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Origin: The Lincolnshire Poacher

DigiTrad:
THE LINCOLNSHIRE POACHER


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Leftish Parody on 'Lincolnshire Poacher' (10)
Help: Lincolnshire Poacher (8)


mlogsdon@teleweb.net 19 Oct 96 - 03:18 PM
GUEST,Mark 21 Aug 00 - 07:48 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 21 Aug 00 - 08:09 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 21 Aug 00 - 08:55 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 21 Aug 00 - 08:58 PM
GUEST,Mark 21 Aug 00 - 09:10 PM
GUEST,Bruce O. 21 Aug 00 - 09:18 PM
GUEST,Mark 22 Aug 00 - 03:12 AM
GUEST,Bruce O. 22 Aug 00 - 03:30 PM
Jim Dixon 07 Sep 16 - 05:13 PM
Rumncoke 07 Sep 16 - 07:22 PM
GUEST 10 May 18 - 01:46 PM
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Subject: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: mlogsdon@teleweb.net
Date: 19 Oct 96 - 03:18 PM

I am trying to determine the earliest known version of The Lincolnshire Poacher. I would like to find someone who can tell me what source they have found that has determined the age of this piece. I love it, but I won't let my Fife and Drum Corps play it, unless it comes from the 18th Century. Thanks for the help, in advance.

Mark Logsdon


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Subject: Reasking the question
From: GUEST,Mark
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 07:48 PM

Are there a number of versions to this song?


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Subject: RE: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 08:09 PM

That's usually not possible on songs from broadsides. It's #299 in Steve Roud's folk song and broadside indexes, and copies by Pitt and Catnach are of the 1st half of the 19th century. Northamptonshire seems to be found as the place more often then Lincolnshire. Search title/fist line/tune on the Bodley Ballads website (in Mucat's Links) for copies under several titles: Poachers, Bold Poachers, Shiny Night.


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Subject: RE: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 08:55 PM

Robert Bell's headnote, 1857, about a copy printed at York about 1776, is reprinted in a book at Click Search there for "The Lincolnshire Poacher"


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Subject: RE: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 08:58 PM

My blue clicky didn't work. Go to: www.geocities.com/~spanoudi/poems/ballads.html or click onto Bell's book on the SCA Minstrel website.


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Subject: RE: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST,Mark
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 09:10 PM

The Lincolnshire Poacher (from http://www.geocities.com/~spanoudi/poems/TitleIdx/titles-l.html)

Apparently the original tune is that of a Lancashire air, well known as The Manchester Angel; but a florid modern tune has been substituted.

Does anyone know what the "Florid modern tune" is? I am off to look for the Manchester Angel.


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Subject: RE: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 21 Aug 00 - 09:18 PM

"The Manchester Angel/ Lincolnshire Poacher" is in William Chappell's PMOT, p. 734, so the other is probably "The Lincolnshire Poacher" on p. 732. T


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Subject: RE: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST,Mark
Date: 22 Aug 00 - 03:12 AM

Thanks Bruce.

Much appreciated.

Dont spose there's a web source for the above refs.


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Subject: RE: Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST,Bruce O.
Date: 22 Aug 00 - 03:30 PM

Wm. Chappell says the tune for "Manchester Angel" was used for "The Lincolnshire Poacher" in 'the North of England, and the site was changed from Lincolnshire to Lancashire.' The last one is the tune collected by W.P. Merick from a Mr. Hills at Shepperton in Nov., 1899.

X:1
T:The Manchester Angel
S:Chappell's PMOT, p. 734
Q:120
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:Eb
(E/F/)|G2 G (EF)G|A2FD2E|F2GE2E|\
(E3 E2)F|G2A (Bc)d|e2cA2B|cde d2 c|\
(B3B2)F|G2A (Bc)d|e2cA2B|cde d2c|\
(B3B2) E/F/|G2 G (EF)G|A2FD2E|F2GE2 E|||(E3E2)|]

X:2
T:The Lincolnshire Poacher
S:Chappell's PMOT, p. 732
Q:120
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:Em
E|G2 G (GF)E|(D2C) B,2 D|G2GA2F|\
(G3G2)D|G2AB2c|(d2B)G2A|B2B (BA)G|\
(A3A2)D|G2 AB2c|d2BG2A|B2B BAG|\
A3.B2A|G2G GFE|D2CB,2D|G2GA2F|(G3G2)|]

X:3
T:The Northamptonshire Poacher
S:JFSS I, #3, p. 118, 1901
Q:120
L:1/8
M:6/8
K:Cmix
G|F2EC2C|G3F2D|F2EC2C|(C3C2)C|F2FG2G|\
c3F2F|c2c=B2A|(G3G2)||C|F2FG2G|c3F2F|\
c2c (B3/2A/) B|G3G3|F2DC2C/ C/|G2AB2 G/ G/|F2EC2C|(C3C2)|]


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE LINCOLNSHIRE POACHER (Chappell, 1838)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 16 - 05:13 PM

From A Collection of National English Airs, …, Vol. 2 edited by W. Chappell (London: Chappell, 1838), page 62. I have boldfaced the words that are different from the version in the DT.

No. LX. IN THE SEASON OF THE YEAR, sometimes called THE POACHER'S SONG, the date or origin of which it is difficult to trace; but so well known among the peasantry, that it has been sung by several hundred voices together at Windsor, at the harvest-homes of George the Fourth.


THE LINCOLNSHIRE POACHER.

WHEN I was bound apprentice in fair Lincolnshire,
Full well I serv'd my master for more than seven year,
'Till I took up to Poaching, as you shall quickily hear,
O 'tis my delight, on a shining night, in the season of the year.

As me and my comarade were setting of a snare,
'Twas then we spied the gamekeeper, for him we did not care,
For we can wrestle and fight, my boys, and jump o'er anywhere,
O 'tis my delight, on a shining night, in the season of the year.

As me and my comarade were setting four or five,
And taking on him up again, we caught the hare alive,
We took the hare alive, my boys, and thro' the woods did steer,
O 'tis my delight, on a shining night, in the season of the year.

We threw him over our shoulder, and then we trudged home,
We took him to a neighbour's house, and sold him for a crown,
We sold him for a crown, my boys, but I did not tell you where,
O 'tis my delight, on a shining night, in the season of the year.

Success to every gentleman that lives in Lincolnshire,
Success to every Poacher that wants to sell a hare,
Bad luck to every gamekeeper that will not sell his deer,
O 'tis my delight, on a shining night, in the season of the year.

* [The tune is given in volume 1 of the same work, page 32:]


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Lincolnshire Poacher
From: Rumncoke
Date: 07 Sep 16 - 07:22 PM

My mother used to sing this.

The version I wrote down is very similar to the one in the Digitrad, with a few differences

In verse 2 line two, The gamekeeper was watching us, for him we did not care

Verse three line three We put her into a bag my boys and through the wood did steer

Verse four line two We called into a neighbour's house and sold her for a crown

Verse five begins Now I do favour poaching I think its very fair.

One thing I noticed - the hare is called 'he' in the two versions, but hares are called 'she', or puss - at least by country folk.


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Subject: RE: Origin: The Lincolnshire Poacher
From: GUEST
Date: 10 May 18 - 01:46 PM

i was born in 1961 but I remember my Dad spotting poachers' old bangers in the woods by night & although he didn't support, nothing would have induced him to intervene - a means of subsistence for the rural poor well after the 19th century, in my experience


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