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Orange Songs

GUEST,songster 11 Jun 08 - 02:21 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 11 Jun 08 - 03:49 PM
trevek 11 Jun 08 - 04:17 PM
Peace 11 Jun 08 - 04:20 PM
GUEST,songster 11 Jun 08 - 05:03 PM
Leadfingers 11 Jun 08 - 05:07 PM
Seamus Kennedy 11 Jun 08 - 05:19 PM
Seamus Kennedy 11 Jun 08 - 05:20 PM
Jack Campin 11 Jun 08 - 06:37 PM
Paul Burke 12 Jun 08 - 03:24 AM
peregrina 12 Jun 08 - 03:29 AM
Big Tim 12 Jun 08 - 04:15 AM
cetmst 12 Jun 08 - 06:44 AM
nickp 12 Jun 08 - 07:02 AM
Wolfgang 12 Jun 08 - 07:06 AM
Wolfgang 12 Jun 08 - 07:15 AM
trevek 12 Jun 08 - 04:13 PM
GUEST,songster 13 Jun 08 - 05:46 AM
GUEST,Suffolk Miracle 13 Jun 08 - 12:32 PM
Big Al Whittle 13 Jun 08 - 05:53 PM
GUEST,JTT 14 Jun 08 - 06:08 AM
GUEST 14 Jun 08 - 09:04 AM
GUEST,JTT 14 Jun 08 - 09:27 AM
Big Tim 14 Jun 08 - 10:09 AM
GUEST,songster 14 Jun 08 - 10:29 AM
Kaleea 14 Jun 08 - 06:42 PM
Jim Carroll 15 Jun 08 - 11:26 AM
Brakn 15 Jun 08 - 12:54 PM
Jim Carroll 15 Jun 08 - 01:02 PM
Reiver 2 15 Jun 08 - 02:11 PM
Big Tim 16 Jun 08 - 05:13 AM
GUEST,songster 16 Jun 08 - 10:56 AM
Big Tim 16 Jun 08 - 11:08 AM
Malcolm Douglas 16 Jun 08 - 11:12 AM
Jim Carroll 16 Jun 08 - 11:37 AM
GUEST,John Moulden 21 Jun 08 - 07:27 AM
*#1 PEASANT* 22 Jun 10 - 07:32 AM
matt milton 22 Jun 10 - 07:59 AM
*#1 PEASANT* 22 Jun 10 - 09:04 AM
topical tom 22 Jun 10 - 01:54 PM
Reiver 2 22 Jun 10 - 03:29 PM
GUEST,A Blackman's Dream 07 Aug 10 - 07:13 PM
GUEST,Sol 01 Mar 18 - 06:49 AM
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Subject: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,songster
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 02:21 PM

I recently came across a pamphlet on about six orange songs at a car boot sale. It was in with a few modern song books I bought for a few pounds and I just left it to one side thinking 'I'm not interested. Was I wrong!
Some were on emigration, love and farming etc. Does anyone know of any sites or were I could find more orange songs, any topic.   

songster


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 03:49 PM

Songster, it might help if we knew which songs are in this pamphlet you got. Could you post the titles, please? Thanks.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: trevek
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 04:17 PM

Just because thy're Orange songs it doesn't necessarily mean they are comparable to SS marching anthems... Orang people have emotions to, so I'm told.

Some ar pretty good songs (politics aside).


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Peace
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 04:20 PM

Orange Colored Sky - Nat King Cole
Jelly Jungle of Orange Marmalade - Lemon Pipers
Orange Blossom Special - Johnny Cash
Orange - 10,000 Maniacs
Orange Rolls - Sonic Youth
Orange County Lumber Truck - Frank Zappa
Orange Crush - R.E.M.
Orange Driver - J.Geils Band
Orange Juice Blues - Bob Dylan
Orange Skies - Love
Orangefield - Van Morrison
Orange and Red Beams - Eric Burdon & Animals
Orang-outang - Bow Bow Wow
Orange Air - Fifth Dimension
Oranges & Apples - It's A Beautiful Day
Love For Three Oranges - Prokofiev
Orange Juice Song - Anita Bryant & Rush Limbaugh
Orange Lady - Weather Report


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,songster
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 05:03 PM

Thanks Peace, not what I ment but then again 'there's one in every classroom!'
George I will post them tomorrow, I have left them in a book in a friends house.
May be 'Peace' be with you.(heh heh)
songster


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Leadfingers
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 05:07 PM

The only Orange song I know came from Seville !


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 05:19 PM

Conrad Bladey who is/was a member here compiled a fairly large collection of Orange songs a few years ago.

Unfortunately he was given a rather rude reception by some members here due to the content of the songs.

His Mudcat name was #1 Peasant; perhaps he's still around.

I know he posted a fine collection of Geordie songs here not long ago.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 05:20 PM

I just checked in the personals, and he's still listed as a member;
#1 Peasant.

Good luck.

Seamus


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Jack Campin
Date: 11 Jun 08 - 06:37 PM

Anybody who encountered Conrad Bladey on Usenet before he discovered this forum will have no problem understanding why his activities might be treated with suspicion.

It would be nice to know what's in "songster"'s book, anyway.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Paul Burke
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 03:24 AM

The big question is, what do they rhyme with 'Orange'?


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: peregrina
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 03:29 AM

That many songs for the Dutch national football team?! (Just kidding.)


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Big Tim
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 04:15 AM

I have two booklets of Orange songs, bought in Derry's main bookshop a few years ago.

'Lilliburlero! and more songs of the Orange tradition'.

'The Orange Lark and other songs o' the Orange Tradition'.

Both published by the Ulster Society (of Brownlow House, Lurgan, Northern Ireland).


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: cetmst
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 06:44 AM

About five years ago I came across an online songbook "The Ulster Orange/Union Loyalist Songbook". On trying to return to it the site is no longer active but I had printed it out. It is mainly lyrics but a few reference the tune the song may be sung to and there are a few chords. Contents are in seven parts:
Part 1
Lili Burlero
Dollie's Brae
The Green Grassy Slopes of the Boyne
The Protetant Boys
The Orange Lilly O!
The Battle of Garvagh
Lisnagade
The Old Orange Flute
The Boyne Water
Portadown
The Sash My Father Wore
Part 2
The Ballad of Lindsey Mooney
Volunteers
The Billy Boys
The Enemies of Ulster
The Courtroom
Ballad of Andrew Craig
Loyal Protestant I
Loyal Protestant II
Ulster Volunteer
The Times They Are a-Changing
Sandy Row
Part 3
When the Old Sash Was New
Up Orangemen Up
The Death of Schomberg
A Fint True-Hearted Protestant
Rise Sons of William
On the Initiation of a Brother
Orange Gathering Song
William of Orange
Part 4
The Orange Flag of Victory
The Orange ABC
The Orange Yeomanry of '98
Derry's Walls
Prentce Boys of Derry
The Pope's Brigade
Loughgall
Ulster to the Rescue
The Orange Tree
You Willimites So True
The Orangeman
The Orange Lark
Part 5
The Orange Banner
Old Father Dan
Succes to the Orange Wherever It Goes
Sons Whose Sires With William Bled
An Advice to Orangemen
The Orange Plant
The Cannon of the 'Prentice Boys
King William's Day
The Battle of the Diamond
Shutting the Gates of Derry
Derry's Deathless Story
Our Contry's Savior
Battle of the Diamond
The Men of Skinner's Alley
Part 6
The Battle of the Diamond
New Protestant Boys
Orange Booven
The Gates of Londonderry
The Arab Orange Lodge
From Street to Street We Marched Away
Croppies Lie Down
From Every Hill and Valley
Shutting the Gates of Derry 2
When the Orange Lilies Grow
A Song for the Yeomen
How Hackett Fell
The Bright Orange Banner
The Crimson Flag of Derry
The Orange Maid of Sligo
Part 7 - Songs Concerning William of Orange from the Pepys Ballads:
A Congratulory Poem
A Third Touch of the Times
The Prince of Orange Welcome
A New Song of the Orange
The Prince of Orange's Triumph, (The Downfall of the Distressed Jesuits)
The Rare Vertue of an Orange (Popery Purged and Expelled Out of the Nation)


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: nickp
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 07:02 AM

Mr Tangerine Man


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Wolfgang
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 07:06 AM

cetmst, the collection is still on the web (with new URL)The Ulster Orange/Unionist/Loyalist~Songbook

Wolfgang (who personally prefers green songs by far)


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Wolfgang
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 07:15 AM

Re Paul's question:

In one song they rhyme "orange" with "great change"

Wolfgang (ouch)


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: trevek
Date: 12 Jun 08 - 04:13 PM

"Mr Tangerine Man "

or that famous Orange shanty, "We all live in an Orange Tangerine"

Home, home home, on Orange...


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,songster
Date: 13 Jun 08 - 05:46 AM

Thanks everyone who has taken this request seriously, I am not trying to provoke anything or anyone by this thread. I remember reading a few threads of Conrads (I discovered mudcat just as Conrad had almost given up on the Orange Songs thing) The songs in the (well worn) pamphlet are:
The Blackman's Dream
The Orange Maid of Sligo
The Shutting of the Gates of Derry
The Protestant Emigrant (quite touching)
The Battle of the Diamond
Dollies's Bray (a very long version - about 34 verses)

The last song Dollies Bray, the pamphlet has the last three or four pages missing so I didn't get the last of it.

I remember sitting in a pub with the late Frank Harte and he told me he had a vast collection of Orange songs. When I asked him, why?
He replied, 'One Country, Two Traditions!'
Why not, the protestant songs are traditional just as much as the nationalist songs. He told me he had written to Michael Stone and sent him a copy of a song composed of him and Michael Stone wrote back to him (from the Maze Prison) sending him another one composed inside the Maze.
Now, I don't like songs from either side that 'stirs' up ill feelings
in folk and I would not learn or sing any that would offend anyone. I just was asking if anyone could point me in a direction so that I could read more of them as in the past I have not been exposed to them.
Thanks again all for your help, Wolgang I checked out that link and am looking forward to reading a few.
Many thanks.
songster


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,Suffolk Miracle
Date: 13 Jun 08 - 12:32 PM

Can I seriously suggest you invest in a copy of John Maguire's autobiography (OK, ghosted by Robin Morton) Come Day go Day God Send Sunday for an example of how a traditional singer subsumes both traditions into his repertoire.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 13 Jun 08 - 05:53 PM

Theres actually a really well known compilation of Orange songs on cd. i see it on market stalls all the time. I'll look it up for you - if you're really interested.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 14 Jun 08 - 06:08 AM

Some of those Orange songs are beautiful. If you're interested in the tradition, you might try Songs of the Ulster Protestant - this is listed as 'various artists' but the artists aren't named on the Amazon listing, unfortunately.

A lot of the songs have that wry humour that's typical of Northerners of both traditions, like The Auld Orange Flute, which tells of a loyal flute whose player converted and attempted to bring it with him; it ended up being burned at the stake while still bravely playing - what else - The Protestant Boys.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Jun 08 - 09:04 AM

Thanks weelittledrummer, but if you can even find out the details of where and by whom it was recorded I can chase it from there.
JTT I know where to get my hands on that book, thanks. Though I don't think I would have any difficulty in mixing some of these in with my own repertoire, it's just the mind set of some folk I sing them in front of. Sean Moane (I hope I have spelt his name correctly) from Armagh who is a lovely singer, sings 'The Bold Orange Heroes of Comber' so there must be plenty out there I have still to find.
Thanks again for all your help
    songster


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 14 Jun 08 - 09:27 AM

Anyone who's too sensitive to hear these lovely songs now that peace is taking firm root in the North needs a sense of humour transplant.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Big Tim
Date: 14 Jun 08 - 10:09 AM

There are lots of Orange/loyalist CDs. I have two:

'52 Shades of Orange: 12th festive singalong: marches, music, songs'.
(52 tracks, but a bit of hotch-potch, including such non-Orange songs as 'Mairi's Wedding').

'No Surrender!': 14 great loyalist songs'.
(The latter includes 'Derry's Walls', 'Green Grassy Slopes of the Boyne', 'Dolly's Brae', 'Battle of Garvagh', etc.)


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,songster
Date: 14 Jun 08 - 10:29 AM

I have just been given an LP (for all those who can remember what they are) of Bobby Hanvey and his group 'Houl yer Whisht' called On Boyne's Red Shore, now I need to find a turn-table (thank God for these antiques) only kidding! I'm not to keen on the 'hard line' songs from either side but this album looks good.
songster


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Kaleea
Date: 14 Jun 08 - 06:42 PM

what rhymes with orange?
   Funny things I've heard people use to rhyme with "orange" in songs:

    porridge
    door hinge
    stonehenge
    lozenge
    forage (they sang "for-ij")


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Jun 08 - 11:26 AM

John Moulden is the overall expert on the subject IMO
Look up his website and see if there's anything there.
At the height of the 'Troubles' an archivist friend, while scouring the North for recordings and books for his archive, came across a cassette
entitled 'The Pope's a Darkie' - takes all kinds.....
Jim Carroll
PS You should have bought the pamphlet


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Brakn
Date: 15 Jun 08 - 12:54 PM

There was an Orange parade yesterday in Liverpool. As it passed the "Irish" pub that I was playing in the police ordered the doors to be closed to keep the baying mob outside. I don't think they wanted to come in for a drink. The incident only lasted about 5 minutes but you could see that people inside the pub were amazed that these kind of people still exist. Orange/NF/BNP - you have to feel sorry for them.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 15 Jun 08 - 01:02 PM

I served my apprenticeship for a ship repair firm on the Liverpool docks with Catholics and Protestants who, for 364 days of the year were the best of friends, except for 'The Glorious Twelfth', when they fought like cat and dog.
The only exception to the unity was when work was slack; then you could only get a job at Brown's if you were a Catholic or Cammel Laird's if you were a Protestant.
Funny thing religion!
Jim Carroll


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE BALLAD OF WILLIAM BLOAT
From: Reiver 2
Date: 15 Jun 08 - 02:11 PM

My favorite "Orange" song is:

THE BALLAD OF WILLIAM BLOAT

In a mean abode on the Shankill Road
Lived a man named William Bloat;
He had a wife, the bane of his life,
Who always got his goat.
So one day at dawn, with her nightdress on,
He cut her bloody throat.

Well he was glad he had done what he had,
As she lay there stiff and still.
But a sudden awe of the angry law,
Struck his heart with an awful chill.
So to finish the fun so well begun,
He decided himself to kill.

He took the sheet from his wife's cold feet
And twisted it into a rope.
And he hanged himself from the pantry shelf,
'Twas an easy end let's hope.
In the face of death, with his dying breath,
He solemnly cursed the Pope.

But the strangest turn to this whole concern
Was only just beginnin'.
He went to Hell, but his wife got well
And she's still alive and sinnin'.
For the razor blade was German made,
But the sheet was Belfast linen.


To fully appreciate the song it helps to know that Shankill Road in Belfast is a hardcore Protestant section of the city, and also of the great pride that Ulster men (and women) have taken in the quality of linen produced in Belfast. My notes (I'm not sure where I found them)(!)credit the song to Raymond Calvert, and the source to "Songs of Belfast, Hammond." Who, what, or where is "Hammond" maybe someone here can tell me.

Reiver 2


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Big Tim
Date: 16 Jun 08 - 05:13 AM

That would be David Hammond.'Bloat' is included in his book 'Songs of Belfast' (Mercier Press, 1978).


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,songster
Date: 16 Jun 08 - 10:56 AM

He is still about. I saw him last year in the 'John Hewitt' pub in Belfast. Someone told me he wasn't very well for a time but it's hard to keep a good thing down!
I have that book Reiver, it's excellent and I have a few others with orange songs since I last was on line. Not new to me, just didn't know I had them until I went and looked in my store of books I have salted away 'hoping to find time to read one day'
John Moulden I hear has vanished off the face of the earth I believe.
I hear he is in Galway lecturing in Galway University. He is Doctor John Moulden now, well done John. I haven't been onto his site in ages, it never seems to be updated. Anway, I have got a lot of help and pointers from this thread, thanks.
More is better, keep 'em coming please.
songster


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Big Tim
Date: 16 Jun 08 - 11:08 AM

I know somebody who bumped in John Moulden at Edinburgh University recently. He fairly gets around!

(David Hammmond got a mention on Mudcat recently for his recording of The Hills Above Drumquin). (Not an orange song!)


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 16 Jun 08 - 11:12 AM

See also thread  Help: William Bloat - background


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 16 Jun 08 - 11:37 AM

John Moulden posted on this site recently - think he is a member; if so, you could try PM-ing him.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,John Moulden
Date: 21 Jun 08 - 07:27 AM

Jim Carroll has told me of this thread and I'll be happy to give answers to specific questions. I don't much like many of these songs but they need to be exposed and discussed; they are made and used by people who, however misguided and afraid they may be, have qualities of endurance and kindness that should be commended. The interesting thing about the songs is that, while many are extreme in their politics, culturally - in the tunes they use and the verse and rhyme forms - they are four square Irish.

I'm flattered by the comments; some will be pleased to know that I've not been ill. As to my having vanished off the face of the earth, I've merely departed Portrush and Northern Ireland for Galway where they are paying me for doing what I'd probably be doing anyway.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 07:32 AM

Thanks for the references.
I have just created a new blog to extend my Battle of the Boyne history and celebration pages. On the sidebar scroll down and you will find a list of links to orange songbooks on line, full view at google books.
Amazing what is available.

http://boynehistory.blogspot.com/

Battle of the Boyne Blog
battle of the boyne blog

I will be extending the purpose of the blog to included orange music in general.
As far as I know my collection of Unionist orange loyalist songs is the largest on line.

Enjoy

http://mysite.verizon.net/cbladey/osong/ooooo.html


Orange Songbook

Conrad


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: matt milton
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 07:59 AM

I'd be interested to see the lyrics to 'the blackman's dream'.

what exactly is a 'blackman' in this context?!

In Paddy Tunney's book 'the stone fiddle' he features a couple of Orange songs. I think he used to sing them, not just collect them. 'The Purple Boy' has a great, fusty, arcane lyric, which puts it in similar territory to those mystical Irish masonic songs. There seem to be quite a few Orange songs in this kind of tradition – rather esoteric and pompous in a dusty old esoteric culty way – that I've come across thanks to the repertoires of Tunney, Len Graham and Frank Harte.

I sing one or two of them around the house, but I'd feel uncomfortable singing them out. It's one thing to be Irish and sing them - I feel that the songs I'm talking about are, relatively peaking, politically anodyne, focusing on the minutiae of tradition, and can be sung on both sides of the political divide in this day and age. But it's quite another thing for a middle-class englishman to sing them – suddenly there's a whole other political context.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 09:04 AM

The availability of more manuscripts on line combined with tunes and lyrics already there leads us to chart the course beyond simply finding the material.

Of course with all music it is important to work not just with archiving but with transmission and installation not just in libraries but within human minds and promoting active use of the material. This is accomplished by modifying performance style presentations into interactive ones. Get people song sheets and get them singing.

There is still substantial old school hatred which is keeping the music from being recorded, preserved and performed. This has eased quite a bit with the recognition that the material is simply folksong just like any other and that songs of solidarity can still be treasured as artworks and human achievements more than they are hated as political objects. In this regard it is important to make sure that in folk forums that the music is encouraged so that it can be preserved archived, stored on disk but also actively used.

In the area of orange music a few areas of interst come to mind.

-Historical accuracy- this has been coverd by John Moulden and others. The accuracy of many songs has been explored but probably more work to be done. Who were the people? Where were the battles? Are the songs correct. But further than that songs are not used as historical documents. They may refer to history but are actually works designed to develop solidarity, fit a rhyme scheme and are then literature only- perhaps fiction. However, history changes when these songs are taken as history over time adding to the perceived history, the received view of certain cultures and then are acted on. Therefore the distortions become as equally powerful and historical as the original historical events. So it is interesting to study the ripples caused by these works.

-Performance vs Oral tradition. What can be said of the songs that were held in common by significant numbers in the oral tradition? The ones that would appear at local, regional, and national gatherings of members of the cultural group. This will be a good number. Some will be known widely only locally.

Other songs will find their way into the performance category. Not every song in a songbook would be sung at gatherings in parlors or large venues by performers. Other songs would be of lesser importance. Why did the songs selected for performance get selected?

Another issue would be How were songbooks used? Were they used for personal use or for group use as hymnals? This would go beyond performance to a wider use of the songbook for groups to sing through.


It is often assumed too broadly that these songs were installed in the oral tradition or became popular. Many were simply marketed commercially.

To re state. No matter what we know of the materials it is important that the dimensions of preservation be covered if we are to know that our work is done. First the songs must be collected and archived found and stored. Second they must be available in recorded or published form Third they need to be performed in an active way not just for entertainment but in ways that will help those present sing along and capture the songs in their minds maybe take home song sheets for later use.

So the world of accessibility of the music begs us to go further till the bases are covered. Once the songs are out there they can inform new composition and can help to bring the benefits of song to the daily lives of others.

Go for it!

Conrad


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: topical tom
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 01:54 PM

I have a copy of a songbook entitled "The Sentinel Orange and Patriotic Song Book".Orders were to be sent to "The Sentinel",37-41 McCaul Street, Toronto,Ontario (no postal code, well before those).It is undated and is full of patriotic and orange songs.On the back page is written "ORANGEMEN-WHAT OF THE FUTURE!" I would venture a guess that the book was probably published sometime in the 30s or 40s.


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: Reiver 2
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 03:29 PM

When I first saw this thread I assumed that "Orange Songs" was in reference to songs of protestant Northern Ireland. Apparently many others did, too. There are some good songs. The Old Orange Flute and The Orange and the Green are two that Reiver 1 and I used to sing, in addition to the Ballad of William Bloat that I posted on this thread some time ago.

My best memory of those days was when we were asked to provide music for a gathering of the Orange Lodge Ladies Auxiliary of British Columbia, that was being held in Kamloops, B.C. where we lived. [I'm not sure if that was the exact name, but it was something like that.] After carefully screening out all the IRA songs or any that we thought might offend the good ladies, we sang other Irish songs for probably 45 minutes, which they seemed to enjoy. Then for our final number, we sang a verse or two of "Lord Nelson" which begins, "Lord Nelson stood in pompous state upon his pillar high. And down along O'Connell Street he cast a wicked eye." It goes on to relate how the IRA blew up the statue in 1966. The Orange ladies grew very quiet, and many smiles had turned to frowns, when we launched into "The Sash My Father Wore", a kind of Orange anthem that is set to the same tune. By the time we finished the first line the entire audience was smiling, clapping and singing with us.

Afterwards when we were putting away our guitars a number of ladies stopped to tell us how much they enjoyed the program. Finally, an elderly, dowager-type lady turned to me and asked where in Northern Ireland we were from! I said, in my best fake Irish accent, that we weren't actually from anywhere in Ireland, that Reiver 1 was a Liverpudlian and I was a Yank. She gave me a long puzzled look, then suddenly broke into a broad grin and said, "Och, go on wi' ye! Y'ur pullin' me leg! I can tell you're both from Belfast!" With that she turned and left, and I heaved a great sigh of relief.

Reiver 2


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,A Blackman's Dream
Date: 07 Aug 10 - 07:13 PM

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/ivymead/Black%20Songs.htm


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Subject: RE: Orange Songs
From: GUEST,Sol
Date: 01 Mar 18 - 06:49 AM

Re. The question earlier about a rhyme for 'orange'.
Leonard Cohen said the only one he could find was 'door hinge'. Who am I to argue with the lyrical genius.


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Mudcat time: 20 September 4:22 PM EDT

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