Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)

Will Fly 13 Mar 16 - 06:37 AM
Dave Hanson 13 Mar 16 - 07:15 AM
Will Fly 13 Mar 16 - 08:40 AM
Donuel 13 Mar 16 - 09:03 AM
Donuel 13 Mar 16 - 09:22 AM
MGM·Lion 13 Mar 16 - 10:40 AM
Will Fly 13 Mar 16 - 01:37 PM
GUEST,Ed 13 Mar 16 - 03:02 PM
Will Fly 13 Mar 16 - 03:19 PM
keberoxu 13 Mar 16 - 03:34 PM
Doug Chadwick 13 Mar 16 - 04:24 PM
Donuel 13 Mar 16 - 04:46 PM
Donuel 13 Mar 16 - 05:12 PM
andrew e 13 Mar 16 - 11:18 PM
Joe Offer 14 Mar 16 - 12:23 AM
MGM·Lion 14 Mar 16 - 12:42 AM
matt milton 14 Mar 16 - 05:25 AM
GUEST,Musket 14 Mar 16 - 09:12 AM
Joe_F 14 Mar 16 - 04:54 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Will Fly
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 06:37 AM

I went to a concert on Friday at the Trinity Theatre in Tunbridge Wells (no "Disgusted" jokes, please*) to see my mate Richard Durrant playing the tenor guitar I lent him for his current tour. The bugger can make the tenor talk, and I'm grrrreeen with envy - but that's another story.

Richard played some Bach on it, including a gavotte I've heard many times over the years - Gavotte no. I from the Cello Suite in D - and, though I've heard it many times, I seemed to hear it anew on this instrument. And realised I didn't really know it.

So I downloaded the sheet music in order to make my own transcription for tenor, and I'm staggered all over again by the beauty of the music, the invention, the harmonic twists and turns. There's no question that sitting down and just patiently unravelling a piece, bar by bar, is an education and increases the appreciation of the music a hundredfold and more.

I video'd part of the concert and, should Richard OK it, will upload to YouTube at some point.

==============

*For US 'Catters, the national joke over here is that one old fogie used to write complaining letters to the Times and other newspapers and sign himself "Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells".


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 07:15 AM

I have Richards CD ' Duelling Banjos ' he is one hell of a fine musician.

Dave H


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Will Fly
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 08:40 AM

Agreed, Dave - first class player, and a first class bloke as well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 09:03 AM

If you want to hear the ultimate life long devotion to Bach on Guitar there is a man, Paul G. who built his own guitar for the purpose of the most perfect performance of BACH.

He has a 2 cd collection. The guitar is so big it has to be played vertically. He does violin partitas as well as cello suites.

Google away with these clues bearing in mind the recordings are almost 20 years old.

Paul Gallibriath ?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 09:22 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFibiB81BAI

check out the fast movement and other you tubes


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 10:40 AM

Yes.

So what else is new!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Will Fly
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 01:37 PM

Well, the point I was making, Michael, is that the brilliance of Bach is made more evident with some serious dissection from a musician's point of view - i.e. over and above casual listening.

There are hundreds of pieces that I love, but I wonder how much more I would love and appreciate them if I had the time to dissect them in more detail. And I'm glad that I do have some basic musical technical knowledge to be able to do this.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 03:02 PM

Will,

Do you mean their intellectual/mathematical elegance?

It's an interesting point. Does a priori knowledge improve musical appreciation, or is it best left to an emotional 'wow'?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Will Fly
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 03:19 PM

It's actually the inventiveness in how one musical phrase is turned and shaped to provide the next one. You almost know (for example) what the harmonic change is going to be - and yet it still sounds fresh when it appears, and surprises you in spite of everything.

I suppose that having some musical training and knowledge are aids to appreciating the music - but, yes, there's the "wow" factor as well, because Bach also wrote wonderful tunes!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: keberoxu
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 03:34 PM

My favorite other-person's response to Bach is in Spanish. Thanks to the late flamenco aficionado Donn Pohren, there is a quote in translation in English. Pohren is speaking of DUENDE.

"Let's see what García Lorca says about it in his 'Teoria y Juego de Duende' (Obras Completas/Complete Works). He says quite a lot, but one of his paragraphs should clear up the issue.
" ' All over Andalucía, from the rock of Jaén to the whorled shell of Cádiz, people talk constantly of the duende and they recognize it when it emerges....the old Gypsy dancer La Malena exclaimed one day while listening to [a recording of] Brailowsky play a fragment of Bach: "Olé! Eso tiene duende!" (Olé, that has duende!) and she was bored with Gluck, Brahms, and Darius Milhaud. "
published in the original Spanish in 1930 [Garcia Lorca]
translated by Donn Pohren in The Art of Flamenco, first edition 1962, reprinted many times since


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 04:24 PM

I reckon that if JS Bach were alive today, he would play modern jazz.

DC


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 04:46 PM

Jacque Loussier, been there done that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Donuel
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 05:12 PM

the lengths we go

What is rarely heard by most people is the over arching themes in which Bach organized his works into 3 sections for religious reasons.

Remember when Bach wrote in this Baroque style it was a retro style that Bach expanded upon. He brought ingenious magnifications of the music of his ancestors.

Improvisations of his are the lost music of all time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: andrew e
Date: 13 Mar 16 - 11:18 PM

For me JSB's organ music is simply the best.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujZ9LtkxMpI


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 14 Mar 16 - 12:23 AM

I'll agree with Andrew that Bach sounds best on a baroque organ; but I've heard Bach sound downright wonderful on guitar, too. My favorite Bach piece is the "Little" Fugue in G minor, and I wondered how it would sound on guitar. Turns out, it sounds great: Anybody know of a good solo performance of this on guitar? I wonder if it can be done.

-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 14 Mar 16 - 12:42 AM

Wonderful. Thank you Joe.

When you have played that, do not immediately disconnect. The "Up next" I got was a wonderful rendering of the same fugue on 4 saxophones.   Wonderfully baroque.

The music of JSB, together with performances of it such as these, are among the things which make me want to go on as long as I can...

≈M≈


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: matt milton
Date: 14 Mar 16 - 05:25 AM

Will, I know exactly what you mean.

When I got back into playing the violin after several years away from it, I tried to play one of Bach's solo violin partitas. After months of practice (not just on that one piece, I hasten to add), I could make a reasonable fist of it. Nothing that a professional violinist, or even a music undergraduate, would be all that happy with, but I found the whole experience immensely satisfying.

Made me a much better fiddler.

Last year I discovered Isabelle Faust's recordings of the violin pieces, and they immediately became my favourite, I listened to them almost every day! She has a profound understanding of the ebb and flow of each piece as a whole, and the overall trajectory. I've not heard that in any other violinist's interpretations as yet - too often they get seduced into making each phrase pretty (easily done!) and lose momentum. There's a "questing" in Bach, a relentless inquisitiveness, one-thing-after-another, and Faust nails that.

Isabelle faust from sonatas & partitas


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: GUEST,Musket
Date: 14 Mar 16 - 09:12 AM

Funny how he dedicated his music to "the glory of God" yet the cadences he used show that music itself, a rather temporal abstraction can be infinite. You don't need the old guy. Bach describes infinity without the mumbo jumbo.

I was listening recently to Angel Romero work his way through the cello suite on a classical guitar. Stunning.

Some of his work could be classed as an oxymoron, such as the well tempered banjo 😎


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Ain't Bach brilliant! (JS in this case)
From: Joe_F
Date: 14 Mar 16 - 04:54 PM

"Back to Bach!" -- H. L. Mencken, passim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 18 September 7:58 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.