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Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)

DigiTrad:
DRILL YE TARRIERS DRILL


Related thread:
Help: What is a tarrier (66)


Q (Frank Staplin) 29 Sep 13 - 02:23 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 29 Sep 13 - 02:55 PM
Lighter 29 Sep 13 - 04:20 PM
GUEST,Gerry 29 Sep 13 - 08:08 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 29 Sep 13 - 08:18 PM
Sandra in Sydney 29 Sep 13 - 10:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Sep 13 - 01:27 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Sep 13 - 01:32 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 03 Oct 13 - 05:29 PM
Joe Offer 13 Mar 17 - 12:09 AM
Mrrzy 13 Mar 17 - 02:29 AM
leeneia 13 Mar 17 - 01:24 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 23 Feb 18 - 05:16 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 23 Feb 18 - 05:29 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 25 Mar 18 - 11:00 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 25 Mar 18 - 11:06 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 25 Mar 18 - 11:12 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 25 Mar 18 - 11:17 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 25 Mar 18 - 11:22 PM
GUEST,Phil d'Conch 26 Mar 18 - 05:13 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: DRILL, YE TARRIERS, DRILL (1888)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 02:23 PM

This thread is for the original song and variants. A version (Richard Dyer-Bennett) in the DT Lyrics is close to the 1888 sheet music,

DRILL, YE TARRIERS, DRILL
Composer (?) and sung by Thomas Casey, 1888

Oh! ev'ry morn at seven o'clock,
There are twenty tarriers on the rock,
The boss comes along and says "be still
And put all your power in the *cast-steel drill."

Then drill, ye tarriers, drill,
Drill, ye tarriers, drill.
Oh! it's work all day without sugar in your tay
When ye work beyant the railway,
And drill, ye tarriers, drill.

2
The boss was a fine man all around
But he married a great, big, fat fardown,
She baked good bread and baked it well,
And baked it hard as the hobs of H--l.

Chorus

3
The new foreman is Dan McCann,
I'll tell you sure he's a blame mean man,
Last week a premature blast went off
And a mile in the air went big Jim Goff.

Chorus
4
When pay day it next came around,
Poor Jim's pay short he found,
"What for?" says he, then came the reply,
"You were docked for the time you were up in the sky."

*The drill must be hardened steel or it would shatter. "Cast iron" as in the DT song would not be usable.

Sheet music published by Frank Harding's Music Office, New York, 1888.

Taken from Norm Cohen, 1981, Long Steel Rail, pp. 553-559, University of Illinois Press.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MICK UPON THE RAILROAD (1888)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 02:55 PM

Possible precursor to "Drill, Ye Tarriers. Drill.

Lyr. Add: MICK UPON THE RAILROAD
Anon. 19th C. song sheet.

When first from Limerick I come here,
My latther days to spend and cheer,
It was to dhrink good ale and beer,
Wid the boys upon the railroad.

Chorus
The railroad, the railroad,
The divil take the railroad.

Now Mick do this, and Mick do that,
Widout a stockin' or cravat,
The divil the thing but an ould straw hat,
To work upon the railroad.

They gave me a drill to drill the hole,
And then confound my Irish sowl,
And blast the ship that brought me over,
To work upon the railroad.

Our smith he is from Molehill town,
He sharpens the picks that grubs the ground,
But be will take his jigger when it goes round,
Wid the boys upon the railroad.

When I lay me down to sleep,
The ugly bugs around me creep,
Bad luck to the wink that I can sleep,
While workin' on the railroad.

When I rises on Monday morn,
I hear the sound of the damned ould horn,
I curse the hour that I was born,
To work upon the railroad.

J. Wrigley, New York.
ImPac, the Library Company of Philadelphia, Digital Collections, American song sheets and poetical broadsides collection, has put the date range as 1850-1870.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: Lighter
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 04:20 PM

Equally related to "Paddy Works on the Railway"


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Gerry
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 08:08 PM

According to an online dictionary, a far-down (2nd stanza, 2nd line) is "a native of the north of Ireland".


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 08:18 PM

Drilling by tarriers (paddies) took place on the Union Pacific transcontinental route, but only a fragment of a song exists. The song "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill," may have originated with this railroad or with the Central Pacific, long before the 1888 sheet music was published.

Then drill, my paddies, drill,
Drill my heroes, drill,
Drill all day, no sugar in your tay,
Workin' on the U. P. Railway.

John P. Davis, 1894, The Union Pacific Railway, S. C. Griggs, Chicago. (Quoted from Norn Cohen, The Long Steel Rail.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 29 Sep 13 - 10:04 PM

thanks for finding & posting these interesting songs, Q.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DRILL MAN BLUES (George C. Sizemore)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Sep 13 - 01:27 PM

Rock drilling in song mostly is based on "John Henry" and Black workmen in the southeast U. S.

The Tarriers were mostly Irish, and worked in the expanding railway system.

Others worked in mines, road building and tunneling for subways, water pipelines, and other rock drilling jobs. In all of them, workmen were liable to develop silicosis.

Lyr. Add: DRILL MAN BLUES
George C. "Curley" Sizemore

1
I used to be a drill man,
Down at Old Parlee;
Drilling through slate and sand rock,
'Till it got the best of me.
2
Rock dust has almost killed me,
It's turned me out in the rain;
For dust has settled on my lungs,
And causes me constant pain.
3
I can hear my hammer rollin',
As I lay down for my sleep;
For drilling is the job I love,
And this I will repeat.
4
It's killed two fellow workers,
Here at Old Parlee;
And now I've eaten so much dust, Lord,
That it's killin' me.
5
I'm thinkin' of poor drill men,
Away down in the mine,
Who from eating dust will end up
With a fate just like mine.

Sizemore lived in Langelly, West Virginia. He was one of the victims of silicosis in the mines.
Recorded by George Korson from the singing of George Sizemore, 1940. Library of Congress record LP60 ( think a new number has been added).

From Duncan Emrich, 1974, American Folk Poetry, an Anthology, Pp. 596-597; Little, Brown & Company.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Sep 13 - 01:32 PM

Gerry is correct in his definition of "fardown."

Some of the folk singers of the 1950s sang of a "cast iron" drill, which was impossible because iron in that form would fracture.
The drills were hardened steel, and could be sharpened a time or two before disposal.


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Subject: Lyr Add: DRILL, YE TARRIERS, DRILL (from C Parker)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 03 Oct 13 - 05:29 PM

Lyr. Add: DRILL, YE TARRIERS, DRILL 2
Sung by Chubby Parker, 1931

Workin' all day without sugar in my tay,
Hammerin' rocks on the old railway,
The months roll by and I don't get no pay.

Drill, ye tarriers, drill.
Drill, ye tarriers, drill.

Workin' in the tunnel, shovelin' out the dirt,
I worked so hard that I wore out me shirt,
The tunnel caved in and we all got badly hurt.
Chorus

Standin' in the mud about six feet deep,
Workin' all night without a bite to eat,
Couldn't get to camp for the mud on me feet.
Chorus

I went to the river to wash out my clothes,
I laid 'em on a log where the river swiftly flows,
The log rolled in, down the river went my clothes.
Chorus

Layin' in the bunkhouse, the chills o'er me creep,
The night was cold and dark, was rainin' hail and sleet,
Everybody snorin' and I couldn't get to sleep.
Chorus

The boss's wife, she bakes pies swell,
She bakes them done and she bakes them well,
She bakes them hot as the hubs of hallelujah.
Chorus

The boss's wife, she bakes pies swell,
She bakes them done and she bakes them well,
She bakes them hot as the hubs of hallelujah.
Chorus.

This from pp. 553-554, Norm Cohen, 1981, "Long Steel Rail," Univ. Illinois Press.

I can't find other versions that differ to any extent from those posted here.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 13 Mar 17 - 12:09 AM

Here's the version from the Digital Tradition. Seems to me there ought to be more verses.

DRILL YE TARRIERS DRILL

Every morning about seven o'clock
There were twenty tarriers drilling at the rock
The boss comes along and he says, "Keep still
And bear down heavy on the cast iron drill"

And drill, ye tarriers, drill
Drill, ye tarriers, drill
For it's work all day for the sugar in you tay
Down beyond the railway
And drill, ye tarriers, drill
And blast, and fire

The boss was a fine man down to the ground
And he married a lady six feet 'round
She baked good bread and she baked it well
But she baked it harder than the hobs of Hell

The foreman's name was John McCann
By God, he was a blamed mean man
Last week a premature blast went off
And a mile in the air went big Jim Goff

And when next payday came around
Jim Goff a dollar short was found
When he asked, "What for?" came this reply
"You were docked for the time you were up in the sky"

@work
recorded here by Richard Dyer-Bennet, but remembered from "Sing
Along with Mitch"
filename[ DRILLTAR
TUNE FILE: DRILLTAR
CLICK TO PLAY
SOF



Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill

DESCRIPTION: Describing, in extravagant terms, the hard life of the (Irish) railroad workers -- subjected to long hours, blast, short pay (and that docked for any or no reason). And always the order comes again, "Drill, ye tarriers, drill!"
AUTHOR: words: Thomas Casey/music: Charles Connolly
EARLIEST DATE: 1888 (play, "A Brass Monkey"; sheet music published by Frank Harding of New York, seemingly without attribution)
KEYWORDS: work railroading hardtimes talltale
FOUND IN: US(SE)
REFERENCES (12 citations):
Morris, #101, "Drill, Ye Terriers" (1 text, 1 tune)
Cohen-LSRail, pp. 553-559, "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill" (2 texts, 1 tune)
Geller-Famous, pp. 14-18, "Drill Ye Tarriers, Drill!" (1 text, 1 tune)
Lomax-FSNA 217, "Drill, Ye Tarriers" (1 text, 1 tune)
Arnett, pp. 112-113, "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill" (1 text, 1 tune)
Botkin-RailFolklr, p. 442, "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill" (1 text, 1 tune)
Greenway-AFP, pp. 43-44, "The Tarriers' Song" (1 text, 1 tune)
Darling-NAS, pp. 329, "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill" (1 text)
Fireside, p. 138, "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill!" (1 text, 1 tune)
Silber-FSWB, p. 130, "Drill Ye Tarriers, Drill" (1 text)
DT, DRILLTAR*
ADDITIONAL: _Sing Out_ magazine, Volume 30, #3 (1984), pp, 50-51, "Drill Ye Tarriers, Drill" (1 text, 1 tune, a Canadian version reportedly collected by Tim Rogers though no informant is listed)

Roud #4401 and 4436
RECORDINGS:
George J. Gaskin, "Drill Ye Tarriers Drill" (Berliner 064-1/Berliner [Canada] 4, 1899)
Chubby Parker, "Drill Ye Tarriers Drill" (Conqueror 7893, 1931)
Dan W. Quinn, "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill" (Victor 3155, c. 1901)

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Drill Ye Heroes, Drill!" (tune)
NOTES: This is believed to have originated with an Irish comedy team, (Thomas F.) Casey and (Charles) Connelly, in the 1880s. It has gone almost verbatim into oral tradition; variations in the text are very few.
Very nearly the only exception to this uniformity is the Chubby Parker recording, which is longer than the popular version, and a genuine song about railroad life rather than a humorous item. Cohen, based on this and a few hints in nineteenth century writings, wonders if there may not have been some ancestral text in existence before 1888. If so, that version has been almost completely displaced by the Casey version.
I seem to recall, in my youth, a bunch of us understanding "tarriers" as "terriers," with resulting very odd notions of what the song was about. - RBW
Last updated in version 4.0
File: LoF217

Go to the Ballad Search form
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The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Mar 17 - 02:29 AM

I have a slightly different version by the Weavers


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: leeneia
Date: 13 Mar 17 - 01:24 PM

Re: cast-iron drill. Haven't you ever worked for an employer who demanded excellent results but provided cheap supplies? The cast-iron drill is part of the satire here.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 23 Feb 18 - 05:16 PM

Bleeding edge recording tech, just a few years after the Hoyt-Casey effort. Big premier for Gaskin.

George J. Gaskin - Drill Ye Terriers Drill 1891

George J. Gaskin - Wikipedia


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 23 Feb 18 - 05:29 PM

Hoyt used the "tarriers" plot device at least once before A Brass Monkey (1888).

In A Hole in the Ground (1887) the roles of "first," "second" and "third tarrier" are cast as women. From the reviews I gather singing, dancing, Irish charwomen in a railroad depot.

And that might have been handed down from A Rag Baby (1883.)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 25 Mar 18 - 11:00 PM

Seems the tarrier of song may have arrived at about the same time as the terrier breed. The spellings were interchangeable for man and dog.

Wiki: “The first breed club was set up in Dublin in 1879. Irish Terriers were the first members of the terrier group to be recognized by the English Kennel Club as a native Irish Breed – this happened just before the end of the 19th century. The first Irish Terriers were taken to the US in the late nineteenth century and quickly became somewhat popular.”

Just before the song and the play came out “Honest John” Kelly appeared as a "Tammany Tarrier" in the Puck political cartoon Our national dog-show (Artist: Bernhard Gillam)(N.Y.: Keppler & Schwarzmann, 9 May 1883.)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 25 Mar 18 - 11:06 PM

See Q (29 Sep 13 - 08:18 PM) above:

Drilling by tarriers (paddies) took place on the Union Pacific transcontinental route, but only a fragment of a song exists. The song "Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill," may have originated with this railroad or with the Central Pacific, long before the 1888 sheet music was published.

John P. Davis, 1894, The Union Pacific Railway, S. C. Griggs, Chicago. (Quoted from Norn Cohen, The Long Steel Rail.

The entire footnote in Davis reads:

Students of folk-lore will doubtless discover some substantial historical material in the refrain of song that the author has often heard sung by an old Irish friend – evidently having seen service in more than one campaign:

“Then drill, my paddies, drill,
Drill, my heroes, drill,
Drill all day,
No sugar in your tay,
Workin' on the U.P. Railway.”

[Davis, J.P., The Union Pacific Railway, (Chicago: S.C. Griggs, 1894, p.141, footnote I)]

The earliest “authentic work song” mention I've found so far is Davis' “old Irish friend.” In the following decades he'll get quoted in history books; children's novels and eventually the American cinema.

No mention of the Euro-American job title “tarrier” in professional industry sources so far. Mostly a French thing.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 25 Mar 18 - 11:12 PM

The chorus of a popular song among the men working upon the railroad ran as follows:

"Then drill, my paddies, drill,
Drill, my heroes, drill,
Drill all day, no sugar in the tay,
Workin' on the U.P. railway."

[The Expansion of the American People, The Chautauquan, 1900, vol. XXXI, April-Sept., p.149, footnote 3)]



General Jack S. Casement and his brother, D. C. Casement, directed the Union Pacific forces, which were handled like an army. In fact, the force on the Union Pacific was largely composed of former army men. Operations partook somewhat of the nature of military maneuvers. The men marched to work to beat of drums, with outposts as a precaution against surprises by Indians. As expressed in one of the popular songs of the day, it was:

"Then drill, my Paddies, drill;
Drill, my heroes, drill;
Drill all day,
No sugar in your tay,
Workin' on the U. P. Railway."

[Carter, C.F., When Railroads Were New, (New York: Holt, 1909, p.252)]


Typical of the "serious" history stuff.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 25 Mar 18 - 11:17 PM

After that came the "romantics."

As the day has waned the effort to complete the seventeen miles of track has become more and more uncertain. Jack has driven his men furiously and they have responded loyally. The only men who have shown no signs of flagging are the eight stalwart Irishmen, Mike Shay, the foreman, Pat Joyce, Thomas Daly, Mike Kennedy, Fred McNamara, Ed Killeen, Mike Sullivan and George Wyatt. They not only work with ever renewed energy and zeal but encourage the others and sing:

Then drill, my Paddies, drill;
Drill, my heroes, drill;
Drill all day
No sugar in your tay,
Workin’ on the U. P. Railway.

These eight men have laid all the rails; others, placing ties, driving spikes, bolting fishplates, unable to stand the terrific strain, fall out exhausted and their places are filled by fresh recruits marshalled by Jack.

[Woodrow, W., Sessions, A.L., Building the Union, (New York: Brandt & Kirkpatrick, 1917, p.58)]




A thousand songs arose, crude and coarse and loud, but full of joy. Pay-day and vacation were at hand!

"Then drill, my Paddies, drill!
Drill, my heroes, drill!
Drill all day,
No sugar in your tay,
Workin' on the U. P. Railway."

[Grey, Z., The U.P. Trail, (New York: Harper, 1918, p.246-7)]




Halfway between Carter and Piedmont General Dodge took charge of the contracts, for the company. Relief for General Casement likewise was close at hand. On the long trail out from the Laramie Plains numerous of the sub-contractors had fallen under the pressure of their grading jobs. Time and again the Casement reserves had been hustled forward to fill the gaps. But now, replacing the plains and desert ditty:

Drill, my paddies, drill !
Drill, you tarriers, drill !
Oh, it's work all day,
No sugar in your tay—
Workin' on th' U. Pay Ra-ailway!

a new chantey was reverberating amidst the granite walls before:

At the head of great Echo the railway's begun,
The Mormons are cutting and grading like fun ;
They say they'll stick to it until it's complete—
When friends and relations they're hoping to meet.

Hurrah, hurrah, the railroad's begun,
Three cheers for the contractor; his name's Brigham Young.
Hurrah, hurrah, we're honest and true,
And if we stick to it, it's bound to go through.

Now there's Mr. Reed, he's a gentleman too–
He know very well what the Mormons can do.
He knows they will earn every cent of their pay,
And are just the right boys to construct a railway.


[Sabin, E.L., Building the Pacific Railway, (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott, 1919, pp.179-180)




"Drill, my paddies, drill!
Drill, you tarriers, drill!
Oh, it's work all day,
No sugar in your tay—
        Wor-rkin' on th' U. Pay. Ra-a-ailway!”
                Song of the "U. Pay." Men

(On title page and throughout the text. Character Paddy Miles as: Boss of the track “Tarriers.” Chapter fourteen titled The “Tarriers” Make a Record.)

[Sabin, E.L., Opening the Iron Trail or Terry as a “U. Pay.” Man, (New York: Crowell, 1919)]


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 25 Mar 18 - 11:22 PM

Drill!, Ye Tarriers…. was also one of the first songs to get the full diegetic treatment... in a silent film no less. Not a “cast iron” drill in sight though. In fact, no drilling at all. They're tamping ballast, sort of, but not really.

In truth, there was relatively little rock drilling or gravel ballast on the UP (aka Irish) side. More om this later.

Note the lyric change when our hero moves west to work for the CP, which was very drill and blast oriented:


40 (intertitle#)
From Omaha the
following year come
the Union Pacific crews
-- chiefly ex-soldiers of
North and South working
peacefully side by side.
They had laid the
first rail three months
after the assassination
of President Lincoln.

41
"Drill, ye terriers, drill --
Drill, ye terriers, drill --

42
"Sure, it's work all day,
Without sugar in yer tay -
When ye work for the U.P.
    Ra-a-ail-way ---

43
"Drill, ye terriers, drill --

44
"Drill, ye terriers, drill,
An' work and shw-e-a-t -"

45
In dead of winter, close
behind the advancing rails,
headquarters has jumped to
      North Platte….



177
Personal bitterness is
      put aside.

Davy is made gang
boss ---- and the
road advances along
the shorter route.

178
"Drill, ye terriers, drill -
Drill, ye terriers, drill -

179
"Sure, it's work all day,
Without sugar in yer tay -
When ye work for the U.P.
    Ra-a-ail-way.

180
"Drill, ye paddies, drill,
An' work an' shw-e-at -"

181
"With those foreign
laborers making trouble,
we Americans must
stick together…."


211
In distant California the
Central Pacific track-layers
make the mountains
resound with their song:

"Drill, ye Chinymen, drill,
Drill, ye haythens, drill -"

212
"Shure it's work all day,
Without sugar in yer tay,
When ye work for the
Cay Pay Ra-a-ail-way.

213
"Drill, ye haythens, drill,
An' work an' shw-e-at."

214
After another year --
over conquered prairie
and through riven
mountain -- the great
roads draw together.

[The Iron Horse, John Ford, Fox Film Corp., 1924, American release scored by Erno Rapee]


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill (1888)
From: GUEST,Phil d'Conch
Date: 26 Mar 18 - 05:13 AM

See Lighter's post at the top of the page:

According to Amercan historian Stephen E. Ambrose, drilling and blasting weren't all that common on the Irish side of construction. The songs he mentions were sung forebiter style as opposed to chantey:

When bosses couldn't level the grade, the scrapers*, drawn by oxen or up to four horses, were called in to do the job. When solid rock was encountered in a ridge line, which was seldom in the Great Plains, the men used hand drills and stuffed the hole with black powder. When the rocks blew apart, the remainder of the cut was dug out and leveled. A cut was done entirely by hand. The men would form an endless chain of wheelbarrows*. For fills, the dirt was dumped in. The land yielded nothing but some limestone for masonry work. There was no gravel for ballast so mainly sand was used.

At night. After supper, the men would play cards or sing songs, such as
”Poor Paddy he works on the railroad” or “The Great Pacific railway for California hail, bring on the locomotive, lay down the iron rail.” Others were "Pat Molloy,” “Whoop Along Liza Jane,” or “I'm a rambling rake of poverty, the son of a gamboleer.” The low notes of the Jew's harps and harmonicas floated across the cool night air. The songs were sung almost regardless of harmony and in contempt of tune.

…The evening meal was more leisurely. Then to the bunkhouses, for card games, a smoke, lots of talk (“railroad talk” was said to consist entirely of “whiskey and women and higher wages and shorter hours”), perhaps a song, such as "Poor Paddy he works on the railroad” or “The Great Pacific railway for California hail.” Then to bed, the whole to be repeated the next day and the next and the next.

[Ambrose, S.E., Nothing Like it in the World, (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000, pp.138, 179)]



*The Fresno Scraper (by way of Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland) combined the scraper & wheelbarrow. Perfected and patented in 1883 by Scots-American inventor James Porteous. The basic design, on steroids, is still in use all over the world today.


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