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National Jukebox - Library of Congress

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Rain Dog 11 May 11 - 03:27 AM
Fred McCormick 11 May 11 - 04:45 AM
MartinRyan 11 May 11 - 08:15 AM
Desert Dancer 11 May 11 - 12:13 PM
katlaughing 11 May 11 - 12:44 PM
Desert Dancer 12 May 11 - 01:26 AM
Desert Dancer 12 May 11 - 01:30 AM
GUEST,Chris B 12 May 11 - 01:54 AM
Desert Dancer 12 May 11 - 02:21 AM
GUEST,Slag310 19 May 11 - 08:00 PM
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Subject: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: Rain Dog
Date: 11 May 11 - 03:27 AM

Apologies if this has already been posted. I seem to have some trouble searching mudcat and only get results from 2010 back.


National Jukebox

National Jukebox
Historical Recordings from the Library of Congress

About the National Jukebox

The Library of Congress presents the National Jukebox, which makes historical sound recordings available to the public free of charge. The Jukebox includes recordings from the extraordinary collections of the Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation and other contributing libraries and archives.


Article about it here

LA Times Blog - National Jukebox


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: Fred McCormick
Date: 11 May 11 - 04:45 AM

I'm just listening to it now. Temptation rag by Arthur Pryor's Band, recorded on 07.06.1910. Amazing stuff.


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: MartinRyan
Date: 11 May 11 - 08:15 AM

Gonna be a huge resource. Keep an eye out for items that might tidy up some loose Mudcat ends - or might curb some of the wilder levels of fantasy we sometimes indulge!

Regards


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 11 May 11 - 12:13 PM

Wow, that's a great idea someone had -- and followed through on.

MartinRyan -- it's undoubtedly from existing resources that we've all been making good use of already, right? (!)

~ Becky in Long Beach


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: katlaughing
Date: 11 May 11 - 12:44 PM

Thank for posting the link. That is going to be fun to share with my grandson and others.

kat


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 12 May 11 - 01:26 AM

Didn't have time to study it this morning - it is more/different than I realized. I thought it was another way to present stuff we knew was there. Actually, it's audio from Victor recordings that has not previously been freely available, due to copyright.

Library of Congress Launches 'National Jukebox'

by Tom Cole
National Public Radio
May 11, 2011

The National Jukebox is spinning tunes – and you don't have to drop any coin to get it to play. Today the Library of Congress and Sony Music Entertainment announced the launch of what's being billed as "the largest collection of historical recordings ever made publicly available online."

The new website provides access to more than 10-thousand historical recordings for free on a streaming-only basis – no downloads. It covers the first quarter of the twentieth century and includes music, poetry, political speeches and other spoken word recordings. Right now, it only includes recordings made by the Victor Talking Machine Company, which Sony controls. The project is also a collaboration with the University of California, Santa Barbara – and its Encyclopedic Discography of Victor Records – which is helping to create a searchable database for every recording in the National Jukebox.

Click on "Browse All Recordings" and you can find albums by Title, Artist, Genre, Place (where the audio was recorded) or Date Range. A search of "1901" (the earliest recordings in the Jukebox) could lead you to the Haydn Quartet singing, "The Owl and the Pussycat," from September of that year.

A search of Target Audience (remember that, in those days, companies recorded music to be sold to a wide range of niche audiences – long before the Internet – when immigrants from all over the world were eager for any connections they could find to their homelands) leads to a long list that includes Croatian, Portuguese (Brazil), Spanish (Venezuela), or French-Canadian; Educational. Click on that last category and you can check out, "Savez-vous planter les choux?" by Eva Gauthier from June of 1918.

There is more well-known stuff: the first recording of the Paul Whiteman Orchestra's "Rhapsody in Blue," with composer George Gershwin at the piano, Parts 1 & 2, from 1924; Woodrow Wilson's speech on labor from September 24, 1912; Theodore Roosevelt's speech on the farmer and the businessman from that same month and year; and the Original Dixieland Jazz Band's 1917 recording of, "Livery Stable Blues," considered to be the "first jazz recording ever released."

There is also an interactive edition of the original 1919 text to The Victrola Book of the Opera, which describes more than 110 operas.

(Over at Deceptive Cadence, NPR Music's classical blog, Anastasia Tsioulcas, who has spent some time in the Victor archives, has a look at what made it into the Jukebox and what got left out.)

In the press release announcing the launch of the National Jukebox, Gene DeAnna – the head of the Library's Recorded Sound Section, says:

    "This represents a strong step in the Library's efforts to return out-of-circulation recordings to public access. Sony Music's commitment to making its recordings more accessible is unprecedented. We will seek additional donors and contributors in an effort to develop the most comprehensive website of historic sound recordings and related interpretive content."

So now it's time for other labels and donors to step up to the plate – and for Sony to broaden its contribution – to make this a true National jukebox.

---

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 12 May 11 - 01:30 AM

This other NPR article, Classical On The National Jukebox: What's There—And What's Not, notes there are some kinks to be worked out:

"The search function is pretty cumbersome. Don't try to type in 'Gershwin' and 'Rhapsody' together, or, for that matter, artists' full names, because the site will inform you that no such recordings exist."

Also,

"For now, the only material that's included is from the Victor Talking Machine Company catalog (with materials from Columbia Records and OKeh on the way, Sony and the Library of Congress promise), so music lovers will undoubtedly find even more treasures to come. And for extra fun, users can assemble and share their own playlists."


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: GUEST,Chris B
Date: 12 May 11 - 01:54 AM

No downloads - hmph - but Audacity can capture a clip whilst playing it using 'Stereo Mix' setting. This can then be "Saved As..." an MP3 file using a Lame codec. 'Stereo Mix' is configured by default on XP, but has to be set up on Win7 (Google how to). Not sure about Macs though.


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 12 May 11 - 02:21 AM

Whoops - have just posted a comment to the NPR article to point out that of course there's an "Advanced Search" option that gets you to a search page that's as sophisticated as anyone might like.

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: National Jukebox - Library of Congress
From: GUEST,Slag310
Date: 19 May 11 - 08:00 PM

Fabulous stuff!!

This link has Grainger's arrangment of Shepherd's Hey, a little flakey, but what the heck! http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4165 or http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4165 if either one works

My favorite thing so far is the Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue, with Gershwin on the piano. He sounds great, but the rest of the band sounds like a Bugs Bunny cartoon. I can't believe they played it that way--with him sitting there.

Slag310


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