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Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot

Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Feb 12 - 02:20 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 17 Feb 12 - 04:37 PM
Joe Offer 18 Feb 12 - 03:31 AM
Joe Offer 18 Feb 12 - 04:06 AM
Joe Offer 18 Feb 12 - 04:14 AM
Joe Offer 18 Feb 12 - 04:39 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Feb 12 - 02:08 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Feb 12 - 02:30 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 18 Feb 12 - 02:35 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Feb 12 - 02:56 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Feb 12 - 03:38 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 18 Feb 12 - 04:51 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 18 Feb 12 - 05:25 PM
Joe Offer 19 Feb 12 - 01:42 AM
Monique 19 Feb 12 - 02:40 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 19 Feb 12 - 06:54 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Feb 12 - 02:20 PM

JEANNETTE AND JEANNOT
The Conscript's Departure

Charles W. Glover, music; Charles Jeffreys, lyrics

1
You are going faw away, far away from poor Jeannette,
There is no one left to love me now, and you, too, may forget
But my heart will be with you, wherever you may go,
Can you look me in the face and say the same Jeannot?

When I wear the jacket red and the beautiful cockade,
Oh I fear that you'll forget all the promises you made;
With a gun upon your shoulder and your bayonet by your side.
You'll be taking some fair lady and be making her your bride,
You'll be taking some fair lady and be making her your bride.
2
Or, when glory leads the way, you'll be madly rushing on,
Never thinking if they will kill you that my happiness is gone;
If you win the day, perhaps a general you'll be,
Though I'm proud to think of that, what will become of me?

Oh if I were queen of France, or still better, pope of Rome,
I'd have no fighting men abroad, no weeping maids at home;
All the world should be at peace, or if kings must show their might,
Why let them who make the quarrels be the only men to fight.
Yes, let them who make the quarrels be the only men to fight.

C. 1840s. The earliest sheet music I have found is dated c. 1847, E. Ferret & Co., Philadelphia; 1848, Sidney (Australia), T. J. Grocott; and several printed in the U. S. dated 1850 (W. H. Eburne, etc.).
According to antiqbook.com, there are four interrelated songs with the common subtitle "Jeannette and Jeannot." Charles Jeffreys seems to have been the first publisher. Variously titled:
Jeannette's Song - The Conscript's Departure
Cheer Up My Own Jeannette
Jeannot's Answer - Cheer Up My Own Jeannette - The Soldier's Return
The Wedding of Jeannette and Jeannot - The Soldier's Wedding
A set was published by C. Jeffreys, c. 1850, in London, as "Songs of a Conscript," with engraved illustrations.

Charles Glover was musical director at Queen's Theatre, London.

The songs were popular in the U. S., and especially so during the Civil War. The first one has been printed in "Southern War Songs: Campfire, Patiotic and Sentimental," 1890, T. Richardson Co. A copy with three of the songs (lacks Wedding), titled "Cheer Up My Own Jeannette, sheet music, n. d., F. D. Benteen, Baltimore, is available at Levy Sheet Music:
https://jscholarship.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/20531

A parody, "California As It Is," a Gold Miner's song, is printed in Dwyer and Lingenfelter.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 17 Feb 12 - 04:37 PM

Roud 391, 30 entries listed. I think the earliest dated entry is an 1849 catalogue entry and copy in a ship's log.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 03:31 AM

Here's the entry from the Traditional Ballad Index:

    Jeanette and Jeannot

    DESCRIPTION: "You are going far away from your poor Jeanette. There is no one left to love me now and you too may soon forget." The singer laments her lover's departure to be a soldier. She wishes she had the power to end war
    AUTHOR: Charles Glover and Charles Jeffreys
    EARLIEST DATE: 1812 (Journal from the Minerva Smythe) [should be 1852 - see below]
    KEYWORDS: love separation soldier
    FOUND IN: Britain(England(South),Scotland(Aber))
    REFERENCES (3 citations):
    Huntington-Whalemen, pp. 245-246, "Genette and Genoe" (1 text, 1 tune)
    GreigDuncan1 102, "Jeannette and Jeaunot" (1 text, 1 tune)
    Wiltshire-WSRO Gl 163, "Jeanette" (1 text)

    ST SWMS245 (Partial)
    Roud #391
    BROADSIDES:
    LOCSheet, sm1850 481050, "Jeanette and Jeannot" or "The Conscript's Departure," A. Fiot (Philadelphia), 1850 (text and tune)
    CROSS-REFERENCES:
    cf. "Henry and Mary Ann (Henry the Sailor Boy)" (tune, per broadside Bodleian Firth c.12(284))
    ALTERNATE TITLES:
    The Conscript's Departure
    NOTES: My sources do not agree on whether the (co-)author's last name was "Jeffreys," "Jeffreys," or "Jeffries." His poetry was not a great success; I have located only two other poems by him. One is a response to this, "Jeannot's Answer" (for which see Hazel Felleman The Best Loved Poems of the American People, which also contains a full text of "Jeannette and Jannot") and "We Have Lived and Loved Together" (also in Felleman). - RBW
    Broadside Bodleian, Firth b.26(472), "Answer to Jeannette and Jeannot" ("Cheer up, cheer up my own Jeannette"), J. Wilson (Bideford), n.d. is [another version of the] sequel. - BS
    Last updated in version 2.6
    File: SWMS245

    Go to the Ballad Search form
    Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
    Go to the Bibliography
    Go to the Discography

    The Ballad Index Copyright 2011 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: ADD Version: Genette and Genoe
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 04:06 AM

GENETTE AND GENOE

You are going far away from your poor Genette
There is no one left to love me now and you too may forget
Yet my heart it shall be with you wherever you do go
Can you look me in the face my love and say the same Genoe

With your lovely jacket on and your beautiful cockade
You will be forgetting all those promises you made
With your gun upon your shoulder and your bayonet by your side
You'll be courting some fair lady and making her your bride

When glory leads the way and you're rushing madly on
Not thinking if they kill you my happiness is done
And should victory crown the day and some general you'll be
Though I'd be proud to hear of this what would become of me

If I was the king of France or what's more the Pope of Rome
I'd have no fighting man abroad or weeping maid at home
But all the world would be at peace and man maintain his right
And them that made the guards 'd be the only ones left out


Euphrasia 1849
Milierva Smythe 1852

Notes from Huntington: The proper title for this song is "Jeanette and Jeannot." It was written by Charles Glover and Charles Jeffreys in the latter part of the eighteenth century and for many years was a remarkably popular parlor song. However, it does seem to have become truly traditional with seamen. Both the Euphrasia and Minerva Smythe versions show changes from the original other than mere spelling. In the Euphrasia journal it is entitled, "The Conscript's Departure."


Source: Songs the Whalemen Sang, by Gale Huntington, pp. 245-245


Click to play (joeweb)


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Subject: ADD Version: Jeanette
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 04:14 AM

JEANETTE

You are going far away, far away from poor Jeanette,
There is no one left to love me now, and you too, may forget;
But my heart will be with you, wherever you may go,
Can you look me in the face and say the same to Jeanette?

Verse 2

When you wear the jacket red and the beautiful cockade,
It's then I fear that you will forget the promises you made;
With the gun upon your shoulder, and the dagger by your side,
You'll be taking some proud lady and be making her your bride.

Verse 3

O if I were the Queen of France, or still better, Pope of Rome,
I'd have no fighting men abroad, no weeping maids at home;
All the world should be at peace, or, if kings must show their might,
Let them who make the quarrels be the only men to fight.



Source: Wiltshire-WSRO -- transcriptions of the Alfred Williams (1877-1930) manuscripts


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Subject: ADD: Jeannot
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 04:39 AM

And there's an answer:

JEANNOT'S ANSWER TO JEANNETTE

Cheer up, cheer up my own Jeannette tho' far away I go,
In all the changes you may see I'll be the same Jeannot
And if I win both fame and gold, ah! be not so unkind
To think that I could leave you in the home I leave behind;
There's not a lady in the land, and if she were a queen,
Could win my heart from you, Jeannette, so true as you have been;
They must have gallant warriors; chance hath cast the lot on me;
But mind you this—the soldier, love, shall no deserter be.

Why, ever since the world began, the surest road to fame
Has been the field, where men unknown might win themselves a name;
And well I know the brightest eyes have ever brighter shone;
When looking at some warrior bold return from battles won.
And you would put an end to deeds the ladies love so well,
And have no tales of valour left for history to tell;
The soldier's is a noble trade, Jeannette, then rail no more;
Were only kings allowed to fight, there'd be an end of war.

Source: Kenneth Goldstein Broadsides, University of Mississippi Libraries

Also at Google Books


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 02:08 PM

Joe caught the error in the Traditional Ballad Index: the date of the Minerva Smythe entry is 1852, not 1812.

As noted above, the earliest date I have found for sheet music is 1847, E. Ferret & Co., Philadelphia. Since the composers are English, it is probable that the first printing was a little earlier, but I have not found an earlier English printing (1848 Australian sheet music noted above).

The "answer" posted by Joe was titled Cheer Up My Own Jeannette in sheet music published by Benteen of Philadelphia (n. d.), copy at Levy Sheet Music (link in first post).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 02:30 PM

Sheet music titled Jeannette and Jeannot, Quick Step, by John C. Scherpf, was published 1849
https://jscholarship.library.jhu.edu


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 02:35 PM

The earliest score entry in the British Library catalogue is for 1848: The Jeannette and Jeannot Quadrilles etc by Charles William Glover, C. Jefferys.

The catalogue also has an entry for Jeannette and Jeannot; or, the Conscript's row A romance - published in 24 parts by E. Lloyd, 1846. I don't know how this might relate to the song, but it may have been suggested by the song, suggesting the song predated 1846.

There is also Jeannette & Jeannot, Or The Conscript's Vow: A Musical Drama in Two Acts (1852) (at archive,org), which definitely contains the song.


Q - re the Arpitan version, I had a quick look at the score and one of the English version scores at Levy and the tune is definitely not the same. The Arpitan score also says Version originale abrégée du folklore jurassien, so you may need to look elsewhere in France for the a possible relative.


Mick


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Subject: add: The Soldier's Wedding (Jeffreys/Glover)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 02:56 PM

THE SOLDIER'S WEDDING
(Charles Jeffreys and Charles W. Glover)

Give me your hand, my own Jeannette,
The wars at length are over,
And merry are the wedding bells
That welcome back the rover;
The Song of Peace is on our hills,-
And all is cheerful labour.
Where late we heard the din of strife
The warpipe and the tabour;
Good omens bless this happy day;
The sun's bright rays are shedding
Their loving light of Hope and Joy
Upon the soldier's wedding.

Rich fields of waving corn are seen
Where hostile flags were streaming,
And where the sword was flashing, now
The sickle bright is gleaming;
Lie still ye brawling hounds of war;
Let Peace our hearts enlighten;
Rest sword, and rust within your sheath,
But let the plowshare brighten
Good omens bless this happy day:-
The sun's bright rays are shedding
Their loving light of Hope and Joy
Upon the soldier's wedding.


G. P. Reed, Boston and Firth Pond, New York, n. d.
https://jscholarship.library.jhu.edu


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 03:38 PM

The Arpitan (French) song is unrelated. See thread French Folk Songs, 4008, for lyrics, and comment by Monique.
French Folk Songs


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 04:51 PM

Q

I just checked French Songs (nb - your previous link is wrong - I think you misread the & following 400 as an 8) and Monique still hasn't replied since yesterday with the translation she was going to try and get (I did check the thread earlier before I posted). Did she contact you separately?

Mick


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 12 - 05:25 PM

Yep, thread 400 it is. Should put on my glasses.
Monique will post when she gets a translation.


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Subject: ADD: Jeannette and Jeaunot
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 01:42 AM

One more:

JEANNETTE AND JEAUNOT

I am going far away, far away from poor Jeannette,
There is no one left to love me now, and you too may forget.
When you wear the jacket red, and the beautiful cockade,
I'm afraid you'll be forgetting all the promises you made.
But my heart shall still go with you wherever you do go,
Can you look me in the face, and say the same, Jeannot?


2............................................................
.............................................................
With your gun upon your shoulder, and your bayonet by your side,
You'll be taking some proud lady, and be making her your bride.

Singer: Mrs. Margaret Gillespie - recorded by Duncan

Source: The Greig-Duncan Folk Song Collection, Volume 1, #102


Click to play (joeweb)


I've posted a MIDI for the "Genette and Genoe" version above from Gale Huntington's Songs the Whalemen Sang. - see above.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Monique
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 02:40 AM

@Mick: whenever I get an answer, I'll post it. But I have to get it first :->)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Jeannette and Jeannot
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 19 Feb 12 - 06:54 AM

Sorry Monique - I wasn't complaining that you'd been slow replying (God knows it sometimes takes me forever to get back to threads with information; I've got two things (at least) to get back to at the moment). It was just that when Q said the Arpitan song wasn't related to the English one I thought he might have had a PM from you, but that you hadn't got round to posting it.

As the main contributor of (so much) French material I'd be amazed if you have any time to yourself! So I shall finish with a suitable French letter ending:

Please be assured, Madam, of my highest regards and have no doubt that I hold you in the highest esteem. My days will be endless, my nights sleepless, my spirit listless, my soul bleak, my mind an empty void as I await anxiously the fruits of your endeavours ;-)

Mick


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