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Origins: Drowsy Sleeper

DigiTrad:
I WILL PUT MY SHIP IN ORDER
I WILL SET MY SHIP IN ORDER (2)
LITTLE SATCHEL
SILVER DAGGER
WAKE, O WAKE, YOU DROWSY SLEEPER


Related threads:
ADD: Awake, Awake, You Drowsy Sleeper (13)
(origins) Origins: Little Satchel (25)
Lyr Req: Awake Ye Drowsy Sleepers (Ian & Sylvia) (17)
Lyr Req: Who Is at My Window Weeping (14)
Lyr Req: Oh, Katie Dear (4)


Richie 13 Jun 16 - 05:03 PM
Richie 13 Jun 16 - 05:21 PM
GUEST,Nick Dow 13 Jun 16 - 05:22 PM
Richie 13 Jun 16 - 05:41 PM
Richie 13 Jun 16 - 05:46 PM
Richie 13 Jun 16 - 06:16 PM
Richie 13 Jun 16 - 06:31 PM
Richie 13 Jun 16 - 10:17 PM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 12:26 AM
Steve Gardham 14 Jun 16 - 09:31 AM
Steve Gardham 14 Jun 16 - 09:40 AM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 10:22 AM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 11:20 AM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 11:40 AM
Steve Gardham 14 Jun 16 - 01:16 PM
Reinhard 14 Jun 16 - 01:40 PM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 02:12 PM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 02:28 PM
Steve Gardham 14 Jun 16 - 04:29 PM
Steve Gardham 14 Jun 16 - 05:06 PM
Steve Gardham 14 Jun 16 - 05:12 PM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 10:23 PM
Richie 14 Jun 16 - 10:39 PM
Steve Gardham 15 Jun 16 - 03:57 AM
Richie 15 Jun 16 - 09:00 AM
Richie 15 Jun 16 - 11:09 AM
GUEST,Jon Dudley 15 Jun 16 - 01:35 PM
Richie 15 Jun 16 - 06:32 PM
Jim Brown 16 Jun 16 - 05:07 AM
Richie 16 Jun 16 - 09:15 AM
Richie 16 Jun 16 - 10:25 AM
Richie 16 Jun 16 - 12:22 PM
Richie 16 Jun 16 - 10:17 PM
Steve Gardham 17 Jun 16 - 10:29 AM
Richie 17 Jun 16 - 11:39 AM
Richie 17 Jun 16 - 11:48 AM
Richie 17 Jun 16 - 12:25 PM
Steve Gardham 17 Jun 16 - 01:14 PM
Jim Brown 17 Jun 16 - 03:35 PM
Richie 17 Jun 16 - 05:35 PM
Steve Gardham 17 Jun 16 - 05:48 PM
Steve Gardham 17 Jun 16 - 05:50 PM
Richie 17 Jun 16 - 10:01 PM
Richie 17 Jun 16 - 10:13 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Jun 16 - 01:17 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Jun 16 - 01:34 PM
Richie 18 Jun 16 - 01:44 PM
Steve Gardham 18 Jun 16 - 04:52 PM
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Subject: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 05:03 PM

Hi,

I'm doing a study of this ballad on my site and am enlisting the aide of catters to get this study completed. There's quite a bit of information on this ballad and it is known by the following titles, among them: Awake, Awake; Bedroom Window; The Silver Dagger; O Katie Dear; I will put my ship in order.

This is considered a "night visit" ballad and there are a number of related earlier versions. The earliest recognized version is said to be dated circa 1817. I post it here in its entirety:

THE DROWSY SLEEPER
Harding B 28(233) J. Crome; c. 1817

"Awake, awake, ye drowsy sleeper.
Awake, awake! 'Tis almost day.
How can you sleep, my charming creature,
Since you have stole my heart away?"

"Begone, begone! You will awake my mother.
My father he will quickly hear.
Begone, begone, and court some other,
But whisper softly in my ear."

Her father hearing the lovers talking,
Nimbly jumped out of bed.
He put his head out of the window,
But this young man quickly fled.

"Turn back, turn back! Don't be called a rover.
Jemmy, turn back, and sit you by my side.
You may stay while his passion's over.
Jemmy, I will be your lovely bride."

"O daughter, daughter, I will confine you.
Jemmy he shall go to sea,
And you may write your truelove a letter,
As he may read it when far away."

"O father, pay me down my portion,
Which is five thousand pounds, you know,
And I'll cross the wide watery ocean,
Where all the hills are covered with snow."

"No, I will not pay down your portion,
Which is five thousand pounds, I know;
Nor you shan't cross the wide watery ocean,
Where the hills are covered with snow.

"O daughter, daughter, I will confine you,
And all within your private room;
And you shall live upon bread and water
Once a day, and that at noon."

"No, I will have none of your bread and water,
Nor nothing else that you have.
If I can't have my heart's desire,
Single I will go to my grave."

So as I understand it, there is an ancient sanctioned night visit (by the parents) in England called "bundling" and another courting custom called "hand-fasting." Similar sanctioned courting customs are found in Western-Europe and were also brought to the US. The male would visit and be allowed to enter and sleep with the girl as long as they were wearing clothes!!!

The Drowsy Sleeper is an unsanctioned courtship, where the young man wakes the girl who is at her parents house. Romeo and Juliet may be considered a parallel story. Some questions are:

1. Is this the oldest extant broadside?
2. What similar broadsides or ballads led to its creation?
3. How many variant broadsides or print versions are there?
4. What are the oldest traditional versions?

For example, is this fragment from Burns a version, or a related ballad?

No. 357. As I lay on my bed on a night.
Tune: Go from my window, love, do (see No. 307).

As I lay on my bed on a night,
I thought upon her beauty bright,
But the moon by night
    Did give no light
Which did perplex me sore—
Yet away to my love I did go.

Then under her window I came,
I gently call'd her by her name;
Then up she rose,
    Put on her clothes,
And whisper'd to me slow,
Saying:—' Go from my window, love, do.'

'My father and my mother are asleep,
And if they chance to hear you speak,
There will be nocht
    But great abuse
Wi' many a bitter blow:—
And it's Go from my window, love, do.'

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 05:21 PM

Hi,

Here are two more examples:

"The Secret Lover." Stanza 2:

"What is my Love a-sleeping? or is my Love awake?"
"Who knocketh at the Window, who knocketh there so late?"
"It is your true love, Lady, that for your sake doth wait."
And sing, Go from the Window, love, go!

Wit and Mirth: Or, Pills to Purge Melancholy by Henry Playford- 1719; 1st stanza:

"Arise, arise, my Juggy, my Puggy,
    Arise, get up, my dear;
The Night is cold, it bloweth, it snoweth;
I must be lodged here."

Is this version considered to be the oldest extent traditional version?

From Alan Cunningham's Works of Robert Burns: With His Life, Volume 4 (1834). Cunningham writes: 'An old Nithsdale song seems to have been in the Poet's thoughts when he wrote this exquisite lyric. Martha Crosbie, a carder and spinner of wool, sometimes desiring to be more than commonly acceptable to the children of my father's house, made her way to their hearts by singing the following ancient strain:-

    "Who is this under my window?
    Who is this that troubles me?"
    "O, it is I, love, and none but I, love,
    I wish to speak one word with thee.

    Go to your mother, and ask her, jewel,
    If she'll consent you my bride to be;
    And, if she does na, come back and tell me,
    This is the last time I'll visit thee."

    "My mother's in her chamber, jewel,
    And of lover's talking will not hear;
    Therefore you may go and court another,
    And whisper softly in her ear."

The song proceeds to relate how mother and father were averse to the lover's suit, and that, exasperated by their scorn, and the coldness of the maiden, he ran off in despair: on relenting, she finds he is gone, and breaks out in these fine lines:-

    "O, where's he gone that I love best,
    And has left me here to sigh and moan?
    O I will search the wide world over,
    Till my true love I find again.

    The seas shall dry, and the fishes fly,
    And the rocks shall melt down wi' the sun;
    The labouring man shall forget his labour,
    The blackbird shall not sing, but mourn,
    If ever I prove false to my love,
    Till once I see if he return." '


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: GUEST,Nick Dow
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 05:22 PM

Marina Russell had the song and the tune is in Midi form on the full English. Read Bert Lloyds' notes to one Night as I lay on my bed in Penguin 1. He used a set of words from Geo. House of Beaminster 1906 to Mrs Russells tune. I collected the same song with an extra verse from Georges son Bill in 1984.
You may be confusing two songs with your Burns song which is Go from my window however they stemmed from a common international root. Go from my Window is still common with Gypsies today. Berts' notes will set you straight.
kind regards


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 05:41 PM

Hi,

TY for your post. I thought "One Night as I lay on my bed" to be a different song from "Drowsy Sleeper" just as all songs I've posted are different songs except the broadside, Drowsy Sleeper. Many of the variants are missing the opening, "Awake" or "Arise" such as this variant from the Bahamas called "The Gold Ring":

True love, true love,
Go an' ask your mother,
An' what Come back to me.
An' if she say yes,
Come back an' tell me;
An' if she say no,
I would no marry.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 05:46 PM

Correction: The Cunningham "Who is under my Window" is a traditional version.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 06:16 PM

Hi,

Just as the end of Cunningham's version appears to be a different song- perhaps related to: "The Unkind Parents, or, The Languishing Lamentation of two Loyal Lovers" (the source of the "Dearest Dear" songs in the US) from the late 1600s- the ballad, "Drowsy sleeper" may have be spawned by an earlier broadside- clearly none I have posted are that broadside or print version. It may not exist.

Here's the complete Bahama version from: "Folk-tales of Andros Island, Bahamas" Parsons; 1918, Story and song from Lucy Rolle about 33, from Andros. (Only the end of the story "bride o' mine" and first verse are part of Drowsy Sleeper)

112. THE GOLD RING.

Once was a time, a very good time,
When monkey chew tobacco an' spit white lime.

Dis was Jack. Engaged to a girl name Greenleaf. He was cotin' her for many months. Jack parents say dey ain't agree for him to marry to Greenleaf. "0h," he said, "if he don' marry to Greenleaf, he go away." Befo' he went he bought a beautiful gol' ring. An' he went to Greenleaf house, gave her de ring, says, "Take dis gol' ring, put it on yer finger. Take dis gol' ring to remember me. An' if I shall remain for a few years mo' longer, I hope you remain a bride o' mine."

1 True love, true love,
Go an' ask your mother,
An' what Come back to me.
An' if she say yes,
Come back an' tell me;
An' if she say no,
I would no marry.

2. Take dis gol' ring,
Put it on your finger;
Take dis gol' ring
To remember me.
Take dis gol' ring,
Put it on your finger;
Take dis gol' ring
To remember me.

Den off Jack went. At las' Jack wrote for de girl. An' she went. She was married in dat far countree. It was one of de grandest weddin' dat we have ever seen. As I was passin' along de bouquet dat de bride had in her han', she knock me wid de bouquet, an' dere I fell; an' no sooner dan I was on de groun' dere I piss.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 06:31 PM

Hi,

Similar to the Cunningham versions and perhaps as old is a version from a MS dated February 22, 1874 found by Belden in Missouri. It also has the "The Unkind Parents/Dearest Dear" stanzas attached at the end. Spelling and punctuation on the MS have not been corrected:

Awake awake you drowsey sleeper
Awake awake it is allmost day
How can you Sleep you felistian[1] creature
When your true love is Just gone1 away

Go way go way youl will wake my
Mother and that will be sad news to me
you must go way and cort Some other
She whispered low love in my year[2]

Go way go way you will wake mi father
he lies on yonders bed of rest
and in his hand he holds a rapture[3]
To pearse the one whome i love best

Go fetch to me yonders pen and paper
That i may Set down and write a while
I will tell you of the greaf and sorow
that troubles me bothe day and night

I wish i was a little swalow
Or els Some lonesome turkle dove
I would fly away over hils of Sorow
and lite on Some land of love

In yonders field go stick an arow
I wish the same was in my heart
Then i would bid adieu to Sin and
Sorow then my poor Sole would be at rest

go dig my grave in yonders meadow
'lace marble stones at head and feet
and on my brest a turtle dove to tes
testify i died for love

1. usually "charming" Belden has Philistine? (Belden 1940)
2. ear
3. rapier


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 13 Jun 16 - 10:17 PM

Hi,

A single stanza entitled "Wake Up" was printed in the 1855 Social Harp, p. 155 as by John G. McCurry of Georgia, 1852:

Wake up, wake up, ye drowsy sleepers,
O wake, O wake for it's almost day!
How can you lie there and sleep and slumber,
When your true love is going away?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 12:26 AM

Hi,

I apologize for starting a new thread when we already had two that I participated in with Malcolm Douglas, Stewie, Dicho, Jean Ritchie (KY Trad) and others years ago :)

At least the texts I've posted are mostly different :)

If anyone has anything to add maybe we can come up with new (old) material.

TY

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 09:31 AM

Hi Richie,
Again you seem to be confusing 'song/ballad' and 'theme' when using the word 'version'. Songs that have the same theme but no substantial text in common are versions of a theme but not versions of the same song. Child sometimes had this problem so you're in good company.

There are many different 'night visit' songs on a similar theme but we wouldn't class them all as the same song.

Taking this even further there are actually 2 distinct 'Drowsy Sleeper' songs Roud 22620 and 22621. Laws even confused them and gave them the same number M4 but they are not the same song. 22621 is only found in America and could have picked up its initial stanza from the English broadside ballad which has caused the confusion by those who haven't looked at the whole song(s).

You can see this easily in the 2 versions you have already posted.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 09:40 AM

There is an early version in Ramsay's Tea Table Miscellany of 1733 which has 4 sts and the late 18thc broadside appears to be a hack's development of this.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 10:22 AM

Hi Steve,

What is the name of the Ramsey version? I'm aware of the two Roud numbers- and some of the differences. Have you found any similar broadsides under Maiden's complaint? Do you think the ending is part of "The Unkind Parents, or, The Languishing Lamentation of two Loyal Lovers" or a similar broadside? Here's another British broadside. It seems her father is more than willing to marry her off to save money!!!

THE MAIDEN'S COMPLAINT. Harding B 17 (183a). Printer, T. Birt, 10, Great St. Andrew Street, wholesale and retail, Seven Dials, London, Country Orders punctually attended to, Every description of Printing on reasonable terms. Between 1828 and 1829.

Awake, awake, you drowsy sleeper,
Awake, awake, 'tis break of day,
Can you sleep my love any longer,
Since my poor heart you've stole away.

Ah! who is that under my window,
Ah! who comes there to disturb my rest?
'Tis thy lover, the young man did answer
Long thus I have waited for your sake.

Jemmy, says she, should my father hear you,
We shall be ruined I fear;
He will send a cruel press gang for you,
And separate you and me, my dear.

Her father chanc'd to overhear them,
And for a press gang sent straight-way;
Against this young man gave information,
And sent him sailing on the sea.

So now my dear daughter I have deprived you
Of your love whom I have sent to see; (sic)
And now you may send him a letter,
With your misfortunes acquainted to be.

Oh cruel father pay down my fortune
Five hundred pounds is due you know;
And I will cross the briny ocean,
To find my true love I will go.

Jemmy is the man that I do admire,
He is the man that I do adore;,
And if I can't have my heart's desire
Single I will go for evermore.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 11:20 AM

Hi,

Another broadside title is "Cruel Father" or "Cruel Father or, The Maiden's Complaint."

There earliest full version of Roud 22621 (Silver Dagger) that I have from the US is "Come Youth and age" dated 1866, original spelling of MS kept. From The Old Album of William A. Larkin by Ruth Ann Musick; The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 60, No. 237 (July- Sept., 1947), pp. 201-251:

Come Youth and age [24] No. 13th sung by William Larkin (IL) 1866

1. Come youth and age prepay atention
To these few lines I am about to right
Tis of a youth whitch I shall mention
Who has lately corted a beauty bright

2. And his parent came to no it
They did in deavor both night and day
To part him from his own dear guble (jewel)
She is two poor they would of times say

3. He would kneel down on his knees before them
He would implore them both night and day
Saying o do not my true love dis pleasure
Or what is this hold worlde to me

4. She being a maid that was crowed with beauty (crowned)
Not noing whitch course to persew
She rambled forth and left the sitty
Some silent grove to wander threw

5. At length she reached the crystial river
And sat her down beneath a tree
She sied and said o shall I ever
Eaver more my true love see

6. She then pulled out her silver dager
And pierced it through her snowwhite breast
Saying fare the well my own truelover
So fare the well I am a going to rest

7. Her truelove was wandering wild and frantic
Not thinking he would see her more
Those words he heard thy seemed romantic
As she lye bleeding in her gore

8. He ran toward his truelove weeping
And raised her from the purple ground
Saying o truelove how can thou dare to
Waste this life that nature gave

9. Its are you tired of all earthy pleasurs
Or are you going with all your charms
Are there no friends nor golde can save you
While you lye bleeding in my armes

10. Her cold black eyes like stars did open
Saying o truelove you have come to late
Prepare to mete me on mountzion (Mount Zion)
Where all our joyes will be complete

12. He then picked up his true loves wepon
And pierced it through his tender heart
Saying let this be a sollum warning
To all who do truelovers part.

This is the "composed" ballad from the early 1800s which is missing. I also know the Drowsy Sleeper Round 22620 was sung during the Civil War but only have a fragment.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 11:40 AM

Hi,

The only US broadside I know is: "Who s[sic] at My Bedroom Window?" by H. J. Wehman. I've posted a copy of it on my site if anyone wants to see it (text is below): http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/us--canada-versions-2-the-drowsy-sleeper.aspx

"Who s at My Bedroom Window?" --broadside by H. J. Wehman, 50 Chatham St., New York; 1890

Who is it at my bedroom window?
Who is it mourns so bitterly?
'Tis I, 'tis I, your own true lover,
'Tis I that mourns so bitterly.

Oh! Katy dear, go ask your mother
If you my wedded wife may be;
And if she says no, return and tell me,
Then I no more shall trouble thee.

Oh! Willie dear, I dare not ask her,
For she intends to keep me in;
So, Willie dear, you go and ask her
If I your wedded wife may be.

Oh! Katy dear, go ask your father
If you my wedded wife may be;
And if he says no, return and tell me,
And I no more shall trouble thee.

Oh! Willie dear, I dare not ask him,
For he lies on his bed of rest;
And by his side lays a silver dagger,
To pierce the young man that I love best.

So Willie took that silver dagger
And pierced it through his own true breast;
Saying, adieu to father, adieu to mother,
Adieu sweet Katy, for thee I rest.

So Katy drew that bloody dagger
And pierced it through her lily-white breast;
Saying, adieu to father, adieu to mother,
Adieu sweet Willie, with thee I rest.

So dig my grave both long and deep,
Place a marble stone at my head and feet,
And on my breast a turtle dove,
To show the world I died for love.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 01:16 PM

Aaargh!

'Come Youth and Age' is a different 'Silver Dagger'. It shouldn't be in with 22621. There are a few hybrids but this one is Laws G21. If Steve hasn't got a separate number for it then I'll have to ask him to give it one.

Ramsey has no title for the song and it is quite likely one from his own pen. As it's only short here it is:

He
Awake, thou fairest thing in nature
How can you sleep when day does break?
How can you sleep, my charming creature,
When half a world for you are awake.

She
What swain is this that sings so early,
Under my window by the dawn?
He
'Tis one, dear nymph, that loves you dearly,
Therefore in pity ease my pain.
She.
Softly, else you'll 'wake my mother,
No tales of love she lets me hear;
Go tell your passion to some other,
Or whisper softly in my ear.
He.
How can you bid me love another,
Or rob me of your beauteous charms?
'Tis time you were wean'd from your mother,
You're fitter for a lover's arms.

Ben Schwartz spotted this, not me!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Reinhard
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 01:40 PM

From the first line, Roud has this as V16784, found in the Madden Collection.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 02:12 PM

Hi,

TY Steve- It's close enough that I'd say it's an early version. That takes the date back to 1725. I'll also credit Ben Schwartz.

I have three Roud numbers, also Roud 402 which may have been the original number. A dozen or so are under 402. Yes, and the other two are mixed together a little but only two are wrong in 22620 (51 listings). Here are two more broadsides, I've included the end text on the first. Need date on first.

1. Drowsy Sleeper
J. Cadman, Printer Manchester

Daughter, daughter, I'll confine you,
All within your private room,
And you shall live on bread and water,
once a day at noon.

No, I'll have none of your bread and water,
. . .

2. Cruel Father w/Then Say My Sweet Girl Can You love/ Maid and the Soldier [no imprint]

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 02:28 PM

hi,

What is the date of Tea-table Miscellany: A Collection of Choice Songs, Scots, Volume 2? It's around 1726 I imagine?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 04:29 PM

My copy of TTM is a 12th edition 1763 where it is given at p306, Song 97. I don't know whether it appeared in all of the previous editions. You might find it online. The dedication is dated 1724.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 05:06 PM

Hi Richie
I do my best when advising Steve of errors in the Roud Index but quite often, especially with American more obscure collections, Steve only has a title or a first line to go on and I don't have copies of everything. The idea is if you know of a definite mistake let either Steve or me know and we will eventually correct it.

Yes, 402 was the old number. When we decided to sort out the different songs under that number Steve decided to give 2 new numbers but probably left the few we didn't have access to under the old number, likewise any still in the wrong place will be because we don't have enough info on those versions to allocate the correct number. This is a problem when 2 distinct songs start with the same verse and sometimes share titles.

Then there is the added complication of what if you only have the first verse? Where does it go?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 05:12 PM

The Silver Dagger is Roud 711. Like 22621 it isn't found this side of the pond.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 10:23 PM

Hi,

According to Roxburghe Ballads Vol. 6, the Ramsey Vol. 2 date is 1725. On pages 193-215 are similar songs "Go from my window, go" and "Who is at my window, who?" both dating back to the 1500s. Another old song "Widow, are you waking?" has vanished but Ramsey printed a new version in the same 1725 edition that begins:

"O, wha's that at my chamber-door?"
"Fair widow, are you waukin'?"

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 14 Jun 16 - 10:39 PM

Hi,

This is one of several broadsides that resemble "drowsy sleeper" although different ballads.

The Secret Lover; c. 1672

A Dainty spruce young Gallant, that lived in the "West,
He courted a young Lady, and real love profest:
And coming one night to her, his mind he thus exprest,—
And sing, Go from my Window, love, go !

"What is my Love a-sleeping? or is my Love awake?"
"Who knocketh at the Window, who knocketh there so late?"
"It is your true love, Lady, that for your sake doth wait."
And sing, Go from the Window, love, go!

"Then open me your Father's Gate, and do not me deny;
Bat grant to me your true love, or surely I shall dye."
"I dare not open now the Gates, for fear my Father spy!"
And sing, Go from my Window, love, go!

"O Dearest, be not daunted, thou needest not to fear;
Thy Father may be sleeping, our loves he shall not hear:
Then open it without delay, my joy and only Dear!"
And sing, Go from the Window, love, go!

"My Father he doth watch me, his jealousie is so:
If he should chance to catch me, 0 then what should we do?
Therefore I dare not venture, my dear to open now."
And sing, Go from my Window, love, go!

"I wish there were no Hinges, nor yet no Key nor Lock;
That I might come unto my love, now she is in her Smock!"
"O peace and be contented! I hear my Father knock."
    And sing, Go from my Window, love, go!

"O Daughter dear, why are you out of your Bed so late?"
"0 Father, I am very sick, and in distressed state."
"Methinks I hear some body under your Window prate."
    And sing, Go from my Window, love, go!

"0 Father, 'tis the Watch-men, this Evening, passing by."
Hark, how a faithful Lover can frame a pritty lye!
"0 Daughter, I command you unto your bed to hye."
    And sing, Go from my Window, love, go!

"Dear Father, I obey you, and quickly I am gone;
But yet I am not willing to leave my Love alone:
Bo soon as you are Sleeping, I down again will come."
And sing, Go from my Window, love, go!

And then she sent her Maiden unto her Chamber straight;
And came unto her true Love, who at the Door did wait:
And open'd him the Wickit, for all it was so late.
   And sing, Go from my Window, love, go! 40

Then softly he did enter, and to the Lady said:
"My Love, there is no Danger, we cannot be betray'd:
Let us enjoy our Pleasure, and never be afraid."
    And sing, Go from my Window, lore, go!

And thus this Faithful Couple their wishes had at last:
For all her Jealous Father, the sweets of love they taste:
And when the day appeared, her Love away did haste:
    And sing, Go from my Window, love, go!

Printed for P. Brooksby, at the Golden-ball, near the Hospital-gate, in West-Smithfield.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 15 Jun 16 - 03:57 AM

There seems to be several songs with this 'Go from my window' motto. They must have been pretty popular as they provoked answers and parodies.
The well known one from the 16th century is Roud 966.

Apart from the Vol 6 Roxburghe ref there is also another broadside at Roxburghe Vol3 p596. All of the Roxburghe Ballads are now online on the Santa Barbra website.

It also appeared in Pills at the end of the 17thc. It can be found in early oral collections as well.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 15 Jun 16 - 09:00 AM

TY Steve, the ballad, or part of it, was sung in the Civil War in Kentucky.

George Dallas Mosgrove was born in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1844, and enlisted in the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry Regiment as a private on September 10, 1862. In his book, Kentucky Cavaliers in Dixie; or, The Reminiscences of a Confederate Cavalryman (271 pp., Courier-Journal Job Printing Co., Louisville, 1895) he describes a Kentucky soldier who sang the ballad during the Civil War to rouse the Fourth Kentucky boys:

"Possessing a deep bass voice, he was wont to arouse the Fourth Kentucky boys by singing, 'Awake, awake, ye drowsy sleeper,' in the early morn before Tom Hayden sounded reveille with his bugle."

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 15 Jun 16 - 11:09 AM

Wow - if some Joe clone could fix that last redundant post :)

Here's a different version from Some Songs and Ballads from Tennessee and North Carolina by Isabel Gordon Carter; The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 46, No. 179 (Jan. - Mar., 1933), pp. 22-50. She also collected an important version of 'Bramble Briar".


24. YOUNG MEN AND MAIDS PRAY LEND ATTENTION [1]

1. Young men and maids pray lend attention,
To these few lines I'm going to write,
Of a pretty youth how I mention
I courted a lady fair and bright.

2. But when her parents came to know it,
They strove to part us day and night;

3. Down on her bended knee she bowed,
Saying, "Father, father pity me!
Don't let my true love be denied,
Of all this world can do for me."

4. She wandered, she wandered a great way from them,
She wandered the green meadows round,
She wandered along the broad green rivers,
And under a green shady tree sat down.

5. She pulled out her silver dagger,
She pinned it through her lily white breast;
Saying "Farewell to my true lover,
Farewell, farewell I'm going to rest."

6. Her true love being on the river,
He thought he heard his true love's voice;
He ran, he ran like one distracted,
Saying, "Dear heart (?) I feel quite lost."

7. Like stars her black eyes opened,
Saying "My true love, you've come too late.
Prepare to meet me in old Zion,
Where all our joys will be complete."
Oh let this be a woeful warning
To all who keeps true lovers apart.

[1] Recorded from Lizzie Fletcher, Rugby, Tenn. The last two lines of admonition were not given until Earnest Brooks, a Rugby boy who was present, said "That isn't all--you've left off the best part." Then the singer, with many wise shakes of her head, sang the last two lines.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: GUEST,Jon Dudley
Date: 15 Jun 16 - 01:35 PM

Bob Copper's father Jim used to quietly sing the first couple of lines of this song to rouse his young son to accompany him fishing or hauling lobster pots early in the morning. It intrigued Bob as he get older but Jim could remember no more than than those few words. It wan't until we started visiting the USA in the 1990's that he discovered an American version of the song which pleased him no end.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 15 Jun 16 - 06:32 PM

Hi,

Jon thanks for sharing that. I wonder what version in the US he liked?

Here's and old one before the Civil War (early 1860s) taken from a motherless tom-boy in the care of her old grandmother, on a farm near Dardanelle, Arkansas, near Russellville. It was from her grandmother that she had learned her songs by rote, since she could neither read nor write.

The Drowsy Sleeper- sung by Mary Lou Miller of Dardanelle, Arkansas in 1932, learned before 1864. Miller was married at the beginning of the Civil war. Melody is similar to Burl Ives version (Coffin). Mr. Haun, who transcribed the music for this article uses both "sleeper" and "sleepers" here.

Wake up, wake up, you drowsy sleeper
The morning wind blows with the tide.
How can you bear to lie in slumber
When your true love lies at your side?

Her face was pale; her eyes were blue,
And black as ravenswing her hair,
The smell of flowers in her bosom:
Men wept to see a maid so fair.

Oh Mary, Mary tell your father
That you would wed this night with me.
If he says no, come back at morning.
We'll sail away across the sea.

Oh love, my father passed his word,
As he lay on his bed at rest.
And in his hand he held a dagger
Which I hold now within my breast.

Wake up, wake up, you drowsy sleeper.
Wake up, wake up, it's almost day,
How can you bear to lie in slumber
When your true love lies cold as clay?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Jim Brown
Date: 16 Jun 16 - 05:07 AM

> I don't know whether it appeared in all of the previous editions.

"Awake, thou fairest thing in nature" is also on pp. 306-307 of the 1740 10th edition of TTM, where it is included in volume 3. I can't find an earlier edition online to check, but The National Library of Scotland catalogue lists a copy of vol. 3 published in 1727, and I've seen that year cited in several places as the year vol. 3 was first published, so I guess that is most likely the earliest date of publication of the song.

By the way, in connection with the general issue of how and when British songs entered circulation in North America, the following feedback from an American reader proudly quoted by Ramsay in the Preface to the 1740 TTM might be of interest:

"THIS tenth edition in a few years, and the general demand for the book by persons of all ranks, wherever our language is understood, is a sure evidence of its being acceptable. My worthy friend Dr. Bannerman tells me from America,

Nor only do your lays o'er *Britain* flow,
Round all the globe your happy sonnets go ;
Here thy soft verse, made to a *Scottish* air,
Are often sung by our *Virginian* fair.
*Camilla's* warbling notes are heard no more,
But yield to *Last time I came o'er the moor*;
*Hydaspes* and *Rinaldo* both give way
To *Mary Scot*, *Tweed-side*, and *Mary Gray*."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 16 Jun 16 - 09:15 AM

TY Jim,

The Roxburghe Ballads, Volume 6 p. 193 says:

"{In the second volume of his dainty little 32mo. Tea-Table Miscellany, issued in 1725, Allan Ramsay printed the Song which Tom D'Urfey had first published in 1683;"

That's where I got the 1725 date.

The Ramsey text however is not attributed. It give the first two stanzas of 1817 Drowsy Sleeper broadside in different words which to me are the identifying stanzas for the ballad. It's the conflict with the parents that vary. The Firth broadside gives a different ending and introduces writing a letter.

There is an old early 1800s late 1700s broadside printed in the United States (probably Boston) that is missing which begins similarly:

Young men and maidens lend attention,
While unto you these lines I write,

I posted a Tennessee version and a Cox version dates back to the 1850s. Hopefully that broadside which may have been copied from a missing British broadside can be recovered.

As far as I can tell there are at least four distinct variants:

1. The broadsides
2. traditional versions that do not mention the dagger and have instead: This is the last time I'll visit thee
3. traditional versions that do mention the dagger; have the double suicide
4. Versions from the US based on an early missing print version that begin: Young men and maidens lend attention,

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 16 Jun 16 - 10:25 AM

Hi,

Mike Yates collected a number of versions of the "missing broadside" version of Silver Dagger in North Carolina (Far in the Mountains 1 and 2- which I own!!). They begin with the broadside "Come All Ye." Scarborough said the ballad was of Irish origin- no sure where she got that. Yates notes follow. Here's one:


36. The Truelover's Warning (Laws G21, Roud 711)
(Sung by Evelyn Ramsey at her home in Sodom Laurel, Madison County, NC. 30.8.80)

Come all you friends and pay attention,
And listen to these few lines I'm going to write.
They are as true as ever was written,
Concerning the life of a beautiful bride.

A young man courted a handsome lady,
He loved her as dear as he loved his life.
And unto him she made this promise,
She would be his lawful wife.

As soon as her parents learnt to know this,
They tried to part them night and day.
'Oh son, why be so foolish?
She's too poor.' they would often say.

Down on his knees before his father,
He cried, 'Oh father, please pity me.
How can you keep me from my true-love?
For she is all the world to me.'

As soon as this lady came to know this,
She soon made up what she would do.
She wandered forward and left the city,
The green wild rose no more to view.

She wandered down by the lonesome river,
And for death she did prepare.
'Let this be a youthful warning,
That all true-lovers may never part.'

Her true-love being not far behind her,
He heard an awful sound.
He looked and saw his true-love lying,
With a sword upon the ground.

Her cold black eyes, like stars she opened,
Saying, 'Love, oh love, you've come too late.
Prepare to meet me up in Heaven,
Where all true-lovers will be complete.'

He then picked up the sword, a-weeping,
And placed it to his own dear heart.
Saying, 'Won't this be a joyful morning,
When all true-lovers may never part.'

This version of The Silver Dagger was well-established in Madison County when I first visited the area - although Cecil Sharp only published sets from Kentucky and Virginia - and I also recorded three of Evelyn's neighbours singing versions of the song. (Doug Wallin's version appears on Volume 3, track 20, of this set).

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 16 Jun 16 - 12:22 PM

Hi,

Here's the letter stanza (see Firth Broadside) from Mrs Jacobs learned about 1871 in Kentucky. She sings it here: http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/WiscFolkSong/data/audio/MmBib/WiscFolkSong/500/reference/000459r.mp4

Oh Mary dear, go ask your mother,
If you indeed may marry me
And if she says, "No" come back and tell me
And it's the last time I'll trouble thee.

Oh no I can't ask my mother,
For she's in her bed of rest.
And in her hand she holds a letter,
That has caused the most, of my distress.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 16 Jun 16 - 10:17 PM

Hi,

AWAKE, DROWSY SLEEPER - Bodleian Broadside- Firth C17 (25). H. Such, Printer & Publisher, 177, Union street, Boro.' S.E. London. c. 1863 (between 1863- 1885)

Awake, awake, you drowsy sleeper
Awake, awake, it is almost day,
How can you be there and sleep so easy
Since my poor heart you have stole away.

Oh, who is that underneath my window?
Oh who is that that sings so sweet?
It's me, my dear, the young man made answer,
Long time been waiting for your sweet sake.

My mother lies in the next chamber,
My father he will quickly hear
So I'd have you go, love, and court some other,
Or whisper softly in my ear.

Oh no I won't go and court no other,
Since I have rifled your sweet charms
You are fit, love, for to leave your mother,
You're fitter to sleep in your true love's arms.

The old man heard in their conclusion
He gently stept out of the bed,
He popped his old head out of the window
But Jane's true love was gone and fled.

Daughter, daughter, I will close confine you,
Your brisk young lad I will send to sea
Then you may write to him a letter,
And he may read it in Botany Bay.

Jim is the lad that I do admire
Jim is the lad I mean to wed
And if I can't have my own desire
A maid I will go to my silent grave.

Father, father, pay down my portion,
Which is five hundred pounds you know,
That I may cross the briny ocean,
If Botany Bay is covered with snow.

Oh no I won't pay your portion
And you shan't cross the raging main,
For you and your love shall be married,
And that will ease you all of your pain.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 10:29 AM

Studying at least 3 songs at once here, Richie. You have me confused.
I know my ageing brain couldn't handle it. I would have to approach it in a different manner. Get all of the versions together sort them into groups and then study each song separate from the others. I don't know how you do it but good luck.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 11:39 AM

Hi,

The songs are at least related. The Drowsy Sleeper broadsides are the source of the traditional versions in the UK collected in the late 1800s and 1900s. Below is one version from William Wise of Alvescot. The same opening stanzas are found in the US- with the different ending. The other "missing US broadside" was written based on the US traditional version. Additionally stanzas have been attached to other songs in the US.

Single I'll go to my grave- Sung by William Wise of Alvescot, Oxfordshire. Collected by Alfred Williams.

Verse 1
"Awake! Awake! you drowsy[1] sleepers.
Awake! Awake! for it's almost day,
How can you sleep, love, here, any longer,
Since you have stole my heart away?"

Verse 2

"Begone! Begone! you'll wake my mother,
My father he will quickly hear,
Begone! Begone! and court some other,
And whisper softly in her ear."

Verse 3
My father heard those lovers talking,
And quickly jumped out of bed,
He put his head out of the window,
And this young man he quickly fled.

Verse 4
"Come back! Come back! don't be called a rover,
Come back! Come back! and stay with me,
And stay until his passion's over,
Your lawful bride then I will be."

Verse 5
"O daughter, dear, now I'll confine you,
Your Jimmy dear shall go to sea,
Then you can write your love a letter,
So that he can read it when far away."

Verse 6
"O father dear, pay me down my fortune,
Which is five hundred pounds, you know,
Then I will cross the watery ocean,
To where the hills are covered in snow."

Verse 7
"No daughter dear, I'll not pay your fortune,
Which is five hundred pounds I know,
Nor you'll not cross the watery ocean,
To where the hills are covered with snow."

Verse 8
"But daughter, dear, now I'll confine you,
All in your own private room,
And you shall have naught but bread and water
But once a day and that's at noon.

Verse 9
"I want none of your bread and water,
Nor any other thing you have;
If I can't have my heart's desire,
Then single I'll go to my grave."

1. spelled, "downy" in MS.

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 11:48 AM

Hi,

I have a question about "fortune" usually "portion":

"O father dear, pay me down my portion/fortune,"

Is this portion a dowry? Is this something a girl would expect to receive in the UK? Would she demand it? Is it a marriage payment?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 12:25 PM

Hi,

What is not know is that this was one of the UKs first "rap" songs :)

Who is that, that raps? - A fragment recorded by Mr. Percy Merrick from Sussex from Mr. Hills on October 10, 1901, who learned it from his mother. It was later arranged by Vaughan Williams for voice and piano.


O, who is that that raps at my window
As I lie on my bed of ease?
I'll go and write my love a letter,
And he will read it when he please,
I'll go and write my love a letter,
And he will read it when he please

My daddy lies in the next chamber
My mammy does so quickly hear,
Begone, begone, and court some other,
And whisper softly in my[1] ear,
Begone, begone, and court some other,
And whisper softly in my[1] ear.

1. her

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 01:14 PM

An even older 'rap' was 'Rap-a-tap-tap'.

portion and fortune would have been almost interchangeable.

Yes, portion is a dowry, what she would receive as a marriage dowry from a relatively wealthy family such as a landed farmer. It's 'portion' in the sense that in those times people had large families and each child would expect a portion and would usually have a good idea how much it would be. A common phrase in the ballads 'you will not get one penny portion'

They would demand it if it had been promised and it was seen as a right, but if she didn't marry someone of her station or higher, the father could withdraw it. Fortune would more usually refer to the inheritance at death of a parent, and this would have been willed so in some ballads if the father has died and left her say £10,000 in the will there was nothing the mother could do about it even if she married the servant.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Jim Brown
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 03:35 PM

> "In the second volume of his dainty little 32mo. Tea-Table Miscellany, issued in 1725, Allan Ramsay printed the Song which Tom D'Urfey had first published in 1683"

I've found the Roxburghe Ballads volume at https://archive.org/details/p1roxburgheballa06chapuoft . The quotation is on p. 197, but it refers to "She rose and let me in" (AKA "The kind lady"), which is in TTM vol. 2, not "Awake, thou fairest thing in nature" in vol. 3. "She rose and let me in" is a night visit song, but as far as I can see it doesn't have any specific links to the "Drowsy Sleeper" cluster (no parental opposition, not letter, etc.). As you mentioned in an earlier post, Richie, TTM vol. 2 also includes Ramsay's version of "Widow are ye wawkin" ("The auld man's best argument") - a variant on the night visit, in which in an old man woos a young widow who in the end is more impressed by the clinking of his money than anything else - again, no particular connection to the "Drowsy sleeper" songs, apart from sharing the night visit motif.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 05:35 PM

TY Steve for portion. TY Jim for that.

Actually all the stanzas of "Awake, thou fairest thing in nature" appear with slightly different wording in Drowsy Sleeper broadside/trad UK versions. There's no story. It introduces the mother, the broadside pen gives the specific conflict with the father, which was then taken into tradition.

What is curious is that North American versions which probably predate 1817 also have the writing a letter reference.

I'm not able to get the versions from the Grieg-duncan Collection, I think in Volume 3, I only have volume 1. Anyone?

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 05:48 PM

I have a full set of GD but there's nothing in there relating to'DS'. Have you got a page number or song number?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 05:50 PM

The letter writing motif is a commonplace appearing in many ballads. Is it just a ref to writing a letter or is there actual phraseology in common?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 10:01 PM

Hi Steve,

According to Malcolm Douglas who was helping on the old thread: "There are some 23 examples in Greig-Duncan volume 4, which I don't have."

The letter is mentioned in the 1828 broadside:

So now my dear daughter I have deprived you
Of your love whom I have sent to see; (sic)
And now you may send him a letter,
With your misfortunes acquainted to be.

In the 1901 version, the UK rap song:

O, who is that that raps at my window
As I lie on my bed of ease?
I'll go and write my love a letter,
And he will read it when he please.

And in a dozen of US versions- to me it's mysterious connection- the broadside is more clear of the letter's intention.

I've written about 4 pages of headnotes, if anyone would like to look over them please do:
http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/2-the-drowsy-sleeper-awake-awake.aspx

TY

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 17 Jun 16 - 10:13 PM

Sorry about the double post- The first one went into cyberspace- it wasn't there when I checked- then it appeared- magic!!!

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Jun 16 - 01:17 PM

Hi Richie

Did you get both of my emails. I did try to post here twice but like you I have problems with Mudcat. In future I will probably send you texts by email. I haven't got the time to type it out here and then lose it.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Jun 16 - 01:34 PM

Read your notes, Richie. Look great to me. I think using Roud Numbers would be a helpful tool though.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 18 Jun 16 - 01:44 PM

Hi,

I did get one email from you but not the Grieg-Duncan texts. I did find an 1849 version of the "composed" US Silver dagger" that was taken from tradition in Indiana, this was published in New York and reprinted from another New York Weekly probably c. 1840s. This is one print source but not the original source:

Gazette of the Union, Golden Rule and Odd-fellows' Family Companion, Volumes 10-11; 1849 Published: New York, N.Y.: J. Winchester.

Indiana Quilting Parties (excerpt with text)

"Sal Jenkins, you come right up here and open them jaws o' your'n fust with me!"

Miss Julia whispered to me: " Sally is nothing but a good singer; she leads in the meetin' home, and that's her beau."

The play (I never shall forget it) commenced with "Over the hills and lofty mountings." A musical friend, who was with our company, complimented Miss Sally on her great vocal powers, and she told him he " hadn't half heard her yit." He asked her if she was fond of sentimental songs. She said she didn't know what they meant, but she knew one that always made her feel so bad when she sang it.

"Oh, my law! Sal," said an old maid, who they called Miss Betsy, "now do sing the Silver Dagger. Oh, it is so infecting! I'll git 'em all to shot up while you sing it, because its jest like natur where true lovers are parted. Shet up!" bawled Miss Betsey, (whose word was law.) " Sally is goin' to sing the Silver Dagger."

"0h, do! do! do! Sally!" came from a dozen voices at once.

Hush! all was still. After a glass of sprucebeer, Miss Bally sang the following, which I was most fortunate in getting a copy of, next day, from her own fair hand:

The Silver Dagger

Young men and maidens pray lend attention,
To these few lines I am about to write:
It is as true as ever was mentioned
Concerning a fair beaty bright.

A young man courted her to be his darling
He loved her as he loved his life,
And often times to her he vowed
That he would make her his lawful wife.

But when his father came to know it,
He strove to part them night and day;
To part him from his own dear jewel
She is poor, she is poor, he did oft-times say.

Then on his bended knees he bowed,
Saying, father, father, pity me,
For I to her my love have showed
What would this world be, without her, to me?

Now when this lady came to hear this,
She quickly resolved what she would do ;
She wandered forth and left the city,
No more the pleasant groves to view.

She wandered down by a flowing river,
And there for death she did prepare;
Saying, here I'll end my youthful morning,
or I am sunk in deep despair.

Then out she pulled her Silver Dagger.
And pierced it through her snow white breast;
At first she reeled, and then she staggered,
Saying, oh! my dear, I'm going to rest.

Then he being near her in a thicket,
He thought he heard his true love's voice;
He ran, he ran, like one distracted,
Saying, oh! my dear, I fear you're lost.

Then up he picked the bleeding body,
And rolled it over in his arms;
Is there no friend nor gold can save you,
Or must you die with all your charms?

Her coal black eyes like stars she opened,
Saying, "oh! my dear, you have come too late,
But prepare to meet me in Mount Zion,
Where all our joys will be complete.

Then up he picked the bloody weapon,
And pierced it through his own dear heart—
Saying, let this be a woful warning
To all that does true lovers part.

After the song, Miss Sally was complimented from all hands. . .
[reprinted from--N.Y. Spirit of the Times]

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 18 Jun 16 - 04:52 PM

Lovely.
Don't suppose they gave the text of 'Over Hills and High Mountains' as well?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 18 Jun 16 - 09:51 PM

Hi,

"Over the hills and lofty mountings[mountains]" is also part of Bramble Briar text :)

The 1849 Silver Dagger version (above) is attributed to Sally Jenkins of Indiana. It's a bit suspicious that she hand-wrote the text. The article was reprinted from--N.Y. "Spirit of the Times" which means it's at least a year older.

Now if we can find the original print version!!!

Richie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Drowsy Sleeper
From: Richie
Date: 18 Jun 16 - 10:06 PM

Hi,

I found another publication that used the same version. On Friday, January 18, 1850 the Burlington Weekly Free Press of Burlington, Vermont on Page 2 printed:

Tho following is the ballad from the Spirit of the Times:

"The Silver Dagger"

Young men and maidens pray lend attention,
To these few lines I am about to write;
It is as as true as ever was mentioned,
Concerning a fair beauty bright. [etc.]

Richie


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