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Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound

DigiTrad:
HOMEWARD BOUND 2
OUTWARD AND HOMEWARD BOUND
OUTWARD BOUND 2


Related thread:
The Lighthouse - 'Homeward Bound' 'Monday Morning' (14)


Mr Happy 13 Sep 02 - 09:00 PM
masato sakurai 13 Sep 02 - 09:24 PM
masato sakurai 13 Sep 02 - 09:27 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 13 Sep 02 - 09:41 PM
Mr Happy 29 Sep 02 - 05:27 PM
GUEST,Roberto 30 Sep 02 - 05:30 AM
BrooklynJay 22 Nov 16 - 07:43 PM
GUEST,Guest 22 Nov 16 - 08:03 PM
Steve Gardham 23 Nov 16 - 02:46 PM
BrooklynJay 23 Nov 16 - 04:42 PM
GUEST,Julia L 22 Mar 20 - 12:35 PM
John MacKenzie 22 Mar 20 - 12:56 PM
Phil Cooper 22 Mar 20 - 02:41 PM
GUEST,Lighter 22 Mar 20 - 03:13 PM
GUEST,Julia L 22 Mar 20 - 07:22 PM
GUEST,Lighter 22 Mar 20 - 08:02 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Mar 20 - 02:57 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Mar 20 - 02:59 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Mar 20 - 03:27 PM
Jim Dixon 29 Mar 20 - 03:45 PM
leeneia 31 Mar 20 - 01:12 PM
Steve Gardham 31 Mar 20 - 03:53 PM
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Subject: outward/homeward bound
From: Mr Happy
Date: 13 Sep 02 - 09:00 PM

song from a long time ago, part of chorus was 'get up jack, let john sit down'

more words anyone?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: masato sakurai
Date: 13 Sep 02 - 09:24 PM

OUTWARD AND HOMEWARD BOUND is in the DT.

~Masato


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: masato sakurai
Date: 13 Sep 02 - 09:27 PM

Another version: Homeward Bound.


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Subject: Lyr Add: TO PENSACOLA TOWN WE'LL BID ADIEU
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 13 Sep 02 - 09:41 PM

That second one which Masato referenced is:

    TO PENSACOLA TOWN WE'LL BID ADIEU / HOMEWARD BOUND
1
To Pensacola town we'll bid adieu,
To lovely Kate and pretty Sue.
Our anchor's weighed and our sails unfurled,
We're bound for to plough this watery world.

CHORUS: You know we're outward bound,
Hurrah, we're outward bound!

2
The wind blows hard from the east nor-east,
Our ship sails ten knots at least,
The skipper will our wants supply,
And while we've grog we'll ne'er say die.

3
And should we touch at Malabar,
Or any other port so far,
Our skipper will tip the chink,
And just like fishes we will drink.

4
And now our three years it is out,
It's very near time we back'd about;
And when we're home, and do get free,
O, won't we have a jolly spree.

5
And now we'll haul into the docks,
Where all the pretty girls come in flocks,
And one to the other they will say,
"Here comes Jack with his three years' pay!"

6
And now we'll haul to the "Dog and Bell,"
Where there's good liquor for to sell,
In comes old Archer with a smile,
Saying, "Drink, my lads, it's worth your while."

7
But when our money's all gone and spent,
And none to be borrowed nor none to be lent,
In comes old Archer with a frown,
Saying, "Get up, Jack, let John sit down."


    Note: These exact lyrics can by bound in American Sea Songs and Chanteys, by Frank Shay (Norton, 1948)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: Mr Happy
Date: 29 Sep 02 - 05:27 PM

thanks to all! [better late than never]


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Subject: Lyr Add: HOMEWARD BOUND (Ian Campbell Folk Group)
From: GUEST,Roberto
Date: 30 Sep 02 - 05:30 AM

This is the version sung by the Ian Campbell Folk Group

HOMEWARD BOUND

To Liverpool docks we bid adieu,
To Suke, and Sal, and Kittie too.
The anchor's weighed. the sails unfurl.
We're bound to cross the watery world.

CHORUS: For you know we're homeward bound.
Hurrah, we're homeward bound.

The wind it blows from the east-nor'east.
Our ship will scud ten knots at least.
The purser will our wants supply,
So while with life we'll never say die. CHORUS

And should we touch at Malabar,
Or any other port as far,
Our purser he will tip the chink,
And just like fishes we will drink. CHORUS

And when we're hauled into Liverpool docks,
Them bloomers all come 'round in flocks.
Them pretty girls, we hear 'em say,
"Here comes Jack with his twelve-month pay." CHORUS

And when we get to the Dog and Bell,
Where there's good vittle for to sell,
In comes Archie with a smile.
"Drink up me lads, it's worth your while." CHORUS

And when Jack's money is gone and spent,
There's none to be borrowed, no more to be lent.
In comes Archie with a frown,
"Get up now, Jack. Let John sit down!"

CHORUS: For you know you're outward bound.
Hurrah, you're outward bound.

HTML line breaks added. --JoeClone, 2-Oct-02.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: BrooklynJay
Date: 22 Nov 16 - 07:43 PM

Can someone provide the chords?


Jay


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 22 Nov 16 - 08:03 PM

Chords??

It's a forebitter, none of that accompanied crap!

Stanley Hugill is turning in his grave.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 23 Nov 16 - 02:46 PM

It may well have become a forebitter but it was written by William Upton for the stage in about 1790. See the Universal Songster.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: BrooklynJay
Date: 23 Nov 16 - 04:42 PM

At the Sunnyside Singers (in Queens, New York) there is an Irish fellow named Martin Daly who does a lovely version of this song, accompanying himself on the guitar. It's the version I'm most familiar with, and, of course, I've forgotten who Martin told me he got it from. (I believe it was Jimmy something-or-other, but I just can't recall anything more.)

Next time I see Martin I'll have to remind myself to ask him for the details.


Jay


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: GUEST,Julia L
Date: 22 Mar 20 - 12:35 PM

Hi folks- any ideas about the term "tip the chink"?

thanks


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 22 Mar 20 - 12:56 PM

I always assumed that means pay a cash bribe/bill.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: Phil Cooper
Date: 22 Mar 20 - 02:41 PM

And here, I thought it was about Tom Paxton's song Outward Bound, or Paul Simon's Homeward Bound. I was wondering how they'd get mixed up. Good post anyway.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 22 Mar 20 - 03:13 PM

"Tip" means to give (hence modern "tip," a gratuity or bit of useful information or advice).

"Chink," for many decades, meant money; in this case, pay.

So the phrase "The purser he will tip the chink" means he'll lay the bread on us.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: GUEST,Julia L
Date: 22 Mar 20 - 07:22 PM

Thanks- so nothing to do with Chinese ?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: GUEST,Lighter
Date: 22 Mar 20 - 08:02 PM

Nope.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Mar 20 - 02:57 PM

From The Boy on the Farm, and Other Narratives in Verse by Murray Whiting Ferris (New York, 1916), page 104:
When on the train, you first take off your coat and then your collar,
Dine at a Chinese restaurant; get lunch for half a dollar.
To your surprise you are refreshed by what you eat and drink,
You get your fill of sundry foods, and then you tip the “Chink.”
From The Girl Scout Pioneers; Or, Winning the First B.C. by Lillian C. Garis (New York, 1920), page 140:
"Wasn't it funny how we all laughed on the question of earning fifty cents," remarked Jeanette. "Looked as if we thought earning money was a big joke."

"No, that wasn't it, Jean," corrected Dora. "It was making it fifty cents. Why, that wouldn't tip the 'chink' who irons our shirtwaists," and the original laugh was encored.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Mar 20 - 02:59 PM

Oops! Sorry; I missed a lot of other examples. Those might not be a fair selection.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LANDLADY CASEY (1799)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Mar 20 - 03:27 PM

Another example of "tip the chink":

From The Comic Songster: Or Laughing Companion ... Fourth Edition (London, 1789), page 7:

LANDLADY CASEY.
Sung by Mrs. Kennedy, in Fontainbleau.

The British lion is my sign,
A roaring trade I drive on;
Right English usage—neat French wine
A landlady may thrive on:
At table d'hôte to eat and drink,
Let French and English mingle;
And while to me they tip the chink,
Faith, let the glasses jingle.

CHORUS: Your rhino rattle,
Come men and cattle,
Come all to Mrs. Casey:
Of trouble and money,
My jewel, my honey,
I warrant I'll make you easy.

When dressed and seated in my bar,
Let 'squire, or beau, or belle come;
Let Captains kiss me if they dare,
It's "Sir, you're kindly welcome!"
On shuffle, cog, and slip, I wink,
Let rooks and pigeons mingle;
And if to me they bring the chink,
Faith, let the glasses jingle.

Let love fly here on silken wings,
His tricks I still connive at;
The lover who would say soft things,
Shall have a room in private:
On pleasure I am pleased to wink,
So lips in kisses mingle;
For while to me they bring the chink,
Faith, let the glasses jingle.


[Rhino is another old slang word for money.]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 Mar 20 - 03:45 PM

Go here: Green’s Dictionary of Slang: chink and hover your cursor over any of the little vertical marks along the timeline; a little window will open up that shows you a quotation.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: leeneia
Date: 31 Mar 20 - 01:12 PM

Here are some chords for this song from the stage c. 1790. Once in the while the first note of a measure is not harmonious, so I picked the best chord for three out of four notes. It's in the key of D, 2/4 time. Sticks and dots are in the DT.

[pick-up notes]To the

[D] Liverpool docks we'll bid adieu to

[G]Sal and Kate an'

[D]Bessie, too. The

[G]anchor's aweigh an' our

[D]sails are unfurled And we're

[A]bound to

[D]plow the

[A]wat'ry world. Hur-

[D]rah, we're outward

[A]bou-ou-ound. Hur-

[G]rah, we're

[D]outward bound.
==========================
It's a good tune.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: outward/homeward bound
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 31 Mar 20 - 03:53 PM

Where did you get the 1790 version from, Leeneia? Does it give Upton as writer?


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