Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar

olddude 13 Dec 08 - 09:07 PM
JohnInKansas 13 Dec 08 - 10:18 PM
Deckman 13 Dec 08 - 10:34 PM
olddude 13 Dec 08 - 10:43 PM
Don Firth 13 Dec 08 - 11:35 PM
olddude 14 Dec 08 - 01:03 AM
olddude 14 Dec 08 - 01:20 AM
banjoman 14 Dec 08 - 08:35 AM
Tangledwood 14 Dec 08 - 05:35 PM
olddude 14 Dec 08 - 05:37 PM
The Vulgar Boatman 14 Dec 08 - 06:25 PM
Murray MacLeod 14 Dec 08 - 06:29 PM
olddude 14 Dec 08 - 06:56 PM
olddude 14 Dec 08 - 10:39 PM
catspaw49 15 Dec 08 - 12:33 AM
Don Firth 15 Dec 08 - 12:38 AM
olddude 15 Dec 08 - 01:26 AM
Tangledwood 15 Dec 08 - 02:39 AM
Murray MacLeod 15 Dec 08 - 03:17 AM
GUEST,Guest from Sanity 15 Dec 08 - 06:58 PM
Murray MacLeod 15 Dec 08 - 07:20 PM
olddude 15 Dec 08 - 10:21 PM
Don Firth 15 Dec 08 - 10:38 PM
GUEST,Guest from Sanity 16 Dec 08 - 01:25 AM
olddude 16 Dec 08 - 10:22 AM
olddude 16 Dec 08 - 10:24 AM
Don Firth 16 Dec 08 - 12:44 PM
olddude 16 Dec 08 - 02:21 PM
Murray MacLeod 16 Dec 08 - 03:41 PM
Don Firth 16 Dec 08 - 04:44 PM
Don Firth 16 Dec 08 - 05:35 PM
olddude 16 Dec 08 - 06:15 PM
GUEST,Guest from Sanity 17 Dec 08 - 02:30 PM
Piers Plowman 17 Dec 08 - 02:43 PM
Murray MacLeod 17 Dec 08 - 02:44 PM
Piers Plowman 17 Dec 08 - 02:50 PM
Don Firth 17 Dec 08 - 06:39 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 13 Dec 08 - 09:07 PM

Changing the strings on my cordoba and the nut fell off, Help
can I use any glue to glue it back on or should I use something special, crazy glue, elmers. How should I fix it. Doesn't have to go to the repair guy, there is nothing wrong, just the bone nut fell out

help
Dan


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 13 Dec 08 - 10:18 PM

Are you sure it's not supposed to fall out?

I'm not even a guitarist, much less a classical one, but I think I've heard that the string tension is supposed to be the only thing holding the nut in on some classical ones.

I'd suggest holding off on the glue until you can get some advice from someone who knows.

If it is supposed to be held in just by the strings your only problem is making sure it's pointed in the right direction since each of the slots should be fitted to the string that goes in it. You'd put one or two strings on just snug enough to hold the nut up, and then bring the strings up to pitch all together.

John

John


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Deckman
Date: 13 Dec 08 - 10:34 PM

Just put a little glue on it, put it back in place, put on the new strings, and go to sleep. bob


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 13 Dec 08 - 10:43 PM

John
you are right, checked on the web, the tension is suppose to hold it in. I never knew that. But I only had this guitar 6 months and the last string change I didn't take all the string off so it stayed in place. (did them 1 at a time)   This time I wanted to wipe down the fretboard so I took them all off first, that is why it fell out. Thanks much, I didn't know that on this guitar it was never glued ...


Thanks


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Don Firth
Date: 13 Dec 08 - 11:35 PM

As many classics as I have owned, I never found out if the nut is loose or not. I change strings one at a time and I've never had all the strings off at once.

Don Firth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 01:03 AM

That is what I normally do, but I wanted to clean up the fretboard. This was the first time I took all the strings off at once to wipe it down to get rid of the dirt


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 01:20 AM

This old cordoba I bought off ebay. No kidding it sounds like angels singing - just a beautiful sounding old guitar. I had a key sticking a bit and I hit it with a little bicycle chain wax lube.   I found that stuff is incredible for lubricating the keys and not building up or sticking with dirt or dust, works like a charm.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: banjoman
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 08:35 AM

Dont panic - just put the nut back in place and the strings will hold it. Make sure that its in the right place and the right way round. I've found that its only on steel string guitars that the nut is glued in place, and even then I've not bothered with glue when replacing it after working on the guitar
Happy Christmas
Pete


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Tangledwood
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 05:35 PM

When I had the action lowered on my guitar recently the luthier commented that the saddle was too tight in the bridge and that this would have an adverse effect on sound production. I infer from this that that glueing is not desirable for saddle and unnecessary for the nut.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 05:37 PM

Tangledwood
Thank you, I am pretty much a newbee at Classicals. I love the sound out of them but this is the first one I ever owned. What I really like is that they can be bright or they can be dull depending on what you try to achieve. My Martin 28 and other steel string guitars is always bright and that is it. Classical is fun although my playing does not do it justice in anyway for sure


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: The Vulgar Boatman
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 06:25 PM

Fare well on your new journey - I took up classical guitar forty years ago to improve my technique for playing folk music. The only music lessons I took in my life, but I had a really serious teacher. Finished up teaching classical guitar...still love it, still playing traditional music. Just do it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 06:29 PM

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Tangledwood - PM
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 05:35 PM

When I had the action lowered on my guitar recently the luthier commented that the saddle was too tight in the bridge and that this would have an adverse effect on sound production. I infer from this that that glueing is not desirable for saddle and unnecessary for the nut.


It would have to be pretty damn tight to have any adverse effect on sound production. When properly fitted, you should be able to grip the saddle with a pair of pincers and lift the guitar up bodily without the saddle coming out of the slot.

If the saddle was so tight that it couldn't make contact with the bottom of the slot, then that's a different matter.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 06:56 PM

I am self taught on everything. I do everything wrong but I do love the sound out of it.   Very very cool, soft and delicate yet bright and full when you want it to be ... love it


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 14 Dec 08 - 10:39 PM

Can you folks tell a newbee what is the difference between a classical guitar and a flaminco guitar? I don't get it both have wide necks and nylon strings. How can you tell the difference?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: catspaw49
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 12:33 AM

When you stand them up next to you, the classical just stands there while the Flamenco strikes a pose. Have you ever noticed that Flamenco dancers all look like they're applauding their own ass? Also don't be put off by my old buddy Murray. He's a Scot who lived in Florida for a time and I think it boiled his noodles. In any case he's still a good guy!

Spaw


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Don Firth
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 12:38 AM

I have owned both classic and flamenco guitars, have taken lessons in both classic and flamenco (several years from a couple of different classic guitar teachers, and lucked into being able to take about four months lessons from a real flamenco guitarist who was in Seattle in 1962, playing at the Spanish Village exhibit during the Seattle World's Fair), and I make an attempt at playing both, although my primary interest is folk song and ballad accompaniment.

The essential difference between a classic guitar and a flamenco guitar is that a classic guitar is generally made with a spruce or cedar soundboard and rosewood (the best) or mahogany back and sides. In a classic guitar, the luthier strives for a rich, mellow tone. A flamenco guitar also has a spruce or cedar soundboard, but it is generally sanded a smidgen thinner and it's a bit more lightly braced (although both use a fan-bracing system). The back and sides are made from cypress. A good flamenco guitar should have a bit of a "bite" to the tone. You could think of it as a good flamenco guitar sings with a distinctly "Spanish accent."

A flamenco guitar also has one or two pieces of plastic (golpeador), sometimes white, sometimes clear (practically invisible), glued to the soundboard to protect the soundboard from damage caused by rhythmic tapping (golpe).

Some hard-nosed purists claim that an authentic flamenco guitar has to have push-pegs in holes drilled through the headstock rather than a slotted headstock with geared tuning machines. Part of the claim is that the metal in the gears dampens the tone of a good flamenco guitar. That's simply nonsense. I've had both kinds of flamenco guitars and there is no perceivable difference in tone between the two. And a guitar with push-pegs is an absolute bitch to tune.

In 1961, I order a flamenco guitar from Arcangel Fernandez in Madrid and he offered me the choice, saying that as far as push-pegs vs geared pegs was concerned, apart from ease of tuning, the only real difference was in appearance rather than tone. Having owned one with push-pegs, I opted for the geared tuning machines. Since he made guitars to order, a year and a half later I got it, air freight from Madrid. It cost me the ridiculous price, including air freight and duty, of less than $200. It's recently been appraised at $18,000. Early 1960s "Arcangels" are highly prized and greatly sought after. But mine isn't for sale.

One other minor difference is that the action of a flamenco guitar is set a bit closer to the fingerboard than that of a classic. Flamenco guitarists tend to like a bit of "fret-buzz." Also, they almost always capo up several frets (using a traditional wooden çejilla (pronounce "say-HEE-yah"), not so much to change keys, but to play where the frets are closer together for fast scale-work (falsettas or improvised variations).

Within recent years, some flamenco guitarists have taken to playing classics, or "flamenco negro" guitars (dark wood backs and sides) because of the somewhat warmer tone, but the "flamenco bionde" (cypress) remains the standard. When I got my Arcangel, other than the small details mentioned, there was no actual difference in the details of construction between the two types of guitar, although I've had people (with no experience with either type of guitar) try to tell there is. Not so's you'd notice, however, when you examine the two types side by side.

Don Firth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 01:26 AM

thanks Don now I get it.

Spaw I will see if the guitar strikes a pose :-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Tangledwood
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 02:39 AM

"If the saddle was so tight that it couldn't make contact with the bottom of the slot, then that's a different matter. "

Thanks Murray, I think that might have been the case.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 03:17 AM

it wasn't the Florida sun that made me what I am today, Spaw, it was the unbelieveable anount of Cuban coffee I consumed there...

nonetheless, the saddle should be a press fit into the slot (not a hammer fit) and should not be easily removable. It is only a matter of a very few thousandths of an inch between a perfect fit and a sloppy fit.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 06:58 PM

on classical guitars, the nut is NOT glued in. (the dried glue tends to act as a 'cushion' for the vibrating strings..and the sound quality is not as crisp)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 07:20 PM

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity - PM
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 06:58 PM

on classical guitars, the nut is NOT glued in. (the dried glue tends to act as a 'cushion' for the vibrating strings..and the sound quality is not as crisp)


thing is, some people might read posts like this and actually believe it ...

I really believe that there is more crap, fallacies, and urban myths posted in the internet about guitars than about any other single subject.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 10:21 PM

Hey Guys
like I said I am a complete newbee when it comes to classicals
may I ask

why are they all so light? I mean this Cordoba is beautiful it has a rosewood back and just had such a mello loud and rich sound. I am completely happy with it. But the thing weights nothing compared to my D-28 Martin. I notice that most classicals that i have seen throughout my life are really really light in construction. Why is that?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Don Firth
Date: 15 Dec 08 - 10:38 PM

Steel strings exert about 2.5 times the tension that nylon strings do, so a classic guitar doesn't need the kind of heavy strutting that a steel-string guitar needs. Also, most steel string guitars have a steel truss-rod in the neck, which classic guitars don't need. Same reason.

If a classic guitar was as heavily built as a steel-string, it would sound muddy and have nowhere near the resonance and projection that it does.

Don Firth

P. S. By the way, for the reasons stated above, never ever put steel strings on a classic guitar.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 01:25 AM

Sorry Murray, you're wrong. Perhaps your 'Esteban classical guitar' bought from an infomercial is glued there...but not higher end models.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 10:22 AM

Thank you Don
now I get it


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 10:24 AM

Oh I switched to the hard tension classical strings instead of the normal tension. will that hurt the guitar? Normally I have used the normal tension but I find the hard has a nice bright sound when I want it. any problems with that?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Don Firth
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 12:44 PM

No problem, olddude. Hard tension classical strings are well within the perameters of what's safe on a classic.

In fact, I use hard tension strings on the flamenco guitar. I was getting just a bit more "fret-buzz" than I wanted. Fine for flamenco, but since I also use the guitar for song accompaniment, I took it to a nearby shop that deals in high-end classics to possibly have the bridge raised a hair. Steve Novacek (pronounced "Nova-check"), who knows about all there is to know about guitars, suggested that I leave the bridge alone, but put hard tension strings on it. I asked about the increased tension, and he said essentially what I said above. It solved the problem for song accompaniment, and I can still get the buzz if I want it.

I use regular tension strings on my classic, however. On that guitar, they sound better than the hard tension.

I also have a neat little nylon-string travel guitar (a GO-GW; it looks like a canoe paddle with strings). It has a short scale length (24.5" instead of the usual 25.6"), so the hard tension strings are what the maker work, Sam Radding, in San Diego, recommends, and they work just fine.

With a new guitar, it's a good idea to experiment with different string brands and tensions to see which ones give you the best sound.

Don Firth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 02:21 PM

Wow Don
thank you for educating me. I appreciate the time you took to tell me about them.

I was finger picking my Martin "california dreaming" and then did the same on the classical. Love the classical for that song so much better, just came out so gentle and sweet sounding. I find it harder for me to bar chord but that is just because I am not really use to it yet. I have a bad habit of thumb hooking the neck when I bar chord on my martin and I know that is not the right way to do it. Since the classical is a wider neck I have to push the proper way. Just a little practice and it will be second nature I think


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 03:41 PM

Guest from Sanity, I am not disputing the fact that classical guitar nuts are not glued in, I am well aware of this.

What I am disputing is your contention that gluing the nut would lead to a perceptible deterioration in tone quality.

That, my friend, is total bollocks.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Don Firth
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 04:44 PM

Dunno if you read music, olddude, but if you don't, this is a painless way to learn, at least for the guitar (and this is transferable to other instruments). There are a few good basic technique books for classic guitar that will give you a pretty good handle on hand positions, technique, and such, and set you up so you can pursue it further if you wish.

Aaron Shearer.   Good, solid basic technique book that moves you easily from very simple exercises up to playing some of the easier studies by such folks as Carulli, Aguado, and Fernando Sor. The Sor studies are especially nice in that they're easy to play, good technical practice, and they sound like real music. In fact, they are real music. Shearer goes on to more complicated stuff in subsequent manuals.

Frederick Noad.   Similar to Shearer, but when you get into the later pages, he has included a few pieces for the lute that have been transcribed for the guitar.   Segovia and others have recorded some of these, even if they are pretty easy to play.

Christopher Parkening. I don't think the exercises are quite as well organized as in the first two, but it has some good pieces in the back, and it's packed with excellent photos showing how to hold the guitar securely, close-ups of hand positions, and such.

I like the sound of the classic guitar enough so that I find practicing a sheer pleasure, even if it is frustrating sometimes (braiding one's fingers!). My main interest, as I said, is folk music and using the guitar for song accompaniment, but it's nice to be able to toss in a couple of Fernando Sor's studies or a lute transcription into a set of folk songs, then hear somebody mutter, "Hey! That sucker can really play that thing!"

Bon appetit!

Don Firth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Don Firth
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 05:35 PM

EEEEEEEK!!

I just spent a bit of time poking around YouTube, looking for miscellaneous classic guitar pieces. The stuff there runs the gamut from brilliant virtuoso playing to just plain gawdawful.

But once in awhile, you run into a real GEM!

I can play this piece almost as well as this young lady. But never again will anyone be able to tell me, "I can't play a classic guitar because my hands are too small!"

Watch and be amazed!!

Requerdos de la Alhambra, by Francisco Tarrega.

I am humbled!

Don Firth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: olddude
Date: 16 Dec 08 - 06:15 PM

OMG
that is incredible Don
wow !!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: GUEST,Guest from Sanity
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:30 PM

Don't be humbled, Don...yes, it was fast..but void of much 'feeling'. By definition, a virtuoso is not based on how fast one can play..but the emoting if the inner soul that comes out, and communicated in the playing!!!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Piers Plowman
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:43 PM

Just to add a couple of suggestions to Don Firth's list, my favorite books on guitar technique are the ones written by the late Ted Greene, who sadly died quite young.

Copied from Wikipedia:

Greene, Ted. Chord Chemistry, Alfred Publishing Company ISBN 0-89898-696-6

Greene, Ted. Modern Chord Progressions, Alfred Publishing Company ISBN 0-89898-698-2

Greene, Ted. Jazz Guitar Single Note Soloing, Volume 1, Alfred Publishing Company ISBN 0-7692-0972-6

Greene, Ted. Jazz Guitar Single Note Soloing, Volume 2, Alfred Publishing Company ISBN 0-7692-1282-4

The problem with hooking your finger around the neck will disappear if you practice not doing it.

A couple of months of practicing barre chords a lot and you shouldn't have any trouble anymore.

A classical guitar is a wonderful instrument. Even if I had my electric guitar available (it's on another continent), I would probably _practice_ most on the classical. I'd love a steel-string, a twelve-string, electric and acoustic, and all sorts of other related instruments. However, for sheer versatility you can't beat the classical guitar.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:44 PM

GUEST Refugee from Sanity, she is like 7 years old FFS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Piers Plowman
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:50 PM

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Piers Plowman - PM
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:43 PM

"The problem with hooking your finger around the neck will disappear if you practice not doing it."

Sorry, I meant your thumb, of course.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Tech: Help guitar nut, classical guitar
From: Don Firth
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 06:39 PM

GfS, I'm not humbled because of that, it's the thought of what I could have done (been) if I had started early and could play as well as she does at that age. Most guitar virtuosi get stated at a very early age:   Segovia, John Williams, Julian Bream, Pepe Romero, when they were around six or so. I began learning a few chords at the age of 22, then started taking classic lessons a couple years later. To have all those technical problems out of the way by the time one achieves a measure of maturity and begins playing music instead of just playing notes. . . .

She bobbled a bit here and there, her tremolo tended to "gallop" a little in places, and she played it a bit too fast toward the end where one should ease off and get lyrical, but when she develops some emotional maturity and can "feel" it, she'll have not much in the way of technical problems (all solved), and playing it should be like a stroll through the park for her.

What really blew my mind was that this piece has some nasty reaches in it, and with those itty-bitty hands of hers, she was making them. The final chord is a bar on the second fret with the pinky playing an A on the 6th string 5th fret and the 3rd finger playing a C# on the 5th string 4th fret, the first finger on the 2nd fret holding down an E and an A on the 4th and 3rd strings respectively. Right hand plays just those four notes—final closed position A major chord.

My problems are the opposite of hers at this stage. I have the musical and emotional maturity, but all too often, I don't have the technical proficiency to bring a piece off the way I feel it should be.

In the early 1960s I had the privilege of meeting the late French guitarist, Ida Presti, and her husband, Alexandre Lagoya, at a reception after a concert in Seattle. She was considered to be the world's greatest woman guitarist at the time (perhaps challenged recently by Sharon Isbin), and she started playing at the age of six. Gave her first public recital at the age of eight, and her first concert, in Paris, at the age of ten, causing a considerable stir in the press.

Her reach was legendary, and someone once challenged her to see how many E's she could get under her left hand.

Pretty impressive!

She was a small woman with small hands. My hands are much bigger than hers and I can't make that reach!

Her ghost continues to play on MySpace.

Don Firth


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 22 July 10:34 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.