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Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2

Related thread:
Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) (640)


Sandra in Sydney 15 Oct 23 - 08:25 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Oct 23 - 02:38 AM
Thompson 19 Oct 23 - 01:16 AM
Raggytash 19 Oct 23 - 07:01 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 23 - 08:23 AM
Bill D 19 Oct 23 - 09:19 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 23 - 04:24 PM
Thompson 21 Oct 23 - 11:14 PM
Thompson 22 Oct 23 - 06:40 AM
Donuel 22 Oct 23 - 09:40 AM
Sandra in Sydney 22 Oct 23 - 10:24 AM
DaveRo 23 Oct 23 - 08:11 AM
Sandra in Sydney 23 Oct 23 - 04:41 PM
Thompson 25 Oct 23 - 07:02 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Nov 23 - 03:29 PM
Sandra in Sydney 01 Nov 23 - 04:30 PM
Helen 05 Nov 23 - 06:35 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Nov 23 - 10:52 PM
Helen 06 Nov 23 - 01:39 AM
Thompson 10 Nov 23 - 01:11 AM
Helen 10 Nov 23 - 03:04 AM
Bill D 01 Sep 23 - 10:36 AM
Bill D 06 Sep 23 - 10:28 AM
Bill D 11 Oct 23 - 09:33 AM
Bill D 19 Oct 23 - 09:19 AM
Raggytash 19 Oct 23 - 07:01 AM
Donuel 01 Sep 23 - 08:02 AM
Donuel 01 Sep 23 - 06:48 PM
Donuel 05 Sep 23 - 02:52 PM
Donuel 21 Sep 23 - 06:37 AM
Donuel 29 Sep 23 - 10:51 AM
Donuel 06 Oct 23 - 06:00 AM
Donuel 06 Oct 23 - 08:49 AM
Stilly River Sage 21 Sep 23 - 12:46 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Sep 23 - 08:34 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 Oct 23 - 06:35 PM
Sandra in Sydney 28 Aug 23 - 05:18 PM
Sandra in Sydney 02 Sep 23 - 07:16 PM
Sandra in Sydney 07 Sep 23 - 05:23 AM
Sandra in Sydney 20 Sep 23 - 05:37 PM
Sandra in Sydney 27 Sep 23 - 02:29 AM
Sandra in Sydney 06 Oct 23 - 04:03 AM
Sandra in Sydney 10 Oct 23 - 05:41 AM
Sandra in Sydney 10 Oct 23 - 05:49 AM
Sandra in Sydney 15 Oct 23 - 08:25 AM
Sandra in Sydney 18 Oct 23 - 02:38 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 23 - 08:23 AM
Sandra in Sydney 19 Oct 23 - 04:24 PM
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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Oct 23 - 08:25 AM

Phallus and the boar: Türkiye digs yield clues to human history The dry expanses of south-eastern Türkiye, home to some of humanity's most ancient sites, have yielded fresh discoveries in the form of a stone phallus and a coloured boar.
For researchers, the carved statue of a man holding his phallus with two hands while seated atop a bench adorned with a leopard, is a new clue in the puzzle of our very beginnings.
The 2.3-metre work was discovered at the end of September at Karahantepe, in the heart of a complex of some 20 sites that were home to thousands of people during the Stone Age.
Karahantepe is part of the network around UNESCO-listed Gobekli Tepe, a place where our prehistoric ancestors gathered to worship more than 7,000 years before Stonehenge or the earliest Egyptian pyramids.

... Archaeologists found a 1.2 metre long by 70 centimetre tall depiction of a boar, with red eyes and teeth as well as a black-and-white body.
This 11,000-year-old wild pig is the first coloured sculpture from this period discovered to date, Mr Karul said ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Oct 23 - 02:38 AM

Prehistoric skeletons of Australia's giant 'wombat' Diprotodon excavated in the Pilbara Skeletons belonging to a gigantic Australian proto-wombat have been unearthed by scientists in Western Australia's north, shedding light on the state's rich natural history.
Western Australia Museum's palaeontology team descended on a remote mine site at Du Boulay Creek, in the Pilbara, where several Diprotodon fossils have lurked beneath the surface for tens of thousands of years.
Related to the modern-day wombat and koala, the diprotodon is the largest known marsupial to have ever lived, growing up to four metres in length and 1.7 metres tall, and reaching weights of almost three tonnes (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Thompson
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 01:16 AM

I see no leopard…?


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Raggytash
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 07:01 AM

Do you mean you can't spot it ?   :-)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 08:23 AM

a few more pics - NEW MONUMENTAL STATUES DISCOVERED AT GÖBEKLITEPE AND KARAHANTEPE

New Statues and Fresh Insights from Karahan Tepe and Göbekli Tepe

I finally found some leopards! Carving of man holding his penis and surrounded by leopards is oldest known depiction of a narrative scene, archaeologists say


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Bill D
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 09:19 AM

*grin* Did you identify those 'leopards', or just take it for granite? ;>)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 04:24 PM

groan ....


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Thompson
Date: 21 Oct 23 - 11:14 PM

Amazing discovery in the Orkneys, the far-flung group of islands north of Scotland: a beautifully built tomb from five thousand years ago, containing fourteen skeletons of adults and children, two positioned as if they were embracing. We'll never know the stories of these people who were commemorated with such beauty and such technology.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Thompson
Date: 22 Oct 23 - 06:40 AM

And what looks to me like an attack by slavers in Scandinavia during the collapse of the Roman Empire.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 22 Oct 23 - 09:40 AM

WOW The World’s Oldest Human Statue Discovered at Karahan Tepe dating back 11,400 years may not be a fertility symbol.-insert joke here like it is a towel hook-
Look closer and you will see a woven/knitted sweater but no pants.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 22 Oct 23 - 10:24 AM

link to 'attack by slavers' doesn't work as the final letter of the URL is missing

A google search on "Can archaeologists solve Sweden's 150 year old mystery" led to the article, but alas, it's only for subscribers


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: DaveRo
Date: 23 Oct 23 - 08:11 AM

The Mudcat link maker has a 128 character limit on a URL. If you paste a longer one it gets truncated.

My Simple Linkier has no such limit.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 23 Oct 23 - 04:41 PM

& I only use your linkifier, Dave!!

testimonial from very satisfied customer


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Thompson
Date: 25 Oct 23 - 07:02 AM

Sandra in Sydney, here's the link

https://www.nationalgeographic.co.uk/history-and-civilisation/2021/10/can-archaeologists-solve-swedens-1500-year-old-murder-mystery

and if that doesn't work, search for the headline or subhead:

Can archaeologists solve Sweden's 1,500-year-old murder mystery?
The remains of 26 massacred men were uncovered at the Iron Age site of Sandby Borg, where a grim tale of societal collapse is revealing itself.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Nov 23 - 03:29 PM

I fixed the first link to NatGeo, but as noted, the article is for subscribers only.

Here's one everyone should be able to read: Declassified Cold War Satellite Photos Reveal Hundreds of Roman-Era Forts
Once thought to be defensive military bases, the forts may have supported peaceful trade and travel

The program ran from 1960 to 1972, Cold War spy satellites taking a look at the landscape and recording patterns on the ground that are archaeologically important sites.
Using declassified photos from Cold War-era spy satellites, researchers have identified hundreds of previously undiscovered ancient Roman forts in Iraq and Syria. Their findings, published last week in the journal Antiquity, are changing long-held assumptions about the Roman military’s role in the area.

Previously, historians knew about a smaller number of the forts. Dating to between the second and sixth centuries C.E., they were thought to function as defensive military posts. The new research upends these ideas, suggesting the forts were more likely built to support trade and travel.

As lead author Jesse Casana, an archaeologist at Dartmouth, tells CNN’s Mindy Weisberger, they were “places of dynamic cultural exchange and movement of goods and ideas.”

In the 1920s and 30s, French archaeologist Antoine Poidebard discovered 116 of the forts by photographing them from a biplane. These forts appeared to form a defensive wall that ran from north to south along an eastern boundary of the empire. Poidebard thought this wall likely acted as a Roman military barrier against invaders.

More at the link.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 01 Nov 23 - 04:30 PM

thanks, Maggie.

another article form my favourite site - Declassified Cold War Spy Satellite Images Reveal Roman Forts In Syria and Iraq
                     
Archaeologists Unearth a Medieval Skeleton with a Prosthetic Hand ...Historically, while this find is exceptional, it's not unique. There are approximately 50 known prosthetic devices from the late Middle Ages and early modern period in Central Europe. They range from rudimentary, non-moving models to intricate devices with mechanical components. The famed knight, Götz von Berlichingen, is a notable figure from this era. He wore an "Iron Hand" prosthetic after losing his right hand during the siege of Landshut in 1530. Unlike the Freising discovery, von Berlichingen's prosthetic was a marvel of engineering for its time, featuring movable parts and a complex design. ...

Origin of Ancient Mummified Baboons in Egypt Found and Points to a Location for Punt

This 15th Century French Painting Features A Precisely Drawn Prehistoric Tool ... he study concludes, that after artistic license is accounted for, it would appear that Fouquet painted an actual handaxe, that perhaps he had seen with his own eyes. Kangas wrote in the study that Fouquet spent a lot of time painting the stone, and this means he had “probably seen one that struck his attention and imagination". ...

before I end up linking lots more articles, here's the source page


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Helen
Date: 05 Nov 23 - 06:35 PM

Tens of thousands of ancient coins found off the coast of Sardinia


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Nov 23 - 10:52 PM

From Helen's most recently linked article:

The coins, dating from the first half of the fourth century AD, were found in seagrass not far from the town of Arzachena.

They were first spotted by a diver who saw something metallic out of the corner of their eye.

The diver alerted authorities, who sent divers from an art protection squad along with others from the Italian cultural ministry's undersea archaeology department.

Exactly how many coins have been retrieved has not been determined yet, as they are still being sorted.

A ministry statement estimated that there are at least about 30,000 and possibly as many as 50,000, given their collective weight.

"All the coins were in an excellent and rare state of preservation," the ministry said.

The few coins that were damaged still had legible inscriptions, it said.

"The treasure found in the waters off Arzachena represent one of the most important coin discoveries," in recent years, said Luigi La Rocca, a Sardinian archaeology department official. . . . Given the location and shape of the seabed, there could be remains of ship wreckage nearby.

That ship will be a story, if they find it!


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Helen
Date: 06 Nov 23 - 01:39 AM

Thanks SRS. The country that the coins came from was not stated in the article and the markings on the coins were not legible in the photos.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Thompson
Date: 10 Nov 23 - 01:11 AM

Danish archaeologists have discovered the importance of a queen long relegated to wifehood: Thyra.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Helen
Date: 10 Nov 23 - 03:04 AM

This isn't archeological but...

Hexham bunyip folklore continues to intrigue as conservationists work to protect Australasian bittern

"One night well over a century ago three miners headed to Hexham Swamp, between Newcastle and Maitland, for an evening of wild duck hunting.

"But instead of finding ducks, they came across a terrifying creature with a tremendous roar 'like that of a lion' and two eyes like 'golden orbs in the night'.

"And so, the legend of the Hexham bunyip was born.

"That infamous night in 1879 may have become a local legend, but today this swamp creature is now rarer than ever and residents are trying to save it from extinction."

Before you tune out of this article, it relates to a bird which is now close to extinction around the world.

"It turns out the mysterious creature that scared the three miners in 1879 was a bird; the endangered Australasian bittern, also known as the 'bunyip bird'".

...

"The Australasian bittern is globally endangered, with fewer than 2,500 individuals estimated to be left in the world.

"It is also believed that more than 90 per cent of its habitat has been lost in Australia."

There is a dedicated wetlands area at the riverside suburb of Hexham which is about 15 minutes drive north of where I live in Newcastle, NSW.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Bill D
Date: 01 Sep 23 - 10:36 AM

https://www.npr.org/2023/09/01/1191263572/turkey-archaeology-zerzevan-castle-discoveries


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Bill D
Date: 06 Sep 23 - 10:28 AM

Old Roman swords found


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Bill D
Date: 11 Oct 23 - 09:33 AM

Earliest known wooden structure found

"Close to half a million years ago, someone built an ancient structure from wood near Kalambo Falls in modern-day Zambia, at a time in human prehistory that archaeologists would previously never have expected."


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Bill D
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 09:19 AM

*grin* Did you identify those 'leopards', or just take it for granite? ;>)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Raggytash
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 07:01 AM

Do you mean you can't spot it ?   :-)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 01 Sep 23 - 08:02 AM

https://greekreporter.com/2023/08/10/humans-neanderthals-lived-together-50000-years-ago/


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 01 Sep 23 - 06:48 PM

https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20220810-derinkuyu-turkeys-underground-city-of-20000-people


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 05 Sep 23 - 02:52 PM

The Nova episode 'The Maya Metropolis' is highly recommended.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 21 Sep 23 - 06:37 AM

WOW great find Sandra.



What separates homo sapiens from our smart and clever ancestors
seems to me to be art.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 29 Sep 23 - 10:51 AM

The discoverer of the submerged island cities in the Nile Delta was neither an archeologist or a scientist. His strength was in math.
He said he took a lot of flack from the empty-handed 'experts'.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Oct 23 - 06:00 AM

Animal footprints in that area include the giant sloth.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Donuel
Date: 06 Oct 23 - 08:49 AM

Basil John Wait Brown (22 January 1888 – 12 March 1977) was an English archaeologist and astronomer. Self-taught, he discovered and excavated a 6th-century Anglo-Saxon ship burial at Sutton Hoo in 1939, which has come to be called "one of the most important archaeological discoveries of all time".

Other innovative amateurs who were open without agendas were Leonardo D'Vinci and the Wright brothers. Government-funded Harvard experts like Samual Langley could not solve the problem of controlled flight.

An armchair amateur archeologist doesn't have to be a genius to make a discovery. If one could dig down 10 meters they would find more than gas and sewer lines or unexploded armaments. If one is curious enough and study twice before digging once, I bet people would be surprised by what they find. My grandmother found rare Eohippus fossils (tiny horses) in the Midwest that were millions of years old.

If you are spry
give it a try
you'll be surprised
by what you find


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Sep 23 - 12:46 PM

Following breadcrumbs from Sandra's story takes me to the Smithsonian entry about Homo heidelbergensis. In particular the description:
In 1908 near Heidelberg, Germany, a workman found the type specimen of H. heidelbergensis in the Rösch sandpit just north of the village of Mauer. This mandible was nearly complete except for the missing premolars and first two left molars; it is heavily built and lacks a chin. German scientist Otto Schoentensack was the first to describe the specimen and proposed the species name Homo heidelbergensis.

Before the naming of this species, scientists referred to early human fossils showing traits similar to both Homo erectus and modern humans as ‘archaic’ Homo sapiens.

A point to make here is that while it says it "lacks a chin" doesn't mean that part of the mandible broke off, it's one of those early humanoid features. It seems that only Homo sapiens have a pronounced chin on the bottom of the face. I read about this recently, that earlier humanoids didn't have chins.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Sep 23 - 08:34 PM

Our friend gnu shared this with me on my FB page, but it needs sharing over here.

Temple of Aphrodite Discovered in Egypt’s Sunken City of Heracleion

The submerged city of Heracleion, discovered back in 2000, continues to yield stunning archaeological treasures. The city, once called Thonis-Heracleion, thrived near present-day Alexandria.

Exploration in the submerged city of Heracleion unveils a remarkable ancient gem: a temple dedicated to the goddess Aphrodite, shining new light on Greek presence in ancient Egypt.

It's not a very long article but it has a link out to more about Heracleion. And Googling this probably brings up other sites, perhaps with more photos.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Oct 23 - 06:35 PM

Meanwhile, Far, Far Away . . .

Osiris-Rex: Nasa reveals first look at 'beautiful' asteroid sample
"It's beautiful, it really is - certainly what we've seen of it so far," said Dr Ashley King.

The UK scientist was in a select group to put first eyes and instruments on the rocky samples that have just been brought back from asteroid Bennu.

The materials, scooped up by a US space agency (Nasa) mission and returned to Earth 17 days ago, are currently being examined in a special lab in Texas.

"We've confirmed we went to the right asteroid," Dr King told BBC News.

The three-day analysis by the Natural History Museum (NHM) expert and five others on the "Quick Look" team showed the black, extraterrestrial powder to be rich in carbon and water-laden minerals.

That's a great sign. There's a theory that carbon-rich (organic), water-rich asteroids similar to Bennu may have been involved in delivering key components to the young Earth system some 4.5 billion years ago. It's potentially how we got the water in our oceans and some of the compounds that were necessary to kick-start life.

The asteroid samples will be used to test these ideas.

The rest at the link.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 28 Aug 23 - 05:18 PM

Archaeologists discover 3,000-year-old tomb honouring elite religious leader in northern Peru Archaeologists in northern Peru have unearthed a 3,000-year-old tomb which they believe might have honoured an elite religious leader in the Andean country some three millennia ago.

Dubbed the "Priest of Pacopampa," referring to the highland archaeological zone where the tomb was found, the priest would have been buried around 1200 BC, Peru's Culture Ministry said in a statement.

The body was buried under six layers of ash mixed with black earth, with decorated ceramic bowls and seals indicating ancient ritual body paint used for people of elite standing ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 02 Sep 23 - 07:16 PM

3D maps of Swan River lead maritime archaeologists to unexplored wreck in Perth, Western Australia Detailed 3D maps of the bottom of the Swan River have led maritime archaeologists to a sunken barge right in the heart of Perth that has lain unexplored for about a century.

Patrick Morrison, who is completing a doctorate in archaeology at the University of Western Australia, said the find was made after studying maps of the riverbed released by the state government.

"We had seen … some of the shipwrecks that we knew existed, but we also saw some interesting lumps," Mr Morrison told Nadia Mitsopoulos, on ABC Radio Perth.

"We ended up diving one of those after checking on the sonar, and it was a shipwreck … it could be about 100 years old." (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 07 Sep 23 - 05:23 AM

can't read it cos I have an ad blocker. They politely ask me to turn it off, but 1. I dunno how, & more importantly 2. I wouldn't even if I knew how, so I asked google - roman swords dead sea caves - & found this on BBC site

sandra


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 20 Sep 23 - 05:37 PM

World's oldest wooden structure discovered in Zambia, dating back 476,000 years, archaeologists say Archaeologists say they have unearthed the oldest wooden structure ever discovered, dating from nearly half a million years ago, which suggests that our ancestors may have been more advanced than previously thought.

The exceptionally well-preserved wooden structure was found at Kalambo Falls in the north of Zambia, near the border with Tanzania.

It dates back at least 476,000 years, well before the evolution of Homo sapiens, according to a study describing the find in the journal Nature.

The wood bears cut-marks showing that stone tools were used to join two large logs to make the structure, which is believed to be a platform, walkway or raised dwelling to keep our relatives above the water.

The ancestors of humans were already known to use wood at this time, but for limited purposes such as starting a fire or hunting.

Larry Barham, an archaeologist at the UK's University of Liverpool and the study's lead author, told AFP that to his knowledge the previous record-holder for oldest wooden structure dated back around 9,000 years. (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 27 Sep 23 - 02:29 AM

Kofun Burial Chamber and Two Iron Swords Uncovered in Parking Lot Shrubbery - it's just a little round garden, surrounded by a low stone wall!!

lots more interesting articles


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 06 Oct 23 - 04:03 AM

Further evidence points to footprints in US National Park being the oldest sign of humans in the Americas New research has indicated fossil human footprints in New Mexico are likely the oldest direct evidence of human presence in the Americas, a finding that up-ends what many archaeologists thought they knew about civilisation in the region.

The footprints were discovered at the edge of an ancient lake bed in White Sands National Park and date back to between 21,000 and 23,000 years ago, according to research published Thursday in the journal Science ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 10 Oct 23 - 05:41 AM

1,900-year-old Knot-Frilled Child’s Gown Discovered in Israel's Cave of Letters The Cave of Letters in Israel has yielded many artifacts from the famous Bar Kokhba revolt, offering deep insights into Jewish history. Recently, a 1,900-year-old child's nightgown with intriguing "knots" was discovered, prompting speculation regarding their protective significance within ancient Jewish practices and beliefs.


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 10 Oct 23 - 05:49 AM

Coin hoard could be linked to 1692's Glencoe Massacre (2023 article)

The dig uncovering Glencoe's dark secrets (2019 article)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 15 Oct 23 - 08:25 AM

Phallus and the boar: Türkiye digs yield clues to human history The dry expanses of south-eastern Türkiye, home to some of humanity's most ancient sites, have yielded fresh discoveries in the form of a stone phallus and a coloured boar.
For researchers, the carved statue of a man holding his phallus with two hands while seated atop a bench adorned with a leopard, is a new clue in the puzzle of our very beginnings.
The 2.3-metre work was discovered at the end of September at Karahantepe, in the heart of a complex of some 20 sites that were home to thousands of people during the Stone Age.
Karahantepe is part of the network around UNESCO-listed Gobekli Tepe, a place where our prehistoric ancestors gathered to worship more than 7,000 years before Stonehenge or the earliest Egyptian pyramids.

... Archaeologists found a 1.2 metre long by 70 centimetre tall depiction of a boar, with red eyes and teeth as well as a black-and-white body.
This 11,000-year-old wild pig is the first coloured sculpture from this period discovered to date, Mr Karul said ...


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 18 Oct 23 - 02:38 AM

Prehistoric skeletons of Australia's giant 'wombat' Diprotodon excavated in the Pilbara Skeletons belonging to a gigantic Australian proto-wombat have been unearthed by scientists in Western Australia's north, shedding light on the state's rich natural history.
Western Australia Museum's palaeontology team descended on a remote mine site at Du Boulay Creek, in the Pilbara, where several Diprotodon fossils have lurked beneath the surface for tens of thousands of years.
Related to the modern-day wombat and koala, the diprotodon is the largest known marsupial to have ever lived, growing up to four metres in length and 1.7 metres tall, and reaching weights of almost three tonnes (read on)


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 08:23 AM

a few more pics - NEW MONUMENTAL STATUES DISCOVERED AT GÖBEKLITEPE AND KARAHANTEPE

New Statues and Fresh Insights from Karahan Tepe and Göbekli Tepe

I finally found some leopards! Carving of man holding his penis and surrounded by leopards is oldest known depiction of a narrative scene, archaeologists say


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 04:24 PM

groan ....


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Subject: BS: Mac Iain's summer house
From: Thompson
Date: 11 Oct 23 - 04:07 PM

I find this story tragic, this family fleeing to their booleying house and burying some coins, perhaps enough to get the children away safely, but being killed by the guests they'd hosted.


This is the same story Sandra posted earlier today. It fits in the Archaeology thread - or you could start a music thread to discuss this kind of thing that might be the subject of a song (or many songs.) ---mudelf


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Subject: RE: Armchair Archaeologist (via Google Earth) pt 2
From: Thompson
Date: 19 Oct 23 - 01:16 AM

I see no leopard…?


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Mudcat time: 30 May 5:45 PM EDT

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