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Tune Req: with wellington we'll go

DigiTrad:
EILEEN AROON
PLAINS of WATERLOO
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (1)
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (3)
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (4)
PLAINS OF WATERLOO (5)
THE EIGHTEENTH DAY OF JUNE


Related threads:
Lyr/Chords Req: Plains of Waterloo (29)
Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo (69)
(origins) Origin: Plains of Waterloo (from Rusby/Roberts) (17)
happy? - June 18 (The Plains of Waterloo) (7)
Lyr Add: Plains of Waterloo (9)
Lyr Req: Plains of Waterloo (High Level Ranters) (18)


GUEST,pete wood 11 Nov 13 - 03:35 PM
GUEST 12 Nov 13 - 03:16 AM
Nigel Parsons 12 Nov 13 - 05:29 AM
GUEST,Scabby Douglas 12 Nov 13 - 07:49 AM
Jim Dixon 12 Nov 13 - 08:34 AM
GUEST 12 Nov 13 - 09:17 AM
Jim Dixon 12 Nov 13 - 09:41 AM
Snuffy 12 Nov 13 - 09:43 AM
GUEST,pete wood 12 Nov 13 - 10:02 AM
Jim Dixon 12 Nov 13 - 10:46 AM
GUEST 12 Nov 13 - 10:50 AM
Jim Dixon 12 Nov 13 - 10:56 AM
GUEST,John Foxen 13 Nov 13 - 10:36 AM
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Subject: with wellington we'll go
From: GUEST,pete wood
Date: 11 Nov 13 - 03:35 PM

Roud 5824 is a song about the battle of waterloo, with mostly a broadside provenance. There are different choruses to the song, one being
    With Wellington we'll go, with Wellington we'll go
    For Welington commanded us on the Plains of Waterloo

the other
    Huzza! Huzza! Huzza! Huzza! To the Plains of Waterloo

I'm after the tune, the only one I've come across being the Nutting Girl, which fits the first chorus but not the second.

Any Offers?


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Subject: RE: with wellington we'll go
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 03:16 AM

Plains of waterloo tune?


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Subject: RE: with wellington we'll go
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 05:29 AM

If it wasna for your wellies where would you be?
You'd be in the hospital, or the infirmary.
You could have a dose of the flu, or even pleurisy,
If you didna have your feet in your wellies. (Billy Connolly)

Oh, sorry, I may have misunderstood the thread title.


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Subject: RE: with wellington we'll go
From: GUEST,Scabby Douglas
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 07:49 AM

I may also have misunderstood: thought it was about the poorly thought-out plan to deter Glasgow's citizens from crowning Wellington's statue with a traffic cone ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-24907190

"Plans to end a long-standing tradition of placing a traffic cone on Glasgow's iconic Duke of Wellington statue have been dropped after a massive backlash.

Glasgow City Council wanted to raise the plinth as part of a £65,000 project to refurbish the monument, which stands outside the Gallery of Modern Art.

It abandoned the plan after a massive social media campaign saw thousands of people sign a petition opposing it."


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Subject: Lyr Add: BATTLE OF WATERLOO (from Bodleian, etc.)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 08:34 AM

Lyrics below copied from Curiosities of Street Literature by Charles Hindley (London: Reeves and Turner, 1871), page 93.

I believe the text matches several broadsides found in the Bodleian collection.

I am unable to provide a tune at this time but will keep looking.

BATTLE OF WATERLOO

[1] 'Twas on the 18th day of June Napoleon did advance,
The choicest troops that he could raise within the bounds of France;
Their glittering eagles shone around and proudly looked the foe,
But Briton's lion tore their wings on the plains of Waterloo.

[CHORUS] With Wellington we'll go, with Wellington we'll go,
For Wellington commanded us on the Plains of Waterloo.

[2] The fight did last from ten o'clock until the dawn of day,
While blood and limbs and cannon balls in thick profusion lay;
Their Cuirassieurs did quickly charge our squares to overthrow,
But Britons firm, undaunted stood, on the Plains of Waterloo.

[3] The number of the French that at Waterloo were slain,
Was near sixty thousand all laid upon the plain;
Near forty thousand of them fell upon that fatal day,
Of our brave British heroes who their prowess did display.

[4] It's now the dreadful night comes on, how dismal is the plain,
When the Prussians and the English found above ten thousand slain,
Brave Wellington and Blucher bold most nobly drove their foes,
And Buonaparte's Imperial crown was taken at Waterloo.

[5] We followed up the rear till the middle of the night,
We gave them three cheers as they were on their flight,
Says Bony, d—m those Englishmen, they do bear such a name,
They beat me here at Waterloo, at Portugal and Spain.

[6] Now peace be to their honoured souls who fell that glorious day,
May the plough ne'er raise their bones nor cut the sacred clay,
But let the place remain a waste, a terror to the foe,
And when trembling Frenchmen pass that way they'll think of Waterloo.

[I am surprised to see that Waterloo here rhymes with foe, go, overthrow, etc.]


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 09:17 AM

http://mainlynorfolk.info/folk/songs/theeighteenthdayofjune.html


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 09:41 AM

From an article "New Lights upon Old Tunes" in The Musical Times, Vol. 36, No. 627, (London & New York: Novello, Ewer and Co., May 1, 1895), page 302:

About 1775 the English people first began to hear of George Washington, and a certain section of them were much surprised and horrified to learn that the Americans, with him at their head, had thrown off dutiful allegiance to George III. and were determined on a Government of their own. Upon this, a song in ridicule of the American army, and on what were deemed the "brags" or idle boasts of its leader, appears to have sprung up in England. Here, I must confess, I am at fault, for in spite of much search in contemporary collections of songs and in other likely places, I have been unable to unearth it. Possibly it never reached a more exalted station than on a broadside. The air survives, for I find two copies of it in a couple of musical manuscript books in my possession, one bearing the date 1791. The air, with its title, is as follows:—

"THE BRAGS OF WASHINGTON."
(From a MS. Copy.)



It is more than likely that the air, as it here stands, is much earlier than Washington's time, for song writers then were very prone to write to airs which were already well known. Before the conclusion of the American war, we, in addition to our other bellicose engagements, had entered into a war with Spain, and Lord Rodney took a high naval command.

In January, 1780, his victory off Cape St. Vincent caused his name to ring through the land. The song about Washington's idle boasts (especially seeing what he had already done) soon fell into disuse, and the tune was used for a ditty in praise of Lord Rodney; this was called "To Rodney we will go." Scarcely any change was made in the air, and a copy published in Aird's third "Selection of Scotch, English, Irish, and Foreign Airs" (Glasgow, 1788), is virtually as the manuscript copy given above. The song bearing the refrain, "To Rodney we will go," along with the lively air held public favour until Wellington's victories in the Peninsula caused him to supersede Rodney as the popular hero, and at the time of the battle of Waterloo a new song to the old air came to the front. This is the first verse out of many on a ballad sheet:—

'Twas on the eighteenth day of June
    Napoleon did advance
The choicest troops that he could raise
    Within the bounds of France.
Their glittering eagles shone around
    And proudly looked the foe,
But the British Lion tore their wings
    On the Plains of Waterloo.

        Chorus.
With Wellington we'll go, we'll go,
    With Wellington we'll go;
For Wellington commanded
    On the Plains of Waterloo.

While Waterloo was still fresh in people's memory an ill-advised action upon the part of the Manchester magistrates against Henry Hunt's reform demonstration in St. Peter's Fields caused the memorable "Peterloo." This was in 1819, and immediately a ballad upon the event was much sung, still to the same old tune:—

With Henry Hunt we'll go, we'll go,
    With Henry Hunt we'll go;
We'll raise the cap of liberty,
    In Spite of Nadin Joe.*

[* Joseph Nadin was the Manchester constable who held the warrant for the apprehension of Henry Hunt; it was the attempt to execute this which led to the unhappy consequences. The yeomanry cavalry, without warning, dashed among the crowd, sword in hand, causing many deaths and injuries innumerable; even artillery was brought upon the scene. Waterloo being 60 fresh in people's memory, the event was spoken of as the "Battle of Peterloo." A somewhat similar dispersal of a Chartist's meeting in Newcastle-on-Tyne, in 1839, was called "Spitaloo"; and a song upon the same lines as the Waterloo and "Peterloo" songs was much sung. It was set to the air we are at present dealing with.]

From this time forward the air became the vehicle for lyrics in praise of popular candidates at election time, and as lately as 1852 was so employed on behalf of Sir George Goodman (Member for Leeds). At this time, too, street singers used the tune for a comical song descriptive of the troubles of a wife who has to provide for a household on five-and-twenty shillings a week, giving a categorical list of the money spent on each article:

She reckoned up and showed him,
    And the answer gave complete,
How five-and-twenty shillings
    Were expended in a week.

In addition to this and the political ballads spoken of, it has been used throughout English country districts, from Yorkshire to Devonshire, for a folk-song called "The Nut Girl"; or, "A-nutting we will go," and this brings us to the Irish versions of the air. Edward Bunting, in his third collection of Irish music (1840), publishes a version in 6-8 time, put to a verse of "The Jolly Ploughman," which is really an Irish copy of "The Nut Girl."

Bunting states that he noted the air in 1792 from J. Duncan (a harper), and that it is "very ancient," from which latter opinion I, with some diffidence, venture to differ:—

"THE JOLLY PLOUGHMAN."
(From Bunting's Irish airs, 1840.)



Beside the one adapted to "The Jolly Ploughman," a very beautiful setting of the air (and possibly an older version) was known in Ireland at the beginning of the present century as "Moll Roone." Thomas Moore, so far as I have ascertained, first published it in December, 1813, in his fifth number of the "Irish Melodies," with the words, "Farewell; but whenever you welcome the hour."

"MOLL ROONE."
(From Moore's "Irish Melodies," 1813)




George Thomson, in 1816, gives a copy in his Irish Collection, Vol. II., as do R. A. Smith in the "Irish Minstrel," circa 1825, and J. Monro in the "Gleaner" of the same date.

Some time in the "forties," Samuel Lover was writing his excellent songs and delighting appreciative audiences by his own rendering of them. One of the number was "The Lowbacked Car," still a favourite. Lover was well acquainted with his country's folk-songs and melodies, and having much natural love for, as well as some technical skill in music, he very happily adapted as well as actually composed airs for his songs. The melody of "The Lowbacked Car" is generally, if not always, printed as being of Lover's own composition; but I think an attentive examination of the airs to which I have drawn attention will show that Lover did no more than arrange his air from one of these, most likely the "Jolly Ploughman," with which he no doubt had been acquainted from his youth.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: Snuffy
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 09:43 AM

Isn't that how the people who live there pronounce it - something like Vatterlow?


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: GUEST,pete wood
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 10:02 AM

Thanks to Jim Dixon for his info. Jim, I'm not sure which is you speaking and which the Musical Times,-only thing is that Rodney's successful battle was the Battle of the Saintes in 1782, which gave rise to the Song "Rodney's Glory" set to the tune of the Princess Royal and later becoming an Irish set dance and hornpipe. However, what the Musical Times seems to be saying is that the tune "Nutting Girl" was used for lots of things, as was Princess Royal. Interesting juxtaposition of morris tunes in song here. Thanks again


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 10:46 AM

A similar story linking these songs is given in an article "The Vitality of Melody" by Frank Kidson in Proceedings of the [Royal] Musical Association, Vol. 34, (London: Novello and Co., Ltd., March 17, 1908), page 93-94.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 10:50 AM

Well, that seems to confirm what I was after. Thanks Jim


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Nov 13 - 10:56 AM

Pete Wood: My entire message (except of course the citation itself) comes from the cited source, as you can see (I hope) if you follow the link. This is my standard practice when I copy and paste text from Google books. If I find it necessary to add my own comments, I put them in brackets at the end.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: with wellington we'll go
From: GUEST,John Foxen
Date: 13 Nov 13 - 10:36 AM

Roy Palmer in his splendid The Rambling Soldier gives an earlier version of the song "Written on the late famous victory obtained over the French Army under the command of Lord Wellington on the 22 and 23 of July 1812." The tune is the Brags of Washington -- near enough Nutting Girl -- and the chorus is "With Wellington we'll go, with Wellington we'll go, Across the main o'er to Spain and fight our daring foe."


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