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BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'

meself 01 Jun 24 - 12:35 PM
Charmion 01 Jun 24 - 12:56 PM
meself 01 Jun 24 - 01:17 PM
MaJoC the Filk 01 Jun 24 - 01:40 PM
Charmion 01 Jun 24 - 01:48 PM
meself 01 Jun 24 - 02:03 PM
meself 01 Jun 24 - 02:04 PM
Helen 01 Jun 24 - 02:11 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Jun 24 - 02:11 PM
Joe Offer 01 Jun 24 - 02:12 PM
DaveRo 01 Jun 24 - 02:45 PM
meself 01 Jun 24 - 02:54 PM
Doug Chadwick 01 Jun 24 - 02:56 PM
Helen 01 Jun 24 - 03:07 PM
DaveRo 01 Jun 24 - 03:08 PM
Charmion 01 Jun 24 - 08:12 PM
meself 01 Jun 24 - 09:10 PM
DaveRo 02 Jun 24 - 03:10 AM
The Sandman 02 Jun 24 - 04:56 AM
meself 02 Jun 24 - 11:04 AM
Rain Dog 02 Jun 24 - 11:49 AM
The Sandman 02 Jun 24 - 11:51 AM
meself 02 Jun 24 - 12:45 PM
meself 02 Jun 24 - 12:54 PM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 02 Jun 24 - 02:45 PM
Reinhard 02 Jun 24 - 03:02 PM
meself 02 Jun 24 - 03:32 PM
The Sandman 03 Jun 24 - 12:43 AM
meself 03 Jun 24 - 01:23 AM
Black belt caterpillar wrestler 03 Jun 24 - 04:33 AM
Helen 03 Jun 24 - 05:00 AM
DaveRo 03 Jun 24 - 06:55 AM
meself 03 Jun 24 - 11:25 AM
Helen 03 Jun 24 - 02:57 PM
FreddyHeadey 03 Jun 24 - 03:27 PM
Doug Chadwick 03 Jun 24 - 03:43 PM
meself 03 Jun 24 - 03:56 PM
meself 03 Jun 24 - 03:59 PM
Helen 03 Jun 24 - 04:48 PM
DaveRo 03 Jun 24 - 05:00 PM
Helen 03 Jun 24 - 06:10 PM
meself 03 Jun 24 - 06:10 PM
meself 03 Jun 24 - 06:52 PM
Sandra in Sydney 04 Jun 24 - 10:31 PM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jun 24 - 10:55 PM
Sandra in Sydney 05 Jun 24 - 12:28 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jun 24 - 12:49 AM
Ebbie 05 Jun 24 - 04:44 AM
Bill D 05 Jun 24 - 09:09 AM
meself 05 Jun 24 - 11:47 AM
Bill D 06 Jun 24 - 08:52 AM
Backwoodsman 07 Jun 24 - 12:52 AM
Ebbie 07 Jun 24 - 01:46 PM
Tattie Bogle 09 Jun 24 - 07:03 PM
MaJoC the Filk 10 Jun 24 - 02:40 AM
meself 10 Jun 24 - 01:18 PM
Helen 10 Jun 24 - 03:56 PM
Tattie Bogle 10 Jun 24 - 07:00 PM
NightWing 11 Jun 24 - 12:41 AM
Dave the Gnome 15 Jun 24 - 06:41 AM

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Subject: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 12:35 PM

The phrase in question - "I forgot my glasses at home" - is the subject of a youtube video for ESL students, is presented as 'wrong', and apparently is marked as such on an ESL exam (whether a specifically UK exam or international, I don't know). Now, I'm not interested in arguing about it here, as the matter is being thoroughly dissected in the youtube comments, but I would like to conduct a straw poll, as there are posters on both sides of the pond who claim never to have even heard this usage - which, frankly, I find hard to believe, certainly in the case of the Americans.

So, here's the question: is this a usage you are familiar with (whatever you think of it)?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 12:56 PM

Yes, I hear it frequently. The location of one’s glasses is a hot topic in my circle.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 01:17 PM

They're on your face - you're wearing them!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: MaJoC the Filk
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 01:40 PM

Thanks for the reminder, meself. My great-grandfather was legendary for bellowing around the house, demanding to know where his glasses were. His wife's traditional reply: "Put your hands on your head."

Skipping down three generations, I used to pointedly get asked why I had two pairs of glasses rather than getting bifocals, to which I would reply: "How can I see to find my glasses if I haven't got my glasses on?"


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 01:48 PM

To be fair to the ESL course designer, the pupils have probably been taught to say "I *left* my glasses at home." This is a case of poor test design; in a multiple-choice question, the list of answers should not include something that is correct, but not preferred.

It is dead wrong to teach ESL students that any idiomatic English phrase is "wrong" because it's almost always correct somewhere, sometime!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:03 PM

I agree completely - but the course designer is undeserving of your charity, IMO. However, the instructor in the video is mounting a most determined defence of the notion that the phrase is 'wrong', ascending to airy heights of pedantry, and refusing to allow that it's even a common 'misuse', and is supported in this latter contention by various posters in the Comments, who, as I say, claim to be quite unfamiliar with it. Hence, my 'straw poll' here.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:04 PM

MaJoC the Filk: I can relate ... sadly ... !


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Helen
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:11 PM

Here in Oz, I have never heard the phrase 'I forgot my glasses at home'.

One of the units I studied in my post-grad teaching diploma was ESL and I agree with your comments Charmion.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:11 PM

Yes. I was in a restaurant with a friend recently and he couldn't read the menu. "I forgot to bring my glasses" may have been what he said, but the gist of it was, he left them at home.

I reached into my handbag and handed him the spare pair of 2.5+ readers I carry for myself and he ordered without having the menu read to him by me. After cataract surgery I no longer need corrective lenses, only close up for reading and computer work. I frequently "forget my glasses" in one room and end up using a pair I've left in another. At this point I probably have 10 pair of them around the house, by my computer and bedside, and the spare in my purse. They sell a good brand in packs of three or four at Costco for a very good price. (In Texas, US)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Joe Offer
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:12 PM

I'm pretty good at not leaving my glasses nowadays, because I can't do much without them. When I needed only reading glasses, I often forgot my glasses at home and often found myself in a problematic situation. And it's not that "left" my glasses at home - I forgot them there, and certainly didn't leave them there occasionally.

But nowadays, my problem is with my hiking stick, which I use instead of a cane to to help me walk with a bad hip. And I often forget my cane at home because I actually can walk a couple hundred feet before I start hurting. And I think I don't look as elderly with a hiking stick instead of a cane...and it works better for me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: DaveRo
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:45 PM

meself wrote: ... is this a usage you are familiar with (whatever you think of it)?
No.

And if someone were to say it I would wonder if they meant they left them at home or whether that was where the glasses were when they forgot where they were.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:54 PM

DaveRo - Whereabouts in the world are you? (That's not meant to be sarcastic, just all-inclusive!).


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 02:56 PM

I would like to conduct a straw poll, as there are posters on both sides of the pond who claim never to have even heard this usage

I am in England and, as far as I can recall, I have never heard the phrase 'I forgot my glasses at home'. It is either 'I forgot my glasses' or 'I left my glasses at home'.

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Helen
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 03:07 PM

Stilly, me too. Pairs of cheap glasses everywhere, although I still use the prescription lenses for computer and reading sessions. The cataract surgeon gave me a choice of lenses and I told him my distance vision is good and I have only needed glasses for computer and reading so he kept it that way.

I guess, technically, the "correct" phrase is "I left my glasses at home" but the "forgot" phrase could be a contraction of "I forgot and left my glasses at home". Language changes over time and locations around the world. Teaching ESL students the correct English is good, but they also need to also understand the common phrases being used in their society. As an example, in Oz they would have to know the meaning of "G'day!" and "Goodonya, mate!" to navigate society effectively. LOL


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: DaveRo
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 03:08 PM

Southern England.

In this case 'at home' - as well as being unusual to the point of unheard of - is ambiguous. Are the forgotten glasses at home, or was the forgetting done at home? Did they remember their glasses, but couldn't find them, or didn't think they'd need them, or didn't think about it? 'At home' is worse than useless.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Charmion
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 08:12 PM

In Canada, most native English speakers would have no problem with “I forgot my glasses at home”. To us, it means “I don’t have my glasses because I forgot to bring them. I’m pretty sure they’re at home.” The statement at issue is essentially an elision.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 01 Jun 24 - 09:10 PM

Yes: "I forgot to put my glasses in my pocket/handbag/whatever before I left home, so they're still there - at home." Or: "While preparing to leave, I forgot the very existence of my glasses; therefore, I left them at home." But now I'm getting sidetracked - I hope more people will chime in with whether they're familiar with the usage in question. I'm starting to get the impression that it's a North-Americanism.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: DaveRo
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 03:10 AM

Helen wrote: in Oz they would have to know the meaning of "G'day!"
When hiking abroad I try to find out what is an acceptable greeting for people we meet on the footpaths (US: 'trails'.) Sometimes I will know or can guess their nationality, but if not it's best - certainly polite - to use the country's language, which can be tricky. In Greece I would use 'kali mera', say, to a cafe owner but learned that 'yassus' get's a more friendly response from local farmers.

Here in England I vary my greeting according to the age of the person I address. 'Good Morning' (or afternoon) is fine for older folk but tends to elicit a quizzical look from younger ones, as if they expect me to start a conversation. 'Hi' is safe in all circumstances - and best around noon. Young people often resond with 'how are you?' or 'how you doing?' - which is not a question.

As for the original glasses sentence, I wouldn't call it 'wrong' to a student - most people would infer the probable meaning - but it's not correct English. It would be a 'learning opportunity'!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: The Sandman
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 04:56 AM

I am old, seventies,but do not need glasses
is the subject in question, correct old english?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 11:04 AM

Sandman: have you ever heard, or do you ever hear, this "I forgot my glasses at home" usage in Ireland or in the UK?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Rain Dog
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 11:49 AM

I was born and raised in the south east of England. My parents were from the west of Ireland and I have spent a fair bit of time there over the years. I have never heard the expression "forgot my glasses at home".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: The Sandman
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 11:51 AM

no


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 12:45 PM

Thanks for all the responses so far. Keep'm coming!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 12:54 PM

(Dick: I wonder if the other drivers on the road are so confident you don't need glasses?)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 02:45 PM

Logically, he was at home when he forgot his glasses, so it is correct.

Robin


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Reinhard
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 03:02 PM

"I left my glasses at home" sounds more as it was done intentionally, similar to "I left him standing".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 02 Jun 24 - 03:32 PM

Black belt caterpillar wrestler: Are you familiar with this usage?

Reinhard: Same question ... ?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: The Sandman
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 12:43 AM

meself, because i have not heard that usage, means nothing, apart from i have not heard it, however i wait in anticipation


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 01:23 AM

Yes, that's why I'm hoping that more people will respond, so I can get a better idea of where this usage is common and where it isn't.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Black belt caterpillar wrestler
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 04:33 AM

I have heard it, but only in the meaning "I can't find my glasses but I know they are in the house".

Robin


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Helen
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 05:00 AM

I think Charmion has nailed it: "The statement at issue is essentially an elision", and I don't agree with Reinhard's suggestion that the word "left" implies deliberate intention. "Left standing" does imply deliberate intention, but "left my glasses at home" could possibly be by deliberate intention or more likely could be simple forgetfulness, e.g. I left my glasses on the bus/at the pub/at the cinema etc etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: DaveRo
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 06:55 AM

No, it's not an elision - or not in the grammatical sense.

And I was wrong when I said it's not correct English. It's correct, but ambiguous: 'at home' could refer to the glasses or the forgetting. In practice it doesn't matter; most people would understand that they forgot their glasses and they're probably at home.

"I left my glasses at home" doesn't to me imply it was deliberate. Rather the opposite, but that's probably because glasses are often forgotten and left at home. Unless in a context such as "I couldn't bring everything. I left my glasses at home."

But I would assume "I left my car at home" meant it was deliberate.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 11:25 AM

Robin: What part of the world are you in?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Helen
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 02:57 PM

Well it is similar to an elision, except that words in a common phrase have been left out but the intended meaning can still be understood.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: FreddyHeadey
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 03:27 PM

“I forgot my glasses at home”

Not here. Cheshire UK

It'd be
"I forgot my glasses."
or
"I left my glasses at/in ____”


Folk using the phrase -
Do you only use it refering to 'home'?

If you suddenly realised you were glassesless would
“I forgot my glasses in the car”
or
“I forgot my glasses at the restaurant”
feel ok?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 03:43 PM

“I forgot my glasses at the restaurant”

That seems more reasonable to me than "...... at home".

Leaving them at home is an inconvenience, whereas leaving them in a restaurant means that they could be lost forever unless you are able to recover them. It is important to impart that urgent information to your companions in the shortest way possible so that action can be taken.

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 03:56 PM

“I forgot my glasses at the restaurant” - That would be a common, familiar, everyday usage in North America. Btw, in case there's any confusion, this usage doesn't pertain particularly to glasses; it can apply to anything; e.g., "I forgot my switchblade at home"; "I forgot my clown nose at the restaurant" - use your imagination ... !


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 03:59 PM

Likewise, "I forgot my Rottweiler in the car."


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Helen
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 04:48 PM

"I forgot my AK47 in the car". Sorry, I've been keeping up to date too much with the recent US political news. :-(

I haven't heard it on TV or in movies either although I tend to watch Oz and UK shows more than US or Canadian shows.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: DaveRo
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 05:00 PM

meself wrote: usage doesn't pertain particularly to glasses; it can apply to anything
Sure, but the object of 'forget' and and context can influence how this potentally ambiguous construction is interpreted.

"Wanna come back to my place?"
"Sure. Doh! I forgot my rottweiler in the car."

Was the rotweiller forgotten when he left the car, like the glasses were when he left home?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Helen
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 06:10 PM

Good point, DaveRo.

Language usage is not as precise as it could be but that is what makes it interesting. One of my favourite TV documentaries was The Story of English which was the basis of my comment earlier: Language changes over time and locations around the world. (01 Jun 24 - 03:07 PM ) The rate of these changes is exponential now in our technological age, IMO.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 06:10 PM

Well, in that instance, he would probably mean, "When I said, 'Sure', I had forgotten that I had left the Rottweiler in the car." However, that usage is a bit of an anomaly that usually arises out of some degree of distress or excitement; more commonly you'd hear, to convey that meaning, "I forgot: I left my Rottweiler in the car."


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 03 Jun 24 - 06:52 PM

I'm talking about what you'd hear in Canada - don't know about the rest of the world; that's what I'm trying to find out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 04 Jun 24 - 10:31 PM

I'd never seen 'forgot (whatever) at home' before & now I have! In an American magazine which is also on line.

I'm reading an article in Vanity Fair - CHAT PERSON April 2023 CHARLOTTE KLEIN Muckraker of the moment KARA SWISHER has seemingly every power player in Hollywood, media, and tech on speed dial. Now, as she tangles with Elon Musk and churns out podcasts, the ultimate insider is running her own show.

Kara Swisher, rocking aviators, AirPods, and a “Lesbians Who Tech” sweatshirt, rolls into Vox Media’s DC headquarters and gets right to work. Today’s episode of On with Kara Swisher, a twice-weekly podcast that launched in September, is about the future of the Republican Party after the House Speaker free-for-all, and she’s tapped CNN’s Manu Raju and The Bulwark’s Charlie Sykes to make sense of the mess. Once the guests come on camera, Swisher apologizes for wearing sunglasses, explaining that she forgot her prescription pair at home ...

but it looks wrong to me - I prefer "left" cos that's what I/you did

sandra - who also sometimes leaves her reading/computer glasses at home


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jun 24 - 10:55 PM

Kara Swisher is NOT a muckraker! She's one smart cookie tech reporter. I've followed her reporting for years. (I will note that muckraking is generally a good thing, at least as perceived in the old-fashioned sense in American journalism, the likes of Lincoln Steffens who was the original, or Jacob Riis. Today you might look at someone like Ronan Farrow for that work.) She does tackle hard problems and Musk is a bit mucky, no doubt about it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 05 Jun 24 - 12:28 AM

I'm looking forward to finishing the article, I've admired the journalism in VF for years. I used to work in Library & Info section of a Federal agency & we ALWAYS had media callers who wanted info NOW! Our Manager or Assistant Director would drop what they were doing - unless it was for another media organisation, so the new caller had to wait a tad when they were both busy!

Reading articles written by someone who had weeks/months to get their story was always a pleasure, I even read articles on stuff I wasn't interested in, tho I still draw a line at the bios of media stars I've never heard of!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jun 24 - 12:49 AM

She is famous for wearing those aviator sunglasses on her videos.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Ebbie
Date: 05 Jun 24 - 04:44 AM

Speakers - I would imagine, in every language- often speak in short hand. Yes, I have heard- and used- the equivalent of "I forgot my glasses at home." I'm actually saying 'I forgot (and left) my glasses at home' or 'I forgot my glasses (and left them) at home.' May be a regional usage but seems clear enough to me.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Bill D
Date: 05 Jun 24 - 09:09 AM

I don't know if I ever heard that exact phrase, but like Charmion, I would know exactly what was meant. I suppose an editor might suggest changing it for a better form, but in informal conversation it would not be an issue.
(I'd never use it because although I can almost do anything without my glasses, they are always with me when I go out... and an older emergency pair in the car in case of breakage.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 05 Jun 24 - 11:47 AM

Ebbie: where are you? I don't mean I'm looking for you; I mean, what part of the world? Are you in Alaska, or am I thinking of someone else?

Bill D: Likewise: where are ya?

I would be very surprised if a North American editor were to notice "I forgot ... at home", which is a perfectly acceptable North American idiom (don't want to get into that argument, though). When I think of the truly egregious grammar and usage errors I've seen come out of highly-regarded publications and publishers in the past decade or two ....

(Btw: Charmion said she "hears it frequently".)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Bill D
Date: 06 Jun 24 - 08:52 AM

Oh.. I'm in Northern Virginia after 40+ years in Maryland and 30 years
being raised in Kansas.
I did say an editor "might" suggest changing it. It would depend on the context.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Backwoodsman
Date: 07 Jun 24 - 12:52 AM

Here in the UK Backwoods of Lincolnshire, I’ve never heard or read anyone use the expression, “I forgot…at home” (or elsewhere, for that matter). My experience (of English English) is that we would say something along the lines of, “I forgot my glasses, and left them at home”, or simply, “I left my glasses at home”.

“I forgot my glasses at home” is perfectly understandable, but it sounds a little clumsy and quirky to this Limey.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Ebbie
Date: 07 Jun 24 - 01:46 PM

I'm in southeastern Alaska, meself. We just say that we're in Southeast. Another shorthand....


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 09 Jun 24 - 07:03 PM

Scotland here: agree with others on this side of the pond, that it’s either:
I left my glasses at home, or
I forgot to bring my glasses.

Scots might also say, if they had forgotten where their glasses were:
I canna mind where I left them, using “mind” in the sense of remember.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: MaJoC the Filk
Date: 10 Jun 24 - 02:40 AM

> using “mind” in the sense of remember

Short for "bring to mind", mayhap?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: meself
Date: 10 Jun 24 - 01:18 PM

Thanks for the responses so far.

Some of you may find this interesting:

"When thou cuttest down thine harvest in thy field, and hast forgot a sheaf in the field, thou shalt not go again to fetch it ...." - Deuteronomy 24:19, King James Bible

Raises the possibility that "forgot ... at/on/in, etc. ... " is one of those old usages that persisted in N. Am. while being lost on the other side.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Helen
Date: 10 Jun 24 - 03:56 PM

MaJoC & Tattie Bogle, I've been thinking but I could be barking up the wrong tree.

Although the verb "mind" is not common as far as I know in modern English, except in Scotland, the verb "remind" is very common. The "re" part indicates repetition of the action of the verb, so maybe "mind" as a verb has less common usage outside of Scotland, but the related usage is still common within the verb, i.e. "remind".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 10 Jun 24 - 07:00 PM

I don’t think it has anything to do with remind. Just possibly bring to mind.
It just has this extra meaning for Scots of “remember”, e.g. Dae ye mind on that time we went tae Glesga?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: NightWing
Date: 11 Jun 24 - 12:41 AM

US here, I'm from the Mountain West (Colorado, Rocky Mountains) but now live in the Mountain East (panhandle of Virginia, Appalachian Mountains).

"I forgot my X at P." meaning "I forgot my [item X] and left them at [place P]."

I would call this moderately common phrasing for most items and places and completely understandable. To my ear, at any rate. (However, I don't think that forgetting one's Rottweiler would be common ... anyplace!)

BB,
NightWing


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Subject: RE: BS: Language: 'I forgot my glasses at home.'
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 15 Jun 24 - 06:41 AM

Never heard it here in the north of England but I wouldn't say it was wrong. Just weird.


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