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Chords Req: Lark In The Morning etc.

02 Jul 97 - 04:30 AM
Laoise, Belfast 02 Jul 97 - 05:57 AM
02 Jul 97 - 06:12 AM
02 Jul 97 - 06:41 AM
Lidi 02 Jul 97 - 06:55 AM
Laoise, Belfast 02 Jul 97 - 07:48 AM
Rick 02 Jul 97 - 12:10 PM
02 Jul 97 - 12:27 PM
Laoise, Belfast 07 Jul 97 - 07:30 AM
Rick 07 Jul 97 - 08:31 AM
Peter Timmerman 07 Jul 97 - 12:38 PM
Lidi 07 Jul 97 - 06:07 PM
Laoise, Belfast 08 Jul 97 - 07:00 AM
ALison 08 Jul 97 - 07:39 AM
Laoise, Belfast 08 Jul 97 - 09:24 AM
Peter Timmerman 08 Jul 97 - 03:10 PM
kiwi@unagi.cybernothing.org 08 Jul 97 - 09:01 PM
Alison 09 Jul 97 - 06:55 AM
Peter Timmerman 09 Jul 97 - 09:54 AM
lidi 09 Jul 97 - 02:01 PM
Kiwi 09 Jul 97 - 03:45 PM
alison 09 Jul 97 - 08:11 PM
Lidi 10 Jul 97 - 07:58 AM
Laoise, Belfast 10 Jul 97 - 09:22 AM
Kiwi 10 Jul 97 - 10:09 AM
13 Jul 97 - 05:40 PM
GUEST,Andrea 09 Oct 09 - 06:39 PM
M.Ted 09 Oct 09 - 11:03 PM
GUEST 13 Oct 09 - 03:44 AM
meself 13 Oct 09 - 11:19 AM
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Subject: Lark In The Morning
From:
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 04:30 AM

Hi everyone

I´ve been looking for chords to Irish songs for quite some time now....

Preferably dubliners or The Pogues...but any others would do as well....I have found lyrics to a bunch of songs but not chords.

Please, can someone help me.....??

Sincerely

Lidi


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Laoise, Belfast
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 05:57 AM

There are a couple of things you can do. You could buy books of Irish songs - there are loads of different ones that do all the standards - Molly Malone, Star of the County Down etc. These usually give you the tune, the lyrics and the basic chords. I don't know what music shops stock where you are, but you could always check Libraries out as well.

You could also try and pick them up by ear. Personally I think this is the best, although the most difficult, method. The important thing is - you have to know the tune. Chords structures for Irish traditional songs are generally quite simple, but within that structure you can play around with rhythm and voicings to produce some excellent sounds. To get the basic chords, start off in an easy key. G, C and D are good major chords and Am or Em are easy minor chords. Sing the first line and fish around for the next chord and continue on through the song. Keep listening to recordings and try and figure out what the guitar or bazouki is doing. The "ear" method is the best cos you improve the more you do it. Pretty soon you'll be picking up the chords to the song on the second hearing.

If you have any songs that you want specifically, tell me the titles and if I know them I'll write my version of the chords down. (There is no definitive right or wrong - everyone has their own chord choices.)

I hope this helps.

Slan

Laoise


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From:
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 06:12 AM

dear Laoise

I would like to play many songs and as you said the best way to do it is to pick the chords out yourself...This is however one thing I would like to avoid if possible because it´s frustrating and takes time.....

If you know the chords to lark in the morning or boys from the county hell it would be greatly appreciated...

if not, maybe you can tell me about a few other tunes you know the chords to...

About the libraries.....here in sweden I don´t think they can provide me with such information, but i will check it out however...

Thanks a million

Lidi


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From:
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 06:41 AM

Lidi,

I haven't got my mandolin or guitar with me so I won't be able to get you those chords for a couple of days. (unfortunately I'm only hooked up at work). I would know most of them by heart but I might get some of them wrong. The kinds of tunes I would know the chords to: If I were a Blackbird, Green Fields of Canada, Willie Taylor, Hills of Glenshee, Flower of Magherally-o, As I Roved Out (both versions), Sailor Boy, Factory Girl, The Parting Glass, Matty Groves, Mary and the Gallant Soldier, Dirty old Town, Fiddlers Green, The Well Below the Valley-O, Green Grow the Rashes-O, Whiskey in the Jar, I am a Wild Rover..., There's loads more. Let me know which ones you would like.

Just to reiterate what I was saying before: I teach Mandolin and Banjo and I have found that if students take the time to "train" their ears they can anticipate chords and even melodies so you can go into any session in the world and join in and impress the locals. It does get quicker the more you do it. It also helps to work it out with friends - and its much more fun taking the piss out of each other when you hit a bum chord.

See you later.

Laoise.


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Lidi
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 06:55 AM

Dear Laoise

so you really teach mandolin and banjo? I have both of those instruments at home, but unfortunately I can´t play them..My father can, but he only knows Hungarian folksongs so he isn´t able to teach me....I only play the guitar, pitty....Anyway I didn´t recognize too many of the songs you mentioned...I know Whiskey in the jar, wild rover, and dirty old town, but I guess everybody knows them....I have just gotten into Irish music a couple of years ago, but since I went to Ireland this past winter, I´m taking the music more seriousely....I have albums from Clannad, Chieftains, Dubliners, dublin city ramblers, Pogues and Shane McGowan.

I don´t know too much about good irish folkmusic, perhaps you could recommend some artists.....About the chords, tell me what tunes you know from the artists mentioned above......

Thanks a million

Lidi


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Subject: Chords Add: JOCK STEWART
From: Laoise, Belfast
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 07:48 AM

I do teach Mandolin and Banjo, to some beginners at the moment. I mainly play the traditional stuff, you know the fiddle-dee-dee stuff. I've only been playing a couple of years so far but I've got really into it.

I've been listening to traditional and folk singing for about four years. I am really into the old type Sean-Os singing. The Chieftains do one of these on their harp album - the Green Fields of Canada. The Chieftains album, The Long Black Veil is the only one I have with a lot of singing on it. They've got Sinead O'Connor singing "(S)He moved through the fair" and the Rebel song "The Foggy Dew", both of which would be brilliant for your repertoire.

I probably know quite a few Dubliners' songs - you'll have to tell me some that you like. I don't know any of their albums I'm ashamed to say, but I know a man who does.

I can give you a Pogues tune right now: It's the chorus from "my name is JOCK STEWART".

So come fill (D) up your glasses (A)
With Brandy (D) and wine (G)
Whatever (D) it costs (A) I don't mind (D)(A)
So be easy (D) and free (A)
When you're drinking (D) with me (G)
I'm a man (D) you don't meet (A) every day(D).

The rest of the song goes to the same chords so you can work away at that tune in the meantime.

Of the other artists you mention, I rarely listen to them so I can't help you with them. I may know some of their songs however so list a few.

As for a few artists, I would recommend:

Altan - Excellent Donegall tunes. Mairead sings some beautiful songs in both Irish and English. The Flower of Magherally is on the Red Crow album and the Hills of Glenshee is on the Horse with a Heart album.

Deanta - they have a couple of CDs out. They do some excellent songs including Willie Taylor, Green Fields of Canada and Dark Inneosghain (Innishowen).
The Bothy Band and Dervish are two more bands with excellent traditional songs.

For English Folk Songs I would recommend Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span. Check out the Bay City Roller type bass on "All around my hat".

When you're next in Ireland give me a call and come and visit me up in Belfast. I can also tell you a few sessions and festivals to go to round Ireland. Summer is the best time of year.

Will post up some chords for you on Friday (4th July).

Slan,

Laoise.


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Rick
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 12:10 PM

Lili

try the following URL for Pogues chords

Pogues

or indeed

OLGA?

which seems to be a mirror to the old Online GUitar Archive, you look up the artist name.

OLGA itself is available (in a form needing Java support which I havn't got at this site :-( ) as follows:

OLGA

HTH

Rick.


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From:
Date: 02 Jul 97 - 12:27 PM

Thanks Laoise and Rick

Laoise

Actually i have a boyfriend in Ireland. He lives in nenagh county tipperary...he´s coming over to sweden this summer..But still, I have plans to go to Ireland again, I loved the time I spent there...I´m looking forward to Friday when I´ll get the tunes from you..

Thanks again

Lidi


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Laoise, Belfast
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 07:30 AM

Dear Lidi,

Sorry about Friday. I couldn't get online to the Mudcat Cafe no matter how hard I tried. There must have been something wrong with the server.

I've the chords to two more songs for you - I hope this helps.

She moved through the fair. - all you need is the following 4 chords. You can add more later as you see fit.

D / D / C / D D / D / G / D D / D / G / D D / D / C / D

Try it!

Another is the "Foggy Dew"

Am / G Em / Am G / Am

Am / G Em / Am G / Am

C Em / G C / Am Em /Am

Am / G Em / Am G / Am

This one starts - As down the glen one Easter morn to a city fair rode I.

I get the feeling that this is not probably the best way of learning chords. I suggest you get your boyfriend over in Ireland to send you over a few of the Irish Pub books etc. They're dead cheap and they have most of the best known songs in them.

Rick's links also look pretty good - I'm going to have a look in them myself.

May the road rise with you.

Laoise.


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Rick
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 08:31 AM

Lidi / Laoise

"She moved through the fair" - one of my favourite songs of all time, especially in the Margaret Barry recording.

I play it myself, with guitar based on (I think it was) Davie Graham's version. I also sing it, but only when I'm by myself 'cause it's so difficult (or I'm a bad singer which is more likely).

Just in case Lidi hasn't got the words, they are available in the Digital Tradition archive.

Cheers

Rick.


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 12:38 PM

A question from an outsider to this thread to Laoise -- I have also been trying to pick up some of the songs by ear, but I have noticed there are some tricks, or maybe slides both in key changes from where you would expect minors, there are majors and so on; and also in trills or scale note additions. Do you know of a book, or some tricks of your own, that would give someone a leg up? Have you learned some rules of thumb that give the songs that Celtic air? I assume that behind it all is some special version of a pentatonic scale, that is, what the usual flats and sharps are that you come to expect or add as frills to Celtic music. I have just never got around to the theory (and have no chance to practice with others at the moment). I have been faking the singing part for years, but not serious playing, which I am edging into. Any help from your newly acquired wisdom as a teacher? Yours, Peter


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Lidi
Date: 07 Jul 97 - 06:07 PM

Laoise and Rick

Thanks a million, I´ll try to play them right away! if you come up with some more tunes to play, please send them here......

Lidi


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Laoise, Belfast
Date: 08 Jul 97 - 07:00 AM

Peter,

You'll have to tell me what instrument you're on. Im teaching mandolin and banjo and basically just the tunes, reels, jigs, slip jigs and hornpipes etc. I do play chords on the mandolin sometimes, but its really basic at the moment and apart from the odd one or two runs I have made up on my own, I suffer from the same lack of knowing "what the hell those guys do" - I'm refering to the likes of Andy Irvine and Paul Brady.

If you are on guitar, which I suspect you are, the first thing is to make a go of the DADGAD tuning if you haven't already. The tuning is self explicit. The bass E is tuned down to D, the B string is tuned down to A and the high E string is tuned down to D. Spelling DADGAD - easy to remember. Chord shapes are going to be different and will require learning but there are some lovely voicings in this tuning and with the bass D string it is possible to do some lovely runs down in the bass on tunes in D and G keys. I know of a couple of books that you can get hold of that give you most of the chords but to be honest I've been told theyre pretty useless. I'll have a search on the net and see if I can come up with anything for you. I only know three chords in this tuning so I'm really the last person to help you.

One tune, I think Andy Irvine does it, Arthur McBride, uses a different tuning. I think it's called open G tuning - maybe there is something on his homepage about it.

For some lovely chord sounds the Bazouki is a lovely instrument. I would rather have a bazouki back me up for most of the older songs I sing. They have a lovely tone and the chord voicings are very unusual sounding - almost archaic.

I don't know if any of this helps, but believe me I do sympathise. Most of this genre of music is played so fast or so expertly that you are left wondering how the hell they do it. You really need someone to show you the tricks and go away and practice them. Sessions are brilliant for that - but you have to get the nerve up to ask!

Anyway it sounds as if you have the basic chords for the songs you play to and that is the most important thing - no I lie - rhythm is the most important thing. You can put in loads of fancy chords and ornamentation into the music but if its not in time - you may as well not try.

So there you have it.

May your roads rise with youse.

Laoise.


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: ALison
Date: 08 Jul 97 - 07:39 AM

Hi

Peter.

Not sure what instrument you're playing or if you're wanting to sing, but here are some of the tricks I picked up along the way. I play various lead type instruments flute, whistles, keyboard and sing a bit too. ( I'm in the preocess of teaching myself the uilleann pipes........ any advice appreciated.)

In Celtic music you tend not to play the same note twice in a row. For example if you have a G followed by another G you will tend to stick another shorter note or grace note in between. so if fact you'll end up playing something like G A G.

You can do rolls around a note, that means you play the note itself (we'll go for a G again) then the note above it, then the G again, then the note below it, and end on the G again. eg. G A G F# G, all played very quickly to fit in with the original note length, eg . if the G was a crotchet, you have to fit all that into a crotchet beat.

You can do slides. Slides up to a note work best. All you have to do is start on the note below and "bend" it until you reach the note you're aiming for. This works really well on instruments like the tin whistle where you can slide your fingers to partially cover the holes. It should work equally well on a guitar etc.

Half the fun of putting all of the ornamentation into Irish or Celtic music is that the tune is always slightly different. In the traditional Sean-Os songs the whole idea is to each verse very slightly different from the others.

Have fun.

slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Laoise, Belfast
Date: 08 Jul 97 - 09:24 AM

Peter,

Having read Susan's message I realise that I'm not sure of what it is you are trying to achieve. I was talking about using the Guitar or stringed instruments to back up tunes or songs - ie playing chords. Susan is talking along the lines of playing the actual tunes and airs themselves.

Susan plays mostly wind instruments and she is describing the ornamentation which is specifically played on those instruments. She is absolutely right. You play the note that is written, the note above, the same note (optional) and the note below before returning to the oringinal note and you have to play it very fast. You usually stick to the same incidentals as in the key signatures but it usually goes along with what sounds right or what is usually played.

On Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar as well as most stringed instruments apart from the fiddle, ornamentation is mainly kept as a triplet. (You can use the hammer on style on guitar and other stringed instruments to achieve the ornamentation in Irish music but as these are usually accoustic instruments it's very difficult to get them to sound loud enough.) A triplet is three notes played fast on the note written. Sometimes if you have a longer note the number of repetitions can be repeated - for example on a dotted crotchet (quarter note). The fiddle, which I am currently learning to play, has a similar ornamentation style to the flute and other woodwind instruments, but fiddlers often use the triplet in certain tunes - and certain styles. Some areas of Donegal, the style is centered around these "grinding" triplets.

Susan, please excuse me, I hope I haven't contradicted you or anything. My intention was to add to what you were saying.

Anyway, I hope, Peter, that most of your questions have been answered between myself and Susan.

Slainte everyone.

Laoise


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 08 Jul 97 - 03:10 PM

Dear Laoise, Alison (I assume Susan is a slip of the mind, unless there is more to this than meets the thread), I play the piano and guitar, but am open to others, like pipes. Both your comments were splendid in response to my foggy, foggy question. The two of you should get together and write "Celtic Music for Dummies" -- there is obviously a need. I am not sure what I was asking for! I haven't had the nerve yet to change tunings on the guitar, but I am now emboldened. I noticed when I was first playing some of the obvious ones like "Bonny Portmore" and "Carrickfergus" that the progressions would do odd things like stay away from 7th chords in favour of the major, and so on. There seemed also to be a pattern in the "blues" notes (if I can call them that). That was what got me started into structural concerns. Both your comments about accompaniment and ornament are incredibly valuable intros. It would be nice if there was a good book/guide/CD package for idiots comme McMoi. Yours, Peter


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: kiwi@unagi.cybernothing.org
Date: 08 Jul 97 - 09:01 PM

Er.. I'm currently doing all I can to keep from drooling on the keyboard! Laoise, would you please do me a favor and send me the chording to "If I Were a blackbird", "The Parting Glass", "Matty Groves", and "Whiskey In the Jar"? Those are some of the songs that I would love to learn to play. Chord structure is fine, but if you could send me the melody notes in ABC format, that would be great. You don't even need to give me note values, just the notes themselves, and I can work them out. I play flute, and just brushed the dust off my old recorder.


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Subject: Chords Add: PARTING GLASS and WHISKY IN THE JAR
From: Alison
Date: 09 Jul 97 - 06:55 AM

Hi

I'll answer to most things, but where did Susan come from?

OK Kiwi here goes....

THE PARTING GLASS

Dm / / Dm C / Dm / Dm C /
Dm / Dm C / Dm Bb F Am / Dm /
F / / Gm / F C Am/
Dm / Dm C / Dm Bb F Am/ Dm

AG/F D D CD/ F F G FG/ A A AG FG/ A C C AG/
F D D CD/ F F G FG / A D CA GA/ F D D A /
CA CD C A /CA CD C A / B A AG FG/ A C C AG/

F D D CD /F F G FG / A D CA GA / F D D

WHISKY IN THE JAR

C / Am / F / C / x2

Chorus G7/ C /F / C G7 / C

G/ E G G A /G E D / E A A B/ A E G/ A A A B / C C B A /
G G C B / A E ( repeat)
)

Chorus E C / D DD DD C /D
- E E D / E G G / - A A G / A B C A / G E D E/ C

Hope you can follow this, there are other ways to write out music, (see the thread on Sol-fa).

I have given you the guitar chords first then the tune. Sorry the parting glass is in a slightly odd key.

Have fun.

Oh, by the way Peter, we also stick in minor choards at every possible opportunity.

Slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Peter Timmerman
Date: 09 Jul 97 - 09:54 AM

Sure, and what would choards be, when they're at home? (One problem with the internet is you can't do a fake Barry Fitzgerald accent on it). Yours, Peter P.S. I'm taking your advice away with me on holiday today, so if I run across any, sure and I'll let you know, begorrah.


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: lidi
Date: 09 Jul 97 - 02:01 PM

alison,

You wouldn´t happen to know the chords to Lark in the morning, would you? Or perhaps to any other known tune?

yours

Lidi


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Kiwi
Date: 09 Jul 97 - 03:45 PM

Alison, Thanks for the chords. That should give me enough of a base to work off of to pick out the melody on my flute. Or, I'll resort to the time-honored method of banging on an out-of-tune piano. :) And don't worry, the ABC format will be no problem for me. I can handle that or Solfege.. yet another way that piano and choir lessons have come in handy!


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Subject: Chords Add: THE LARK IN THE MORNING
From: alison
Date: 09 Jul 97 - 08:11 PM

Hi

THE LARK IN THE MORNING

Chords (see I spelt it right this time!)

The (F) lark in the morning she (C) rises off her (Am) nest,
And she goes (Dm) off in the evening with the dew all (C) on her (Dm) breast.
And like the jolly ploughboy she whistles and she (Am) sings,
She goes (Dm) home in the evening with the dew all (C) on her (Dm) wings.

Tune

a / a g a b / c c a /g a g e / c
cde/ f e f g / a c a g / f d e c / d ^d/
^d d d d /^d c a / g a g e / c
d e / f e f g / a c a g / f d e c / d

Have fun.

Slainte

Alison


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Lidi
Date: 10 Jul 97 - 07:58 AM

Alison,

You just saved my life!

Thanx a million

Lidi


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Subject: Chords Add: IF I WERE A BLACKBIRD and MATTY GROVES
From: Laoise, Belfast
Date: 10 Jul 97 - 09:22 AM

Gabh mo leascaeol Alison, I can't believe I wrote Susan. My Apologies. What I think happened was that when I started writing the message someone interrupted me - I'm at work you see. I have to write these messages on the sly. So sometimes my concentration is not all there. Alternatively, maybe it was some kind of weird magical force...

Kiwi, Here's the chords for the other two songs:

IF I WERE A BLACKBIRD

If I (Am) were a Blackbird (Em) and could whistle (G) and sing (F)
I would Follow (Am) the vessel (Em) that my true (Am) love sailed in (Em)
And in (C) the top riggin' (Em) I would there (Am) make my nest (Em)
And I'd flutter (Am) my wings (Em) on her Lily (G) white breast (F)

There is a nice run down you can do on the third line from the C to the Em using B then A as passing notes to the g of the Em chord.

MATTY GROVES goes something like this.

A Holiday (Em) a Holiday (D/Em) the first one of (G) the year (Em)
Lord Arnold's wife came into (D) the Church the gospel (C) for (D) to hear (Em)

I'm not 100% about these chords - I've no guitar here to try them out but they go something like that anyway.

Hope this helps.

Laoise


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From: Kiwi
Date: 10 Jul 97 - 10:09 AM

Laoise, thanks for the chords. Time to go collar my minstrel friend and make him learn the chords so I can sing it next open mike at the local pub. :)


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Subject: RE: Lark In The Morning
From:
Date: 13 Jul 97 - 05:40 PM


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: Lark In The Morning etc.
From: GUEST,Andrea
Date: 09 Oct 09 - 06:39 PM

Hi Laoise,
I saw that you know the chords for Willie Taylor. I'm a vocalist and new at the guitar, so I'm terrible for trying to pick chords out because I'm still learning so many of them. Would you be willing to pass along the chords for Willie Taylor?
Cheers!
Andrea


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: Lark In The Morning etc.
From: M.Ted
Date: 09 Oct 09 - 11:03 PM

Andrea, this thread is from 12 years ago--best to start a new thread, which you can do by going to the upper left corner of this page and clicking on "Lyrics and Knowledge", then clicking on "Start a New Thread" on the Mudcat Forum page that comes up. Then check back to see what comes up--


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: Lark In The Morning etc.
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 03:44 AM

Oh! Hahaha! I didn't even look at the dates! That's pretty funny. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Chords Req: Lark In The Morning etc.
From: meself
Date: 13 Oct 09 - 11:19 AM

I wonder if the original poster ever re-considered the fact that her father seemed to be willing and able to teach her to play "Hungarian folksongs" ....


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