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Greensleeves tune in New Year song

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GREENSLEEVES
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Rex 28 Sep 99 - 01:34 PM
28 Sep 99 - 01:47 PM
Matthew B. 28 Sep 99 - 04:51 PM
MMario 28 Sep 99 - 04:55 PM
vissjoy@superiway.net 28 Sep 99 - 05:41 PM
28 Sep 99 - 06:38 PM
T in Oklahoma 28 Sep 99 - 07:22 PM
Susan of DT 28 Sep 99 - 07:48 PM
Matthew B. 28 Sep 99 - 08:03 PM
Rex 27 Dec 99 - 01:23 AM
katlaughing 27 Dec 99 - 08:21 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 May 04 - 06:13 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 20 May 04 - 06:23 PM
masato sakurai 22 May 04 - 10:25 AM
masato sakurai 22 May 04 - 11:24 AM
Desert Dancer 09 Dec 06 - 04:08 PM
GUEST,Jeanne 01 Jan 14 - 01:08 PM
CapriUni 09 Jan 16 - 05:48 PM
Charmion 09 Jan 16 - 07:25 PM
GUEST 09 Jan 16 - 08:07 PM
CapriUni 10 Jan 16 - 01:15 PM
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Subject: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Rex
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 01:34 PM

I have a book with a bit of history on Greensleeves and then lists words for a New Years song to the same tune. The book mentions how old Greensleeves is but says nothing of when these words showed up. It offers no other title either. Anyone out there know anything about it?

Rex


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From:
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 01:47 PM

What is the New York song?


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Matthew B.
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 04:51 PM

I don't know of any, but let me write one now. Bear with me, this version won't be much good, because I only have 5 minutes. (So feel free to add verses)

New Year's, 1999 (to the tune of Greensleeves)
by Matthew B (and others?)

Before the advent of Y-2-K
As ev'ryone is out rev-el-ing
The clocks are ticking the minutes away
And the date fields are nearing their lev-el-ing

Cho:
Crash, crash go the systems all
As the lights go out and the elevators fall
Phones are down so there's no one to call
And the banks have lost all your mon-ey

The planes can't land 'cause their guidance is down
And the lights are out all over the town
There's no water pressure the fires to drown
And you find yourself stuck on the subway

Cho.
Well, you get the idea. Anybody want to add a verse?


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: MMario
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 04:55 PM

*groan* PLEASE don't encourage the Y2K disaster-mongers. *whimper* pleasepleasepleasepleasepleasePLEASE*sob*

MMario


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: vissjoy@superiway.net
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 05:41 PM

The old year now away is fled, / The new year it is entered;

I have three verses from a book titled: A Song Book for Schools, published by Clarke, Irwin & Co. Ltd, 1940; 6th reprint in 1950. It was compiled by Ethel A. Kinley, Supervisor of Music in the Schools of the City of Winnipeg.

The title on the page is Greensleeves (English) and is arranged by Martin Shaw.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From:
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 06:38 PM

Tune is "Greensleeves". Song is "The Old Year Now Is Fled Away" from New Christmas Carols, London, 1642.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: T in Oklahoma
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 07:22 PM

Was that the elusive Bruce O. ?

Here are three verses, as found in Chappel's Popular Music of the Olden Time, London, circa 1856.

The old year now away is fled,
The new year it is entered;
Then let us now our sins down tread
And joyfully all appear.

Let's merry be this holiday
And let us run with sport and play,
Hang sorrow, let's cast care away--
God send you a happy new year.

Come lads and lasses every one,
Jack, Dom, Dick, Bess, Mary, and Joan,
let's cut the meat unto the bone,
for welcome you need not fear.

And here for good liquor we shall not lack,
It will whet my brains and strengthen my back,
This jolly good cheer it must go to wrack--
God send us a merry new year.

Come give us more liquor when I do call,
I'll drink to each one in this hall,
I hope that so loud I must not bawl,
But unto me lend an ear.

Good fortune to my master send
And to my dame which is our friend,
God bless us all and so I end--
And God send us a happy new year.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Susan of DT
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 07:48 PM

See a fuller version in the DT as Carol for new years day


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Matthew B.
Date: 28 Sep 99 - 08:03 PM

Guess I have no takers on the Y2K idea, huh?


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Rex
Date: 27 Dec 99 - 01:23 AM

Howdy all, may your Christmas have been a merry one.

Susan, above pointed out a good version of the song in question. Yup, I should have known it would be in the DT. As it turns out, I had a version myself and found it buried in papers. I got it from a forgotten newsgroup and as it's a bit different from the DT version and the above, I'll just toss in what I found:

The following song appeared in Faith Petric's excellent column, "The Folk Process," in the Nov/Dec issue of Sing Out! (what year I don't know). It was found under a collection of carols dated 1642. Since it can't possibly be under copyright, I thought I'd post it. (who it was that posted this is not known to me either)

Happy New Year

Tune: Greensleeves

Words: anonymous

The old year now does pass away;
The New Year comes awhile to stay.
So let us merry be this day
And sing with joyful cheer.

Let joy be confined;
Put grief and sorrow far behind.
Farewell to a troubled mind,
And send us a happy New Year.

Our joyous greetings now we send
With heart and hand to every friend,
And pray we may our lives amend,
And good deeds soon appear.

Now let us welcome in
The goodly days soon to begin.
Cast off all thoughts of sin
And send us a happy New Year.

So there you go, yet another version. May you all enjoy a fine New Year.

Rex

(line breaks fixed by a Joe clone)


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: katlaughing
Date: 27 Dec 99 - 08:21 AM

That'a beautiful version, Rex. Thanks for posting it.

katlaughing


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 May 04 - 06:13 PM

Lyr. Add GREENSLEEVES CAROL

The old year now away is fled.
The new year it is entered. (en-ter-ed)
Then let us now our sins down tread
And joyfully all appear.

And now with New Year's gifts each friend
Unto each other they do send.
God grant we may all our lives amend.
And that the truth may appear.

Refrain
Let's merry be this day
And let us now both sport and play.
Hang grief, cast care away,
God send you happy new year.

"This is a 'waits' carol. 'Waits' were night guards stationed at city gates in England, during the Middle Ages. They formed musical bands , playing for notables at Christmas."
With music, p. 195, Music for Living Series, "Music Around the World," Teachers Book Six, Silver Burdett Co., James L. Mursell et al., 1956.

The tune is post Middle Ages, of course, first registered in 1580 as noted by Bruce O. in other threads. The song posted by Rex, 27 Dec 99, is obviously related to this carol. He refers to a 1625 songbook, and an article in "Sing Out," but gives no definite information.

The tune of "Green Sleeves" was used for parodies in the 17th c, one being "A New Song of Lulla by, or Father Peter's Policy Discovered," 1688, a song about religious controversy. See Bodleian Ballads, Wood E25(110) or Harding B 39(131).
Also "A Pretty Ballad of the Lord of Lorn and the False Steward," c. 1656-1664, Wood 401((95)

I have no information relative to this carol other than what I have posted here. If data given by Rex are good, it could be 17th c., otherwise possibly much later.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 20 May 04 - 06:23 PM

Damn! I scrolled over contributions by Susan of DT's and T in Oklahoma without seeing them. Sorry! Seem to be quite a lot of verses.

What is the evidence for the 1625 and 1642 dates?


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: masato sakurai
Date: 22 May 04 - 10:25 AM

Notes to "Greensleeves" in The Oxford Book of Carols (1928, No. 28):
A Waits' carol. There are three more verses, appealing to 'Jack, Tom, Dick, Bessy, Mary, and Joan', and also to the dame of the house, rather pathetically pleading for good cheer. From New Christmas Carols, 1642 ('to the tune of Greensleeves'), in the unique black-letter collection of Antony à Wood, now in the Bodleian. We have had to alter some words for the sake of choral singing.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: masato sakurai
Date: 22 May 04 - 11:24 AM

See The Hymns and Carols of Christmas site:
The Old Year Now Away Is Fled, with lyrics, info, sheet music & midi.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 09 Dec 06 - 04:08 PM

I was looking about for the "three more verses" dropped by the Oxford Book of Carols. Glad to find them still about in various places.

Others coming here comparing versions might note that where the OBC "had to alter some words for the sake of choral singing" was in verse 2:

OBC has

The name-day now of Christ we keep,
Who for our sins did often weep ;

in lieu of

For Christ's circumcision this day we keep,
Who for our sins did often weep;

For my 2 cents, while I agree that the OBC might have it right on the above substitution for the purposes of choral singing, I don't find the other verses pathetic at all. A more honest assessment might be that the liquor content is higher than they felt was appropriate. :-)

Another site with the full set (and also much of Drive the Cold Winter Away, among an assortment of "blackletter" ballads) is here.

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: GUEST,Jeanne
Date: 01 Jan 14 - 01:08 PM

None of the versions linked here are exactly the same as the original 1642 version -- I'm looking at the file now. Chappell, Bullen, and the Oxford Book of Carols all have variations in text, spelling, punctuation, etc. Here is it from the scan, albeit without italicization or font changes, but all of the variations in spelling and punctuation -- enjoy!

Good and True,
Fresh and New
Christmas Carols
(...)
Printed at London by E. P. for Francis Coles,
dwelling in the Old-Baily. 1642.

(ninth carol of twelve)

A Caroll for New-yeares day.
To the tune of, Greene Sleeves.

The old yeare now away is fled,
The new yeare it is entered,
Then let us now our sins downe tread,
and ioyfully all appeare,
Let s merry be this Holyday,
And let us now both sport and play,
Hang sorrow, let's cast care away,
God send you a happy new yeare.

For Christs Circumcision this day we keepe,
Who for our sins did often weepe,
His hands and feet were wounded deepe,
and his blessed side with a Speare,
His head they crowned then with Thorne,
And at him they did laugh and scorne,
Who for to save our Soules was borne,
God send us a merry new yeare.

And now with New=yeares Gifts each Friend,
Unto each other they doe send,
God grant we may all our lives amend,
and that the truth may appeare ;
Now like the Snake cast off your skin
Of evill thoughts and wicked sin,
And to amend this new yeare begin.
God send us a merry new yeare.

And now let all the company
In friendly manner all agree,
For we are here welcome all may see,
unto this iolly good cheere ;
I thanke my Master and my Dame,
The which are founders of the same,
To eate to drinke now is no shame,
God send us a merry new yeare.

Come Lads and Lasses every one,
Jack, Tom, Dick, Besse, Mary and Ione,
Lets cut the meate up unto the bone,
for welcome you need not feare,
And here for good liquor we shall not lack,
It will whet my braines + strengthen my back
This ioylly good cheere it must goe to wrack,
God send us a merry new yeare.

Come give's more liquor when I doe call,
Ile dunke to each one in this Hall,
I hope that so loud I must not baule,
but unto me lend an eare ;
Good fortune to my master send,
And to my dame which is our friend,
Lord blesse us all, and so I end,
and God send us a happy new yeare.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: CapriUni
Date: 09 Jan 16 - 05:48 PM

This ioylly good cheere it must goe to wrack,

I've been wondering about this for nine days, or so:

What does "wrack" mean, in this context?

I know it primarily as a type of torture -- or as part of the phrase "go to wrack and ruin." But that doesn't seem to fit with the overall mood of the song.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: Charmion
Date: 09 Jan 16 - 07:25 PM

The instrument of torture is a "rack", without the w.

"Wrack" as in "wrack and ruin" is a variant of "wreck".

In the song, I think it means that the arrival of New Year's Day means that Christmas is drawing to a close.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Jan 16 - 08:07 PM

Seems like someone should mention the Christmas carol, "What Child Is This?", set to Greensleeves.

Also, I'm pretty sure the tune is English, not Irish.


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Subject: RE: Greensleeves tune in New Year song
From: CapriUni
Date: 10 Jan 16 - 01:15 PM

Guest (8:07 PM) --

Yes, it is. But if I recall correctly, these New Year lyrics are actually older.

Charmion--

Thanks. That makes sense (We can't party all the time, so let's make the best of our time and party while we can!)


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