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Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo

DigiTrad:
EILEEN AROON
PLAINS of WATERLOO
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (1)
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (3)
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (4)
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (5)
THE EIGHTEENTH DAY OF JUNE


Related threads:
Lyr/Chords Req: Plains of Waterloo (29)
Tune Req: with wellington we'll go (13)
(origins) Origin: Plains of Waterloo (from Rusby/Roberts) (17)
happy? - June 18 (The Plains of Waterloo) (7)
Lyr Add: Plains of Waterloo (9)
Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo (High Level Ranters) (18)


Matt Robson 06 Apr 97 - 06:41 AM
dick greenhaus 06 Apr 97 - 12:34 PM
12 Apr 97 - 05:13 AM
Dave Smithers 12 Apr 97 - 05:21 AM
Wolfgang 19 Aug 99 - 07:33 AM
GeorgeH 19 Aug 99 - 08:35 AM
Allan C. 19 Aug 99 - 08:41 AM
Wolfgang 19 Aug 99 - 09:31 AM
GeorgeH 19 Aug 99 - 01:09 PM
Allan C. 19 Aug 99 - 01:12 PM
wildlone 19 Aug 99 - 01:45 PM
bigJ 19 Aug 99 - 06:13 PM
Wolfgang 20 Aug 99 - 03:40 AM
GeorgeH 20 Aug 99 - 09:50 AM
bigJ 20 Aug 99 - 03:16 PM
Susanne (skw) 13 Dec 99 - 06:36 PM
Slider 16 Dec 99 - 11:20 PM
NSC 17 Dec 99 - 11:02 AM
Susanne (skw) 17 Dec 99 - 05:31 PM
Liam's Brother 17 Dec 99 - 07:17 PM
john c 18 Dec 99 - 02:47 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Dec 99 - 04:07 PM
Graham Pirt 18 Dec 99 - 06:17 PM
Liam's Brother 18 Dec 99 - 06:30 PM
McGrath of Harlow 18 Dec 99 - 06:50 PM
Susanne (skw) 18 Dec 99 - 07:04 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Dec 99 - 09:01 PM
Malcolm Douglas 18 Dec 99 - 09:36 PM
Susanne (skw) 19 Dec 99 - 06:52 PM
Graham Pirt 19 Dec 99 - 07:20 PM
richardw 24 Jan 00 - 11:32 PM
Wolfgang 25 Jan 00 - 06:14 AM
AndyG 25 Jan 00 - 07:01 AM
GUEST,aldus 25 Jan 00 - 11:31 AM
Liam's Brother 25 Jan 00 - 12:41 PM
Susanne (skw) 25 Jan 00 - 05:30 PM
Wolfgang 26 Jan 00 - 08:52 AM
Susanne (skw) 31 Jan 00 - 05:28 PM
lamarca 31 Jan 00 - 11:13 PM
The_one_and_only_Dai 02 Jun 00 - 04:02 AM
richardw 02 Jun 00 - 01:58 PM
The_one_and_only_Dai 05 Jun 00 - 06:15 AM
GUEST,Jim I 05 Jun 00 - 08:12 PM
AndyG 06 Jun 00 - 04:49 AM
richardw 26 Jan 01 - 11:14 AM
John P 27 Jan 01 - 08:22 AM
richardw 27 Jan 01 - 11:19 AM
richardw 02 Nov 01 - 11:57 AM
Wolfgang 02 Nov 01 - 12:17 PM
richardw 02 Nov 01 - 12:31 PM
Wolfgang 02 Nov 01 - 12:47 PM
John J 02 Nov 01 - 12:54 PM
Keith A of Hertford 02 Nov 01 - 02:15 PM
GUEST,Boab 03 Nov 01 - 02:34 AM
Wolfgang 08 Nov 01 - 03:45 AM
Paul from Hull 08 Nov 01 - 09:09 PM
richardw 09 Nov 01 - 12:19 PM
Malcolm Douglas 09 Nov 01 - 03:52 PM
richardw 09 Nov 01 - 08:13 PM
GUEST,yum yum 10 Nov 01 - 04:40 PM
Malcolm Douglas 10 Nov 01 - 05:09 PM
richardw 11 Nov 01 - 05:53 PM
GUEST,Bill Hewitt 30 Apr 05 - 05:45 PM
Malcolm Douglas 30 Apr 05 - 09:12 PM
smpc 07 Jul 09 - 09:41 AM
GUEST 17 Jun 15 - 10:18 AM
Keith A of Hertford 17 Jun 15 - 01:04 PM
GUEST 17 Jun 15 - 01:58 PM
GUEST 17 Jun 15 - 01:59 PM
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Subject: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Matt Robson
Date: 06 Apr 97 - 06:41 AM

Yet another song about the Battle of Waterloo. Anyone got the full lyrics to this version which begins:

On the eighteenth day of June me boys Eighteen hundred and fifteen Both horse and foot they did advance So glorious to be seen Both horse and foot they did advance And the bugle horn did blow And those sons of France we made them dance On the Plains of Waterloo.

Our cavalry sadvanced......

Napoleon like a fighting cock...


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 06 Apr 97 - 12:34 PM

It's in the database.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From:
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 05:13 AM

This version isn't in the database


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Dave Smithers
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 05:21 AM

I cant find this version in the database either. There are lots of versions but none with the words Matt Robson was looking for.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 07:33 AM

I refresh that very old request for I'd love to see the lyrics too. None of the about five songs in the DT you'll find searching for [plains of Waterloo] is even close.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: GeorgeH
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 08:35 AM

Nor is the rather fine Les Barker parody "The Trains from Waterloo" in the database (WHAT a philistine I am!!). I really must find some time to do a bit of typing . .

G.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Allan C.
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 08:41 AM

I poked around a bit and found two recordings of this song. Haven't heard them yet but I will pass them on as possible sources:

There is a recording of "Plains of Waterloo" by Rusby and Roberts which, if I read the note properly, is on a CD called, Rusby and Roberts

and another by Martin Simpson on a CD called, Cool and Unusual.

Hope this helps.

Allan C.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 09:31 AM

George,
not in the DT yet, but it has been posted last year in the Forum: Trains of Waterloo ^^

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: GeorgeH
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 01:09 PM

Alan C: The Cool & Unusual album is all instrumental . . and the "Two Kates", fine though it is, is (I believe; I'll check tonight) of the version in the DT rather than the one currently being sought.

G.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Allan C.
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 01:12 PM

Drat!


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: wildlone
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 01:45 PM

Try Voices Fellside fecd87.There is a version by the Wilsons.This is an exellent cd and as the name implys is recorded only using the human voice apart from the last track which uses multi tracking.i hope this helps.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE 18TH DAY OF JUNE (Wilson Family)
From: bigJ
Date: 19 Aug 99 - 06:13 PM

With compliments:-

THE EIGHTEENTH DAY OF JUNE (PLAINS OF WATERLOO)
as sung by the Wilson Family on the CD 'Voices' Fellside FECD87
(They learned it from the singing of Pete Woods)
It's possible that this may have come from the book 'Songs of the Midlands' by Roy Palmer where he included a version that Cecil Sharp collected in 1909.

On the 18th day of June, me boys, eighteen hundred and fifteen,
Both horse and foot they did advance; most glorious to be seen,
Both horse and foot they did advance and the bugle-horn did blow
Where the sons of France we made to dance on the Plains of Waterloo.

Our cavalry advanced with true and valiant heart
Our infantry and artillery did nobly play their part.
While the small arms they did rattle and the great guns they did roar
All on the Plains of Waterloo where the thundering cannons roar.

The French dogs made a stout attack in front of Mount Saint John,
Threw on their best battalions for the village for to gain.
Our infantry first charged them and made them face about
Sir William with his heavy brigade soon put them to the rout.

Napoleon, like a bantam cock, sat mounted on a bar (?)
He much did wish to represent brave Mars the god of war.
On a high platform there he did stand and loudly he did crow,
He drooped his wings and turned his tail to us at Waterloo.

The valiant Duke of Brunswick fell in the field that day,
And many a gallant officer fell in the awful fray.
And many a British soldier lay wounded in their gore,
Upon the plains of Waterloo where the thundering cannons roar.

(Repeat first verse)


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 20 Aug 99 - 03:40 AM

bigJ, that's it! Thanks a lot. If Matt Robson is still among us (well, this was his last post), he won't believe it.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: GeorgeH
Date: 20 Aug 99 - 09:50 AM

Well, the version on the "Two Kates" CD isn't the one which was being looked for, and isn't any of those on the database either (though I suspect if I'd transcribed all of the song rather than just V1 I would find it to be a variant of one of them . . ).

This one opens . .

Come all you loyal lovers I pray you to draw near To lie and write (?) a verse or two I mean to let you hear In praises of a worthy Who's honest, fair and true Who fought through Spain and Portugal And fell at Waterloo . . .

(now I ask myself whether this version could have been John Tamsed . . )

G.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: bigJ
Date: 20 Aug 99 - 03:16 PM

George, I'm surprised that John Mouldon hasn't been here before me, but a version similar to Kate Rusby's is on page 87 of Sam Henry's 'Songs of the People' (Huntinton/Herrmann/Mouldon)where it is followed by a version of the Eighteenth of June song that I give in the thread above.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PLAINS OF WATERLOO
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 13 Dec 99 - 06:36 PM

Just to complicate this thread even further, I taped the following song on Waterloo from the radio ages ago. It is sung by a man in a light tenor voice, very quiet and straightforward, but I have no idea who he is. It must have been in the late 70s or early 80s as I'm quite certain I got it from Wally Whyton's 'Folk Review' programme on BBC, probably from a (then) new album. I'd love to know who sings it and which album it is from. Do the words jog anyone's memory?

One fine summer's morning as I went a-walking
All down by the banks of some clear-flowing stream
There I spied a fair maiden making sad lamentation
And I drew myself in ambush for to hear her sad complaint
Through the woods she marched along, made the valleys to ring oh
While the small feathered songsters around her head they flew
Saying, The war it is all over and peace is returning
But my Willie's not returning from the plains of Waterloo

I approached this young maiden and I said, My fond creature
May I make enquiry as to what's your true love's name
For I have been in battle where the loud cannons rattle
And by his description well I think I know the same
Willie Reilly's my love's name, he's a hero of great fame
Although he's gone and left me in sorrow now 'tis true
And no man will me enjoy but my own darling boy
Although he's not returning from the plains of Waterloo

If Willie Reilly's your love's name then he's a hero of great fame
He and I have been in battle through many a long campaign
Through Italy and Russia, through Germany and Prussia
He was my loyal comrade in France and in Spain
But alas there at length by the French we were surrounded
And like heroes of old we did them subdue
We fought for three days till at last we defeated him
That bold Napoleon Boney on the plains of Waterloo

On the fourteenth of June it be an end in the battle
Leaving many a gallant hero in sorrow to complain
Where the drums they do beat and the loud cannons rattle
'Twas by a Frenchman's bullet your young Willie he was slain
And as I drew near to the spot where he lay bleeding
Scarcely had I time for to bid him adieu
And as he lay dying these words he kept repeating
Farewell my lovely Annie you are far from Waterloo

When this maiden she heard all this sad declaration
Her red rosy cheeks they grew pale and woeful wan
And when he heard the sound of her sad lamentations
He drew her in his arms and said, I am your loving one
Oh see here is the ring that between us was broken
In the midst of all danger it reminded me of you
And now this young couple well they are reunited
No more will Willie battle on the plains of Waterloo


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Slider
Date: 16 Dec 99 - 11:20 PM

Susanne, thanks for posting those lyrics. Funny how things have a way of turning up. I've thought about making an inquiry regarding this song. I not sure if this is the singer you have in mind, but I do have this song on a tape that a friend gave me years ago of Peter Rowan stuff. Sorry I can't tell you the name of the album as the tape is labled simply "Peter Rowan". Hope this is some help.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: NSC
Date: 17 Dec 99 - 11:02 AM

wildlone.

I think that track is not multi tracked but uses a number of people. All the music sounding bits are made by the human voice too. A wonderful CD imaginatively put together.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 17 Dec 99 - 05:31 PM

Thanks, Slider, but no, it can't be Peter Rowan. There is no trace of an American accent. It sounds VERY English, actually! Still, I'll keep hoping. - Susanne


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 17 Dec 99 - 07:17 PM

Unless I'm mistaken, the ballad supplied by Suzanne is known in tradition only in Canada. If it was sung elsewhere, I would love to hear. The great Ontario singer, O.J. Abbott, is the one who really "gave" us the ballad via folklorist Edith Fowke who collected and published his songs. There is every indication that it comes from an Irish or British broadside however, to the best of my knowledge, no one has ever come up with an original (broadside) sheet. Again, I would be delighted to learn otherwise.

As I wrote in another Mudcat thread, in the 1970's, every unaccompanied singer who wanted to be taken seriously sang this song. Frank Harte and Royston Wood sang it at our folk club in NYC and there were more. Amazingly, hardly anyone sings it today and when I came out with it at a festival in Ireland a couple of years ago I could hear people whispering, "Oh, THAT one!" in happy and nostalgia-touched voices.

In short, it could have been any good singer of the '70s, Suzanne. Was it Peter Bellamy?

All the best,
Dan Milner


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: john c
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 02:47 PM

There is a great version of P.o.W with the the lyrics as given by Suzanne on the record Love,Death and the Lady by Shirley and Dolly Collins. Actually, the whole of that record is great and cant be recommended highly enough. J.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 04:07 PM

I'd certainly second john c's recommendation of Love, Death And The Lady. There are some other Waterloo songs, including the "fighting cock" one, at the Bodleian Broadside site, here -a search for Waterloo will find them.

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Graham Pirt
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 06:17 PM

I have a wonderful rendition of a variant of this song by Willie Scott the border shepherd who died a few years ago. The tape was recorded in The Plough at Whitby Folk Week, in the 80's


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 06:30 PM

Hi Graham!

I'm curious which Plains of Waterloo Willie Scott sang. As I' sure you know there are a few totally distinct songs with the same title. Can you give us a few verses please. Thanks.

All the best,
Dan


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 06:50 PM

Susanne's "Plains of Waterloo" (with a few minor variations - sixteenth of June instead of 14th, for example) is included in an excellent book called "The Cruel Wars - 100 Soldiers' Songs from Agincourt to Ulster" compiled by Karl Dallas (also known at one time as Fred Dallas, and writer of a lot of good songs, including Thew Family of Man), which was published by Wolfe Publishing in London in 1971 or so.

And he credits it to O.J.Abbott of Ottowa (sic) - and recommends the Shirley Collins recording.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 07:04 PM

It's wonderful the way you're all trying to help, and I certainly know more now than I did before, though I've seen Karl Dallas' book. However, the singer is neither Shirley Collins (whose voice - dare I say it? - I'm rather allergic to) nor Peter Bellamy who'd be unmistakable. I think I'll try to follow up Dan's Canada hint. Thanks to all of you. - Susanne


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 09:01 PM

Tom Gilfellon (tenor voice) recorded the song with the High Level Ranters in the early '70s, so that one's probably worth bearing in mind. Unfortunately I can't find any reference to which record it was on...

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 18 Dec 99 - 09:36 PM

Turns out that the version I was thinking of was on High Level, (Leader Records, probably 1971), and therefore now sitting un-re-issued in the vaults of Celtic Records (on whom we spit). A great pity, because it was a fine record, which really should be allowed out once again into the world!

Malcolm


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 19 Dec 99 - 06:52 PM

Malcolm, I have another album by the HLR, and I'll check out the voice. Also, I've seen High Level (or was it High Ground?) around in second-hand shops. Thanks! - Susanne


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Graham Pirt
Date: 19 Dec 99 - 07:20 PM

Dan

Willie Scott's version began:

Was a lady was a-walkin alang the banks o Clyde
The tears ran doon her rosy cheeks as I passed by her side
I saw her bosom heavin, her voice was low and true
she was weepin for her Willie lad, who sailed for Waterloo.

Great song with an even better tune - if you're interested I'll get the rest of the words and send you a file of the tune.

Graham


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 24 Jan 00 - 11:32 PM

Liam's brother: re "Plains of Waterloo".

I am interested in your comments about this (these) song[s]. I am doing some research on this and came across the old and not so old thread. I am trying of find a tune for a song that is likely called Plains of Waterloo that was written down, ie collected, remembered, recorded, whatever, in B.C. in May of 1877. What was the life span of Abbott?

The first verse, which sort of fits the "Waterloo" midi in the mudcat is:

On the 16th day of June my boys in Flanders where we lay,

Our Bugels did alarm us Belgiums just at the break of day,

Our Royal British Brunswickers and Hanovarians to

Brussels left that morning for the Plains of Waterloo.

In the mudcat the "plains of Waterloo II has the same repeating line, but the words are not the same.

Any ides from anyone, and what tune might it fit to.

Richard Wright


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 25 Jan 00 - 06:14 AM

Susanne, following one lead from DanMilner, here's your man: Frank Harte singing 'Plains of Waterloo' on his Mulligan Records LP 'And listen to my song'. The lyrics are as identical as lyrics in a transcription can be expected to be. The only time I've seen this song in print is in 'The Penguin Book of Canadian Folksongs', a slightly different version starting 'As I roved out on a fine summer's morning'.

Notes from Frank Harte:
"This is a song that lay dormant for years, I heard it first sung at a flead in Ballyfarnon, the singer had heard it in England. I have since discovered that it was found by a collector in Ottawa where it was sung by Mr. O.J. Abbott who is eighty five years of age, he in turn many years ago learned it from a Mrs. O'Malley. The song must be Irish in origin, the air is a version of the older song 'The Blackbird' which was the allegorical name for the Young Pretender Prince Charles Edward Stuart and the story is very similar to the song sung by Margaret Barry 'The Mantle So Green' where the woman says to her hero (Willie O Reilly and not Willie Smith as in the Canadian version)
'To the woods I will wander to shun all men's view,
For the lad that I love fell in famed Waterloo.'
or when he reveals that he is indeed her true love
'Now Peace is proclaimed and the truth I declare,
Here is your love token the gold ring I wear.'
Later on I came across a reference to it in Sam Henry's collection Volume Two, where underneath song number 619 The Lakes of Pontchartrain he asks 'Can any reader supply the complete words of the song beginning' and he gives only the first verse of this song, for myself I can only be grateful that somebody has at last come up with the rest of the words."

Notes from 'The Penguin Book of Canadian Folk Songs' (compiled by E. Fowke):
"This fine version of the broken ring story seems to be best known in Canada. Dr. Mackenzie, the first to report it (183). suggests that it is a modified version of 'The Mantle So Green' (N 38), which in its turn is a modified version of the eighteenth century 'George Reilly' (N 36). Creighton found three more versions in Nova Scotia(MFS 56 and Folkways FEE 4307); Greenleaf (172) and Peacock (1014) found it in Newfoundland; Leach in Labrador (172); Creighton in New Brunswick (FSNB 76); and I have two other versions from Ontario."

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: AndyG
Date: 25 Jan 00 - 07:01 AM

It's strange how memory (doesn't) work !

Both the original and most recent requests suddenly brought stuff to mind. This is on the tip of my tongue but I just can't retrieve it. However the chorus, if I'm on the right track goes along the lines of:

Chorus:
Ten thousand prisoners we made
Imperial Eagles too
Though prisoners we made, there were more lay dead
On the Plains of Waterloo

It's not in the database, it's a big rousing chorus.
Someone out there must remember it.

AndyG


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: GUEST,aldus
Date: 25 Jan 00 - 11:31 AM

Susanne; I think the version you are looking for is by pentagle..at least the lyrics are very close to a version they did of it. I forget which album it was on.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 25 Jan 00 - 12:41 PM

TO: Robert Wright

Mr. Abbott died, I believe, in 1962 at the age of 90. His ballad is not the one you're researching.

The standard reference for broadsides ballads of British Isles origin collected in North America is American Balladry from British Broadsides by G. Malcolm Laws, Jr. (1957). In that reference, Laws gives 3 distinct ballads under the title of "The Plains of Waterloo." He codes the ballad you cite above as "J3" - "The Plains of Waterloo II."

Songs of the Newfoundland Outports, by Kenneth Peacock was a book published in 1965 by the National Museum of Canada (note: after the Laws reference). In volume 3, page 1016, there is "The Plains of Waterloo (II)."

The first verse of this ballad is corrupted but this is your song.

"On the fourteenth day of June, me boys, on Flanders where we lay,
Such bugle 'larms of all did sound before the break of day;
Three British boldly Brunswickers and men of Erin too, oh,
How they crowd sails that morning for the plains of Waterloo."

Songs of the Newfoundland Outports has a tune for this ballad. If you live in Canada, this should be available through the library.

Additionally, this song was collected in the UK by Ford, Logan, Christie, Grieg, Kidson and others.

I hope this is helpful.

All the best,
Dan Milner


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 25 Jan 00 - 05:30 PM

Wolfgang and aldus, thanks for your suggestions. I'll check my tape and let you know. Actually, I think Frank Harte is more likely, for I have a recording by Pentangle which doesn't sound anything like the style. As I've never consciously heard Frank Harte sing (now stop throwing those foul eggs, please!), it's a bit difficult, but many thanks, anyway. - Susanne


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 26 Jan 00 - 08:52 AM

AndyG, here are two verses from M. Pollard, Ballads and Broadsides, of a song titled (how else?) Plains of Waterloo:

Come all courageous Britons brave, of honour and renown,
who fight for King and country, likewise for Britain's crown,
I'll tell you all the story, as far as I do know,
concerning the great victory that was gained at Waterloo.

...
The tune had not been half played out till the French had danced their fill,
twenty thousand of her bravest troops upon the field lay still
. Ten thousand prisoners we had, with Imperial eagles too,
and British vioctory was proclaimed on the plains of Waterloo.

Well, that's the first and the before last verse of a song too long to type today but I wouldn't mind the work if it's the right song. It sounds like it could be the song you had in mind. I have never heard it and my source gives no tune.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 31 Jan 00 - 05:28 PM

Wolfgang, after listening to my tape again I'm quite convinced the singer isn't Frank Harte. It's a youngish voice, very smooth, and there is accompaniment of a rather popsy quality. I don't think Frank Harte would like to be associated with this version. The mystery continues ... Watch this space! - Susanne


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Subject: Lyr Add: LONELY WATERLOO
From: lamarca
Date: 31 Jan 00 - 11:13 PM

Daithi Sproule recorded a lovely variant of this ballad on his solo album, Heart Made of Glass. Titled Lonely Waterloo, he found the lyrics in a book and set it to a tune of his own composition. I've since found the song in Peacock's Songs of the Newfoundland Outports, and sing those lyrics (or at least my errant memory's approximation of them) to Daithi's tune:

LONELY WATERLOO

A maiden fair was walking down by the riverside,
The crystal tears fell from her eyes as I walked by her side;
I saw her wavering bosom, these words being kind and true;
She said "Friends, I'm afraid my Willy's slain at lonely Waterloo."

"What were the clothes your Willy wore?" one soldier there replied,
"He wore the highland bonnet with a feather standing high,
With a glittering sword hung by his side o'er his dark coat of blue
Those were the clothes my Willy wore at lonely Waterloo."

"If that's the clothes your Willy wore, I saw his dying day,
Five bayonets pierced his tender breast before that he down lay.
He held me at his dying hand, saying 'Some Frenchman did me slew(sic)';
It was I that closed your Willy's eyes at lonely Waterloo."

"Oh, Willy, lovely Willy," and she could say no more,
She threw herself down on her knees, those dreadful tidings bore.
"Oh, if I had wings of little birds, with eagles I would fly,
I would fly to lonely Waterloo, where my true love does lie.

I'd alight all on his bosom, all sorrows to remove,
I'd kiss my Willy's cold, clay lips at lonely Waterloo.
May the gates of Death swing open wide, and swallow me down through,
Since my Willy lies a mouldering corpse, at lonely Waterloo.

I'm afraid I don't know ABC or other tune formats, else I'd give the tune, too. I really love this song.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 02 Jun 00 - 04:02 AM

The immensely talented Five Guys Not Called Matt (of whom I'm one) have recorded this. For your delectation, you can find the recording here

(http://website.lineone.net/~andy_powell/five.htm)


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 02 Jun 00 - 01:58 PM

Which version is "This", please

richard


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: The_one_and_only_Dai
Date: 05 Jun 00 - 06:15 AM

Oops, it's actually the one identified by Liam's Brother above as the target of this thread.


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Subject: Lyr Add: PLAINS OF WATERLOO
From: GUEST,Jim I
Date: 05 Jun 00 - 08:12 PM

What an incredible thread. I've learnt more about 'Waterloo' songs in 20 minutes than I have in 20 years. The version I learnt about 1968 seems to hover between many of the above. I have no idea where I got it from.

Jim

PLAINS OF WATERLOO

1. On the fourteenth day of June, me boys
In Flanders where we lay
The bugles the alarm did sound
Before the break of day.
We British, Belgians, Brunswickers
The Hanoverians too,
All Brussels left that bitter night
For the plains of Waterloo

CHORUS: Ten thousand prisoners we made
Imperial eagles two.
Though prisoners we made
There were more lay dead
On the plains of Waterloo.

2. For full four hours or longer
We sustained that bloody fray.
All through that long, cold, darksome night
Upon our arms we lay
Our orders from our general
Next day we did pursue
And retired in files for near six miles
To the plains of Waterloo.

3. The bloody battle then began
The cannons they did roar.
We being short of cavalry
They pressed us full sore
Three British cheers we gave them
And volleys not a few
Which made them wish themselves in France
And far from Waterloo.

4. Here's a health to George, our royal king
And long may he govern.
Likewise the Duke of Wellington
That noble son of Erin.
Three years they've added to our time
With pay and pension too
And now we are recorded all
As the men of Waterloo.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: AndyG
Date: 06 Jun 00 - 04:49 AM

Thank you Jim!

That's the one I didn't learn 20 years ago :)

AndyG


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 26 Jan 01 - 11:14 AM

Jim, Guest;

That's the version I have been looking for. I know you say you don't know where you got it, but do you know where I might find the tune?

I have the same version, or very similar, written in long hand in 1877.

Thanks

Richard Wright


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Subject: Lyr Add: PLAINS OF WATERLOO (John Renbourn Group)
From: John P
Date: 27 Jan 01 - 08:22 AM

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the version sung by Jacqui McShee on the John Renbourn Group's "Enchanted Garden" album. I think it's the only time I've bothered to learn someone else's guitar part for a song.
John Peekstok

THE PLAINS OF WATERLOO

As I rode out one bright summer's morning,
Down by the gay banks of some clear and pleasant stream,
There I spied a fair maid making sad lamentations,
So I threw myself in ambush to hear her sad refrain.
Through the woods she marched along, caused the valleys to ring,
And the fine feathered songsters around her they flew.
Saying, "The wars they are over and peace it is restored again,
Yet my Willie's not returning from the plains of Waterloo."

Well I stepped up to this fair maid and said, "My young creature,
Oh, may I make so bold as to ask your true love's name?
For it's I have been in battle where the cannons round do rattle,
And by some strange fortune I might have known the same."
"Willie Smith's my true love's name, he's a hero of great fame,
And he's gone and he's left me and stole my heart, it's true,
Yet no one will I enjoy but my own darling boy,
Although he's not returned yet from the plains of Waterloo."

If Willie Smith's your true love's name, he's a hero of great fame,
He and I have been in battle through manys a long campaign.
Through Italy and Russia, through Germany and Prussia,
Oh, he was my me loyal comrade through France and through Spain.
Until at length by the French we were surrounded,
Like the heroes of old we did them subdue.
We did fight for three days until we did defeat him,
That bold Napoleon Boney on the plains of Waterloo.

On the eighteenth day of June was the end of the battle,
Leaving many a poor hero for to sigh and to moan.
Oh, the war drums they did beat and the cannons loudly rattle,
It was by a French soldier your Willie was slain.
And as I passed by where he lay a-bleeding,
Oh, I scarcely had time for to bid him adieu,
In a faltering voice these words he was repeating,
"Fare thee well, my lovely Annie, you are far from Waterloo."

Now when this fair maid heard his sad acclamation,
Well her two rosy cheeks turned to pale and to wan,
And when he saw this fair maid making sad lamentations,
Oh, he said, "My dearest Annie, I am that very one.
And here is the ring that was broken between us
In the midst of our danger to remind me of you."
And when she saw the token she fell into his arms then,
Saying, "You're welcome dearest Willie from the plains of Waterloo."


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 27 Jan 01 - 11:19 AM

John;

I can't hear the tune of your positng but the lyrics are the same as the version June Tabor sings. She does a good job of it, of course. With all the ornamentation she adds it woudl be a hard version to duplicate.

Richard Wright


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 02 Nov 01 - 11:57 AM

I've finally got a chance to get back to this song;

Dan: the Laws J3 that you quote is does seem to be the one I'm looking for, but, the Plains of Waterloo II in the Digitrad is not the same, though it says it is Laws J3. Hmm.

Dai: I tried your link to find out about your CD but it goes to a search engine. Is there a new link?

The one I'm looking for has the chorus, I now realize that Andy G. mentions. I thought it was a partial verse tagged on the end. The one Jim mentions is the one that I have in manuscript form from 1877. Anyone know of documentation of this or a CD?

Richard Wright


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 02 Nov 01 - 12:17 PM

Richard,
look at my post from 26 Jan 00 that was in response to Andy's verse/chorus. Is that the song you mean?

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 02 Nov 01 - 12:31 PM

Wolfgang;

Yes it would appear a variation of the same. Your last verse reads like this in my version:

When Caledone took up her drone and loud her chanters blew
To marshal Ney a new Strathspey to the tune of Waterloo
The tune it was not half played out when the French had cried their fill
Ten thousand of their warriors all on the field lay still.

Ten thousand prisoners we took with Impereagles too
The British Victory was proclaimed on the plains of Waterloo.

The last two lines are written separately so may be the chorus referred to. Caledone would seem to refer to the Highlanders, Caledonians. However, it seems your version is close. What are the references for it in the text you have?

I am trying to document songs sung in the BC Gold Rush and this and the British Grenadiers are the only "traditional" songs I have found, so it may be of some significance.

Richard


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 02 Nov 01 - 12:47 PM

I'll have a look at home, Richard, but won't be back before Monday or Tuesday.

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: John J
Date: 02 Nov 01 - 12:54 PM

bigJ: many thanks for posting the words.

John J


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 02 Nov 01 - 02:15 PM

Suzanne, I have your version on an album by a band called Crows. The sleeve note justifies the line We foght for three long days... saying" the campaign began on the 16th with Napoleon's attack on the Prussians at Ligny.Many regiments in Wellington's army who foght at Quatre Bras on the evening of the 16th lost more men than they did in the subsequent engagement." Their vocallist is/was Mick Ryan. They say it comes from Canadian O.J. Abbott.

Keith.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: GUEST,Boab
Date: 03 Nov 01 - 02:34 AM

Just an aside; Terry Conway, my favourite Northumbrian singer/songwriter, used to perform regularly in Hexham club his song "Waterloo". I can't quote all lyrics, but my mind brings back--"Wellington and Marshal Blucher, underneath a sky of blue, on a golden day of summer, won the field at Waterloo" . Anyone familiar with this one?


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Wolfgang
Date: 08 Nov 01 - 03:45 AM

Richard,

the 'Plains of Waterloo' I have in Pollard's 'Ballads and Broadsides' is definitely the same song. The information, however, in my photocopy of the book is scarce. Here's all I have:

...contemporary broadside account of the battle of Waterloo which appeared in many nineteenth-century books of ballads but did not survive too well among singers...

Wolfgang


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Paul from Hull
Date: 08 Nov 01 - 09:09 PM

Good thread..well worth refreshing!

Keith of Hertford, unsurprisingly, got in with all that I could add, & more, with referring to the one 'Crows' recorded. I've got that too (and the song done by the Wislons also)


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 09 Nov 01 - 12:19 PM

Wolfgang;

Thanks for that. That is the first definite published hit I have been given. I cannot find it on any listing of broadsheets or sheet music. As I metnioned the date I have is 1877 and my guess is that it was transcribed from singing, rather than a roradhseet, as there are spelling and grammatical errors.

Thanks for the help

Richard


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 09 Nov 01 - 03:52 PM

To amplify a bit on Dan Milner's post earlier on, that particular Plains of Waterloo turns up in a number of places, amongst which:

Frank Kidson's Traditional Tunes (1891) has a set obtained "from a country singer in Dumphriesshire", with tune.  Only four verses are given. Kidson commented:

"The above version of the ballad is said to be the composition of a Sergeant Grant of the 92nd regiment, who wrote it directly after the battle... it is the copy most frequently met with on broadsides, ...is reprinted in Logan's Pedlar's Pack of Ballads, and a similar version is given by Christie..." [Traditional Ballad Airs, 1876 and 1881].  He adds that the air he prints is quite dissimilar from Christie's.

Ord, Bothy Songs & Ballads (1930) prints a 12-verse text (no tune) with an alternative final verse, about which he remarks "Half a century ago a version of this ballad was sung in the Feeing Markets of the North-east of Scotland."  Since the book was published posthumously, that would likely be in the 1870s.

The Grieg-Duncan Folk Song Collection (vol. I, 1981) has 8 texts and 7 tunes; these were collected in the early years of the 20th century, at least one having been learned by the singer "about 60 years ago from an old soldier".  Mr. Garioch's set was noted in 1907, so that would take us back to the the mid 19th. century.

The song has also been credited (cf. notes, Greig-Duncan) to "John Robertson, a bugler in the 92nd Highlanders" and "two soldiers of the Highland Brigade".  I wonder if anyone has researched these attributions?

None of these examples, incidentally, has a refrain.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 09 Nov 01 - 08:13 PM

Malcom;

Thanks for the references. Unfortunately I am not near a major library so will have to wait until I do so to look them up. Mine one does appear to have a chorus, however. And, as mentioned earlier, does not fit with any of the Laws versions. My 1877 date does fit nicely with some of the dates and refs you have.

Thanks again.

Richard


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: GUEST,yum yum
Date: 10 Nov 01 - 04:40 PM

Is not the version you seek on Frank Harts new CD 'My Name is Napoleon Bonaparte'. If not, he will have it.

yum yum


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 10 Nov 01 - 05:09 PM

None of the Waterloo songs on Frank Harte's CD is the one Richard is looking into.  Incidentally, Richard, I can always let you have copies if you can't get the material through a library.


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: richardw
Date: 11 Nov 01 - 05:53 PM

Malcolm has generously scanned and sent me a copy of the version printed in Frank Kidson's Traditional Tunes, 1891. it is the version I have been looking for. Kidson does not show a chorus. My version has what appears to be the same chorus as AndyG mentioned above. Kidson's has a range of a octave and a half --ouch-- so it is tough to sing for me.

Thanks for all the help

Richard Wright


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: GUEST,Bill Hewitt
Date: 30 Apr 05 - 05:45 PM

There is a version of "18th Day of June" under the title Waterloo - which I am in the process of learning. Its on a CD by Dave Webber and Anni Fentiman
According to the sleeve notes this version was found in the Frank Kitson collection - the words are similar to several of the other sets posted but has the first verse repeated as a chorus after each subsequent verse

There are enough verses in this trail which would fit the tune to put together a realy interesting or very long version - the lyrics are given below


WATERLOO (F or F#)

On the eighteenth day of June me boys , eighteen hundred and fifteen
Both horse and foot they did advance , most glorious to be seen
Both horse and foot they did advance and the bugle horns did blow
And them sons of France we made them dance on the plains of Waterloo


On the fifteenth day of June me boys , in Flanders where we lay
The bugles sounded the alarm , before the break of day
We British , Belgians , Brunswicker's and Hanovarians too
All Brussels left that morning for the plains of Waterloo

On the eighteenth day of June me boys ……………..

By a forced march we did advance till three in the afternoon
Each British heart was there to beat to cut the tyrant down
At Quatre Bras we met the French and his shape to us he'd view
For in steel armour he was clad on the plains of Waterloo

On the eighteen day of June me boys .........

Napoleon to his men did say , before they had begun
My hero's if we loose this day our nation is undone
For the Prussians we've already beat , we must beat the British too
And display victorious Eagles on the plains of Waterloo

On the eighteen day of June me boys............

Napoleon like some fighting cock fermented on some corn
Did sorely wish to represent great Mars the God of War
On a high platform he did stand and loudly did he crow
But he drooped his wings and he turned his tail on us at Waterloo

On the eighteen day of June me boys.............


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Subject: RE: Plains Of Waterloo
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 30 Apr 05 - 09:12 PM

Evidently a collation by the Fentimans of various verses from the two sets in Kidson's Traditional Tunes, with the third verse of one pressed into service as a chorus and the title changed (probably to avoid confusion with the well-known Canadian song).

A couple of things. It's "my boys" rather than "me boys", though Dave and Annie tend to pronounce "my" as "me" when singing; they'd write it as "my", I should think, as Kidson did. People do tend to assume that if it's a folksong it must be "me" (see other examples in this thread) but that's accent rather than dialect, so it isn't compulsory.

You might also like to compare the words as you hear them with some already quoted in this thread; "fermented on some corn", for instance, is a mis-hearing of "far mounted on a car". The Fentimans seem to have altered some of the wording, but I doubt if they really sang that!

The second text Kidson quotes is from a broadside and has 18 verses, so the "long version" is already available; you can see an example at Bodleian Library Broadside Ballads (there are also shorter ones):

Plains of Waterloo!.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo
From: smpc
Date: 07 Jul 09 - 09:41 AM

i have yet another version i have quite recently heard on a cd

come all you young lovers of high and low degree
i pray you attention and listen unto me
for t'is all about young man and his tale i will tell unto you
gor he fought in Spain and in Portugal but was slain at waterloo.

. .. . . . . . . . . . .

unfortunetly there are a few words/phrases i can't make out. does any1 know this version.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Jun 15 - 10:18 AM

Ahead of tomorrow's Bicentenary, here is an excellent piece on one of the many songs related to the events at Waterloo 200 years ago, in the current issue of English Dance & Song Magazine:


EDS Summer Edition: The Eighteenth Day Of June


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo
From: Keith A of Hertford
Date: 17 Jun 15 - 01:04 PM

I will do Plains tomorrow at hertford.
Maybe Napoleon Banaparte, and Bonny Light Horseman too.
And some other redcoat/greencoat songs.
And Bonny Bunch of Roses.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Jun 15 - 01:58 PM

Smpc : details of the CD? There's at least one version sung in Ireland that opens like that.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Jun 15 - 01:59 PM

That's me, Martin Ryan, with a missing cookie!


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