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Origin: Rising of the Moon (Irish)

DigiTrad:
RISING OF THE MOON
THE BATTLE OF GRANARD
U.S. INFANTRY


Related threads:
Folklore: Sean O Farrell, (10)
A note on: The Rising of the Moon (13)
Tune Req: Rising of the Moon (closed) (4) (closed)
Help: The Rising of the Moon--when? (19)
Lyr/Chords Req: Rising of the Moon (Kate Wolf) (4)


Jon Baade (baade@execpc.com) 19 Jul 97 - 08:16 PM
Bo 19 Jul 97 - 10:19 PM
Murray 20 Jul 97 - 02:08 AM
Bo 21 Jul 97 - 02:06 AM
Dowland 22 Jul 97 - 11:35 PM
Jon W. 23 Jul 97 - 02:21 PM
Kiwi 23 Jul 97 - 05:39 PM
Ferrara 24 Jul 97 - 03:23 AM
rich r 24 Jul 97 - 05:57 PM
Martin Ryan 29 Jul 97 - 03:32 AM
Stalker 26 Aug 01 - 10:46 PM
Bob Bolton 26 Aug 01 - 11:32 PM
Bob Bolton 26 Aug 01 - 11:40 PM
GUEST,chrisj 27 Aug 01 - 12:21 AM
Fiolar 27 Aug 01 - 06:35 AM
Suffet 27 Aug 01 - 06:46 AM
GUEST,Martin Ryan 27 Aug 01 - 08:14 AM
GUEST,PeteBoom (at work) 27 Aug 01 - 08:21 AM
GUEST,an t-Uasal Cathal 27 Aug 01 - 05:27 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Dec 09 - 08:18 PM
GUEST,999 22 Dec 09 - 08:25 PM
katlaughing 23 May 10 - 11:46 PM
GUEST 09 Sep 11 - 06:48 PM
ollaimh 10 Sep 11 - 10:00 AM
Fergie 10 Sep 11 - 11:49 AM
Fergie 10 Sep 11 - 11:54 AM
MartinRyan 11 Sep 11 - 05:36 AM
MartinRyan 11 Sep 11 - 08:25 AM
John MacKenzie 11 Sep 11 - 09:29 AM
Joe Offer 20 May 17 - 03:55 AM
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Subject: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Jon Baade (baade@execpc.com)
Date: 19 Jul 97 - 08:16 PM

Know the song Rising of the Moon? I have heard some rumors/stories about the backround. Can anyone confirm or deny or add any they know.

I heard that the lyrics were written to an old irish air by a boy of 15 years. Anyone know if this is true or not or who wrote it when?

I also hear the the last verse (Well they fought for poor old Ireland and full bitter was their fate / Oh what glorious pride and sorrow fills the name of Ninety-eight) was added in the 20th century. Does anyone know about this? What/who is Ninety-eight?

Thanks,

Jon


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Bo
Date: 19 Jul 97 - 10:19 PM

I'm pretty sure that "Ninety Eight" refers to the Irish rebellion of 1798.

I don't know enough of the history to comment more. I'll be following this thread though.

bo

good luck


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Murray
Date: 20 Jul 97 - 02:08 AM

The author was John Keegan Casey (Leo), but how old he was I have no idea. 19th [early 20th?] century; the song is about the 1798 rebellion, though, like many others, e.g. "The Croppy Boy", "Boolavogue" etc. This one is often sung to "The Wearing of the Green", but another more dramatic tune is in Colm O Lochlainn's More Irish Street Ballads (1965), no. 67.


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Bo
Date: 21 Jul 97 - 02:06 AM

Soodlums attributes it to J.K.Casey (1846-1870) a Fenian from Mullingar

bo


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Dowland
Date: 22 Jul 97 - 11:35 PM

FYI: From the book "Folk Songs and Ballads popular in Ireland (volume 1)" in the back they have small write ups on each of the tunes. For Rising of the Moon, they say: "John Keegan Casey, the author of this poem, was imprisoned himself at the age of twenty and died as a result of brutal treatment. Originally another tune was used. 'The wearing of the green' is the air to which it is sung now.


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Jon W.
Date: 23 Jul 97 - 02:21 PM

The album by the Clancy Bros. and Tommy Makem on songs of the Irish rebellions has liner notes with some background. I checked it out from a library, though, and don't have it anymore.


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Kiwi
Date: 23 Jul 97 - 05:39 PM

Jon - damn, I knew I should've gotten my own copy rather than bootlegging it.. liner notes would be useful. :)


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Ferrara
Date: 24 Jul 97 - 03:23 AM

This is wonderful. About 4 days ago, I told some friends that I had learned another tune (not Wearing of the Green) to Rising of the Moon. I thought perhaps I had heard Theodore Bikel sing it, and I always think of it as the "real" tune. I didn't know whether the singer had written the other tune, though. We all liked the older tune.

One of my friends has O'Lochlainn's book. Now I can look up the older tune. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: rich r
Date: 24 Jul 97 - 05:57 PM

The following is transcribed from the back of the album cover: The Rising of the Moon - Irish Songs of Rebellion by the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem.

"The Earl of Pembroke (Strongbow) led the first English army into Ireland in 1169. Soon English (norman) settlements were established and for centuries there were endless raids, skirmishes and wars. Through all these there was no united Irish effort, and not until Wolfe Tone founded the Society of United Irishmen, in 1791, was Irish nationalism, as we know it, established. Under Tone's leadership Irish and Anglo-Irish, Catholic and Protestant were united in a demand for independence from the British crown. This led to the great risings of 1798. These risingsf, however, were largely local and isolated and, when expected French help did not arrive, the revolt failed. Only in Wexford was there any success.

While people were waiting for the 1798 rising, pikes and guns were hidden in thatch and bogs, and hearts were beating fast. Sixty years after the rising, John Keegan Casey wrote this song while in prison as a Fenian; he died in prison at the tender age of twenty-three as a result of his sufferings. The phrase, "The rising of the moon", has become alamost proverbial in connection with an Irish uprising in arms. The air is well-known as The Wearing of the Green."

rich r


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Subject: RE: Rising of the moon ... backround?
From: Martin Ryan
Date: 29 Jul 97 - 03:32 AM

Zimmerman in "Songs of Irish Rebellion" (1967) says: "... It seems that this ballad was circulated on broadsides before appearing in newspapers and songbooks. Eugene Davis says that Casey had for some time the idea of writing ballads to be sold at the country fairs and markets; one thousand copies of "The rising of the moon" would have circulated in Longford, Cavan and Westmeath before Casey settled in 1865."

Incidentally, Jon, the old copies all contain the verse you refer to as possibly a later addition.

Regards


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Subject: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: Stalker
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 10:46 PM

Anyone know the story behind the tune Rising of the Moon?


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 11:32 PM

G'day Stalker,

I thought I saw this same request within the last few days: Rising of the Moon.

I'll keep out of your actual question ... it seems to raise a few (green) hackles when I mention this as yet another of the tunes 'borrowed' from the Scots.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: Bob Bolton
Date: 26 Aug 01 - 11:40 PM

Oooops....!!

Sorry about the sloppy html: Should (probably) be: Rising Moon.

Regards,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: GUEST,chrisj
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 12:21 AM

Stalker, as far as I know the song 'The Rising of the Moon' refers to the Rebellion of 1798 by the group called the 'United Irishmen'. They were a group of revolutionaries influenced by the Republican philosophy of the recent French Revolution as well as the American Revolution and sought to forma n Irish Republic on non-sectarian lines. Unfortunately for them their ideals were lost in a welter of reprisals which touched off the very hatreds they had wanted to supersede. The song of course, deals with events on a more 'grass-roots' level, where the "revolutionary spirit' hardly penetrated. Bob Bolton, I doubt that any reasonable Irish person would take umbrage a your claim that the tune in question was 'borrowed' from the Scots. We all know that so many of these old tunes were recycled time and time again . Lets just accept that many tunes have crossed (and probably re-crossed) the Irish Sea several times and will continue to do so. Like it or not Scots, Irish, Welsh, Manx and even English have much more cultural integration than is evident on the surface of things.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: Fiolar
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 06:35 AM

The composer is unknown. However it must have been written at least in the 19th century as there is a one act play by Lady Gregory dated 1907 entitled "The Rising of the Moon" in which the song is sung. It would have taken several years for the ballad to circulate and become popular.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: Suffet
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 06:46 AM

One of the leaders of the 1798 rebellion was Theobold Wolfe Tone, after whom the Wolfe Tones took their name. Wolfe Tone was the child of a wealthy Protestant family. His parents sent him off to Trinity College to study law, and the next thing you know he is leading poor folks and peasants in a rising against the Crown.

At least the English never had the pleasure of hanging Wolfe Tone. He slit his own throat with a pen knife on the eve of his execution.

-- Steve


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: GUEST,Martin Ryan
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 08:14 AM

Lots of detail on background and author HERE

Regards


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: GUEST,PeteBoom (at work)
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 08:21 AM

Couple of things - As Suffet points out, Wofe Tone was a Protestant, as were many of the leaders of the United Irishmen. By the time the rising came about however, the UI were in such disarray, mostly as the result of political splits over the AIMS of the group - more radical elements wanted a republic that would exclude some portion of the current residents of Ireland - others wanted a "Catholic" republic, much to the chagrin of the members of the Church of Ireland who were in positions of authority of the UI. It was this organizational disarray which led to the uncoordinated efforts in the eventual rising, which were further polarized by actions of radical elements in South Eastern Ireland. In short, it was a major CF.

The words are generally attributed to John Casey. The tune is traditional, with variants found in Ireland and Scotland. Which version came first? I don't think anyone can tell.


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Subject: RE: Tune Req: Story behind Rising of the Moon?
From: GUEST,an t-Uasal Cathal
Date: 27 Aug 01 - 05:27 PM

Pete Boom writes:-
"more radical elements wanted a republic that would exclude some portion of the current residents of Ireland.."
I'd be more than interested to find out who these radicals were. Don't be so coy, Pete.
Cathal


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RISING OF THE MOON (1865)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Dec 09 - 08:18 PM

From Street Ballads, Popular Poetry, and Household Songs of Ireland, Second Edition, collected and arranged by Duncathail [pseud.] (Dublin: McGlashan & Gill, 1865), page 42:

THE RISING OF THE MOON.
A. D. 1798.
Anonymous (Leo).

"Oh, then, tell me, Shawn O'Ferrall,
Tell me why you hurry so?"
"Hush! ma bouchal, hush, and listen;"
And his cheeks were all a-glow:
"I bear ordhers from the Captain—
Get you ready quick and soon;
For the pikes must be together
At the risin' of the Moon."

"Oh, then, tell me, Shawn O'Ferrall,
Where the gath'rin' is to be?"
"In the ould spot by the river,
Right well known to you and me;
One word more—for signal token,
Whistle up the marchin' tune,
With your pike upon your shoulder,
By the risin' of the Moon."

Out from many a mud-wall cabin
Eyes were watching thro' that night;
Many a manly chest was throbbing
For the blessed warning light.
Murmurs passed along the valleys,
Like the banshee's lonely croon,
And a thousand blades were flashing
At the risin' of the Moon.

There, beside the singing river,
That dark mass of men were seen—
Far above the shining weapons
Hung their own beloved "Green."
"Death to ev'ry foe and traitor!
Forward! strike the marchin' tune,
And hurrah, my boys, for freedom!
'Tis the risin' of the Moon."

Well they fought for poor old Ireland,
And full bitter was their fate;
(Oh, what glorious pride and sorrow
Fills the name of 'Ninety-Eight).
Yet, thank God, e'en still are beating
Hearts in manhood's burning noon,
Who would follow in their footsteps
At the risin' of the Moon!


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Subject: RE: Origin: Rising of the Moon (Irish)
From: GUEST,999
Date: 22 Dec 09 - 08:25 PM

Some history here.


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Subject: John Ford movie: Rising of the Moon-3 vignettes
From: katlaughing
Date: 23 May 10 - 11:46 PM

I just happened to catch the last of three vignettes of a movie made by John Ford, called "Rising of the Moon" which was released in 1957, shot entirely on location in Ireland. The third one, which I saw, was called "1921" and was about Sean Curran escaping the Black & Tans. Now, I want to see the rest of it. Have to see if netflix has it.

Here's more about the movie from HERE:

To make the Rising of the Moon, American filmmaker John Ford returned to his Irish roots. An obscure and highly personal film for Ford, it is comprised of three episodes--each offering insight into Irish culture and values. All are introduced by Tyrone Power. In "The Majesty of the Law," a police officer is assigned to arrest an Irish curmudgeon who hit the neighbor who sold him a lousy batch of homemade whiskey. But this is no ordinary arrest as the old man is a traditionalist who loathes the new directions his beloved Eire is going. Out of respect, the cop eschews his car and walks to his cottage. The two have a conversation and the old man mourns the loss of the old ways and expresses his frustration over the encroachment of modern amenities that are destroying the Irish heritage. The sympathetic cop offers to free him if the old man will pay a small fine, but though the codger has more than enough to pay it, he refuses on principal. Even when the man who filed the charges offers to pay the fine, the coot refuses to give in and stoically heads off to serve his time. As he walks with the officer to the jail, the whole town comes out to honor the old man.

Set at a train station "A Minute's Wait" offers a humorous look at Irish conceptions of time as a train's brief scheduled stop to pick up some lobsters for an important dinner stretches out into a long, leisurely pause.

The final vignette, "1921" features members of Dublin's Abbey Theatre and tells the story of how they engineer an elaborate rescue of an Irish patriot from prison. ~ Sandra Brennan, All Movie Guide


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Rising of the Moon
From: GUEST
Date: 09 Sep 11 - 06:48 PM

There is an Irish language version in the old publication "The Gaelic Journal" that professes to predate the English version. I don't know
how reliable that is. I am leaving out accents. Sorry about that.

Maiseadh 'nois dom, a Sheain Ui Fhearghail,
Faith do dheithnis chughainn i leith,
Inneosfaidh me sin duit, a bhuachaill;-
Is bi a leaca lasta teith
Ta 'gam dibh orduighthe an chaptaoin;
Faghaige ur n-airm i gcoir gan sgith
Ni fulair na picidhe bheith le cheile
Amuigh l h-eirghe na gealaighe

      Amuigh le h-eirghe na gealaighe
      Amuigh le h-eirghe na gealaighe
      Ni fulair na picidhe bheith le cheile
      Amuigh le h-eirghe na gealaighe.

Goide an ait, a Sheain, dubhairt se,
A mbeidh coimhthionol na bhfear ann?
Ait aithnid duinn araon, a bhuachaill,
'S an tsean-ait lamh leis an abhainn
Port feadghala id bheal an comhartha
Port na bhfear ar siubhal is e:
'S biodh do phice ar do ghualainn
Amuigh le h-eirghe ban na rae.


      Amuigh le h-eirghe ban na rae
      Amuigh le h-eirghe ban na rae
      Biodh do phice ar do ghualainn
      Amuigh le h-eirghe ban na rae.


Bhi na luachra ar feadh na h-oidhche
Ag faireadh i ngach tigh chinn-tuighe
Is croidhe gach trean-fhir diobh ag leimneach
Ag suil le teacht na ngeal-shoillsighe
O bheal go bheal do cluinti monbhar,
Cosamhail le cronan na mbainsighe
Is bi mile lann ag soillsiughadh
'S an ngleann le h-eirghe na gealaighe

Cur fe(Chorus)


Thall le h-ais na h-aibhne ceolmhaire
Do sheas dubh-shluagh na bhfear go teann.
A lann ins ngach ndoid 's anairde
Bhi an ghlas-mheirge os a gceann
Bas d'ar naimhdibh 's do lucht ' feill-bheart,
Port an ghlaoigh liughaigh, liughaidh'
Go mbuaidh dia linn is leis an tsaoirse/
Feachaidh an rae, sud i, sud i.


Cur fe:


Ba chrodha a dtroid ar son Eireann
Is ba i ndan doibh cinneamhain chruaidh
Bliadhain an do as cead ba leanmhar
gidh ni n-ar linn ros fos a luadh--------


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Rising of the Moon
From: ollaimh
Date: 10 Sep 11 - 10:00 AM

thanks for the gaelic version, i'm down loading it right away, i've never seen a gaelic version. my gaelic is not very good scotts gaidhlig but i can usually sing irish with an accent.

the spelling looks archaic, which is interesting, but i am no irish spelling expert


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Subject: RE: Origin: Rising of the Moon (Irish)
From: Fergie
Date: 10 Sep 11 - 11:49 AM

Hi all,
As part the 2011 Frank Harte Festival, Góilín Singers' Club are organising a singing tour of Glasnevin Cemetery. We meet at the main gates of the cemetery at 11am on Sunday 25th Sept. One of the people we will elebrate is John Keegan Casey who wrote The Rising of the Moon when he was 15 years old. Find more about him here 'Leo'.

The tour is free and all who have an interest in traditional singing and Irish culture are welcome to join us, we will be heading to the Brian Boro Pub for food, drinks and songs when the walk is finished.

Fergus


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Rising of the Moon
From: Fergie
Date: 10 Sep 11 - 11:54 AM

Hi all,
As part the 2011 Frank Harte Festival, Góilín Singers' Club are organising a singing tour of Glasnevin Cemetery. We meet at the main gates of the cemetery at 11am on Sunday 25th Sept. One of the people we will elebrate is John Keegan Casey who wrote The Rising of the Moon when he was 15 years old. Find more about him here 'Leo'.

The tour is free and all who have an interest in traditional singing and Irish culture are welcome to join us, we will be heading to the Brian Boro Pub for food, drinks and songs when the walk is finished.

Fergus


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Rising of the Moon
From: MartinRyan
Date: 11 Sep 11 - 05:36 AM

GUEST

Can you give more detail on "The Gaelic Journal", please? Looks to me like the Gaeilge version is a translation of Casey's original. Ihave a vague memory of seeing it before...

Regards


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Rising of the Moon
From: MartinRyan
Date: 11 Sep 11 - 08:25 AM

The Gaelic Journal was a late 19C./early 20th C. bilingual publication Click here for info . I see reference to the translation online but can't view it yet. There was , of course, great interest in the '98 rebellion at the time, thanks to the centenary.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Rising of the Moon
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 11 Sep 11 - 09:29 AM

I think it was Dominic Behan did a wonderful parody of this


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Subject: RE: Origin: Rising of the Moon (Irish)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 20 May 17 - 03:55 AM

Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

Rising of the Moon, The

DESCRIPTION: "Oh! Then tell me, Sean O'Farrell, Tell me why you hurry so...." The singer is told that the "pikes must be together at the rising of the moon." The pikes gather, but are spotted and defeated. The listeners are told, "we will follow in their footsteps."
AUTHOR: Words: John Keegan Casey (1846-1870)
EARLIEST DATE: 1867 (reference in _The Nation_, Feb 23, 1867, according to Zimmermann); c.1865 (Zimmermann)
KEYWORDS: rebellion Ireland
HISTORICAL REFERENCES:
1798 - Irish Rebellion
FOUND IN: Ireland
REFERENCES (10 citations):
O'Conor, p. 111, "The Rising of the Moon" (1 text)
PGalvin, p. 35, "The Rising of the Moon" (1 text)
OLochlainn-More 67, "The Rising of the Moon" (1 text, 1 tune)
Zimmermann 69, "The Rising of the Moon" (1 text, 1 tune)
Moylan 117, "The Rising of the Moon" (1 text, 1 tune)
Silber-FSWB, p. 322, "The Rising Of The Moon" (1 text)
Healy-OISBv2, pp. 120-121, "The Rising of the Moon" (1 text, tune on p. 22)
DT, RISEMOON*
ADDITIONAL: H. Halliday Sparling, Irish Minstrelsy (London, 1888), pp. 21-22, 497, "The Rising of the Moon"
Kathleen Hoagland, editor, One Thousand Years of Irish Poetry (New York, 1947), pp. 550-551, "The Rising of the Moon" (1 text)

Roud #9634
RECORDINGS:
The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem, "The Rising of the Moon" (on IRClancyMakem03)
BROADSIDES:
Bodleian, 2806 b.10(189), "The Rising of the Moon," unknown, n.d.; also 2806 b.10(205), "The Rising of the Moon"
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "The Wearing of the Green (I)" (tune) and references there
cf. "Bannow's Bright Blue Bay" (tune)
NOTES: John Keegan Casey was a nineteenth century Irish patriot. He wrote this song in prison, where he died at the age of twenty-three. He was regarded as being very promising, but of course died very young; this is the only piece of his to have any wide circulation.
The reference to "pikes" accurately shows one of the problems of the 1798 rising. The rebels in Wicklow, for instance, had over ten thousand men enlisted to their cause -- and guns for only a thousand of them, and too little powder even for that thousand weapons.
Their alternative was the pike. These they had in sufficiency, since local blacksmiths could and did make them. And they also had the advantage of being easy to use: An illiterate farmer boys wouldn't know how to use a musket, but (in theory) anyone could figure out how to stick an enemy with a pike.
Of course, against real soldiers armed with firearms, they would have been quite useless. Pikes had been a genuine military weapon at the time of the last great battles in Ireland, the Boyne and Aughrim (see G.A. Hayes-McCoy, Irish Battles: A Military History of Ireland, pp. 219-220), but the ratio of musketeers to pikemen had been steadily rising; even at the Boyne, there were some regiments on the Williamite side with no pikes at all. And, by 1798, the bayonet had replaced the pike in all modern armies.
Still, the British were doing what they could to stop even pike production; Viceroy Camden was concerned about the way blacksmiths were turning them out (see Robert Kee, The Most Distressful Country, Volume 1 of The Green Flag, p. 68).
To add to the problems, the leadership of the United Irishmen were almost all in British custody by the time the of the 1798 uprising. The uprising was almost forced; the British were determined to root out all hints of rebellion; rather than be rounded up, the local cells went into revolt. But they no longer had leaders to coordinate their activities.
Robert Gogan, 130 Great Irish Ballads (third edition, Music Ireland, 2004), p. 34, says that in Casey's original, the rebels met by the Inny River, but he feared that this would bring extra British attention, so he changed it to the "shining river." - RBW
OLochlainn-More, pp. viii-ix: "John Keegan Casey's 'Rising of the Moon' had to be included for the spendid air my grandfather John Carr of Limerick had to it. (I hate to hear it sung to 'The Wearing of the Green' -- a tune which does not suit at all)." The OLochlainn-More tune is very much the tune as I remember Richard Dyer-Bennet singing it in the early 1950's (probably the one available on the 1957 LP Dyer-Bennet 4000). - BS
File: PGa035

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


And the Digital Tradition lyrics:

RISING OF THE MOON

"Tell me, tell me, Sean O'Farrell, tell me why you hurry so?"
"Hush me bhuachail, hush and listen," and his face was all aglow
"I bear orders from the captain, get you ready quick and soon
With your pike upon your shoulder for the rising of the moon"

"Tell me, tell me, Sean O'Farrell, where the gatherin' is to be?"
"Near the old spot by the river, right well known to you and me"
"One more thing, the signal token?" "Whistle up the marching tune
For our pikes must be together by the rising of the moon"

Out from many a mud-walled cabin, eyes were lookin' through the
night
Many a manly heart was throbin' for the blessed morning light
A cry arose along the river, like some banshee's mournful croon
And a thousand pikes were flashing by the rising of the moon

All along the shining river one black mass of men was seen
And above them in the night wind floated our immortal green
Death to every foe and traitor. Onward, strike the marching tune
And hurrah me boys for freedom, it's the rising of the moon

Well they fought for dear old Ireland, and full bitter was their fate,
Oh what glorious pride and sorrow fills the name of ninety-eight.
But thank God e'en now are beating hearts in mankind's burning noon,
Who will follow in their footsteps, at the rising of the moon.


@Irish @rebel
recorded by Clancy Brothers and by Dyer-Bennet
filename[ RISEMOON
TUNE FILE: RISEMOON
CLICK TO PLAY
TUNE FILE: WEARGREN
CLICK TO PLAY
SOF


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