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Lyr Add: Irish Rover (various versions)

DigiTrad:
THE IRISH ROVER


Related threads:
(origins) Origins: Irish Rover (15)
Irish rover - chorus? (4)
Irish Rover copyrighted? (13)
Lyr Req: Illegal Cargo in the Irish Rover (3)
Chords Req: Irish Rover (8)


MudGuard 31 Oct 99 - 02:47 AM
Mbo 31 Oct 99 - 12:01 PM
McGrath of Harlow 31 Oct 99 - 02:30 PM
MudGuard 01 Nov 99 - 08:48 AM
charcloth 11 Dec 99 - 02:43 PM
AKS 16 Dec 99 - 04:32 AM
GUEST,Philippa 06 Mar 03 - 08:29 AM
Leadfingers 12 Sep 04 - 07:55 AM
GUEST 12 Sep 04 - 01:35 PM
ced2 13 Sep 04 - 09:29 AM
ossonflags 13 Sep 04 - 02:24 PM
Leadfingers 13 Sep 04 - 04:56 PM
Joe Offer 12 Mar 05 - 05:43 PM
akenaton 12 Mar 05 - 05:55 PM
Bernard 12 Mar 05 - 08:14 PM
GUEST,Chris Jordan 09 Sep 15 - 06:38 PM
Tattie Bogle 10 Sep 15 - 05:08 AM
Tattie Bogle 10 Sep 15 - 05:23 AM
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Subject: Irish Rover (different Version)
From: MudGuard
Date: 31 Oct 99 - 02:47 AM

I found a different version of lyrics to this song than the ones in the database.
Most notable differences:
1s verse 1st line,
4th verse, 10th and 11th line
5th verse (not found in database at all)

Mudguard

Irish Rover

On the fourth of July eighteenhundred and six,
We set sail from the sweet Cobh of Cork,
We were sailing away with a cargo of bricks
For the grand City Hall in New York.
'Twas a wonderful craft,
She was rigged 'fore and aft,
And now how the wild winds drove her.
She stood several blasts
She had twenty seven masts
And they called her the Irish Rover.

We had one million bags
Of the best Sligo rags,
We had two million barrels of stone,
We had three million sides
Of old blind horses hides
We had four million barrels of bones,
We had five million hogs,
Six million dogs,
Seven million barrels of porter,
We had eight million bails
Of old nanny goats' tails,
In the hold of the Irish Rover.

There was old Mickey Coote
Who played hard on his flute
When the ladies lined up for the set.
He was tootlin' with skill
For each sparkling quadrille
For the dancers were fluthered and bet
With his smart witty talk
He was cock of the walk
And he rolled the dames under and over
They all knew how to dance
When he took up his stance
That he sailed in the Irish Rover

There was Barney McGee
From the banks of the Lee,
There was Hogan from County Tyrone,
There was Johnny McGurk
Who was scared stiff of work
And a man from Westmeath called Malone,
There was Slugger O'Toole
Who was drunk as a rule,
And fighting Bill Tracy from Dover,
And your man Mick McCann
From the banks of the Bann
Was the skipper on the Irish Rover.

For a sailor it's always a bother of live
It's so lonesome by night and by day.
That he longs for the shore
And a charming young whore
Who will melt all his troubles away.
All the noise and the rout
Stew and poteen and stout
For him soon it's done and over
Of the lord of a maid
He is never afraid
An old soul of the Irish Rover.

We had sailed seven years,
When the measles broke out
And our ship lost its way in the fog,
And the whale of the crew
Was reduced down to two.
Just myself and the captain's old dog,
Then the ship struck a rock,
Oh Lord what a shock,
The bow it was turned right over,
Turned nine times around
And the poor old dog was drowned,
I'm the last of the Irish Rover.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (different Version)
From: Mbo
Date: 31 Oct 99 - 12:01 PM

These are the lyrics to the great Dubliners/Pogues Irish traditional-punk collaboration version!

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (different Version)
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 31 Oct 99 - 02:30 PM

There's a very different version of the fourth verse in James N. Healy's Second Book of Irish Ballads, (published by Mercier Press in 1962), celebrating the Irish Diaspora.

Donaghue and MacHugh came from Red Waterloo
And O'Neill and Mac Flail from the Rhine
There was Ludd and Mc Gludd from the land of the flood
Pat Malone, Mike McGowan and O'Brien
Bould MacGee, MacEntee and big Neill from Tigree
And Michael O'Dwyer from Dover
And a man from Turkestan sure his name was Kid MacCann
Was the skipper of the Irish Rover



And he gives a chorus as well -

Fare thee well, my own true one, I'm going far from you
And I will swear by the stars above, forever I'll be true
But as I part it willbreak my heart, and when the trip,is over
I'll roam again in true Irish style aboard the Irish Rover.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (different Version)
From: MudGuard
Date: 01 Nov 99 - 08:48 AM

Mbo, you're right!


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Subject: The Irish Rover
From: charcloth
Date: 11 Dec 99 - 02:43 PM

Does anyone know when "The Irish Rover" was written, now don't somebody say " In the year of our Lord 1800 & 6"
I moved this message here from another thread on the same topic.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE IRISH ROVER
From: AKS
Date: 16 Dec 99 - 04:32 AM

Hai! This does not answer your question, ch-th, but I'll give this anyway: A friend of mine has 'Walton Songs, Book 5: The Irish Rover, A Ballad Miscellany (1966)' which prints this version of the IR by J. M. Crofts (most of it already is either in the DT or in the threads, some lines are in different order and the last verse is 'extra' and the verse about 'Donoghue and MacHugh...' is missing):

THE IRISH ROVER

On the fourth of July eighteen hundred and six,
We set sail from the sweet cove of Cork.
We were sailing away with a cargo of bricks
For the grand City Hall in New York.
'Twas a wonderful craft. she was rigged fore and aft,
And how the wild wind drove her!
She stood several blasts. she had twenty-seven masts
And we called her the Irish Rover.

CHORUS: So fare thee well, my own true love.
I'm going far from you;
And I will swear by the stars above,
Forever I'll be true to you.
Though as I part, it breaks my heart,
Yet when the trip is over,
I'll come back again in true Irish style,
Aboard the Irish Rover.

We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags.
We had two millions barrels of stone.
We had three million sides of old blind horse's hides.
We had four million barrels of bone.
We had five million hogs and six million dogs.
We had seven million barrels of porter.
We had eight million bales of old nanny goats' tails
On board the Irish Rover. CHORUS

There was old Mickey Coote who played hard on his flute
When the ladies lined up for a set.
He would tootle with skill for each sparkling quadrille
'Til the dancers were fluthered and bet.
With his smart witty talk, he was cock of the walk
As he rowled the dames under and over.
When he took up his stance, they all knew at a glance
That he sailed the Irish Rover. CHORUS

There was Barney Magee from the banks of the Lee.
There was Hogan from County Tyrone;
And Johnny McGuirk who was scared stiff of work
And a chap from Westmeath named Malone.
There was Slugger O'Toole who was drunk as a rule,
And fighting Bill Tracy from Dover.
There was Dolan from Clare, just as strong as a bear,
All on board the Irish Rover. CHORUS

For the sailor, it's always a botherin' life.
It's so lonesome by night and by day,
That he longs for the shore and a charming young wife
Who will melt all his troubles away.
All the noise and rout swillin' poteen and stout,
For him soon is done and over.
Of the love of a maid he is never afraid,
That old salt from the Irish Rover. CHORUS

We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out
And our ship lost its way in the fog.
Then the whole of the crew were reduced down to two:
Myself and the captain's old dog.
The ship struck a rock. O Lord, what a shock!
The boat was turned right over,
Whirled nine times around, then the poor old dog was drowned.
I'm the last of the Irish Rover. CHORUS

I'm the last of the barons, those buckos so tough,
An old salt who has weathered the storm.
Be the breezes asleep or the sea wild and rough,
We were always in top fighting form.
Oh, 'tis we were the boys who had tasted life's joys.
On shore we were all in clover;
For all women and wine so buxom and fine
Loved the lads of the Irish Rover. CHORUS

Now, please someone trace back J M Crofts?

Greetings aks, joensuu, Finland


I moved this message here from another thread on the same topic.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE IRISH ROVER (J M Crofts)
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 06 Mar 03 - 08:29 AM

similar, but with a chorus

THE IRISH ROVER
J M Crofts

On the fourth of July, eighteen hundred and six,
We set sail from the sweet cove [Cobh?] of Cork,
We were sailing away with a cargo of bricks,
For the grand city hall in New York.
'Twas a wonderful craft, she was rigged fore and aft,
And how the wild wind drove her.
She stood several blasts, she had twenty-seven masts,
and we called her the 'Irish Rover'.

chorus
So fare thee well, my own true love,
I'm going far from you,
And I will swear by the stars above
Forever I'll be true to you,
Tho' as I part, it breaks my heart,
Yet when the trip is over
I'll come back again in true Irish style
Aboard the Irish Rover.

We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags,
We had two million barrels of stone,
We had three million sides of ould blind horses hides,
We had four million barrels of bone,
We have [sic] five million hogs, we had six million dogs,
We had seven million barrels of porter,
We had eight million bales of ould nanny goats tails
On board the Irish Rover.

chorus ....[after each verse]

There was ould Mickey Coote who played hard on his flute
When the ladies 'lined up' for a 'set',
He would tootle with skill for each sparkling quadrille,
Till the dancers were fluthered and bet,
With his smart witty tallk he was 'cock o' the walk',
As he rowled the dames under and over,
When he took up his stance they all knew at a glance,
That he sailed the 'Irish Rover'.

There was Barney McGee from the banks of the Lee,
There was Hogan from County Tyrone
And Johnny McGuirk who was scared stiff of work
And a chap from Westmeath named Malone,
There was 'Slugger' O'Toole who was drunk as a rule,
And fighting Bill tracy from Dover:
There was Dolan from Clare, just as strong as a bear
All on board the 'Irish Rover'.

For a sailor it's always a botherin' life -
It's so lonesome by night and by day -
That he longs for the shore, and a charming young wife
Who will melt all his troubles awya.
All the noise and the rout, swillin' poteen and stout
For him soon is done and over,
Of the love of a maid he is never afraid,
that ould salt from the 'Irish Rover'.

We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out,
Our ship lost its way in the fog.
Then the 'whale' of a crwe were reduced down to two,
Myself and the captain's ould dog.
The ship struck a rock, O Lord, what a shock,
The boat was turned right over,
Whirled nine times around, then the ould dog was drowned,
I'm the last of the 'Irish Rover'.

I'm 'the last of the barons', those 'buckos' so tough,
An ould salt who has weathered the storm:
Be the breezes asleep, or the sea wild and rough,
We were always in top-fighting form!
Oh 'tis we were the boys, who had tasted life's joys,
On shore we were all in clover:
For all women and wine, so buxom and fine,
Loved the lads of the 'Irish Rover'.

The Irish Rover A Selection of Irish Songs and Ballads
Dublin: Walton's Musical Instrument Galleries (Publications Dept), 1966

I don't know whether J M Crofts wrote the original "Irish Rover" or if this is his adaptation. (There are a couple of songs attributed to Delia Murphy in this publication which I believe are her adaptations of traditional songs). The book also credits J M Crofts with authorship of Noreen Bawn, and Eileen McManus, and gives his adaption of The Wild Colonial Boy.


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Subject: Lyr Req: Irish Rover (extra verse)
From: Leadfingers
Date: 12 Sep 04 - 07:55 AM

Heard someone sing The Irish Rover with an extra verse which (I think)
started with someone who played the flute . As a whistle player this would interest me to add to ny version . Any one got any idea ? Or is
this an extra verse that some clever folkie has added ! I await results , so dont let me down catters .


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish Rover (extra verse)
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Sep 04 - 01:35 PM

Those lyrics can be found in above "different version"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish Rover (extra verse)
From: ced2
Date: 13 Sep 04 - 09:29 AM

Something along these lines?

There was old Micky Coote, who played upon his flute, when the ladies lined up for a set,
He tootled with skill, for each sparkling quadrill, till the dancers were flutered and bet,
With his smart witty talk, he was cock of the walk, and he rolled the dames under and over,
They all knew at a glance, when he took up his stance, that he sailed on the Irish Rover.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish Rover (extra verse)
From: ossonflags
Date: 13 Sep 04 - 02:24 PM

That is the verse I know and sing.
Changed it slightly to;
"There was old mickey coote who played hard on his flute" makes it a little easier to sing.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Irish Rover (extra verse)
From: Leadfingers
Date: 13 Sep 04 - 04:56 PM

Thanks for all the info - That IS what I was looking for - Only looked at one set of Lyrics in the D T , fool that I am !!


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Subject: Add Version: Irish Rover (Clancy version)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 05:43 PM

Since we've been discussion the origins of this song, perhaps we ought to post the Clancy-Makem version. It's certainly not the original source, but I'll betcha it's where we all learned it.
-Joe Offer-


THE IRISH ROVER

In the year of our Lord, eighteen hundred and six,
We set sail from the Coal Quay of Cork,
We were sailing away with a cargo of bricks
For the grand City Hall in New York.
We'd an elegant craft, it was rigged fore and aft
And how the trade winds drove her;
She had twenty-three masts and she stood several blasts,
And they called her the Irish Rover

There was Barney Magee, from the banks of the Lee;
There was Hogan, from County Tyrone;
There was Johnny McGurk, who was scared stiff of work;
And a chap from Westmeath named Malone.
There was Slugger O'Toole, who was drunk as a rule;
And fighting Bill Tracy from Dover;
And your man Mick McCann, from the banks of the Bann,
Was the skipper on the Irish Rover.

We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags,
We had two million barrels of bone;
We had three million bales of old nanny goats' tails,
We had four million barrels of stone.
We had five million hogs and six million dogs,
And seven million barrels of porter;
We had eight million sides of old blind horses' hides
In the hold of the Irish Rover

We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out,
And our ship lost her way in a fog.
And the whole of the crew was reduced down to two;
'Twas myself and the captain's old dog.
Then the ship struck a rock, Oh, Lord what a shock,
And nearly tumbled over;
Turned nine times around, then the poor old dog was drowned.
I'm the last of the Irish Rover.

Source: The Irish Songbook, by the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem (Oak Publications, 1979)

Also available at Makem.com


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (various versions)
From: akenaton
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 05:55 PM

Joe..I notice on the other thread you mention a song called "Katey of Lochgoil".
I,m interested to get the words for this ,as I live not far from Lochgoil and havn't heard the song.
Any ideas??...Ake


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (various versions)
From: Bernard
Date: 12 Mar 05 - 08:14 PM

Another chorus I've known for thirty-odd years is shorter:

Fare thee well, my bonny little girl,
I must sail away,
Fare thee well, my bonny little girl,
I must sail away.

Is that the version the Pogues used? The tune for that chorus doesn't appear to be derived from the remainder of the song.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (various versions)
From: GUEST,Chris Jordan
Date: 09 Sep 15 - 06:38 PM

Attributed to J M Crofts. Who was he When did he live?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (various versions)
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 10 Sep 15 - 05:08 AM

As for how old it is, I found a hand-written copy among my grandfather's papers, along with other memorabilia from WW1. So guess it's older than some of the other quoted versions. Just 4 verses and no chorus. Some similarities in the 3rd verse with the one given by McGrath on 31.10.99.

Donoghue and McHugh came from Red Waterloo
And O'Neill and McPhail from the Rhine,
There was Ludd and McSpudd from the Land of tge Flood,
Mick Malone, Mike McGlone and O'Brien,
There was Mick McIntee and a big Portuguee
And Michael O'Dowd from Dover,
And a man from Turkestan by the name of Pat McCann
Was the skipper of The Irish Rover.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Irish Rover (various versions)
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 10 Sep 15 - 05:23 AM

J.M. Crofts - not a lot known, but possibly....? Copied from website, countysongs.ie
If he was 24 in 1911, thus my fit with my grandfather having picked up the song. There are sound clips on the website for the lower songs on the list.

J M Crofts

I have no biography of Joseph M Crofts. The best I can find is a Joseph Mary Crofts (age 24) who was recorded in the 1911 Census as a 'delph and hardware merchant' living in Dublin at 82 Camden Street, Lower West Side. He could read and write, and was fluent in Irish and English languages. His songs include :-

The Carlow Maid
Lament for Patrick Pearse
Sweet lovely vale of Adare
Eileen McManus
Wild Colonial Boy
A battle hymn
Galloping Hogan
Irish Rover

Bring me a shawl from Galway

Carlow maid

Chimes of Cove are pealing

Eileen McManus

Irish Rover

Sweet lovely vale of Adare


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