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Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson

GUEST 26 Jul 11 - 07:30 AM
Drumshanty 26 Jul 11 - 08:56 AM
maeve 26 Jul 11 - 09:06 AM
maeve 26 Jul 11 - 09:07 AM
Jack Campin 26 Jul 11 - 10:02 AM
GUEST,Barbara 26 Jul 11 - 12:43 PM
Jack Campin 26 Jul 11 - 01:39 PM
GUEST,Chris Wright 29 Jul 11 - 08:21 PM
McGrath of Harlow 30 Jul 11 - 05:33 PM
Jack Campin 30 Jul 11 - 07:00 PM
Jack Campin 30 Jul 11 - 07:36 PM
GUEST,Phyllis Davison Canada 31 Jul 11 - 11:55 AM
Abby Sale 01 Aug 11 - 09:49 AM
Jack Campin 01 Aug 11 - 09:51 AM
Dave MacKenzie 01 Aug 11 - 11:11 AM
Susanne (skw) 07 Aug 11 - 09:17 PM
GUEST,Cosimo 24 Oct 12 - 09:42 AM
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Subject: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Jul 11 - 07:30 AM

Heard this beautifully sung by Lucy Pringle at the week-end at Cullerlie singing festival, would love to have a copy of the lyrics so I can learn and sing it.
Can anyone help please?
thanks


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Subject: RE: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: Drumshanty
Date: 26 Jul 11 - 08:56 AM

Here y'are

A puir lad yince and a lad sae trim
Hi the haw, the gillieflour, hie the thyme!
A puir lad yince and a lad sae trim
He loed a lassie that loedna him.

Says, she gae fetch to me ye rogue
Your mither's hairt to feed my dog

Tae his mither's hous gaed that young man
He cut out her hairt and awa he ran.

Noo as he ran he trippit and fell
and the hairt rolled on the grun as well

Nou the hairt it stotted against a stane
And the laddie heard it makin its mane.

Nou the hairt was greetin and cryin fu sma
Are ye hurt my bairn, are ye hurt at aa?

There's a wee sample on Lucy and Chris's page here. Their CD is wonderful.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: maeve
Date: 26 Jul 11 - 09:06 AM

Hello, Guest. You might start with the purchase of this album: Folk Songs Of North-East Scotland...Greig-Duncan Collection CDTRAX 5003 The whole album looks wonderful; brilliant individually and in its entirety.
**********
An excerpt from the Living Tradition review:
"The only song without any Greig-Duncan connection is Hamish Henderson's "The Ballad of the Speaking Heart", his own free translation - and sung to his own cheerful tune - of a French poem by Jean Richepin (1849-1926), called "La Chanson de Marie-des-Anges", in the Oxford Book of French Verse, 1926."
*************
You will likely also to want this cd, as it is Lucy's version you liked so much...as do I: 'The Speaking Heart' - Lucy Pringle & Chris Wright, with an excerpt available at this link as well.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: maeve
Date: 26 Jul 11 - 09:07 AM

Well done, Drumshanty!


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Subject: RE: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: Jack Campin
Date: 26 Jul 11 - 10:02 AM

From an old post of mine on uk.music.folk:


I was trying to find a song where a a sadistic woman gets a boy
to cut his mother's heart out to feed her dog, when he falls and
drops it on his way to her, the heart calls out asking if he's
all right.

I got the nationality wrong. The song is by the 19th century
French poet Jean Richepin, ultimately from a Finnish ballad,
and the translation I was thinking of was by Herbert Trench.
There is a choral setting of it by Joseph Charles Holbrook,
who I hadn't heard of before.

   Jean Richepin's Song
   ====================

   A poor lad once and a lad so trim
   Gave his love to her that loved not him

   And says she, 'fetch me tonight you rogue'
   Your mother's heart to feed my dog!

   To his mother's house went that young man
   Killed her and took the heart, and ran.

   And as he was running look you he fell
   And the heart tolled to the ground as well.

   And the lad, as the heart was was a-rolling heard
   That the heart was speaking and this was the word

   The heart was a weeping and crying so small
   'Are you hurt my child, are you hurt at all?'

Hamish Henderson's translation isn't in his Collected Poems and
Songs. Where was it printed? I know I've got it somewhere.

The first tune that came into my head for Trench's text was
"Blyth, blyth, blyth was she", but lots of others would fit.
Henderson's doesn't have such a singable metre.


I prefer Trench's version by a long way.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: GUEST,Barbara
Date: 26 Jul 11 - 12:43 PM

Thank you so much everyone, greatly appreciated.
Barbara


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Subject: RE: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: Jack Campin
Date: 26 Jul 11 - 01:39 PM

Here it is in Richepin's original:


Un poème de Jean Richepin 1848-1926

La Chanson de Marie-des-Anges

Y avait un'fois un pauv'gas,
Et lon la laire,
Et lon lan la,
Y avait un'fois un pauv'gas,
Qu'aimait cell'qui n'l'aimait pas.

Elle lui dit : Apport'moi d'main
Et lon la laire,
Et lon lan la,
Elle lui dit : Apport'moi d'main
L'coeur de ta mèr' pour mon chien.

Va chez sa mère et la tue
Et lon la laire,
Et lon lan la,
Va chez sa mère et la tue,
Lui prit l'coeur et s'en courut.

Comme il courait, il tomba,
Et lon la laire,
Et lon lan la,
Comme il courait, il tomba,
Et par terre l'coeur roula.

Et pendant que l'coeur roulait,
Et lon la laire,
Et lon lan la,
Et pendant que l'coeur roulait,
Entendit l'coeur qui parlait.

Et l'coeur lui dit en pleurant,
Et lon la laire,
Et lon lan la,
Et l'coeur lui dit en pleurant:
T'es-tu fait mal mon enfant?

Jean Richepin


Seems to be in some not-quite-standard French dialect.


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Subject: RE: Ballad of the speaking heart
From: GUEST,Chris Wright
Date: 29 Jul 11 - 08:21 PM

In addition to Lucy's lovely singing of the song (yes, I know I'm biased!), there's a rendition by Gordeanna McCulloch on Fred Freeman's tribute to Hamish Henderson - 'A' the Bairns o Adam' (CDTRAX244).

As it happens, I recently came across Hamish's notes for the song in one of his notebooks while collating his papers along with Steve Byrne for the Hamish Henderson Archive Trust, of which we're both Trustees (www.hendersontrust.org). There's not much to add to the wealth of information given above, so I'll leave it there!

Thanks,

Chris Wright

P.S. - except maybe to invite you to have another listen here: www.pringlewright.com


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 30 Jul 11 - 05:33 PM

I remember Taffy Thomas telling this as a story.

"...ultimately from a Finnish ballad..." - I suspect that was just one version of a song/story that goes back a long long way in many cultures.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: Jack Campin
Date: 30 Jul 11 - 07:00 PM

A bit more on Richepin's poem: it occurs in a play, "La Glu", based on an earlier novel (dunno if it occurs in the novel too) - Marie-des-Anges is a character in it, hence the title. That was made into an opera of 1910, music by Gabriel Dupont (who I've never heard of and it seems there's a reason for that). "La Glu" is a prostitute, the villainness or anti-heroine of the piece, and Marie-des-Anges smashes her head in with an axe near the end.

There is also a 5-part choral setting of it (1919) by Joseph Jongen, fairly well known for his organ music. That might be worth looking for.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: Jack Campin
Date: 30 Jul 11 - 07:36 PM

A bit more googling. A note in "Notes and Queries" (v.163, 1932, p.562) says it's a Yugoslav song. There seems to have been a film of "La Glu" from 1927, which was the year they invented the talkies, so it probably didn't have an audio version of the song in it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: GUEST,Phyllis Davison Canada
Date: 31 Jul 11 - 11:55 AM

I met with Hamish Henderson on several occasions when I was back in Scotland. He heard my singing and gave me one of his tapes, "Pipes, Goatskin and Bones", encouraging me to sing The Ballad of the Speaking Heart as he thought my voice was suited to this song. I have treasured this tape along with writings and letters received from him during his life. I continue to sing this beautiful song and shall be including it in a presentation of "Ballads" at Parry Sound, Ontario, this Fall.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: Abby Sale
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 09:49 AM

Hi there!

This discussion was just pointed out to me - one of the many things I've missed by so rarely being at Mudcat these days.

I finally started singing the song just a few weeks ago. FWIW, I talk a translation of the first verse to USian first and then sing, rendering just a very few words while singing. "Stottit," eg. It seems to go over pretty well and people (as they should) shudder a bit.

Aside from the fine CD cited, I _think_ it's in the Arthur Argo 'Chapbook' devoted to Hamish. Can't put my hand on it yet but will post here when I do. (Soon) Perhaps Jack has a copy?

I agree with all posted and can only finickily add very minor considerations to the Hamish transcription above. (It appears an excellent transcription from singing, rather then from the Given text)

I have
   Hey the haw the gilly-floo'er, hey the thyme.

Although McCulloch pronounces "Hey" as 'Hi'.
And I would (even more picky) demur at the quote that it's Hamish's "own free translation." It's more of a literal translation into Scots. I think the English translation as used for lieder is older. Not sure there. BTW, As lieder, with the usual tune, it's crap. Destroys any meaning at all as far as I'm concerned. Makes it, as always, an Art Song rather than a good & chilling story.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: Jack Campin
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 09:51 AM

Lieder?

What version are you thinking of?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 01 Aug 11 - 11:11 AM

Hi Abby.

Just been through all my old 'Chapbook's, including the Hamish Special (vol 3 No 6) and can't find it anywhere, though I have a couple of gaps nowadays. Maybe you were thinking of the 'Flyting o' Life and Daith'.

David R


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 07 Aug 11 - 09:17 PM

Abby, "his own free translation" was quoted in the review but comes from the sleevenotes of "Folk Songs of North-East Scotland" (1995) which has Hamish himself singing the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Ballad of the Speaking Heart (H Henderson
From: GUEST,Cosimo
Date: 24 Oct 12 - 09:42 AM

There is another version/traduction of this song, made by Fabrizio De Andrè, italian Poetry/folksinger. In my Humble opinion is a lovely and amazing version; the warm voice of Fabrizio gives to song a bit of more sadness, so the lyrics take greater depth and meaning. Apologize for bad english.

Un uomo onesto, un uomo probo,
tralalalalla tralallaleru
s'innamorò perdutamente
d'una che non lo amava niente.

Gli disse portami domani,
tralalalalla tralallaleru
gli disse portami domani
il cuore di tua madre per i miei cani.

Lui dalla madre andò e l'uccise,
tralalalalla tralallaleru
dal petto il cuore le strappò
e dal suo amore ritornò.

Non era il cuore, non era il cuore,
tralalalalla tralallaleru
non le bastava quell'orrore,
voleva un'altra prova del suo cieco amore.

Gli disse amor se mi vuoi bene,
tralalalalla tralallaleru
gli disse amor se mi vuoi bene,
tagliati dei polsi le quattro vene.

Le vene ai polsi lui si tagliò,
tralalalalla tralallaleru
e come il sangue ne sgorgò,
correndo come un pazzo da lei tornò.

Gli disse lei ridendo forte,
tralalalalla tralallaleru
gli disse lei ridendo forte,
l'ultima tua prova sarà la morte.

E mentre il sangue lento usciva,
e ormai cambiava il suo colore,
la vanità fredda gioiva,
un uomo s'era ucciso per il suo amore.

Fuori soffiava dolce il vento
tralalalalla tralallaleru
ma lei fu presa da sgomento,
quando lo vide morir contento.
Morir contento e innamorato,
quando a lei niente era restato,
non il suo amore, non il suo bene,
ma solo il sangue secco delle sue vene.


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