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Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber

Related threads:
A Maid Went To Comber (Next Market Day) (16)
Lyr Req: next market day (3) (closed)
Lyr Req: The next market day (6)
Chords Req: The Next Market Day (7) (closed)


peg 12 Jan 00 - 03:16 PM
MMario 12 Jan 00 - 03:28 PM
Bruce O. 12 Jan 00 - 03:30 PM
MMario 12 Jan 00 - 03:33 PM
MMario 12 Jan 00 - 03:39 PM
Bruce O. 12 Jan 00 - 03:54 PM
MMario 12 Jan 00 - 03:56 PM
John Moulden 12 Jan 00 - 04:53 PM
peg 12 Jan 00 - 05:18 PM
Bruce O. 12 Jan 00 - 05:31 PM
John Moulden 13 Jan 00 - 07:40 AM
Alice 13 Jan 00 - 11:44 AM
Alice 13 Jan 00 - 12:04 PM
peg 13 Jan 00 - 01:36 PM
Neil Comer 13 Jan 00 - 02:56 PM
Bruce O. 13 Jan 00 - 03:25 PM
Neil Comer 13 Jan 00 - 03:30 PM
John Moulden 13 Jan 00 - 03:44 PM
Alice 13 Jan 00 - 09:36 PM
Bruce O. 13 Jan 00 - 09:43 PM
Bruce O. 13 Jan 00 - 10:34 PM
Áine 06 Oct 00 - 05:43 PM
Joe Offer 06 Oct 00 - 06:24 PM
GUEST,peter, holland 16 Jan 05 - 02:37 PM
ard mhacha 16 Jan 05 - 03:02 PM
GUEST,John in Brisbane 17 Jan 05 - 03:52 AM
GUEST,pjh jansen 17 Jan 05 - 05:03 AM
GUEST,jansen holland 17 Jan 05 - 04:58 PM
ard mhacha 18 Jan 05 - 01:22 PM
ard mhacha 18 Jan 05 - 01:37 PM
GUEST 19 Jan 05 - 01:34 AM
GUEST,Dusty 10 Jun 09 - 06:42 PM
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Subject: A Maid Went to Comber
From: peg
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 03:16 PM

I may have the spelling of the place name incorrect.

I have heard this song on A Celtic Sojourn a couple times; a guy whose last name is Corcoran sings it.

The chorus goes: Sit down beside me, I mean you no harm Sit down beside me this new tune to learn Here are three guineas your mammy to pay etc.

anyone know it? I am trying to find out the name of the CD, too, but I don't know that it contains lyrics...

thanks!


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Subject: Lyr Add: MAID GOING TO COMBER (NEXT MARKET DAY)^^
From: MMario
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 03:28 PM

I know this as "Next Market Day" and have heard it with several different locales.

A maid went to London her market to learn
and to sell for her mama three hanks of fine yarn
She met a young man, on the Queen's own highway
and this caused our damsel to dally and stray

chorus:
Sit down beside me, I mean you no harm
Sit down beside me this new tune to learn
Here are three guineas your momma to pay
Stay by my side 'till the next market day

So she sat down beside him, the grass was so green
The day was the fairest that she'd ever seen
The look in her eyes, beat the morning in may
and she'd stay by his side 'till the next market day

chorus:

And as she went home, sure the words that he said
and the tune that he'd learned her still spun in her head
she'll search for that laddie by night and by day
'Til she's learned her the words to the Next market Day

chorus:

MMario


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Bruce O.
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 03:30 PM

It's one from the McPeake's and is a version of the 17th century "The Comber's Whistle", a reworked version of the 16th century "The Carman's Whistle". The prototype seems to have been "Maulkin was a country maid". See relevant texts of all in the Scarce Songs 1 file on my website. www.erols.com/olsonw


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: MMario
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 03:33 PM

and there's another thread about it here

url:http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=9387#60622


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: MMario
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 03:39 PM

thanks bruce. someday I am actually going to go out and read through the stuff on your site instead of just making notes about - "see Bruce's site"

incredible amount of work you have done...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Bruce O.
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 03:54 PM

Thanks MMario. Maybe you can tell me where "The Next Market day" day came from. Herbert Hughes gave a version only slightly different than the one you give in his 1st volume of 'Irish Country Songs'. Is that where all Irish texts spring from?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: MMario
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 03:56 PM

Bruce, I cannot tell a lie.....I got it from a group at ren-faire...and godonlyknows where they got it from. someday I hope to move back into an area where I can do research again.....


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: John Moulden
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 04:53 PM

This is a song which has an almost fixed form in Ireland and a "status," like that of "She moved through the fair" and "The stuttering Lovers" ( among others) which tends towards the "classical art song" For this reason I tend to believe that its recent transmissional history in Ireland started with the Herbert Hughes version mentioned by Bruce.

I have a xerox of a longer than usual text which I copied from a xerox bound in with the copy in the Linenhall Library in Belfast, of the index of the Sam Henry collection which was prepared by Seán O'Boyle for the BBC. I've hitherto thought it was an extension made by a latter-day versifier but, to sustain this opinion must look at the versions mentioned by Bruce. (I'll confirm whether I was right or wrong in a later message.)

The locale is equivocal; Comber, County Down is the choice of most people but there is a Parish in Co (London)Derry called Cumber Claudy which is locally known as Comber.

Of course, Bruce's derivation indicates that the word "comber" in the song has been subjected to a metamorphosis from occupation to location.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: peg
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 05:18 PM

thanks everyone! I look forward to checking out that site of yours, Bruce...

best to you all

peg


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Bruce O.
Date: 12 Jan 00 - 05:31 PM

John, if you haven't checked out Hughes' "The Stuttering Lovers" on my website, do so, and see the marvelous difference in Hughes' text from the 17th century one (Scarce Songs 1).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: John Moulden
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 07:40 AM

Thank you Bruce, I'll do that.

I have now checked on "The Comber's Whistle" and my opinion of the text I mention above remains unchanged. I'll transcribe and post it as soon as I can find a moment.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE NEXT MARKET DAY
From: Alice
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 11:44 AM

In Irish Country Songs Vol I collected and arranged by Herbert Hughes (1909) the notes on THE NEXT MARKET DAY are that it is a fragment of a Tyrone ballad that is adapted and sung to an Ulster melody.

THE NEXT MARKET DAY

A maid goin' to Comber her markets to larn
To sell for her mammy three hanks o' fine yarn
She met with a young man along the highway
Which caused the young damsel to dally and stray.

Sit ye beside me, I mean ye no harm,
Sit ye beside me, this new tune to larn,
Here is three guineas your mammy to pay,
So lay by your yarn til the next market day.

They sat down together, the grass it was green,
And the day was the fairest that ever was seen,
Oh, the look in your eyes beat a mornin' o' May,
I could sit by your side til the next market day.

This young maid went home and the words that he said,
And the air that he played her still rang in her head,
She says I'll go find him by land or by sea,
Til he larns me that tune called "The next market day".

Hughes writes "Except where otherwise stated, all the songs in this volume may be considered traditional. As far as I could, I have avoided editing these rather fragmentary ballads; they are, I think, far better in their crude, unpolished state.... "

alice


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Alice
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 12:04 PM

John and Bruce, btw, thank you for sharing your deeper understanding of these songs with those of us who know only 'fragments' of information such as a recording or one mention in a book (such as Hughes).

alice


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: peg
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 01:36 PM

wow; Bruce what a great site! Can't wait to explore all those links. Thnaks for such great work.

When I heard the afore-mentioned song on the radio, it sounded like the chorus ended with: "here are three guineas your mammy to pay, and hang (hand?) by your yarns til the next market day.."

I could be wrong about that. But all these mutations of the lyrics are no less than fascinating, anyway...

I especially like the ambiguity of "comber" referring to either a locale, or maybe to the combing acivity of a yarn spinner or a weaver...

cheers,

peg


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Neil Comer
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 02:56 PM

Just as a matter of interest, Comber means Cummar- a confluence in a river- which applies to Comber in Down and Derry. I have only heard the song under the name 'Next Market Day,' as sang bt Oisín.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Bruce O.
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 03:25 PM

Neil, The OED doesn't agree with your definition of comber. 1: one who combs; 2: name of two fishes found off the English coast [and that's all].


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Neil Comer
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 03:30 PM

Bruce, Most placenames in Ireland have their origins in Irish, and The Placenames Dept. of Queen's University states that Comber ( Down/Derry) is an English spelling of Cummar- ie Confluence. The word Cumar/Cummar in Irish definitely means a confluence. By the way, my surname has nothing to do with this- as it is a bad translation of Ó Ciaráin ( the original Irish version) which should mean 'black-haired one' Ciar means black and, but cíor means comb- hence the confusion.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE NEXT MARKET DAY
From: John Moulden
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 03:44 PM

Alice's posting the Herbert Hughes text allows me to add the following - numbering the Hughes stanzas 2, 3, 6, 7 - from the Xerox I mention above. I am still of the opinion that these additional verses post-date the Hughes version and are the work of an imitator rather than of someone who sang traditional songs - the words are just a little contrived and consciously archaic or countrified. Make of it what you will.

1
Come all ye good people and listen to me
I'll sing you a song of a strange history,
But I hardly need say that the song I have made
Is a bit of a discourse 'tween a man and a maid.

4
Oh, says she, I have tunes and enough for to do,
And my mother has warned me 'gainst strangers like you,
My mother has warned me, and her I must heed,
And besides I've my markets to make with all speed.

5
Oh your markets can wait and the day it is young,
And the tune I will teach you is easily sung!
'Tis you are the coaxer, one moment I'll stay,
I'm longing to learn it, "The next Market Day.”

I have heard the first of these sung, on a Folkways LP, by Dick Cameron, who died a couple of years ago in Dublin, but neither of the others has felt singer's breath in my hearing.

It is interesting to compare the presumably traditional verse in Hughes with these and with the Comber's Whistle. The four traditional verses fit in with the Comber's Whistle - 30 years ago, long before I knew of the Comber's Whistle's existence, I initiated a discussion with Bert Lloyd over the likelihood that song was an extended seduction metaphor. Linking "yarn" with "little ball of yarn," the learning of tunes, with Johnny who took out his fiddle or played upon his pipes, and, I ask, what "Market" was she learning, and why was she paid?

It all seemed a little far-fetched and conjectural at the time so I'm feeling justified.

One of the reasons for supposing that the additional verses are the work of a formally educated hand is that they move it into the realm of innocent discussion rather than vigorous dalliance; ordinary people would have been more aware.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 21-Apr-02.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Alice
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 09:36 PM

Is there anything to add about Hughes' mention that it was a fragment of a ballad from Tyrone?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Bruce O.
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 09:43 PM

Those that wish to believe so can. But after seeing what he did to "The Stuttering Lovers", I find it hard to give such statements from him much credence.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: Bruce O.
Date: 13 Jan 00 - 10:34 PM

Another tidbit. Those who haven't visted "The Stuttering Lovers" on my website may be amused to learn that it was copyrighted in the United States of America on Aug. 17, 1906.


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Subject: Chords Add: MAID GOING TO COMBER (NEXT MARKET DAY)
From: Áine
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 05:43 PM

Dear Robin,

Here are the guitar chords to the first verse and chorus of the version that I know. I got this from fellow Mudcatter, Den (thanks again, Den, if you're reading this!):

(Em)Oh a maid going to (D)Comber
Her (Bm)markets to (Em)learn
To (G)earn for her (D)mammie
Three (C)hanks of fine (Em)yarn
She (G)met with a (D)young man
(C)Along the (Em)highway
Which caused this young (D)damsel
(Bm)dally and (Em)stray

Chorus:

(Em)Sit down (D)beside me
I (Bm)mean you no (Em)harm
(G)Sit down (D)beside me
this (C)new tune to (Em)learn
(G)Here is three (D)guineas
your (C)Mammie to (Em)pay
So lay by your (D)yarn
Till the (Bm)next market (Em)day

I hope that helps. And great good luck to you with the bazouki.

-- Áine


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Subject: Lyr Add: A MAID GOING TO COMBER (NEXT MARKET DAY^^
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Oct 00 - 06:24 PM

This is what I plan to submit to the database. Any corrections?
-Joe-
A MAID GOING TO COMBER (NEXT MARKET DAY)

A Maid Going to Comber
Her markets to learn [pronounced 'tae larn']
And to sell for her mammy three hanks of fine yarn.
She met with this young man along the highway
Who caused this young damsel to dally and stray.

CHORUS -
Come sit ye down by me, I'll do ye no harm,
Sit ye down by me, this new tune to learn,
And here is three guineas your mammy to pay,
Come leave by your yarn till the next market day.

They sat down together, the grass it was green
And the day was the fairest that ever you've seen
"Oh, the look in your eye beats a morning in May,**
I could sit by your side till the next market day."

This maid she went home, but the words that he said,
And the song that he sang, it still ran in her head.
She said, "I'll go find him by land or by sea,['say']
Till he learns me the tune called 'The Next Market Day"

** alternate: Sure, the look in your eye would lead young girls (or angels) astray

Alternate title: A MAID WENT TO COMBER

@Irish @music @love @courting
filename[ MAIDCOMB
PR AC
Oct00
Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry for this song:

Next Market Day, The

DESCRIPTION: Woman going to the market meets a man. He gives her three guineas to pay for the yarn, that he might play her a new tune.She goes home with the tune in her head. She will seek him "by land or by sea/Till he larns me that tune called the next market day"
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE:
LONG DESCRIPTION: Young woman going to the market at Comber, with three hanks of yarn to sell for her mother, meets a young man (apparently a musician), and dallies. He gives her three guineas to pay her mother for the yarn, that he might play her a new tune. They sit together; they gaze lovingly into each other's eyes, and she goes home with the tune in her head. She vows to seek him "by land or by sea/Till he larns me that tune called the next market day"
KEYWORDS: courting love sex commerce music
FOUND IN:
REFERENCES (1 citation):
Silber-FSWB, p. 158 "The Next Market Day" (1 text)
Roud #6547
RECORDINGS:
Seamus O'Doherty, "The Next Market Day" (Columbia 33289-F, n.d.)
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "The Stonecutter Boy" (plot)
cf. "The Haselbury Girl (The Maid of Tottenham, The Aylesbury Girl)" (plot)
cf. "The Mower" (plot)
cf. "The Wanton Seed"
File: FSWB158B

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2004 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: GUEST,peter, holland
Date: 16 Jan 05 - 02:37 PM

The song called 'the next market day'is also found on a cd from 'the lonely stranded band, starring Charly Piggott and Joe Corcoran performing the lyric 'the next market day'.

seeyou
pjh jansen
holland


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: ard mhacha
Date: 16 Jan 05 - 03:02 PM

John McCormack recorded The next market day in 1920, the song is included on an LP of John McCormack on John McCormack Rarities.


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Subject: Index: Jerry Silverman's Folk Song Encyclopedia
From: GUEST,John in Brisbane
Date: 17 Jan 05 - 03:52 AM

Not sure whether the dots are included but available in:

Title: Jerry Silverman's Folk Song Encyclopedia [music] : volume 1. / edited and designed by Beverly Tillett         
Publication:        New York : Chappell Music, c1975         
Description:        1 score (431 p.) ; 30 cm         
Other title:        Folk song encyclopedia         
Notes:        On cover: 'With over 1,000 favorite songs arranged for voice and guitar'.
In 2 volumes.         
Subject(s):        Popular music
Folk music--North America
Folk music--England
Folk songs, English         
Other Author(s):        Tillett, Beverly
Silverman, Jerry         
Song Titles Included:
    Starving to death on a government chain
    Banks of the Sacramento
    Clementine
    Arkansas Traveler
    Days of forty-nine
    The Sioux indians
    El-a-noy
    We're coming Arkansas
    The lovely Ohio
    For Kansas
    The State of Arkansas
    Acres of clams
    Little old sod shanty on the plain
    Sweet Betsy from Pike
    The streets of Laredo
    Night herding song
    Bury me not on the lone praire
    Zebra dun
    Cowboy's life
    The big corral
    Lonesome cowboy
    Red River Valley
    Brown-eyed Lee
    The tenderfoot
    When the work's all done this fall
    Home on the range
    The cowboy's dream
    Utah Carroll
    I've got no use for women
    I'd like to be in Texas
    I ride and old paint
    Buffalo skinners
    The trail to Mexico
    My love is a rider
    Git along little doggies
    The Texas Rangers
    The dreary, dreary life
    The Colorado Trail
    The old Chisholm Trail
    Tryin' a knot in the devil's tail
    Ten thousand cattle
    Doney gal
    Little Joe, the wrangler
    The cowboy
    The strawberry roan
    The gal I left behind me
    Hard luck
    The wild colonial boy
    Poor Ellen Smith
    Poor Lazarus
    George Collins
    MacPherson's farewell
    Brennan on the moor
    Louisville Burglar (v.1)
    Boston burglar (v.1)
    Kilgary Mountain
    John Hardy
    Jesse James
    John Hielandman
    Lincolnshire poacher
    Delia
    Billy the Kid
    Sam Bass
    A prisoner for life
    Bad company
    Brady
    Pretty Polly
    Otto Wood
    Banks of the Ohio
    Down in the willow garden
    Yonder comes the high sheriff
    Sam Hall
    Tom Dooley
    Jim Fisk
    Cole Younger
    Charles Guiteau
    Seeing Nellie home
    Dabbling in the dew
    Sailing in the boat
    At the foot of yonder mountain
    Will you go, lassie, go
    The turtle dove
    William Taylor
    When you go a-courtin'
    Love is pleasing
    Black is the color
    None can love like an Irishman
    Pretty Saro
    Whistle daughter, whistle
    The trooper and the maid
    As I roved out
    Uh Uh no
    The next market day
    Six questions
    Old maid's song
    Soldier, soldier will you marry me?
    Scarborough Fair
    The brisk young bachelor
    You go to old Harry
    Devilish Mary
    The Tex-i-can boys
    Come all ye fair and tender ladies
    On top of old Smokey
    Who's gonna shoe your pretty little foot?
    The butcher boy
    Paper of pins
    Danville girl
    Careless love
    The Quaker's courtship
    Bury me beneath the willow
    Charlie is my darling
    Sucking cider through a straw
    Mowing the barley
    Wait for the wagon
    I know where I'm goin'
    I should like to marry
    A railroader for me
    Hurree hurroo
    East Virginia
    There is a tavern in the town
    The passionate shepherd to his love
    I know my love
    If he'd be a buckaroo
    Blow the candles out
    Hard, ain't it hard
    How old are you, my pretty little Miss?
    Peggy-O
    The house carpenter
    Kind Miss
    Waillie
    John Riley
    Once I had a sweetheart
    The Queen of hearts
    Listen to the mockingbird
    Darling Nellie Gray
    Lily of the west
    Come, o my love
    Jeanie with the light brown hair
    Mountains of Mourne
    I'll take you home again Kathleen
    Brown eyes
    He's gone away
    The river in the pines
    Long, long ago
    Rosewood casket
    While strolling through the park
    Go 'way from my window
    Flow gently sweet Afton
    Engine
    Old soldiers never die
    The foggy fogy dew
    She's like a swallow
    The riddle song
    Love's old sweet song
    I'll give my love an apple
    The foggy dew
    The minstrel boy
    Dumbarton's drums
    Aura Lee
    Down by the Sally Gardens
    Silver threads among the gold
    In the gloaming
    My old Kentucky home
    How should I your true love know
    Must I go bound?
    The last request
    Look down that lonesome road
    Swanee River
    More pretty girls than one
    The little orphan girl
    Dink's song
    Beware, Oh take care
    Freight train
    Good morning Mr Railroadman
    Kathleen Mavourneen
    Grandfather's clock
    Home sweet home
    The water is wide
    Ben Bolt
    Johnson
    Lorena
    My mother's old red shawl
    My bonny lies over the ocean
    The rose of Tralee
    I will never marry
    By the silvery Rio Grande
    One morning in May
    The blooming bright star of Belle Isle
    Old Blue
    Willie Moore
    Believe me if all those endearing young charms
    Beautiful dreamer
    Stewball
    I'm sad and I'm lonely
    The parting glass
    Poor boy
    Little Mohee
    Lord Thomas and Fair Ellender
    The cruel war
    Sally in our alley
    Handsome Molly
    The great American bum
    A rich Irish lady
    The blind fiddler
    Edward
    The cruel mother
    Drink to me only with thine eyes
    Lady Gay
    The bad girl
    Don't sing love songs
    Green grow the rashes
    Lowe Bonnie
    Strawberry Lane
    The willow song
    Bow and balance
    The great silkie
    The cuckoo
    The devil's nine questions
    Nottamun Town
    It was a lover and his lass
    Cock Robin
    Matty Groves
    The drunkard's doom
    Bill McCandless' Ride
    Lord Bateman
    Johnson's ale
    The maid on the shore
    Lady of Carlisle
    Lady Margaret
    The gallows pole
    The card song
    The Cutty Wren
    Blow away the morning dew
    Rue
    Cockles and mussels
    The Calton weaver
    Dublin City
    The four Marys
    John Peel
    Every night when the sun goes down
    The unquiet grave
    Barb'ry Ellen
    Lady Isabel and the elf knight
    The three ravens
    Gypsy Davey
    The wraggle-taggle gypsies
    Lang a-growing
    Wheel of fortune
    Lord Randall
    Have you seen but a white lily grow
    Jackson
    The maid freed from the gallows
    In good old colony times
    Lord Lovel
    The bailiff's daughter of Islington
    Queen Jane
    Billy Barlow
    Geordie
    Greensleves
    Lili Burlero
    Two maids went a-milking one day
    Song of greeting
    Volga boatman
    Who knows why
    Cuckoo
    Stenka Razin
    On a raven black horse
    Vrt' sa, Dévca
    Moscow nights
    Meadowland
    In the meadow stood
    The young girl was married off
    Kalinka
    Katiusha
    Two guitars
    Sano Duso
    Yovano
    Toom Balalaika
    Hey! Zhankoye
    Proshchai
    Vdol' po ulitse
    Vigndig a fremd kind
    Zog nit Keynmol
    Yomi, yomi
    Liebster meiner
    Oyfn pripetshok
    Rozhinkes mit mandlen
    Hava nagila
    Hava netze B'machol
    Hinneh mah tov
    Mi y'malel
    Zum gali gali
    Freiheit
    Peat bog soldiers
    Du, du liegst mir im herzen
    Venga Jaleo
    Los cuatro generales
    Ay! Linda amiga
    La Llorona
    Duermete Nino Lindo
    Viva la quince bragada
    La cucaracha
    Malaguena salerosa
    Si me quieres escribir
    Mi cabollo blanco
    Cielito Lindo
    Adelita
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    Many thousands gone
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    Raise a rukus tonight
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    Poisoning the students' minds
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    Stung right
    Money is king
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    Solidarity forever
    United front
    The old orange flute
    Roddy McCorley


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Subject: Lyr Add: A MAID WENT TO COMBER
From: GUEST,pjh jansen
Date: 17 Jan 05 - 05:03 AM

Charlie Piggot, Miriam Collins and Joe Corcoran: The Lonely Stranded Band.
THE NEXT MARKET DAY is actually called A MAID WENT TO COMBER.
Joe Corcoran also performs THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY.

A maid went to Comber her markets to larn
To sell for her mammy three haks o' fine yarn.
She met the young man along the highway
Which caused this young lady the rambling stray.

CHORUS: Sit down beside me. I mean you no harm.
Sit down beside me this new tune to larn.
Here is three guineas your mammy to pay,
So hang by your yarns till the next market day.

They sat down together. The grass was so green,
And the day was the fairest that ever was seen.
By the look your eyes would leave angels to stray
And I could lay in your arms till the next market day. CHORUS

This garl she went on and the words that he said,
And the air that he blazed rings round in my head,
And I will go find him by land or by sea
Till he learns me the tune called The Next Market Day. CHORUS

I had this wonderful CD in my collection. I bought it straight from Charlie when he visited Breda in a local pub called 'Biermuseum'
I think it was winter some eight years ago.
Two removals ago I could have give the reader numbers or labels of the mentioned.

Cy
Peter


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: GUEST,jansen holland
Date: 17 Jan 05 - 04:58 PM

gotcha!

MOC music 1996
Clo Iar-Chonnachta
Indreabhan, Co na Gaillimhe, Eire

telephone + 353-91-593307

Or telephone ireland : +353-91-37499

'traditional Irish music and song from Charlie piggott, Miriam Collins and Joe Corcoran.

1. Jigs ; the fari hared boy, scatter the mud
2. reels : Larry's favourite, John Naughtons reel
3. song: : the wind that shakes the barley
4. Hornpipes : the girl with the golden tresses, the stranger
5. jigs : the trip to Bantry, staia Donnely
6. song : a maid went to Comber
7. jigs : the maid on the green, the cow that ate the blanket
8. jigs : collin's jijg Pat McMahon's jig, the haunted house
10. song: come on the stairs
11. s air, reel : Abha an tSulain, the sailors cravat, lady Gordon
12. song The rocks of Bawn
13. jigs : the hole in the boat, The lake shore.


The inner sleeve : ( thanks to Jackie Small and Tom Munnely ( MOC music Ireland)
Song : A maid went to Comber ( trad. arr. Corcoran) MOC music

"this beautiful song of romance ( also called the next market day or sit down beside me)was popularised by in the 1930's by Belfast -born tenor Richard hayward, Joe Corcoran learnt it from the Dublin band Oisin in the 1970's and it's been ringing round his head ever since"

the number of the cd is CICD 116
MOC Music ireland, 1996.

that's all, mysterie solved. another box removal emptied.

cy peter.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: ard mhacha
Date: 18 Jan 05 - 01:22 PM

Cy Peter as you can see from my previous reply, John McCormack`s recording in 1920 was well ahead of Richard Hayward.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: ard mhacha
Date: 18 Jan 05 - 01:37 PM

I forgot to add, The next market day was a favourite of the Northern Ireland Light Orchestra in their programme of Irish Rhythms, away back in thos old wireless days of the 1940s.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Jan 05 - 01:34 AM

dear ard mhacha

I only replied on the message of peg in which she asked for a link 'to a guy with the name of corcoran who sang "the next marktet day'
Nevertheless : interesting how many people actually know what's going on in irish-music-wonderland.
Thank you for the link-up to former days in Irish Music

seeyou
Peter


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: A Maid Went to Comber
From: GUEST,Dusty
Date: 10 Jun 09 - 06:42 PM

This is what i came up with chord wise for this song


(Am)A maid went to (Em)Comber her (G)markets to (Am)larn
To sell for her (C)mammy three (G)haks o' fine (Em)yarn.
She (Am)met the (Em)young man a(G)long the high(Em)way
(Am)Which caused this young (G)lady to (Em)tarry and (Am)stray..

CHORUS: Sit down beside me. I mean you no harm.
Sit down beside me this new tune to larn.
Here is three guineas your mammy to pay,
So hang by your yarns till the next market day.


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