sometimes sixteen measures at a time are incorporated and usually done once or twice within a section to add some spice.

A few common groove mixes include:

1.Salsa with a quasi-Samba section and/or ending
2.Bolero with a quasi-Samba or Bossa Nova ending
3.Salsa with a Bomba section
4.Bolero that segues into Salsa
5.Salsa with a Guaguanco intro and/or interlude
6.Salsa with a Rap or Reggaeton section
7.Merengue with a Rap section

Conclusion
This article is very brief introduction to the style of "Latin Jazz." In short, this genre began as a style of playing bebop lines over a Latin groove. This medium will continue to evolve and intensify as more artists probe deeper into the great wealth of Latin music. In order to develop a better understanding of "Latin Jazz," as with any style, one must listen to recordings, watch live performances, and study the art form. "


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 08:55 AM

Cuban music is a sub-genre of Afro-Latin music.

Here's an excerpt from an online article on Cuban music:

"Salsa music, with its roots in Afro-Cuban popular music, was invented in New York in the early 1960's. The Cubans were adamant about never using the word "salsa" to describe their music. It was this author's experience that, when asking for salsa music in a Havana record store, I was told that there was no salsa to be bought. Only Cuban music could be bought there. Sñr. Formell says that due to the international music scene, Cubans were forced to call their music salsa. But he feels that Timba is so strong internationally, Cuban music now has its own identity and no longer relies on the salsa name. (Granma International, May, 1998). There also seems to be different opinions about this new music within the Cuban music community. The soneros in Cuba (those who hold close to the musical traditions of son) are not all in agreement that this is a worthy style.

The history of this new style of Cuban popular music reflects similarly the early history of son music in Havana. Son is recognized as the most influential Cuban music style of the 20th century. Originally from the eastern part of Cuba, son found its way to Havana in the early 1900's. Just as Juan Luis Cortés, "El Tosco", leader of the seminal Afro-Cuban groups NG (Nueva Generación) la Banda says, Timba is music of the barrios, it is generally recognized that son came from the blacks in the barrios. Son became commercially acceptable just as Timba is now very commercially acceptable. As son first began to be performed in Havana, there was a general distaste of and public outcries against the music. (Moore, 1997) Musicians and son aficionados were routinely arrested for playing and/or enjoying the son. And in modern day Cuba, as little as a year prior to this writing, Timba musicians have been hassled by police and subsequently not allowed to perform or travel for months. A popular band, La Charanga Habanera, was punished for what may have been a variety of reasons. One of these reasons was these words in one of their songs, : "Hey green mango, now that you're ripe, why have you still not fallen?" The words may have been in reference to Fidel Castro, usually dressed in green fatigues. (Christian Science Monitor) The government acted swiftly in banning the group from traveling overseas or performing in Cuba. Had La Charanga Habanera taken the step into the hidden transcripts of James Scott, and paid the price?

And, as further comparison, Robin Moore states, about son, "Son lyrics refer to a diversity of themes including bawdy sexual innuendo, topical social events, political issues, and regional nationalism". El Tosco states, "...the lyrics have to be simple, with words that motivate people to dance". Furthermore, Tosco states. "our songs are the literature of the people". Much of the lyrics and rap ideas found in this new style reflect a national pride, much as some son lyrics did and still do.

Musical form in the early sones involved European harmonies and the call and response reminiscent of Western African music. An important part of son is the call and response (called inspiraciones). The tempo can accelerate and the music takes on an important, forward motion. This formula has been exhibited in many Afro-Cuban song styles after the son, like mambo and chachachá...The music is strong and seductive"

http://www.chucksilverman.com/timbapaper.html


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 09:11 AM

Here's some biographical information about Tito Puente:

http://www.vh1.com/artists/az/puente_tito/bio.jhtml :

"By virtue of his warm, flamboyant stage manner, longevity, constant touring, and appearances in the mass media, Tito Puente is probably the most beloved symbol of Latin jazz.

But more than that, Puente managed to keep his music remarkably fresh over the decades; as a timbales virtuoso, he combined mastery over every rhythmic nuance with old-fashioned showmanship... A trained musician, he was also a fine, lyrical vibraphonist, a gifted arranger, and played piano, congas, bongos, and saxophone. His appeal continues to cut across all ages and ethnic groups, helped no doubt by Santana's best-selling cover versions of "Oye Como Va" and "Para Los Rumberos" in 1970-1971, and cameo appearances on The Cosby Show in the 1980s and the film The Mambo Kings in 1992...

Rooted in Spanish Harlem, of Puerto Rican descent, Puente originally intended to become a dancer but those ambitions were scotched by a torn ankle tendon suffered in an accident. At age 13, he began working in Ramon Olivero's big band as a drummer, and later he studied composing, orchestration, and piano at Juilliard and the the New York School of Music. More importantly, he played with and absorbed the influence of Machito, who was successfully fusing Latin rhythms with progressive jazz. Forming the nine-piece Piccadilly Boys in 1947 and then expanding it to a full orchestra two years later, Puente recorded for Seeco, Tico, and eventually RCA Victor, helping to fuel the mambo craze that gave him the unofficial -- and ultimately lifelong -- title "King of the Mambo," or just "El Rey." Puente also helped popularize the cha-cha during the 1950s, and he was the only non-Cuban who was invited to a government-sponsored "50 Years of Cuban Music" celebration in Cuba in 1952.

Among the major-league congueros who played with the Puente band in the '50s were Mongo Santamaria, Willie Bobo, Johnny Pacheco, and Ray Barretto, which resulted in some explosive percussion shootouts. Not one to paint himself into a tight Latin music corner, Puente's range extended to big-band jazz (Puente Goes Jazz), and in the '60s, bossa nova tunes, Broadway hits, boogaloos, and pop music, although in later years he tended to stick with older Latin jazz styles that became popularly known as salsa. In 1982, he started reeling off a string of several Latin jazz albums with octets or big bands for Concord Picante that gave him greater exposure and respect in the jazz world than he ever had."


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 09:12 AM

http://www.mp3.com/albums/261555/summary.html {The Best of Tito Puente, El Rey de Timbal!" has these sound clips of Tito Puente songs.

These can be played using windows media player.

Here's a review of that album:

"Album: The Best of Tito Puente: El Rey del Timbal!
Artist: Tito Puente
Release Date: 11/23/1949
Genre: Latin

Summarizing Tito Puente's numerous accomplishments on a single CD would be impossible. El Rey del Timbal!, a 1997 disc spanning 1949-1987, barely scratches the surface -- but for Puente, a five-CD box set would also only scratch the surface. But this gem-laden collection does illustrate just how remarkably consistent the salsa legend was during the course of 38 years. El Rey del Timbal! kicks into high gear with 1949's "Ran-Kan-Kan" before treating listeners to such essential 1950s recordings as "Cao-Cao Mani Picao," "Cual Es Tu Idea," "Agua Limpia Todo," and "Oye Mi Guaguanco." Live versions of "Separala Tambien" and "A Gozar Timbero" from 1960 are superb, as is 1961's exuberant "T.P. on the Strip." Though salsa dominates the disc, Puente's Latin jazz output for Concord Picante in the 1980s is well represented by "El Rey del Timbal" and "Machito Forever." Die-hard Puente fans will notice that "Ban Ban Quiere," "Oye Como Va," and other essential hits are missing, but then no one said El Rey del Timbal! was all-inclusive. Again, it barely scratches the surface, but what a marvelous surface it is. ~ Alex Henderson, All Music Guide"


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 09:38 AM

Here's a YouTube video of Carlos Santana and his group performing Tito Puente's composition "Oye Como Va":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpPb2cVswlI

This video has 104 comments. Interesting reading!

**

Here's a YouTube video of the Tito Puente's performance of the song as the sound track. That video shows a translation of the song's lyrics:

"Oye Como Va" Translation

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reaNVtCgQqs

From sundroid Added June 24, 2006

"Latin music legend Tito Puente was the composer of "Oye Como Va", which Carlos Santana, the son of a Mexican mariachi violinist, recorded with his band in 1970. Lyrics and translation: Oye Como Va (Hey, how's it goin'?) Mi ritmo, bueno pa' gozar, mulata. (My rhythm is good for partying, babe.) Note: the literal translation of "mulata" is "dark-skinned girl", however, it's basically a slang for "hot chick"."

-snip-

Fwiw, I believe that "mulata" is the same as the English word "mulatto" {a person of who has one Black birth parent & one Whie birth parent}


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 09:44 AM

Celia Cruz is another one of my favorite Afro-Latin music artists.

Here's an excerpt of an online article about Celia Cruz:

"Celia Cruz had the chameleon-like ability to master many different genres of Afro-Caribbean songs. She chose a repertoire that showcased the power of her voice as well as her ability to navigate the richness and complexity of the rhythms and melodies of the music.

Here you can listen to examples of her music at different periods of her career, from the traditional "Ye ye oh guamá," a song dedicated to the orisha (deity) Oshún, through her performance of "La mazucamba" with the Sonora Matancera, as well as her later exploration of new musical forms and combinations, such as her collaboration with Tito Puente on "Aquarius." With Willie Colón, she recorded "A papá," a traditional plena from Puerto Rico arranged for a salsa orchestra. "Cúcala" (originally recorded by Puerto Rican singer Ismael Rivera) with Johnny Pacheco and his orchestra became one of her biggest hits. "La vida es un carnaval" and "La negra tiene tumbao" reflect her ability to reinvent herself and explore new horizons in music."


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 10:15 AM

Here's a link to a YouTube video clip of:

Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, and Poncho Sanchez: Quimbara

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Y06BvtWjrg

Added February 01, 2007; From elguerote
"Quimbara: Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, and Poncho Sanchez"

**

Also, here's a link to a YouTube video of "A very very young Celia Cruz, from a TV show ca. 1960" posted on YouTube by dogon on June 04, 2006 :

Celia Cruz - Pinar del rio

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsNPELxQnhQ


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 11:02 AM

Here's some definitions of guaguaco {btw, this word is pronounced like "wah wahn co"] :

"The mid-paced guaguanco has African roots and was originally a drum form related to the rhumba. Though often played in 4/4, it has a strong 6/8 feel. The basic rhythm is traditionally carried by three conga drums and usually includes a good deal of solo drumming. The theme of a modern guaguanco is a somewhat loose melody line. It is one of the few 2-3 reverse clave forms.
artdrum.com/DICTIONARY_LATIN_PERCUSSION_MUSIC.HTM

The best known and most popular rumba form danced in couples. Born in the cities, its versatility has allowed modern bands easily to adapt and play it. It is mid to up–tempo, played to 4/4 time.
www.salsa-merengue.co.uk/revealit/glosrham.html

A variation of the rumba originating in Havana, Cuba.
www.si.umich.edu/CHICO/salsa/texts/glossary.html

Guaguancó is one sub-genre of Cuban rumba, a highly complex rhythmic music and dance style. The traditional line-up consists of:*three conga drum parts, namely the tumbadora (lowest), tres-dos (middle, playing a cross-clave counter rhythm), and quinto (highest, solo drum). These parts are also often played on cajones, wooden boxes.*claves*palitos (wooden sticks striking the side of the drum) or guagua (kind of woodblock)*solo singer*coro (chorus)*two dancers, one male, one female
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guaguanco"

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls=GGLG,GGLG:2005-45,GGLG:en&defl=en&q=define:Guaguanco&sa=X&oi=glossary_definition&ct=title


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Apr 07 - 08:12 PM

Since in African and African Diaspora cultures, music & dance are two facets of a whole, I've decided to include links to YouTube videos of Afro-Latin dances in this thread. Notice also the instruments shown in these videos. Fascinating!


Peru afro dance of Chincha
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgah34cPa2I&mode=related&search=

Added January 09, 2007 ; From kawash125
"this is a typical dance of Chincha in... this is a typical dance of Chincha in Peru"

-snip-

Actually, this music is "Afro-Latin" in that it is performed by people of African descent in a Latin American country. But imo, it's not "Afro-Latin" as defined earlier ["Afro-Latin is a very broad term used to describe the fusion of African rhythms with the harmonic and melodic development of Latin America"]. To my ears, that music for that Peruvian Chincha dance seemed to be the same rhythms and beats that I've heard attributed to traditional West African or Central African music. As a matter of fact, I heard the same beats and saw the same dance movements performed at an African dance program I attended last night in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

-snip-

The 'Festejo', a festive Afro-Peruvian dance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HS0iVojIsGE&mode=related&search=

Added January 16, 2007; From spanishonline
"EL SOL -- Spanish School"

-snip-

I'm not going to show my ignorance by commenting on the music of this video except to say that I'm not sure if this is what is meant commercially by the catch-all term "Afro-Latin music". I will say that it appears to me that the dancers were doing shoulder and hip movements, angular bending of their arms, pelvic thrusts, and other traditional African dance movements.

Fwiw, I posted a comment on that page asking about the meaning of the Festejo dance and that particular song.


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 11:28 AM

It's been a while since I posted to this thread.

I'm adding some more examples of YouTube videos of guaguanco music. I love listening to this music and also watching the videos. I particularly like watching the dancing that the singers do.

The first video I'm posting features the wonderful singer Celia Cruz:

Celia Con El Gran Combo - Guanguanco de el Gran Combo

**

Btw, the summary and the comments for this video is in Spanish. That appears to also be the case with a lot of other YouTube videos of Cuban music. It stands to reason that these summaries and most of these comments would be in Spanish since Spanish is the official language of Cuba. However, I wonder if the paucity of viewer comments in English means that few non-Spanish speaking people are watching these videos.

If so, that's a shame and is a wasted opportunity on so many levels.


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 12:16 PM

Here are links to four classic Celia Cruz videos

Note: These summaries are in English :o)

Celia Cruz - Pinar del rio
"A very very young Celia Cruz, from a TV show ca. 1960"

**
Celia Cruz from "Affair in Havana" [movie'] 1957
"Celia Cruz (October 21, 1925 -- July 16, 2003) in Lazlo Benedek's Affair in Havana (1957)."

-snip-

The drums shown in these scenes are sacred "bata" drums that come from the Yoruba people of Nigeria. The dancing and chanting/singing sound to me like they come from the Santeria religion.

**

Celia Cruz and The Fania All Stars Quimbara
"The Africa Concert performing Quimbara. Cheo Feliciano, Héctor Lavoe, Ismael Miranda, Ismael Quintana, Santos Colon, Ray Barreto, Larry Harlow, Jorge Santana, Bobby Valentin, Nicky Marrero y Johnny Pacheco and Pupy Pedroso.

**

Celia Cruz - Guantanamera con la Fania
"The legend lives on!! Celia Cruz - Guantanamera - Con la Fania"


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 01 Jun 09 - 11:59 AM

Here's an excerpt from an article that I just came across in my search for thread.cfm?threadid=121227&messages=30 :

May 31st marked the death of famed Puerto Rican musician Tito Puente (1923-2000). Born Ernest Anthony Puente Jr. in Spanish Harlem (in New York City), Tito Puente is internationally recognized for his seminal contributions to Latin music as a bandleader, composer, arranger, percussionist, and mentor. Popularly known as the "El Rey del Timbal" and the "King of Mambo," he recorded more than 100 albums, published more than 400 compositions, and won five Grammy awards. Although he played and recorded jazz and salsa, Puente is one of only a handful of musicians considered "legendary" for his mastery of the mambo.

Puente's first big break came when the United States entered World War II; after the regular drummer of the famous Machito Afro-Cubans was drafted into military service, Puente was given the opportunity to demonstrate his talents. After being himself drafted and serving on a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier in the South Pacific, Puente returned to New York and enrolled in New York's Juilliard School of Music, where he studied composition, orchestration, and conducting. Credited with introducing the timbal (a double tom-tom played with sticks) and the vibraphone to Afro-Cuban music, Puente also played the trap drums, the conga drums, the claves, the piano, and occasionally, the saxophone and the clarinet.

Throughout his many years as "King of Mambo," Puente continued "to find a marriage between Latin music and jazz" and not to lose a "Latin-American authenticity." He became more visible to a mainstream audience in the United States in1992 when he performed at the White House, where former President Jimmy Carter, introduced him as "The Goodwill Ambassador of Latin American Music." Puente also played some of his own music in the movie The Mambo Kings, an adaptation of Oscar Hijuelos' Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, and was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was awarded an honorary degree at Columbia University in 1999, and the Latin Grammy for Best Traditional Tropical Performance for "Mambo Birdland" in 2000.

Tito Puente died after undergoing heart surgery on May 31, 2000, at age 77, but his music has continued to transcend cultural and generational boundaries"...

http://repeatingislands.com/2009/06/01/remembering-tito-puente/


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: Azizi
Date: 01 Jun 09 - 12:00 PM

That Mudcat thread whose link I provided is titled "Blogs About People of Color & Culture".


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Subject: Afro-Latin Music : "Afroperuana"
From: keberoxu
Date: 23 Feb 16 - 01:14 PM

Is there room in this thread for the subject of Afro-Peruvian music?

Perhaps this culture is not well-known, north of the border. In South America it is another matter. "Black Rhythms of Peru" is a well-researched book from Wesleyan University Press written by Heidi Carolyn Feldman, clearly documenting how this kind of poetry, music, and dance put down roots amongst the descendants of African slaves shipped to Peru by the Spanish colonists. When, in the 1950's and 1960's, a revival of these styles was presented in a folkloric context by a new young generation of artists, there were opportunities that had not existed before, to document and disseminate this music through sound recording.

An entire thread, for example, as for Tito Puente, could document the career of Nicomedes Santa Cruz who died some time ago. Santa Cruz was in the right place at the right time. When his folkloric theatrical company, Cumanana, got the attention of the record companies with their show reviving musical genres like the "festejo," the release of these sound recordings became an event in itself, in the early '60s. Then there is the "landó" which has been compared to North American rhythm-and-blues, with emphasis on the blues. These Afro-Peruvian styles have been emulated in songs like "Samba Landó", written with Patricio Manns and Inti-Illimani.


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: GUEST,Larry the Radio Guy
Date: 23 Feb 16 - 08:59 PM

There's an amazing book that explores in depth the whole history of Afro-Cuban music.......and how the "Afro" part of it spread, via Cuba, throughout the whole world and influenced virtually every type of music we listen to today.

It's called: CUBA AND IT'S MUSIC:FROM THE FIRST DRUMS TO THE MAMBO. By Ned Sublette.   I'm about halfway finished it now.

I've been doing a series of radio programs, much of which are based on that book. It's called "Cuba in Motion".   They're only a half hour each, and so far I've completed about 35 of them and post a new one each week.

Here's a link, in case you're interested. http://peachcityradio.org/programs/cubainmotion/

You can also comment on any of the programs through the related facebook page: Cuba in Motion.

-Larry


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: GUEST,Stim
Date: 24 Feb 16 - 05:55 PM

This subject deserves its own thread, Kerberoxu. There are many living musical traditions, most of which I know nearly nothing about. I appreciate very much when somebody takes the trouble to put together some background and a few links.   

Nowadays, it's possible to fine nearly any kind of music online, the trick being that you have to know about it first. it's a cold and rainy night here, and I am googling Nicomedes Santa Cruz...ah, here's "No Me Cumben"-it's getting warmer already!


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 24 Feb 16 - 06:48 PM

Wait till you hear Eva Ayllon and Inti-Illimani on a video, performing it live in a club (Chile?). I flunked blue clicky school so I can't link it.

The joint is jumping.


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: GUEST,Gibb Sahib
Date: 25 Feb 16 - 12:34 AM

One might just as well start a topic on "Afro-Anglo Music" ("Anglo" as in people in areas where English is the dominant language). And it would be equally, ridiculously broad.

It helps to be specific.

"Cuban music is a sub-genre of Afro-Latin music."

And American music is a sub-genre of Anglo music, I suppose?


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: GUEST,wysiwyg minus cookie
Date: 25 Feb 16 - 08:29 AM

This woman would like ppl to know that Afro-Latin music is African music:

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10156496611635231&id=26423400230


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: GUEST,wysiwyg minus cookie
Date: 25 Feb 16 - 08:29 AM

This woman would like ppl to know that Afro-Latin music is African music:

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10156496611635231&id=26423400230


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: GUEST,wysiwyg minus cookie
Date: 25 Feb 16 - 08:29 AM

This woman would like ppl to know that Afro-Latin music is African music:

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10156496611635231&id=26423400230


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: keberoxu
Date: 05 Mar 16 - 02:10 PM

From the ground-breaking double-disc 12-inch vinyl album:
Philips 63350001 / 63350002 , 5976 / 5977
Producido por Phonogram SAIC
Philips owned Virrey recording label in Peru, for which this studio recording was made.
Title: CUMANANA, Version Original, featuring Nicomedes Santa Cruz
The date of these recordings is roughly 1960 to 1965.


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Subject: RE: Afro-Latin Music {Tito Puente & more}
From: keberoxu
Date: 07 Mar 16 - 02:39 PM

The disc Philips 63350002 is the disc with the Conjunto Cumanana theatrical show music. The other disc does not have the entire cast, only Nicomedes Santa Cruz.

From Philips 63350002, the music performed by Cumanana with Nicomedes Santa Cruz in the Lima theater:

Side One: Folclore Afro-Peruano
1. Son de los diablos, Comparsa callejero
2. Inga (danza del muneco)
3. Negrito (danza o habanera)
4. Ahi viene mi caporal (panalivio)
5. No quiero que a la misa vayas (Zana): glosa, dulce, y fuga
6. Samba malató (landó)
7. Mándame quitar la vida:
             Marinera: primera, segunda, tercera
             Resbalosa
             Fuga


Side Two: Motivos Negro-Peruanos
1. Cumanana, tema de característica
2. Ya yo 'ta cansá (lamento)
3. El frutero (pregón de la Lima Antigua)
4. La misturera (pregón)
5. No me cumbén (festejo)
6. Belén cochambre
7. Manuel Antonio (festejo)


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