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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2

Bill D 17 Dec 22 - 09:17 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 Dec 22 - 10:46 AM
Bill D 17 Dec 22 - 04:33 PM
MaJoC the Filk 17 Dec 22 - 05:48 PM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Dec 22 - 07:29 PM
Sandra in Sydney 17 Dec 22 - 07:30 PM
DaveRo 18 Dec 22 - 02:47 AM
Rain Dog 18 Dec 22 - 03:03 AM
DaveRo 18 Dec 22 - 04:59 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Dec 22 - 08:49 AM
Rain Dog 18 Dec 22 - 09:00 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Dec 22 - 08:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 18 Dec 22 - 09:46 PM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Dec 22 - 03:38 AM
Steve Shaw 19 Dec 22 - 06:08 AM
Stilly River Sage 19 Dec 22 - 12:46 PM
Stilly River Sage 22 Dec 22 - 10:28 AM
Sandra in Sydney 24 Dec 22 - 09:11 PM
Donuel 27 Dec 22 - 03:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Dec 22 - 04:30 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Dec 22 - 08:27 AM
Sandra in Sydney 31 Dec 22 - 07:36 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jan 23 - 07:40 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Jan 23 - 10:59 AM
Sandra in Sydney 20 Jan 23 - 02:07 AM
Donuel 23 Jan 23 - 09:29 AM
Donuel 23 Jan 23 - 09:55 AM
Sandra in Sydney 24 Jan 23 - 06:13 PM
Donuel 24 Jan 23 - 07:36 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Jan 23 - 08:32 PM
Donuel 28 Jan 23 - 01:39 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Jan 23 - 04:11 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Jan 23 - 03:27 PM
Sandra in Sydney 31 Jan 23 - 05:46 PM
Donuel 31 Jan 23 - 06:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Jan 23 - 09:43 PM
Sandra in Sydney 01 Feb 23 - 04:40 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Feb 23 - 02:18 PM
Sandra in Sydney 02 Feb 23 - 05:31 PM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 02 Feb 23 - 07:33 PM
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Subject: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Bill D
Date: 17 Dec 22 - 09:17 AM

I can't find the old one, even going back a year... I hope it's ok.
Anyway, here's a nice list of recent finds.
https://www.cnn.com/style/article/art-archaeology-discoveries-2022/index.html


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Dec 22 - 10:46 AM

Here it is. Do you want to go with this new thread or combine them?

I remember a few of these, but some are new. Nice year-end summary!


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Bill D
Date: 17 Dec 22 - 04:33 PM

Your choice...
Not sure why a year's update didn't find it...


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: MaJoC the Filk
Date: 17 Dec 22 - 05:48 PM

I was about to say: I suggest making this the new fork, as the old one causes my browser indigestion, and presumably much mewing at Max's end .... then I went to submit the reply, and the Cat had gone off for a brief nap. In the argot of the music-hall comedians: Badum, Tish.


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Dec 22 - 07:29 PM

thanks for the link, Bill.

I'd prefer all posts in one thread, but if long threads are a problem, this new thread could have a link to the old thread posted above it, like other popular themes. A link inside a post will be lost.

When a decision is made, I'll post some more links I've collected

sandra


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 17 Dec 22 - 07:30 PM

my fist attempt to post my reply was made during the catnap!


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: DaveRo
Date: 18 Dec 22 - 02:47 AM

MaJoC: don't you use one of the two 'paged' views:
Latest post at the bottom
Latest post at the top

See the 'how to' under Mudcat Time at the bottom of the index page.

I use the 'latest on top' for threads I follow.

The old title - Armchair Archeology was much better.

And I'll mention my Simple Linkifier which works with long URLs.


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Rain Dog
Date: 18 Dec 22 - 03:03 AM

The old title was called 'Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth)'


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: DaveRo
Date: 18 Dec 22 - 04:59 AM

The armchair is the important bit ;)

Sandra should choose. She is the main poster - SRS is next.


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Dec 22 - 08:49 AM

I bookmarked the (old) thread some time back, & also have bookmarked your Linkifier as The Guardian likes long URLs & I like their archaeology pages!

I would like all archaeology posts together, but as Stilly has to do the work, it's really her decision.

sandra


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Rain Dog
Date: 18 Dec 22 - 09:00 AM

A related thread link to the previous thread would make a lot of sense, as you suggested Sandra.

It has been mentioned before that long threads do put a strain on the mudcat site.


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Subject: RE: BS: New thread on archeology
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Dec 22 - 08:25 PM

rename thread? - Armchair Archaeologist, part 2 & add Related link


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Dec 22 - 09:46 PM

I can fix the name. :)

"Armchair" seemed a natural because we can sit at our computers and pull up Google Earth and find these places. I've explored ancient wells in Croatia, Chinese dessert roads, spent tons of time poking around the pyramids and ruins in Egypt, and poked around the Middle East in general. All from the chair in my office.

Also, there are actual discoveries made by people who studied these online maps and noticed patterns or shadows that were remarkable and realized there was *something* there.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Dec 22 - 03:38 AM

great, mate!

are you able to put a related thread above our shiny new thread so enquiring minds can see where we've been?

https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=163442&messages=461&page=1

meanwhile, here's a few articles I've been saving up - links crated using DaveRo's linkifier

Quarries, trade and Dark Emu: unearthing treasures from ‘Australia’s Silk Road’ Researchers continue the search for evidence of traditional Aboriginal food production.
In 2017, the Indigenous elder George Gorringe led a small research expedition in the Channel Country of south-west Queensland.
The expedition, on the traditional land of the Mithaka people, visited several sites including sandstone quarries, stone arrangements, and the remains of gunyahs – dwellings made from excavated structures covered with branches.
The region is archaeologically significant: the landscape has been dramatically altered by a huge network of quarries, which Mithaka people once used to make seed-grinding implements (read on)
===========
shock! horror! Iconic 30000-Year-Old Ancient Female Dubbed “Dangerous Pornography” By Facebook (2018)
==============
New evidence of a Roman road in the Venice Lagoon (Italy) based on high resolution seafloor reconstruction


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Dec 22 - 06:08 AM

As an aside, it's nice to see "archaeology," not "archeology." I love most American spellings and am a doughty defender thereof, but that one always looks like a mistake to me!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Dec 22 - 12:46 PM

Just in time for news out of Nazca, Peru

Archaeologists Uncover Nearly 170 Nazca Lines Dating Back About 2,000 Years in Peru
Following the discovery of an enormous lounging cat in 2020, archaeologists have uncovered hundreds of additional geoglyphs on the Nazca Lines site in Peru. A team from Yamagata University has spent nearly a decade at the location 250 miles south of Lima, and a field study between June 2019 and February 2020 unveiled 168 previously hidden works. Spotted in aerial photos captured by drones, the drawings feature myriad creatures like birds, snakes, orcas, and people likely created between 100 B.C. and 300 A.D.

Researchers believe there are two types of geoglyphs on the Nazca Pampa, a linear and relief, although only five documented during this mission are linear. Prehistoric populations created the works by removing darker stones from the earth’s surface to reveal the lighter sand below, and the renderings are thought to be part of spiritual, astronomical rituals. Spreading across 170 square miles, the Nazca lines vary in size, although most are smaller than 30 feet in diameter.

Archaeologists have spotted 358 geoglyphs at the UNESCO World Heritage site so far, which is currently being studied to see how the works are distributed across the area. (via ArtNet)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Dec 22 - 10:28 AM

To Save a Ruin, Send in the Sheep
The archaeological park of Pompeii has found a low-tech way to prevent the site from being overrun by vegetation: hungry sheep.
In recent years, the vast archaeological park of Pompeii, a city buried alive by the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, has turned to high-tech options to maintain its excavated ruins. A surveillance drone makes a monthly flight over the site’s roughly 10,000 exhumed rooms. Artificial intelligence programs analyze aerial images for new cracks, fallen stones and other signs of erosion. But to prevent the third of the park that remains hidden under pumice and meters of earth from becoming overgrown with thorn bushes, wild hedges and trees, Pompeii has found a more appropriately ancient, and inexpensive, solution in hungry sheep.

Without the sheep “you’d have some kind of jungle that would invade the archaeological structures and the site,” said Gabriel Zuchtriegel, the park’s director. He said that he came up with the idea of bringing in the sheep after seeing them maintain the land on top of dikes in the North Sea, and said that the Pompeii sheep would chomp down invasive vegetation, destructive roots and wild terrains that could lead to the city’s reburial under landslides.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Dec 22 - 09:11 PM

Scientists claim first discovery of mammal eaten by dinosaur Paleontologists say they have identified foot of mouse-sized mammal in fossilised rib cage of predatory microraptor


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 27 Dec 22 - 03:54 PM

Archaeologists have linked Graham Hancock's claims to "racist" and "white supremacist" ideologies from the 19th century, which they say are insulting to the ancestors of indigenous peoples who built the monuments. A Maltese archaeologist who appeared in the episode said that her interview had been manipulated. The Society for American Archaeology (SAA) objected to the classification of the series as a documentary and requested that Netflix reclassify it as science fiction. The SAA also stated that the series repeatedly and vigorously dismisses archaeologists and the practice of archaeology with aggressive rhetoric, willfully seeking to cause harm to our membership and our profession in the public eye; ... the theory it presents has a long-standing association with racist, white supremacist ideologies; does injustice to Indigenous peoples; and emboldens extremists.

While it is true Graham is a polemicist and media hound much like Michiu Kaku or Professor Dyson I think a prehistoric advanced building civilization is a 'holy grail' worth searching for that existed prior to the latest ice age. The ancient Egyptians called these people the Zep Tepi. It is also true That Hitler and Himmler did search for some archeological evidence of a master race but that is certainly not what Hancock wishes to do.

In short we shouldn't throw the baby out with the bath water.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Dec 22 - 04:30 PM

What do/did Donna Haraway or Annette Kolodny think of him? I'd trust their opinions.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Dec 22 - 08:27 AM

Young Sudanese archaeologists dig up history as ‘west knows best’ era ends On a continent that has long attracted western expeditions, a wave of young people are now exploring sites.
A late morning in Khartoum. Inside a low, dusty building in the centre of the Sudanese capital, there are crates of artefacts, a 7ft replica of a 2,000-year-old stone statue of a Nubian god, and students rushing through the corridors. Outside is noisy traffic, blinding sunlight and both branches of the Nile.

Heading down one staircase are Sabrine Jamal, Nadia Musa, Athar Bela and Sabrine al-Sadiq, all studying archaeology at Khartoum University. Not one of them is older than 24 and they see themselves as pioneers, breaking new ground on a continent that has long attracted western expeditions, specialists and adventurers but whose own archaeologists have received less attention overseas.

“It is very important that Africans do African archaeology … because then we will have our own archaeological cultures. There is a lot we understand because we are from here. The idea that people from the west know best is changing,” said Sadiq.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 31 Dec 22 - 07:36 AM

Eight Historic Lies about the Ancient World that will Blow Your Mind


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jan 23 - 07:40 PM

I haven't tried this yet, but here is a link to, of all people, Martha Stewart, about You Can Now Use Google Maps' Street View to Travel Back in Time—Here's How to Use the Interactive Feature. While it isn't archaeology or ancient history, it is another hole we can dive down exploring places included in this feature.
If you've ever used the tool to view your own home, you know that Google updates these photos regularly. Now, the technology company is using its database of street level photography to allow users to see what a particular area looked like years ago, according to a report by Wired.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Jan 23 - 10:59 AM

Material Evidence of Silk Road Found In Israel
A joint team from the Israel Antiquities Authority, Ben-Gurion University, Hildebrandt of Göttingen University, and Nofar Shamir of Haifa University, have uncovered cotton and silk fabrics that date from the Early Islamic Period, which were imported from India and China around 1,300-years-ago along the Silk Road.

The Silk Road was a network of trade routes for exotic goods, which derives its name from the highly lucrative trade of silk textiles. During its 1,500 years of existence, the Silk Road endured the rise and fall of numerous empires, and major events such as the Black Death and the Mongol conquests.

The researchers have been excavating rubbish deposits in the Aravah that date back to the late 17th century AD. Excavations uncovered a treasure trove of finds, including fabrics, clothing, and leather, preserved in the arid climate that reveals new insights into the material culture and the daily lives of the people that inhabited the region.

Previous excavations also revealed decorative fabrics from India and silk from China, in which a Carbon-14 analysis has dated to between the 7th to 8th century AD. The archaeologists suggest that the cotton fabrics probably came from India and Nubia, and that the silk fabrics provide strong evidence for trade with China.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Jan 23 - 02:07 AM

‘3D medieval puzzle’: Newport ship to be reassembled from 2,500 pieces of timber Oak and beech 15th-century vessel is being returned to Welsh city where it was found in riverside mud in 2002 ...

The ship was a three-masted craft measuring more than 30 metres in length and capable of carrying about 200 tonnes of cargo. Examination of the artefacts found onboard suggests it probably sailed the Lisbon to Bristol trade route.
Through the study of tree-ring data, it has been concluded that the trees used to construct the ship were felled around 1449 in the Basque Country. It was brought to Newport for repairs or refit in about 1469 but was taken to bits after being damaged when a cradle supporting it collapsed and it did not sail again.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Jan 23 - 09:29 AM

This is not the time to visit Machu Pichu.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-64037002

Friends made it to Peru only 2 weeks ago and were OK but now its a mess.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Jan 23 - 09:55 AM

btw my childhood hometown was named after the American discoverer of Machu Pichu. Binghamton


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 24 Jan 23 - 06:13 PM

Digital scan unwraps secrets of mummy from 2,300 years ago Team at Cairo University conclude teenager was rich and he may point to evidence non-Egyptians were mummified
Matthew Weaver
Tue 24 Jan 2023 16.15 AEDT

A new digital scan has revealed intimate details about a teenage boy who was mummified about 2,300 years ago.

A team of scientists led by Sahar Saleem, a professor of radiology at the faculty of medicine at Cairo University, concluded that the boy and his family were rich and of high social status because his body was adorned with 49 precious amulets.

Saleem said: “Many were made of gold, while some were made of semi-precious stones, fired clay or faience. Their purpose was to protect the body and give it vitality in the afterlife.”

The team dubbed the mummy the Golden Boy. He was first discovered in 1916 at a cemetery used from 332BC to 30BC in Nag el-Hassay in southern Egypt. Until now it had been stored unexamined in the basement of Cairo’s Egyptian museum. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 24 Jan 23 - 07:36 PM

Modern mummification is more complex than the Egyptian book of the dead.
https://patents.google.com/patent/CA1087101A/en


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Jan 23 - 08:32 PM

One of those intimate details is that the lad wasn't circumcised! Speculation is rife!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 28 Jan 23 - 01:39 PM

LIDAR discoveries and speculations


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Jan 23 - 04:11 PM

‘Incredible’ Roman bathers’ gems lost 2,000 years ago found near Hadrian’s Wall Intricately carved stones that fell down drain at ancient pool uncovered by archaeologists in Carlisle


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Jan 23 - 03:27 PM

Not archaeology, but you can still travel to Mauritius on your map and look around.

Resurrecting the Dodo: How Scientists Plan to De-Extinct an Iconic Species
The dodo's demise was caused by humans. Now scientists think they can bring the bird back. But should they?
The wildlife of Mauritius, a tropical island in the Indian Ocean just 500 miles east of Madagascar, could not have known the giant shadows cast across the bay in 1598 would signal their doom. The fleet of Dutch ships was akin to the Chicxulub asteroid that had arrived in the Yucatan peninsula some 66 million years earlier.

That rogue rock ended the reign of the dinosaurs in dramatic fashion. The threat posed to their modern-day relatives — creatures like the blue pigeon, the scops owl and the broad-billed parrot — by the Dutch fleet was much more insidious. It wasn't an explosive end. It was a slow burn: The sailors who colonized the island destroyed the natural habitat and introduced alien species like rats, pigs and monkeys, pests that could outcompete the island's native residents for resources.

Some species disappeared before anyone even noticed.

The most enduring emblem of the island's extinct species is, without doubt, the dodo (Raphus cucullatus). It was wiped out no more than a century after the Dutch arrived.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 31 Jan 23 - 05:46 PM

Metal detectorist unearths Tudor gold pendant linked to Henry VIII in Warwickshire ... What the Birmingham cafe owner had discovered was a huge and quite spectacular early Tudor pendant and chain, made in gold and enamel and bearing the initials and symbols of Henry VIII and his first wife, Katherine of Aragon.

When Rachel King, curator of Renaissance Europe at the British Museum, first heard about the discovery, she had to sit down. Nothing of this size and importance from the Renaissance period had been found in Britain for more than 25 years, she said.

The heart-shaped pendant, attached to a chain of 75 links and made of 300 grams of 24-carat gold, is decorated with a bush bearing the Tudor rose and a pomegranate, Katherine’s symbol, and on the reverse the initials H and K. Ribbon motifs carry the legend TOVS and IORS, which King called “a beautiful early English Franglais pun” on the French word “toujours” and “all yours” ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 31 Jan 23 - 06:04 PM

It is not that the Dutch found Dodo indescribably delicious it was that the ground nesting bird became prey to the rats the Dutch inadvertently brought.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Jan 23 - 09:43 PM

See if this opens.

Wall Street Journal Vast Maya Kingdom Is Revealed in Guatemalan Jungle
Archaeologists identify a sprawling network of ancient ruins using laser mapping technology

The WSJ has a robust paywall.

Airborn laser mapping technology was used in this project. (Lidar)

Nestled in the jungle of northern Guatemala, a vast network of interconnected Maya settlements built millennia ago has been mapped in unprecedented detail.

The civilization featured towering pyramids, palaces, terraces, ball courts and reservoirs connected by a sprawling web of causeways, an international group of archaeologists reported during a presentation at Francisco Marroquín University in Guatemala City this month.

Their findings reveal a “level of infrastructure that is just mind-boggling,” said Dr. Timothy Beach, a professor of geography at the University of Texas at Austin who wasn’t involved in the research.


https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/ancient-mesoamerica/article/lidar-analyses-in-the-contiguous-miradorcalakmul-karst-basin-guatemala-an-introduction-to-new-perspectives-on-regional-early-maya-socioeconomic-and-political-organization/31075DFA8ADBAA5E7C7320CA6DB93E5E really long file and link to the original paper.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 01 Feb 23 - 04:40 PM

Embalming recipes used on Egyptian mummies at ancient workshop near pyramids decoded Researchers analysed embalming vessels found at a mummification workshop dated between 664 BC and 525 BC near the Saqqara pyramid
They found several different ingredients were used for different parts of the body
Some of the ingredients were sourced from as far away as South-East Asia


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Feb 23 - 02:18 PM

I wish the artist had been told that the ancient Egyptians performing this work probably DIDN'T look like tall European men with really short hair, or that perhaps it was women who did some of this work.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 02 Feb 23 - 05:31 PM

I wonder how old the image is


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 02 Feb 23 - 07:33 PM

I remember reading an account of the time that stated that the Dodo was actually not that tasty, just easy to catch.

Robin


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