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Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'

GUEST,Paul McKenna 09 Feb 10 - 10:16 AM
GUEST,Peter Laban 09 Feb 10 - 11:06 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 09 Feb 10 - 11:50 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 09 Feb 10 - 11:52 AM
Roberto 09 Feb 10 - 11:54 AM
Roberto 09 Feb 10 - 11:58 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 09 Feb 10 - 12:09 PM
Jim Carroll 09 Feb 10 - 12:14 PM
GUEST,Paul McKenna 09 Feb 10 - 03:24 PM
Jim Carroll 10 Feb 10 - 07:33 AM
GUEST,Paul McKenna 10 Feb 10 - 11:36 AM
GUEST,Philippa 12 Feb 10 - 10:45 AM
Susan of DT 12 Feb 10 - 11:10 AM
GUEST,Paul McKenna 15 Feb 10 - 10:08 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 15 Feb 10 - 12:26 PM
banksie 04 May 10 - 11:01 AM
GUEST,^&* 04 May 10 - 11:39 AM
Liberty Boy 04 May 10 - 11:42 AM
GUEST,John Moulden 04 May 10 - 12:03 PM
GUEST,Paul McKenna 07 May 10 - 05:40 AM
GUEST,John Moulden 07 May 10 - 09:06 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,Paul McKenna
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 10:16 AM

Hi

I am currently doing a project at University and I am looking for Irish versions of the song 'My Son David'. I know it is related to 'Edward' and 'Who Put the Blood' but more information would be very appreciated.

cheers
Paul McKenna


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,Peter Laban
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 11:06 AM

The first version of 'What put the blood' that would come to mind is that of John Reilly


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 11:50 AM

My copy of the Roud index shows 20 entries of Irish origin for the song (Roud#200). (Some may be the same recording, but this is the full list). The entries are Title, Source (recording/book), Singer, Collector, Location and First Line:


SON COME TELL IT UNTO ME
Caedmon TC 1145 / Topic 12T 160 (`Child Ballads 1')
Tunney, Paddy
Kennedy, Peter
N. Ireland : Co. Fermanagh : Beleek        
What brought the blood on your right shoulder dear

WHAT BROUGHT THE BLOOD
Topic 12TS 289 (`The Flowery Vale')
Tunney, Paddy
1976        N. Ireland : Co. Fermanagh        
Where have you been the whole day long

WHAT BROUGHT THE BLOOD
O Boyle, Irish Song Tradition pp.90-91        
Connors, Ellen
O Boyle, Sean
Ireland : Co. Wexford
Where have you been all the whole afternoon

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Topic 12T 359 (`The Bonny Green Tree')
Reilly, John
Munnelly, Tom
1969        Ireland : Co. Roscommon : Boyle        
Oh, what put the blood on your right shoulder?

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Ceol 4:1 (1972) pp.3-5
Reilly, John
Munnelly, Tom        
1969        Ireland : Co. Roscommon : Boyle
O what put the blood on your right shoulder

EDWARD
BBC recording 22015
Moran, Thomas
Ennis, Seamus
1954 (Dec)        Ireland : Co. Leitrim : Mohill
Oh where have you been all this long summer's day

EDWARD
BBC recording 22423
Murphy, James & Brigid
Ennis, Seamus
1954 (18 Dec)        Ireland : Co. Leitrim : Mohill
What had the blood on your right sword

WHAT BROUGHT THE BLOOD ON YOUR RIGHT SHOULDER
BBC recording 18587
Connors, Mary        Kennedy,
Peter / Sean O'Boyle
1952 (1 Aug)        N. Ireland : Belfast
Where have you been of the whole afternoon

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Topic TSCD 667 (`It Fell on a Day, a Bonny Summer Day')
Delaney, Mary
Carroll, Jim / Pat Mackenzie
1977 (27 May)        Ireland
Where have you been all the long summer's day

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Topic TSCD 653 (`O'er his Grave the Grass Grew Green')
Tunney, Paddy
Engle, Tony / Tony Russell
1975 (Feb)        N. Ireland : Co. Fermanagh
Where have you been the whole day long

EDWARD
Rounder CD 1775 ('Classic Ballads 1')
Connors, Mary Ellen
Kennedy, Peter
1952        N. Ireland : Belfast
Where have you been of the whole afternoon

EDWARD
Rounder CD 1775 ('Classic Ballads 1')
Moran, Thomas
Ennis, Seamus
1954        Ireland : Co. Leitrim : Mohill
And what will you do when your father comes home

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Folktrax 175-C60 ('John Reilly')
Reilly, John
Munnelly, Tom
1967        Ireland : Co. Roscommon : Boyle
What put the blood on your right shoulder

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Jim Carroll / Pat Mackenzie Collection
Connors, (Pop's) Johnny
Carroll, Jim / Pat Mackenzie
1973 (Jul / Aug)        Ireland : Co. Wexford / England : London
What put the blood on your hands, my son

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Jim Carroll / Pat Mackenzie Collection
Cash, Andy
Carroll, Jim / Pat Mackenzie
1973 (Jul / Aug)        Ireland : Co. Wexford / England : London
Where have you been all day my beloved son

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
Jim Carroll / Pat Mackenzie Collection
Cash, Mary
Carroll, Jim / Pat Mackenzie
1973 (Aug) / 1975        Ireland / England : London
Where have you been this long whole say

EDWARD
Tunney, The Stone Fiddle pp.111-112
Doran, Paddy
Tunney, Paddy
Ireland
Where have you been all the whole afternoon

EDWARD
Folktracks 60-501 (`Bonny Barbara Allen')
Connors, Mary
Kennedy, Peter
N. Ireland : Belfast
Where have you been all the whole afternoon

EDWARD
Folktracks 60-501 (`Bonny Barbara Allen')
Moran, Thomas
Kennedy, Peter
Ireland : Co. Leitrim : Mohill
And what will you do when your father comes home

WHAT PUT THE BLOOD ON YOUR RIGHT SHOULDER SON
Folk-Legacy FSE 7 (`The Man of Songs')
Tunney, Paddy
Hamilton, Diane
1963c        N. Ireland : Co. Fermanagh
Where have you been a' the whole afternoon



You can check the Roud index online at the Roud Index at EFDSS (and probably should - it's probably more up to date than my copy).

Jim Carroll, who recorded several of the versions listed, is a regular poster here and may be able to help you more.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 11:52 AM

And PS Mudelves - that took three goes at submitting before the post took (luckily I had it copied).

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Roberto
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 11:54 AM

What Put The Blood?
Paddy Tunney, on O'er his grave the grass grew green, Tragic Ballads, The Voice of the People vol.3, Topic TSCD 653; song recorded 1975

Where have you been the whole day long?
Son, come tell it unto me
I was fishing and fowling the whole day long
All through mother's treachery
All through mother's treachery

What put the blood on your right shoulder?
Son, come tell it unto me
'T was the killing of a hare that I killed today
That I killed right manfully
That I killed right manfully

The blood of the old hare it could never be so red
Son, come tell it unto me
'T was the killing of a boy that I killed today
That I killed most manfully
That I killed most manfully

What came between yourself and the boy?
Son, come tell it unto me
It was mostly the cutting of a rod
That would never come a tree
That would never come a tree

What are you going to do when your daddy finds you out?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will put my foot on board of a ship
And sail to a foreign country
And sail to a foreign country

What are you going to do with your lovely young wife?
Son, come tell it unto me
She can put her foot on board of a ship
And sail e'er after me
And sail e'er after me

What are you going to do with your two fine young babes?
Son, come tell it unto me
I'll give one to my father and the other to my mother
For to bear them company
For to bear them company

What are you going to do with your two fine racehorses?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will take the bridles off their necks
For they'll run no more for me
They'll run no more for me

What are you going to do with your two fine greyhounds?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will take the leads all off their necks
For they'll run no more for me
They'll race no more for me

What are you going to do with your houses and your lands?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will lay them bare to the birds of the air
For there's no more welcome there for me
There's no more welcome there for me


What Put The Blood?
Mary Delaney, on It fell on a day, a bonny sumer day, Ballads, The Voice of the People vol.17, Topic TSCD 667; ballad recorded 1977

Where have you been all the long summer's day?
Son, come tell it unto me
I was a-hunting and fowling the whole day long
And it's, Mama, pardon me, oh, me
And it's, Mama, pardon me

What put the blood upon your right shoulder?
Son, come tell it unto me
It's the blood of a hare I killed today
That I killed so manfully, oh ee
That I killed so manfully

The blood of a hare then it cannot be so red
Son, come tell it unto me
That's the blood of my youngest brother
That I killed so manfully, oh ee
That I killed so manfully

What came between you and your youngest brother?
Son, come tell it unto me
It is all all about the pulling of a stick
Ah, that never grew a tree, a tree
Oh, that never grew a tree

What will you do when your daddy will come home?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will put my foot on board of the ship
And I'll sail to a foreign country, ee oh ee
And I'll sail to a foreign country

What will you do with your own lovely wife?
Son, come tell it unto me
She will put her foot on board of the ship
And she'll sail all along with me, with me
And she'll sail all along with me

What will you do with your two lovely children?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I'll leave one to my mummy and the other to my daddy
For to keep them company, oh ee
For to keep them company

What will you do with your two greyhounds?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will take the straps from around their neck
And they'll hunt no more for me, for me
And they'll hunt no more for me

What will you do with your two race horses?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will take those halters off their head
And they'll race no more for me, for me
And they'll race no more for me

What will you do with your fine big house?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will leave it there to the birds in the air
And there be no more welcome for me, for me
And there be no more welcome for me


What Put The Blood
John Reilly, in Jacko Reilly, Irish Tinker Ballads, Folktrax; recordings made by the Irish folk-collector Tom Munnelly, near Boyle, Co. Roscommon, 1967


The Christy Moore Songbook, edited by Frank Connolly, introduction by Donald Lunny, Brandon 1984 – What Put The Blood? (John Reilly's version)

Singing – What put the blood on your right shoulder?
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
Saying – That is the blood af a hare, Mama
Says, Mam', O pardon me
I says – Mam', O pardon me

Saying – That is the blood of your youngest brother
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
Well, it's all from the cutting of a hazel rod
That never will grow a tree, a tree
That never will grow a tree

What are you want to do with your two grand children?
Son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
I'll give one to me daddy and the other to me mammy
And they'll keep them company
And they'll keep them company

What will you do with your house and land?
Son, come tell it unto me, to me
I will leave it here for the birds of the air
For to sing and mourn for me, for me
For to sing and mourn for me

What will you do with your greyhounds?
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
I will take the straps off their two necks
And they'll race no more for me, for me
And they'll race no more for me

What will you do with your two racehorses?
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
I will take the bridles off their heads
And they'll race no more for me, for me
And they'll race no more for me

What will you do with your darling wife?
Son, come tell it unto me, to me
O, son, come tell it unto me
She will leave her foot upon a ship board
And she'll sail all along with me


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHAT PUT THE BLOOD
From: Roberto
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 11:58 AM

Sorry, an extra-line in my previous post. R

^^
WHAT PUT THE BLOOD?
Paddy Tunney, on O'er his grave the grass grew green, Tragic Ballads, The Voice of the People vol.3, Topic TSCD 653; song recorded 1975

Where have you been the whole day long?
Son, come tell it unto me
I was fishing and fowling the whole day long
All through mother's treachery
All through mother's treachery

What put the blood on your right shoulder?
Son, come tell it unto me
'T was the killing of a hare that I killed today
That I killed right manfully
That I killed right manfully

The blood of the old hare it could never be so red
Son, come tell it unto me
'T was the killing of a boy that I killed today
That I killed most manfully
That I killed most manfully

What came between yourself and the boy?
Son, come tell it unto me
It was mostly the cutting of a rod
That would never come a tree
That would never come a tree

What are you going to do when your daddy finds you out?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will put my foot on board of a ship
And sail to a foreign country
And sail to a foreign country

What are you going to do with your lovely young wife?
Son, come tell it unto me
She can put her foot on board of a ship
And sail e'er after me
And sail e'er after me

What are you going to do with your two fine young babes?
Son, come tell it unto me
I'll give one to my father and the other to my mother
For to bear them company
For to bear them company

What are you going to do with your two fine racehorses?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will take the bridles off their necks
For they'll run no more for me
They'll run no more for me

What are you going to do with your two fine greyhounds?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will take the leads all off their necks
For they'll run no more for me
They'll race no more for me

What are you going to do with your houses and your lands?
Son, come tell it unto me
I will lay them bare to the birds of the air
For there's no more welcome there for me
There's no more welcome there for me


What Put The Blood?
Mary Delaney, on It fell on a day, a bonny sumer day, Ballads, The Voice of the People vol.17, Topic TSCD 667; ballad recorded 1977

Where have you been all the long summer's day?
Son, come tell it unto me
I was a-hunting and fowling the whole day long
And it's, Mama, pardon me, oh, me
And it's, Mama, pardon me

What put the blood upon your right shoulder?
Son, come tell it unto me
It's the blood of a hare I killed today
That I killed so manfully, oh ee
That I killed so manfully

The blood of a hare then it cannot be so red
Son, come tell it unto me
That's the blood of my youngest brother
That I killed so manfully, oh ee
That I killed so manfully

What came between you and your youngest brother?
Son, come tell it unto me
It is all all about the pulling of a stick
Ah, that never grew a tree, a tree
Oh, that never grew a tree

What will you do when your daddy will come home?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will put my foot on board of the ship
And I'll sail to a foreign country, ee oh ee
And I'll sail to a foreign country

What will you do with your own lovely wife?
Son, come tell it unto me
She will put her foot on board of the ship
And she'll sail all along with me, with me
And she'll sail all along with me

What will you do with your two lovely children?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I'll leave one to my mummy and the other to my daddy
For to keep them company, oh ee
For to keep them company

What will you do with your two greyhounds?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will take the straps from around their neck
And they'll hunt no more for me, for me
And they'll hunt no more for me

What will you do with your two race horses?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will take those halters off their head
And they'll race no more for me, for me
And they'll race no more for me

What will you do with your fine big house?
Son, come and tell it unto me
I will leave it there to the birds in the air
And there be no more welcome for me, for me
And there be no more welcome for me


What Put The Blood
John Reilly, in Jacko Reilly, Irish Tinker Ballads, Folktrax; recordings made by the Irish folk-collector Tom Munnelly, near Boyle, Co. Roscommon, 1967

Singing – What put the blood on your right shoulder?
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
Saying – That is the blood af a hare, Mama
Says, Mam', O pardon me
I says – Mam', O pardon me

Saying – That is the blood of your youngest brother
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
Well, it's all from the cutting of a hazel rod
That never will grow a tree, a tree
That never will grow a tree

What are you want to do with your two grand children?
Son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
I'll give one to me daddy and the other to me mammy
And they'll keep them company
And they'll keep them company

What will you do with your house and land?
Son, come tell it unto me, to me
I will leave it here for the birds of the air
For to sing and mourn for me, for me
For to sing and mourn for me

What will you do with your greyhounds?
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
I will take the straps off their two necks
And they'll race no more for me, for me
And they'll race no more for me

What will you do with your two racehorses?
And, son, come tell it unto me, to me
And, son, come tell it unto me
I will take the bridles off their heads
And they'll race no more for me, for me
And they'll race no more for me

What will you do with your darling wife?
Son, come tell it unto me, to me
O, son, come tell it unto me
She will leave her foot upon a ship board
And she'll sail all along with me


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 12:09 PM

I have the Paddy Tunney versions from Child Ballads 1, The Flowery Vale and The Stone Fiddle if you want those.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 12:14 PM

Paul,
Roberto has put up the version we recorded from Mary Delaney - I assume you are looking for the text only, but should you want it, we have the tune transcribed (e.mail address please). Recording?
I assume you know there is an Irish language version.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,Paul McKenna
Date: 09 Feb 10 - 03:24 PM

a huge thanks to everybody for their replies.

Mick Pearce
yes I would love the Paddy Tunney versions if possible.

Jim Carroll
I was not aware that there was an Irish language version, are there any recordings or text for that? I would also appreciate the transcription of the tune if you could pass that onto me.

my email address is paul@paulmckennaband.com

Paul McKenna


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 10 Feb 10 - 07:33 AM

Paul,
Abject apologies; after much searching and failing to find the Irish language version of Edward I have come to the conclusion that I was confusing it with Lord Randal, of which there is a version in Gaelic.
Sorry,
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,Paul McKenna
Date: 10 Feb 10 - 11:36 AM

Jim,
No proble, I am grateful for all the help so far

cheers
Paul


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 12 Feb 10 - 10:45 AM

is this considered a version of Lord Randal. I know of two Irish Gaelic versions of Lord Randal (it's unusal to find a Child ballad variant in Gaelic. At least one of them is on Mudcat already:
http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=9884


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Susan of DT
Date: 12 Feb 10 - 11:10 AM

Philippa - Child considered them separate ballads - Lord Randall is Child #12 and Edward/My Son David is Child #13. Both involve mother/son dialogs, but the subject is different. Lord Randall was poisoned by his sweetheart and Edward/David killed his brother.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,Paul McKenna
Date: 15 Feb 10 - 10:08 AM

Thanks for all of this great information.

Paul McKenna


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Subject: Lyr Add: EDWARD (Paddy Doran)
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 15 Feb 10 - 12:26 PM

Paul

Here's Paddy Doran's version from The Stone Fiddle. I'll get the Paddy Tunney versions from the records in the next few days.

Mick



X:1
T:Edward
B:The Stone Fiddle - Paddy Tunney
S:Paddy Doran
L:1/8
M:4/4
K:Gdor
G2 G>F (G>A) B>G|(A>F) D>E F4|
w:Where have you been_ all the whole_ af-ter-noon
d3 d c<A F>A|c6
w:Son come tell it un-to me
Bc|d2 d>d c2 dd|G (G/A/G/F/) (D>C)
w:I've been fish-in' and fowl-in' the whole day___ long_
DF|G2 G2 F2 c2|(B2- B/c/B/G/ A2)
w:All through moth-er's treach-er-ie_____
B>A|G2 (G>F) (DC)(DF)|G6 z2|]
w:All through moth-er's_ treach_er_ie



  EDWARD

"Where have you been all the whole afternoon?
son come tell it unto me."
"I've been fishin' and fowlin' the whole day long,
all through mother's treacherie,
all through mother's treacherie."

"What put the blood on your right shoulder?
son come tell it unto me."
"Twas the killing of a hare that I killed today,
that I killed most manfulliee,
that I killed most manfulliee."

"The blood of the hare it could never be so red,
son come tell it unto me."
"Twas the killing of a boy that I killed today,
that I killed most manfulliee,
that I killed most manfulliee."

"What came between yourself and the boy?
son come tell it unto me."
"It was mostly the cutting of a rod,
that would never come a tree, a tree,
that would never come a tree."

"What are you going to do when your Daddy finds you out?
son come tell it unto me."
"I will put my foot on board of a ship
and sail to a far-off countriee,
and sail to a far-off counteriee."

"What are you going to do with your lovely young wife?
son come tell it unto me."
"She can put her foot on board of a ship,
and sail there after me-e,
and sail there after me."

"What are you going to do with your two fine young babes?
son come tell it unto me."
"I'll give one to my father and the other to my mother
for to bear them companie-e,
for to keep them companie."

"What are you going to do with your two fine race-horses?
son come tell it unto me."
"I will take the bridles off their heads,
for they'll race no more for me-e,
for they'll race no more for me."

"What are you going to do with your two fine greyhounds?
son come tell it unto me."
"I will take the leads all off their necks,
for they'll run no more for me-e
they'll run no more for me."

"What are you going to do with your houses and your lands?
son come tell it unto me."
"I will lay them bare to the birds of the air
for there's no more welcome there for me-e,
for there's no more welcome there for me."

"What will you do in the winter of your life?
son come tell it unto me."
"Like a saggin on the lough I'll bend with the wind
and I'll hope for God's mercie-e,
and I'll hope for God's mercie."

Source: In Paddy Tunney - The Stone Fiddle, from Paddy Doran


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: banksie
Date: 04 May 10 - 11:01 AM

In the last verse of this song is phrase `like a saggin in the loch'.

Can kind person tell me what a `saggin' is? I assume it is a tree, perhaps a Willow, but I could horribly wrong.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,^&*
Date: 04 May 10 - 11:39 AM

Paddy Tunney himself gives "reed" as the meaning of saggin. Origin may well be Irish - but I'll need to check.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: Liberty Boy
Date: 04 May 10 - 11:42 AM

I his book "Narrative Singing in Ireland", Lays Ballads, Come -All-Yes and other Songs Dr. Hugh Shields states, "Only two English ballads seem to have gone into Irish retaining something of the ballad character. Both come to light at the end of the nineteenth century, both edited by Douglas Hyde. They are probably not more than two or three generations older". He then goes on to name them as "Cá rabhais ar Feadh and Lae Uaim", an adaptation of "Lord Randal", collected in Roscommon in 1905 and "Muire agus Naomh Joseph" a version of "The Cherry Tree Carol" published by Hyde in 1897 from Mayo sources.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,John Moulden
Date: 04 May 10 - 12:03 PM

Paul McKenna, If you are the Paul McKenna who was at Girvan last weekend, I was also there to give a presentation. If you're assessing these versions, it's necessary to realize that Paddy Tunney often benefited from the collections made by Peter Kennedy and Alan Lomax. That is, Paddy's version derives from Paddy Doran's, and that version is closely similar to Mary Doran's - they were recorded by Peter Kennedy and Liam Andrews on the same occasion. However, Paddy Tunney frequently altered or added to what he had received and I rather think that anything out of keeping with the two traveller versions he knew of fits this - for example 'the saggin on the lough' is a bit of Paddy's poetic fancy.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,Paul McKenna
Date: 07 May 10 - 05:40 AM

John, yes I was at Girvan last weekend, didn't make it to you presentation unfortunately. I am still interested in this ballad and trying to discover origins etc. a task I realise may be impossible. Thanks to my research, however, I am now looking at ballads from a slightly different view point and I am extremely interested in how these ballads travelled so extensively.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish version of 'My Son David'
From: GUEST,John Moulden
Date: 07 May 10 - 09:06 AM

Hamish Henderson considered Scotland and the north of Ireland to be a single area in terms of song circulation; so do I. You have only to consider the extent to which there were exchanges, from before the plantation of Ulster, in both directions, of people and traders across 'the narrow sea' - permanent migrants, seasonal migrants (tattie howkers), traveller families (Cathie Stewart was born in Strabane, Co Tyrone) and holiday makers - all of whom might have (and clearly did) carried songs. Paul, I can send you a paper I wrote (some time ago) giving details of some of the musical links between Scotland and Ulster). If you're interested, send an email address to jmoul81075@aol.com


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