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Lyr Req: The Parson and the Clerk (Phil Tanner)

DigiTrad:
MA SHEELA
THE FIRST THING
TOPMAN AND AFTERGUARD


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: Soldier and the Sailor (Soldier's Prayer) (39)
Lyr Req: The Soldier's Prayer / Soldier and Sailor (6)
Lyr Add: Parson & the Clerk - Australian (20)
ADD/Origins: The Mare and the Foal (6)


GUEST 08 Jun 07 - 09:38 AM
GUEST,SussexCarole 08 Jun 07 - 09:40 AM
RTim 08 Jun 07 - 10:29 AM
Joe Offer 08 Jun 07 - 03:21 PM
r.padgett 08 Jun 07 - 04:51 PM
badgerbiker 11 Jun 07 - 06:21 AM
badgerbiker 11 Jun 07 - 06:21 AM
Mick Tems 11 Jun 07 - 12:21 PM
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Subject: Lyrics for Parson to the Clerk by Phil T
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Jun 07 - 09:38 AM

Anyone got the above please?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics for Parson to the Clerk by Phil T
From: GUEST,SussexCarole
Date: 08 Jun 07 - 09:40 AM

Andrew(CraneDriver) sings this...I'm sure he'll post them for you


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Subject: RE: Lyrics for Parson to the Clerk by Phil T
From: RTim
Date: 08 Jun 07 - 10:29 AM

The Parson and the Clerk

A parson preached to his flock one day, on the sins of the human race.
And the clerk, ÔAmen,Õ aloud did say, with the solemnest tone and face.
And this pious clerk, on the quiet, though would venture a bit of remark.
ÔOh sin is sweetÕ, said the parson.Õ Then sin for meÕ, said the clerk.
Amen
Then sin for meÕ, said the clerk.

ÔOh never covet thy neighbourÕs goods,Õ the parson he said, Ônor his maid,Õ
ÔTo rob a man of that whatÕs his, why a fellow should be afraid.
Nor covet ye not no man of sin, I would venture this better to mark.Õ
ÔThy neighbourÕs wifeÕ, said the parson. ÔThe slavey for me,Õ said the clerk.
Amen
ÔThe slavey for me,Õ said the clerk.

ÔOh never sigh for that dross called gold, for blessed in the man that is poor,
Nor cast ye the loaves, nor fishes from the poor.
For, I grieve to say, it is my fate to drive a carriage-and-pair in the park,
With a thousand a yearÕ, said the parson. ÔOh give it to me,Õ said the clerk.
Amen
ÔThereÕs no pride about me,Õ said the clerk.

My Christian friends and brethren, you should ever be humble and meek,
And never strike a sinful man, when he strike you one on the cheek.
But turn, my friends, to the erring one, Yes, turn to the sinner so dark.
Thy other cheek,Õ said the parson. ÔIÕll break his nose,Õ said the clerk.
Amen
ÔYes, land him at once,Õ said the clerk.

ÔOh the boys are awfully tribulous,Õ the parson he said with a groan.
ÔThe boys too oft their Sunday school, wonÕt let the young hussies alone,
IÕve watched them grin behind their books, and IÕve seen the boys at their lark,
They were kissing the girls,Õ said the parson. ÔIÕve done it myself,Õ said the clerk.
Amen
ÔAnd theyÕre fond of it too,Õ said the clerk.

Well now, my sermon, friends, is done, I bid you go work and pray.
And donÕt do all your parson does, but do as your passion say.
And be ready to part of all worldly care, I venture this modest remark.
ÔNever drinkÕ, said the parson. ÔIÕm awfully dry,Õ said the clerk.
Amen
ÔAnd IÕm off for a wet,Õ said the clerk.

       For many years it was thought that Phil Tanner's version of this song, first recorded in 1949, was unique. In 1979, though, Mike Yates recorded Walter Pardon (1914-96) of Norfolk singing it. Then a Mrs. Brenda Bentall of Tonbridge, Kent, wrote to me (Roy Palmer) in 1982 to say that not only did she remember a verse of the song which she learned before 1934 but that she had a printed copy. This turned out to be an item of sheet music 'sung with immense success' by G. H. Macdermott (1845 1901), and written and composed by Geoffrey Thorn (pseudonym of Charles Townley, 1843-1905) which Hopwood & Crew of London published in 1882. Tanner would have been twenty when it came out. His memorable performance, almost lapsing into speech at times, is full of infectious gusto.
Song transcribed by John Howson
Song notes: Roy Palmer


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Subject: ADD: The Parson and the Clerk
From: Joe Offer
Date: 08 Jun 07 - 03:21 PM

I can't seem to read RTim's apostrophes and quotation marks, no matter what character encoding I choose. Here's his post again, with changes to the punctuation. Seems to me there was another song like this posted some time ago - see the crosslinks above.
-Joe-

The Parson and the Clerk

A parson preached to his flock one day, on the sins of the human race.
And the clerk, 'Amen,' aloud did say, with the solemnest tone and face.
And this pious clerk, on the quiet, though would venture a bit of remark.
'Oh sin is sweet', said the parson. 'Then sin for me', said the clerk.
Amen
'Then sin for me', said the clerk.

'Oh never covet thy neighbour's goods,' the parson he said, 'nor his maid,'
'To rob a man of that what's his, why a fellow should be afraid.
Nor covet ye not no man of sin, I would venture this better to mark.'
'Thy neighbour's wife', said the parson. 'The slavey for me,' said the clerk.
Amen
'The slavey for me,' said the clerk.

'Oh never sigh for that dross called gold, for blessed in the man that is poor,
Nor cast ye the loaves, nor fishes from the poor.
For, I grieve to say, it is my fate to drive a carriage-and-pair in the park,
With a thousand a year', said the parson. 'Oh give it to me,' said the clerk.
Amen
'There's no pride about me,' said the clerk.

My Christian friends and brethren, you should ever be humble and meek,
And never strike a sinful man, when he strike you one on the cheek.
But turn, my friends, to the erring one, Yes, turn to the sinner so dark.
Thy other cheek,' said the parson. 'I'll break his nose,' said the clerk.
Amen
'Yes, land him at once,' said the clerk.

'Oh the boys are awfully tribulous,' the parson he said with a groan.
'The boys too oft their Sunday school, won't let the young hussies alone,
I've watched them grin behind their books, and I've seen the boys at their lark,
They were kissing the girls,' said the parson. 'I've done it myself,' said the clerk.
Amen
'And they're fond of it too,' said the clerk.

Well now, my sermon, friends, is done, I bid you go work and pray.
And don't do all your parson does, but do as your passion say.
And be ready to part of all worldly care, I venture this modest remark.
'Never drink', said the parson. 'I'm awfully dry,' said the clerk.
Amen
'And I'm off for a wet,' said the clerk.

       For many years it was thought that Phil Tanner's version of this song, first recorded in 1949, was unique. In 1979, though, Mike Yates recorded Walter Pardon (1914-96) of Norfolk singing it. Then a Mrs. Brenda Bentall of Tonbridge, Kent, wrote to me (Roy Palmer) in 1982 to say that not only did she remember a verse of the song which she learned before 1934 but that she had a printed copy. This turned out to be an item of sheet music 'sung with immense success' by G. H. Macdermott (1845 1901), and written and composed by Geoffrey Thorn (pseudonym of Charles Townley, 1843-1905) which Hopwood & Crew of London published in 1882. Tanner would have been twenty when it came out. His memorable performance, almost lapsing into speech at times, is full of infectious gusto.
Song transcribed by John Howson
Song notes: Roy Palmer


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Subject: RE: Lyrics for Parson to the Clerk by Phil T
From: r.padgett
Date: 08 Jun 07 - 04:51 PM

The late great Tony Rose used to sing this one back in the 1970s and is on his Young Hunting vinyl record and a good job he always did of it

Tony passed on far too early and was one of the very first revivalist singers in UK along with Martin Whyndam Read, Nick Jones, Martin Carthy and Dave Burland

All of them were/are superb singers in the Tradition and singers like Tony and Dave really have not had the credit for all they have done for Traditional folk music ~ true gods!!


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Subject: RE: Lyrics for Parson to the Clerk by Phil T
From: badgerbiker
Date: 11 Jun 07 - 06:21 AM

Thanks everyone - all I need now is to learn the tune!!


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Subject: RE: Lyrics for Parson to the Clerk by Phil T
From: badgerbiker
Date: 11 Jun 07 - 06:21 AM

Forgot to say - Andrew - expect requests!


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Subject: RE: Lyrics for Parson to the Clerk by Phil T
From: Mick Tems
Date: 11 Jun 07 - 12:21 PM

Notes to The Parson And The Clerk were taken from the Phil Tanner CD "The Gower Nightingale" (VT145CD), which is a comprehensive, absorbing and fascinating 50-page booklet of notes and never-before-seen collection of photographs. There's even a photograph of the sheet music to G. H. MacDermott and Geoffrey Thorn's most famous piece in there.

"The Gower Nightingale" was born in the year 2000, which was 50 years since Phil's death. I had campaigned for a Phil Tanner CD - all that was left was a solitary 40-year-old EFDSS LP. I was determined that Gower's most famous traditional singer should live on in CD form, and I wrote a stage play called about Phil and the Gower culture he grew up in, called "A Gower Garland", which my duo Calennig and The Rag Foundation took to various village halls in Gower and ultimately to the National Festival. Calennig recorded a WildGoose CD called "A Gower Garland" as well, which went with the Phil's anniversary.

Not surprisingly, Welsh labels didn't want to know about the 50-year anniversary of Phil's death, so I contacted John Howson's Veteran Records. John readily agreed to publish the CD - then came my severe stroke, which disrupted my life and delayed the CD as well.

I was just recovering when John contacted me about "The Gower Nightingale", which he wanted to press ahead with the CD. I met him, with the traditional singer Roy Harris, at the Museum of Welsh Life, St Fagans, Cardiff, where I had a good response and offers of help from Beth Thomas, the manager. I took John on a journey of Gower, where we met informants who talked excitedly about a new Phil Tanner CD.

Eventually "The Gower Nightingale" came out in 2003, with a 15-minute introduction by the BBC correspondent Wynford Vaughan Thomas, recorded in the 1960s. Doug Fraser, Tanner historian, has a mention, and so do the Gower Society (particularly Malcolm and Ruth Ridge), The Museum Of Welsh Life, including Beth Thomas and Emma Lyle, Sally Clayden and The Gower Centre, Roy Harris and Ralph Jordan. Thank you all so much for helping us realise it.

Mick Tems


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