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DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England

DigiTrad:
ROLLING HOME 2
ROLLING HOME 3
ROLLING HOME TO OLD NEW ENGLAND


Related threads:
Lyr Req: Rolling Home to Ireland (Irish Rovers) (19)
Lyr Req: Rollin' Home (sea song) (44)


Joe Offer 19 Sep 02 - 03:53 PM
greg stephens 19 Sep 02 - 04:14 PM
old moose 20 Sep 02 - 11:37 PM
Joe Offer 21 Sep 02 - 11:15 AM
GUEST 21 Sep 02 - 02:07 PM
GUEST 21 Sep 02 - 02:39 PM
Malcolm Douglas 21 Sep 02 - 03:03 PM
GUEST 21 Sep 02 - 03:18 PM
Frivolous Sal 23 Sep 02 - 12:51 PM
Snuffy 23 Sep 02 - 07:50 PM
Frivolous Sal 23 Sep 02 - 08:20 PM
GUEST 23 Sep 02 - 08:59 PM
Joe Offer 24 Sep 02 - 01:35 PM
Sandy Paton 24 Sep 02 - 06:20 PM
radriano 24 Sep 02 - 07:34 PM
michaelr 24 Sep 02 - 07:56 PM
McGrath of Harlow 25 Sep 02 - 02:52 PM
Frivolous Sal 25 Sep 02 - 04:19 PM
GUEST 25 Sep 02 - 04:37 PM
Frivolous Sal 26 Sep 02 - 04:38 AM
GUEST,Storyteller 26 Sep 02 - 08:16 AM
Frivolous Sal 04 Oct 02 - 06:49 PM
Richie 29 Nov 02 - 12:14 AM
Charley Noble 29 Nov 02 - 09:44 AM
Richie 29 Nov 02 - 10:45 AM
Richie 29 Nov 02 - 08:41 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 04 Aug 03 - 09:43 AM
akenaton 04 Aug 03 - 06:35 PM
Malcolm Douglas 04 Aug 03 - 07:27 PM
ooh-aah 04 Aug 03 - 07:28 PM
akenaton 04 Aug 03 - 07:44 PM
Malcolm Douglas 04 Aug 03 - 09:15 PM
GUEST,Q 04 Aug 03 - 09:47 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 04 Aug 03 - 11:45 PM
GUEST,Q 05 Aug 03 - 01:11 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 05 Aug 03 - 01:54 PM
ribkie 05 Aug 03 - 05:21 PM
GUEST,Q 13 Aug 03 - 05:26 PM
Lighter 30 Sep 04 - 07:28 PM
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Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Aug 08 - 09:15 PM
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Subject: DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Sep 02 - 03:53 PM

This is an edited DTStudy thread, and all messages posted here are subject to editing and deletion.
This thread is intended to serve as a forum for corrections and annotations for the Digital Tradition song named in the title of this thread.

Search for other DTStudy threads


I came across eleven threads discussing the John Tams song When We Go Rolling Home and a few messages discussing "I've Got Sixpence" when the Tams song was wanted, and one requesting Eric Anderson's Rollin Home. I found very little mention of "Rolling Home to Dear Old England/Old New England," and I think it would bve worthwhile to discuss the origins and versions of this lovely song. To start things off, here are the versions we have, along with the Traditional Ballad Index entry.
-Joe Offer-
ROLLING HOME 2

Pipe all hands to man the windlass.
See our cable running clear.
As we heave away the anchor,
For old England we will steer.

Rolling home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea.
Rolling home to dear old England,
Rolling home, fair land, to thee.

Let us all heave with a will, boys,
Soon our cable we will trip,
And across the briny ocean
We will steer our gallant ship.

Man the bars; heave with a will, lads,
Let all hands that can clap on;
And while we heave round the capstan
We will sing that well-known song.

To Australia's lovely daughters
We will bid a fond adieu.
We shall ne'er forget the hours
That we spent along with you.

We will leave you our best wishes,
We will leave your rocky shores.
For we're bound to dear Old England,
To return to you no more.

Up aloft amongst the rigging
Blows the wild and rushing gale,
Straining every spar and backstay,
Stretching stitch in every sail.

Eighteen months away from England,
Now a hundred days or more
On salt-horse and cracker-hash, boys,
Boston beans that made us sore.

Eastwards, ever eastwards
To the rising of the sun.
Homewards, ever homewards
To the land where we were born.

Ten thousand miles now lay behind us,
Ten thousand miles or more to roam.
Soon we'll see our native country,
Soon we'll greet our dear old home.

Round Cape Horn one winter's morning,
All among the ice and snow
You could hear them shellbacks singing,
``Sheet her home, boys, let her go!''

Heave away, you sons-of-thunder,
For the nor'ard we will steer,
Where the gals and wives are waiting,
Standing there upon the pier.

Cheer up, Jack, bright smiles await you
From the fairest of the fair.
There are loving hearts to greet you
And kind welcomes everywhere.

And the gal you love most dearly,
She's been constant, firm and true.
She will clap you to her bosom,
Saying, ``Jack, I still love you.''

And we'll sing in joyful chorus
In the watches of the night,
And we'll greet the shores of England
When the grey dawn breaks the light.

@sailor @home
See also ROLLHOME
filename[ ROLLHOM2
BR

ROLLING HOME TO OLD NEW ENGLAND

Call all hands to man the capstan
See the cable running clear
Heave away and with a will, boys
For new England we will steer

Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to old New England
Rolling home dear land to thee

Fare you well, you Spanish maidens
It is time to say adieu
Happy times we've spent together
Happy times we've spent with you

"Round Cape Horn one frosty morning
And our sails were full of snow
Clear your sheets and sway your halyards
Swing her out and let her go

Up aloft amid the rigging
Blows a wild and rushing gale
Like a monsoon in the springtime
Filling out each well known sail

And the waves we leave behind us
Seem to murmur as they flow
There's a hearty welcome waiting
In the land to which you go

Many thousand miles behind us
Many thousand miles before
Ocean lifts her winds to bring us
To that well remembered shore

@sailor @home
Ed Trickett learned from Lawrence Older
Recorded on Golden Ring
filename[ ROLLHOME
SOF
ROLLING HOME 3

Call all hands to man the capstan
See the cable flaked down clear.
Heave away, and with a will, boys,
For ol' England we will steer.

Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea,
Rolling home to dear ol' England
Rolling home, fair land to thee.

Now Australia we are leavin'
For Old England give a cheer,
Fare thee well, ye dark-eyed damsels
Give three cheers for English beer!

Goodbye Heads, we're bound to leave you
Haul the tow=rope all inboard,
We will leave old Aussie sternward
Clap all sail we can afford.

Round Cape Horn on a winter's morning
Now among the ice and snow,
You will hear our shellbacks singin'
Sheet her home, boys, let 'er go!

WIghteen months away from England
Only fifty days, no more,
On salt horse and cracker-hash, boys
Boston beans that mke us sore.

Now the Lizard Light's a-shinin'
And we're bound up to the Nore,
With the canvas full an' drawin'
Soon we'll be on England's shore.

From Songs of the Sea, Hugill
@sailor @home @work
filename[ ROLLHOM3
Tune file : ROLLHOM3

CLICK TO PLAY

RG



PLEASE NOTE: Because of the volunteer nature of The Digital Tradition, it is difficult to ensure proper attribution and copyright information for every song included. Please assume that any song which lists a composer is copyrighted ©. You MUST aquire proper license before using these songs for ANY commercial purpose. If you have any additional information or corrections to the credit or copyright information included, please e-mail those additions or corrections to us (along with the song title as indexed) so that we can update the database as soon as possible. Thank You.

Rolling Home

DESCRIPTION: The sailors are "Rolling home, rolling home, rolling home across the sea, Rolling home (to wherever home is)." They describe they voyage, the girls or whatnot they have left behind, and the joys of returning to home (and sweethearts)
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1906
KEYWORDS: ship travel return reunion
FOUND IN: US(MA,NE) Australia
REFERENCES (6 citations):
Doerflinger, pp. 155-160, "Rolling Home" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
Fahey-Eureka, pp. 54-55, "Rolling Home" (1 text, 1 tune)
Meredith/Covell/Brown, p. 95, "Rolling Home" (1 text, 1 tune)
Darling-NAS, pp. 320-321, "Rolling Home" (1 text)
Silber-FSWB, p. 96, "Rolling Home" (1 text)
DT, ROLLHOME ROLLHOM2 ROLLHOM3

RECORDINGS:
Capt. Leighton Robinson w. Alex Barr, Arthur Brodeur & Leighton McKenzie, "Rolling Home" (AFS 4230 A, 1939; on LC27; on LC27, in AMMEM/Cowell)
Notes: Silber credits this to Charles Mackay, but I have seen no other support from this claim, and the variety of verses known to me (most of which do not occur in Silber) implies that this is a genuinely traditional song. - RBW
File: Doe155

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions

The Ballad Index Copyright 2002 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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I know there are other songs that use this tune. I'd like to have a list of them here; but if the songs are related to this one just by tune, maybe we could discuss them in another thread. The tune we have for "Rolling Home 3 (CLICK TO PLAY) is almost like the tune we have for Kevin Barry in the Digital Tradition (and exactly the tune I know for Kevin Barry). I know "Rolling Home to Old New England" from the Golden Ring recording - with a different tune. I don't think we have that tune posted anywhere, and I think we should have it.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: greg stephens
Date: 19 Sep 02 - 04:14 PM

Not quite sure what information is required, or what we already have. Things that obviously spring to mind are that the words are attributed to Charles Mackay,in 1858.(I take thisfact from Hugill, "Shanties from the Seven Seas"). Often sung as "Rolling home to dear old Ireland", and doubtless other countries.
Songs which later used the tune include "Kevin Barry" and "Will me soul pass through Ireland".


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLLING HOME (TO DEAR NEW ENGLAND)
From: old moose
Date: 20 Sep 02 - 11:37 PM

All the notes tell me how much this song was liked, and I find it pleasing but not a favorite. Going through the books and tapes available to me I have found Stan Hugills' version, of course, and two others not mentioned so far in the thread. I give them with proper citations, but no scores. I have a score for the version in the "Songs of the Sea" and in "American Sea Songs and Shanties" but none for the LP version. If asked I will make shift to fax any score wanted
A further note to give some dimension to all this. My spouse, aka Mehitabel tells me that her grandfather, 1888 -1965, loved this song above all others; he and his forefathers were British seamen, and this was the song sung at his funeral.


pp 141-143 American Sea Songs & Chanteys c.1948 Frank Shay and Edward A. Wilson from Iron Men and Wooden Ships c. 1924


This ballad, so completely English, is a great favorite on the vessels of all nations. Several attempts have been made by eager patriots to give it a Yankee slant, such as "rolling home to dear old Boston" or to New York or some other two-syllable port but without any auricular success. Americans, letting go as the song deserves, still roll home to merry England.

Rolling Home

Up aloft amid the rigging,
Swiftly blows the favoring gale,
Strong as springtime in its blossom,
Filling out each bending sail.
And the waves we leave behind us,
Seem to murmur as they rise,
We have tarried here to bear you,
To the land you dearly prize.

Rolling home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea;
Rolling home to dear old England,
Rolling borne, dear land, to thee!

Full ten thousand miles behind us,
And a thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean waves to waft us
To the well-remembered shore,
Newborn breezes swell to send us
To our childhood's welcome skies,
To the glow of friendly faces
And the glance of loving eyes.

Rolling home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea;
Rolling home to dear old England,
Rolling home, dear land, to thee!


The Oxford book of Sea Songs - Song 116 p.238

Call all hands to man the capstan
See your cable is all clear
For tonight we'll sail for England
And for England, sure, we'll steer

Rolling home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea;
Rolling home for dear old England,
Rolling home, dear land, to thee!

Up aloft amidst the rigging,
Loudly roars th' exulting gale,
Like a bird with outstretched pinions,
Rolling on 'neath billowing sail.

Chorus

Many thousand miles behind us,
Many thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean waves to waft us
To the well-remembered shore,

I have heard it in various parts of the world, and I think that on the whole it has given me more pleasure than any song I have ever heard. 'It has many stanzas, for I expect that many of its lovers have added to it.' So John Masefield wrote of 'Rolling Home', which was originally a poem written by Charles Mackay (1814— 89) on 26 May i858 while homeward bound from America as a passenger on the Europa. Its eight verses were indeed augmented by sailors. Hugill, who calls it 'the most famous homeward-bound song of them all', prints well over twenty, many with variants. Bob Roberts (1907—82) heard this version sung in the forecastle of the barquentine, Water witch, coming up-Channel, when an American sailor remarked: 'Goddam, that song almost makes me wish I was a "limey".' He need not have worried, for there are versions in which 'dear old England' is replaced by New England, fair Columbia, and New York City, not to speak of bonny Scotland, dear old Ireland and even Deutschland Heimat. The song was also used as a capstan shanty.



Songs of The Sea Norman Luboff Choir Columbia c. 1948

Rolling home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea;
Rolling home to dear New England,
Rolling home, dear land, to thee!

Call all hands to man the capstan
See your cable is run clear
We'll heave and heave together
And for New England we will steer

Chorus

All the waves we leave behind us
seem to murmur as they go
there's a hearty welcome waiting
In the land to which you go

Chorus

Then we'll sing in joyful chorus
Thru the watches of the night
Till we see the shores of dear New England
In the early morning's light

From Mehitabel -
I noticed that every available tune is slightly different, consistent with sailors making up tunes or words as they carry it from ship to ship and can't quite remember it. The "Rolling Home tune #1" in my family is quite different from the two in the data base.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Joe Offer
Date: 21 Sep 02 - 11:15 AM

OK, so what about the tune Golden Ring uses on this song? Is it traditional? Where's it from?
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Sep 02 - 02:07 PM

Does anyone have Charles Mackay "Rolling Home ...." from 1858(?). The original has been credited to this poet, but the Ballad Index questions this. I have found a couple of his poems, but not this one.
If it can be found and posted, comparison can be made with the sea songs given here.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Sep 02 - 02:39 PM

A great version is sung by Leighton Robinson, Alex Barr, Arthur Brodeur and Leighton McKenzie, 1939 (mp3, wav and Real Audio), Cowell Coll., American Memory, California Gold, Northern California Folk Music From The Thirties, item 6 0f 500.
Put Rolling Home in American Memory Search and click on Cowell Collection.
The song is recorded on American Folklife Center AFS L 27, "American Sea Songs and Shanties."
Search (Sorry, can't figure out the direct hit. Perhaps someone can help?).


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 21 Sep 02 - 03:03 PM

Roy Palmer (The Oxford Book of Sea Songs, re-issued as Boxing the Compass, 2001) states that Charles MacKay (1814-1889) wrote his poem Rolling Home "on 26 May 1858 while homeward bound from America as a passenger on the Europa. Its verses were indeed augmented by sailors."


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST
Date: 21 Sep 02 - 03:18 PM

Forgot to mention, the "Rolling Home" audio on American Memory site is the English one (with the verse rolling home "from Australia").


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Frivolous Sal
Date: 23 Sep 02 - 12:51 PM

After drowning myself in the tune to rolling home, I believe that the tune in digitrad is not a variant. I believe it is an error. All other versions are almost the same, and I have not been able to find this tune connected to this song.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Snuffy
Date: 23 Sep 02 - 07:50 PM

Mehitabel

The tune ROLLHOM3 is used for Rolling Home 2, Rolling Home 3, and Rolling Home to Old New England in the DT. This is the traditional "Kevin Barry" tune, and the only one I have ever heard the song(s) sung to.

WassaiL! V


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Frivolous Sal
Date: 23 Sep 02 - 08:20 PM

I am sorry. I played it some more. You are right. It is a variant. The library has found the original poem, and I should be able to post it shortly.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Sep 02 - 08:59 PM

Thanks, Mehitabel. The poem may or may not have anything to do with the song, but it will be good to settle that point.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Joe Offer
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 01:35 PM

Here's a note from Sandy Paton, posted with his permission:

Ed Trickett learned the version that he sings of "Rolling Home" from Gale Huntington of Martha's Vinyard island, author of Songs the Whalemen Sang. The tune is very derivative of that usually used for "Kevin Barry." One major difference: Gale had the song in 4/4 time, not the usual 3/4 in which it is usually found. Try singing the tune as Ed has it, but switching it into 3/4 or 6/8, and you'll see how closely it resembles "Kevin Barry." Not identical, mind you, but very reminiscent.
Sandy
Yeah, I wondered about that. Now I think I see it. Same tune, different tempo.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Sandy Paton
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 06:20 PM

Donald Duncan, of the Greater Boston Folksong Society and active Revels participant, asked about Ed's source a while back. I had forgotten that Ed got it from Huntington by way of Lawrence Older (Adirondack woodsman and singer). We then checked to see if either Ed or Lawrence had made the tempo shift, and found that they had it just the way Huntington had sung it - 4/4 time, not 3/4. Huntington gathered much of his material from his wife's kinfolk, the famous Tilton family of seafarers from Martha's Vinyard. Larry Kaplan's song "Old Zeb" is about one member of the clan. Wonderful song!

Sandy


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: radriano
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 07:34 PM

I much prefer singing this shanty in 3/4 time.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: michaelr
Date: 24 Sep 02 - 07:56 PM

German sailors sang it as "Rolling home to dear old Hamburg". There may also be verses in German.

Cheers,
Michael


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 02:52 PM

"Rolling Home to Saint Helena" is another way I've heard it sung. Anything with four syllables.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Frivolous Sal
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 04:19 PM

From "British Authors of the Nineteenth Century" c.1936, edited by Stanley J Kunitz

MACKAY, CHARLES (March 27,1814 - December 24,1889), Scottish songwriter, was born in Perth, the son of a half-pay lieutenant. His mother died while he was an infant, and he lived with his nurse in a lonely cottage in the country. In 1822 he moved with her and her husband to Woolwich. In 1825 he attended the Caledonian Asylum (really a school), and in 1828 was put to school in Brussels. In 1830 he became private secretary to an ironmaster in Belgium, all his leisure being given to verse, which he wrote and published both in English and in French. In 1832 he came to London, where he supported himself by teaching Italian. From 1838 to 1844 he was assistant sub-editor of the Morning Chronicle, and then became editor of the Glasgow Argus. Nearly all his verses were set to music, and became very popular. It is said that 400,000 copies were sold of "A Good Time Coming." In 1846 he received an honorary LL.D. from Glasgow University, an unusual honor for a songwriter. In 1848 Mackay joined the staff of the illustrated London News, and was its editor from 1852 to 1858. From 1851 to 1855 the magazine issued one of his songs weekly as a supplement. In 1857 he lectured in the United States and Canada. In 1860 he established the "London Review", and in 1861 "Robin Goodfellow", but both magazines failed. During the American Civil War he was in New York as correspondent of the "London Times". He was married in 1845 to Rosa Henrietta Vale, who died in 1859, leaving three sons and one daughter. His second wife was a widow, Ellen (Kirtland) Mills, but she too predeceased him, dying in 1875. Besides his extremely popular songs, some of which still live, Mackay wrote books of travel, history, and biography, and was a good all-round journalist. Principal Works: Songs and Poems, 1834; The Hope of the World, 1840; Voices From the Crowd 1846; Voices From the Mountain, 1847; Town Lyrics, 1848; Under Green Leaves, 1857; Forty Years Recollections, 1877; Interludes and Overtones, 1844; Through The Long Day, 1887; Gossamer and Snowdrift, 1890


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Sep 02 - 04:37 PM

Has anyone found the Mackay poem "Rolling Home"? Would still like to see his eight verses.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Frivolous Sal
Date: 26 Sep 02 - 04:38 AM

The library which told me it had found the poem sent me a photocopy of the song. The words were identical to those I posted above, from "American Sea Songs and Chanteys", save that it "rolled home to our dear homeland". I finally learned today, their source was "The Folksinger's Workbook" compiled and edited by Irwin and Fred Silber. I felt rather foolish. I am sure that Hugill is a thorough researcher and he was not able to answer the question. I have requested the books above by Mackay, but they will come by inter-library loan, which will probably take weeks. I am still interested in the origin of the tune. Mackay's history doesn't indicate whether the words, if they are his, were set to a new melody or an old one.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST,Storyteller
Date: 26 Sep 02 - 08:16 AM

I've just posted the words to a WWII song (but which is thought to be much older) here This Old Coat of Mine which includes the chorus:-

Roll on the boat that takes me home

It isn't related directly to any of the other songs discussed above, but it is interesting in this context perhaps.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLLING HOME (TO OLD NEW ENGLAND)
From: Frivolous Sal
Date: 04 Oct 02 - 06:49 PM

From Shantymen and Shantyboys by William Doerflinger c.1951;
pp. 155 – 160:

Though of British origin, the next song was often heard on American vessels as well. Richard Maitland, For example, always said "Rolling Home" was his favorite of them all. It was simple enough for American sailormen to change the traditional words "Merry England" in the strong, swelling chorus to "dear New England" or "Young America" or to sing about

Rolling home to New York City
Those Bowery girls to see

Or as other shellbacks sang of rolling home to "Dear Old Scotland" or "good old Ireland."
"Rolling Home" was, first and foremost, a song rather than a shanty. Such was its well-deserved popularity at sea, however, that it was sometimes sung at the capstan, when homeward bound, according to Captain Patrick Tayluer. His statement is confirmed by several other writers on shantying. The song was perhaps most frequently used in that manner on British ships leaving Australian ports.

        Rolling Home(1) ¾ time

1 Call all hands to man the capstan
See your cable it runs clear
And we'll heave and heave together
For New England home we'll steer

Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to old New England
Rolling home dear land to thee

2 Up aloft amid the rigging
Blows the wild and rushing gale
Like a monsoon in the springtime
Filling out each well known sail

3 And the waves we leave behind us
Seem to murmur as they flow
"There's a hearty welcome waiting
In the land to which you go!"

4 And the girl you love so dearly,
She'll be constant, kind and true.
When you press her to your bosom,
All your fondest vows renew.

5 To Australia's lovely daughters
We have bid a fond adieu.
And we'll ne'er forget the hours
That we've happ'ly spent with you.

6 Twice five thousand miles behind us,
Twice five thousand miles before
Now we're passing Saint Helena,
Heading for New England shore.
(Or, Heading for Columbia's shore)

7 And we'll sing in joyful chorus
In the watches of the night,
And we'll sight the shores of New England
When the dawn brings in the light.
(Or, when the gray dawn brings the light)

That was Dick Maitland's version. Sometimes at the end he added:


8 So heave away and with a will, boys,
For New England we will steer,
For the girls they are a-waiting
For us there upon the pier.

Here are two stanzas from the version of a man who learned "Rolling Home" under the Red Duster:

Behind we leave you our best wishes
As we leave your rocky shores.
We are bound to Merry England
And return to you no more.

Eastward on and eastward ever
To the rising of the sun;
Homeward ever, homeward ever
To the land where I was born.

The interesting and unusual version that follows, departing from the regular pattern, works a clipper home from Melbourne or Sydney to London, by way of Cape Horn. The singer, Captain Patrick Tayluer, had spent considerable time in Australia. This solo pattern, which I have never heard used by anyone else, probably goes back to the famous British wool clippers. The same is doubtless true of the song as a whole. Those greyhounds of the seas, some of which were built in the United States and Canada, did magnificent work on the Australia run from 1851 on.
The verses relate the colorful details of the voyage. They tell of the preparations for sea, the passing of Port Philip Heads or Sydney Heads, the hauling in of the towrope. In stanza two appears the question of making the homeward passage by way of Cape Horn, as was now becoming a common practice, thanks to the scientific study of ocean winds, rather than around the Cape of Good Hope, the route formerly customary. The singer touches on the ordeal off the Horn. He alludes to the welcome change in weather after the Roaring Forties of the South Atlantic, with their leaden skies, for sunny latitudes where steady trade winds blew and the shadows of the rigging etched the whiteness of the decks. Then the proud clipper storming home; the raising of the well remembered Channel lights as she sails through the chops of the Channel and races on past the Lizard, Start, Portland, and Dover to the Nore and the final tow up the Thames to London.
Figures in parentheses refer to the explanatory data, given by the singer, below the song. In the choruses, Captain Tayluer often used the words "sailing home," place of "rolling home."

Rolling Home (II) 3/4 time

1 Now, it takes all 'ands to man the capstan,
Mister, see your cables clear.
Soon you'll be sailing 'omeward bound, sir,
And for the channel you will steer.
See your sheets and clewlines free, sir,
All you buntlines over'auled.
Are the sheer-poles and gear all ready?
Soon for Old England we will steer.

2 Soon we'll be leaving dear Australia,
And for old England we'll give a cheer!
We'll be leaving you black-eyed damsels
As we loved when free and near.
When our sails are set, and to windward
Lies a westerly waind so clear, (1)
"Are we going around the Cape, sir,
Or for the eastward 'round the Horn we'll steer?"

3 Good-bye, Heads, and let us leave you!
Haul your tow-rope all inboard.
The heads are straightaway behind you,
And an easterly course you'll steer.
Mister, set your stu'n's'ls quickly,
Gather up all the waind you can.
It must be done within the seventies,
Or soon we will lose our lead. (2)

4 Mister, sweat all your weather braces!
Look, the waind is gathering, and—and soon
'We'll be rounding the Diego Raminerees
And around Cape Horn we'll steer.
Then we'll see the dear Atlantic,
And our head is pointed home,
And our lee cathead is under,
And to the land, good God, let her go!

5 Soon well be down beneath the islands.
Oh, hark, she roars—and the riggin's crack!
She must he easily doing seventeen,
And to the waind is rolling home.
Next we'll hear the Forties roaring,
When sun rays and shadows near,
And the Chops are slowly rising
And the strings are pulling clear. (3)

6 Ah, there's the Lizard light is shining,
And we're bound down now to the Nore!
Everything is full and drawing,
BY the Start we soon will clear.
Down to Eddystone and Portland,
By the Bill (4) we'll race along.
Now we're bound down to clear Dover
And there you will see what we'll sheer

7 Down with your sails and drop your anchor,
Mister, see your cable is clear!
Give her fourteen good long fathoms-
And for the tugboat we will steer!(5)

        Chorus

Rolling 'ome, rolling 'ome
Rolling 'ome across the sea
Rolling 'ome to Merry England
Where kind friends do await for me!

Notes:(1) This refers to the strong steady westerlies to be picked up in the Southern Pacific Ocean. (2) The passage must be made in less than eighty days says the captain, with confidence. (3) Allusion to the old sailor saying, "The girls have got hold of the tow rope." (4) Portland Bill (5) The ship anchors and awaits a tug to tow her upriver to London. From now on, the voyage really over, the only steering that remains to be done is to follow the towboat.


In all the stanzas the second and tenth measures are sung very much alike. There is enough difference to indicate, yet the notation may make the two measures seem more different than they actually are as Tayluer sings them. The tenth measure should he slowed considerably over the last three notes and picked up again immediately. Tayluer rolls over this phrase, so to speak.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLLING HOME (TO MERRY ENGLAND) (Mackay)
From: Richie
Date: 29 Nov 02 - 12:14 AM

Here's the poem by Mackay (1858), that was requested on this thread.
However, no one has found the origin of the tune. "Bingen on the Rhine" a poem by Caroline Norton (Levy), was set to music circa 1847 with the same tune, which was later used for "Kevin Barry." Did Mackay write the tune or is it an exsisting tune from the British Isles?

Rolling Home
by Charles Mackay

Up aloft amid the rigging blows the fresh exulting gale,
Strong as springtime in the blossoms filling out each blooming sail;
And the wild waves, cleft behind us, seem to murmur as they flow,
"There are kindly hearts that wait you in the land to which ye go."

Rolling home, rolling home, rolling home, dear land to thee,
Rolling home to merry England, rolling home across the sea.

Twice a thousand miles behind us, and a thousand miles before,
Ancient Ocean heaves to bear us to the well-remembered shore;
New-born breezes swell to waft us to our childhood's balmy skies,
To the glow of friendly faces, to the light of loving eyes.

Every motion of the vessel, every dip of mast or spar,
Is a dance and a rejoicing, and a promise from afar;
And we live the light above us, as it tips the waves around,
All the more because ere coming, it has beam'd on English ground.

And 'tis nearer, ever nearer, to the rising of the morn,
And 'tis nearer, ever eastward, to the land where we were born;
And we'll sing in joyful chorus through the watches of the night;
And shall see the joys of England at the dawning of the light.

Rolling home to little England - though so little yet so great -
With her face of sunny beauty, and her heart as strong as Fate,
With her men of honest nature, with her women good and fair,
With her courage and her virtue that can do as well as bear.

-Richie


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Charley Noble
Date: 29 Nov 02 - 09:44 AM

Good work! I'd always assumed this old poem was a traditional sea shanty that dated back to the early 1800's. Nice to see the variations that folks have dug up.

I especially like Captain Tayluer's verses; the "Heads" referred to are, of course, the two heads guarding the entrance to Sydney Harbor.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Richie
Date: 29 Nov 02 - 10:45 AM

Here are some of my notes on "Rolling Home" which has an extensive reach into many other areas. Comments?

NOTES: "The Legend of the Rebel Soldier", was arranged /written in 1963 by the bluegrass singer Charlie Moore, who also recorded it along with other groups, including The Country Gentlemen, for which it became a signature song. According to Charlie Moore, the melody is based on the Irish fiddle tune and ballad "Kevin Barry." Moore's lyrics closely resembles the US folk song, "Soldier from Missouri,"and also "Shall my Soul Pass through Old Ireland?"

"The Legend of the Rebel Soldier" is a shorter and simpler rewrite of "Bingen on the Rhine," a poem by Caroline Norton (1808-1877) and published circa 1847. According to Norm Cohen, "Lady Caroline Norton's Bingen on the Rhine" was set to music by Judson I. Hutchinson of the Hutchinson Family. It appears that Judson I. Hutchinson of the Hutchinson Family used the melody of "Rolling Home to Dear Old England" to set to the "Bingen on the Rhine," lyrics.

"Bingen on the Rhine" spawned a number of rewrites (parodies) including "In the Libby Prison Sadly" by John Ross Dix in 1864 (which was used in the Civil War), the "Soldier from Missouri," and in the 1920's "Shall my Soul Pass through Old Ireland" as well as "Kevin Barry." With so many rewrites and different versions it's hard to tell which version Charlie Moore based his rewrite of "The Legend of the Rebel Soldier" but it was probably "Shall my Soul Pass through Old Ireland?"

The tune "Rolling Home to Dear Old England" is the melody for the "Kevin Barry" song. John Masefield wrote of 'Rolling Home', which was originally a poem written by Charles Mackay (1814— 89) on May 26, 1858 while homeward bound from America as a passenger on the Europa. Its eight verses were indeed augmented by sailors. Hugill, who calls it 'the most famous homeward-bound song of them all', prints well over twenty, many with variants. The song was also used as a capstan shanty. Roy Palmer (The Oxford Book of Sea Songs, re-issued as Boxing the Compass, 2001) also states that Charles MacKay (1814-1889) wrote his poem Rolling Home "on May 26,1858 while homeward bound from America as a passenger on the Europa. Its verses were indeed augmented by sailors." It is not clear whether Mackay wrote the tune or it was an older British melody. The song "Shall my Soul Pass through Old Ireland," is a shorter and simpler rewrite of "Bingen on the Rhine", a poem by Caroline Norton (1808-1877) and published between (1847-1859). "Shall my Soul Pass" was written closer to the date of publication of Kevin Barry, to commemorate all Irish prisoners in British prisons and the death of Terence McSwiney, who starved himself to death in a British prison, in 1920.

Terence McSwiney (starvation) and Kevin Barry (hanging) died within one week of each other in 1920. So the "Kevin Barry" song is definitely 1920, or later in the same decade. The song "Shall my Soul" is said to commemorate Terence McSwiney.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Richie
Date: 29 Nov 02 - 08:41 PM

Anyone have any info on the origin of the melody used for "Rolling Home"?

According to McGrath from Harlow in the "Legend of the Rebel Soldier" thread (which I can't access now) the "Rolling Home" melody is the same is used for "Kevin Barry" and "Shall my Soul Pass through Old Ireland?" Does that include "Bingen on the Rhine"?

Any corroboration?

Richie


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 09:43 AM

Just heard this song on Saturday, with the destination set for Nova Scotia. Irish Singer Jimmy Sweeney who now lives in Nova Scotia was saying it is 150 years old.

Now with this information we'll ask him for more details on where he heard/learned it as Nova Scotia, and how he ascertained the date.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: akenaton
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 06:35 PM

Iv just been listening to a live version by Archie Fisher and Garnet Rogers...Rolling home to Caledonia..Dear old England dosnt have the right feel to it. Basically its a nationalistic song the chorus bring ing out great emotion in the audiance.    For some reason the English dont seem to have the same emotional attachment to their homeland as the Scots or Irish...


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 07:27 PM

Oh, they do; but only when abroad. It isn't about nationalism, but about nostalgia. The original author, though a Scot, knew fine well what he was doing when he wrote "England". It was his home at the time, quite apart from anything else, and after a few years in the USA he was undoubtedly looking forward to getting back there.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: ooh-aah
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 07:28 PM

Gosh, you really ARE stirring the possum, aren't you! We just don't go on and on and on and on (and on and on) about it, at endless and tedious length like the Celtic (loony) fringe. 'The deepest love\Is in the fewest words', and all that.
   I've been in Australia since I was four but still consider myself an Englishman. What sane person would want to be anything else, if given the chance?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: akenaton
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 07:44 PM

Well...Considering the number of English people who have moved beside me.    Seems they cant wait to get out...Ake


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 09:15 PM

Well, my grandfathers showed no sign of wanting to go back to Scotland or New Zealand (their respective places of birth) but that doesn't mean they didn't miss the old places. Subjective value-judgements of that sort are anachronistic and irrelevant. Good job this is an edited thread, which can be pared down later to information that's actually useful.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 09:47 PM

Richie, where did you find the poem by MacKay?
Is it in "Voices From the Crowd?" (A collection of his poetry).


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 04 Aug 03 - 11:45 PM

Guest Q, here is one of the web-pages giving this information.

Poetry of the Sea - Rolling Home


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 05 Aug 03 - 01:11 PM

Still trying to find out where the poem was first published, and if it occurs in the volume of his collected poems ("Voices From The Crowd"). There are several websites without documentation, like the one posted by George Seto.
Was the "original" MacKay poem ever set to music?

What was the first shanty "revision" set to the tune now generally used? -The tune is at the Contemplator. Rolling Home to dear old

The Contemplator has an error in one of the verses (correct in one of the "Australian" versions above) of the England to New England version that they print:

See your sheets and "crew" lines free, sir,- should be clew lines.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 05 Aug 03 - 01:54 PM

Guest Q, Have you tried e-mailing the person at that web-site I sent you to? Lesley Nelson, the Contemplator would be happy to make the corrections. Again, you'd have to e-mail her directly.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: ribkie
Date: 05 Aug 03 - 05:21 PM

Just read a ridiculous comment made by akenaton, you know the one!!! If I didn't know better I'd swear he'd even make an a**e of floortiling! You would expect something more intelligent from a fireplace specialist!


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 13 Aug 03 - 05:26 PM

The poem "Rolling Home" (written 1858, see posts above) was published in "Songs for Music,." which was revised and added to more than once. The second edition came out sometime after Nov. 1858, but without a copy, I don't know if the poem is in that printing. It is in the 1876 revision. All of his poems up to 1876 are collected in The Lansdowne Poets, "The Poetical Works of Charles Mackay," 1876, F. Warne and Co., London. "Rolling Home" pp. 610-611. Words as posted by Richie.
The volume contains a number of songs extolling or full of longing for England.

He was a popular poet at the time; his verses inspiring poets in America as well as England. The poem "Up the Stream! Through the Wood! " sourced the idea for "Over the River and Through the Woods, to Grandma's House we go!," originally "The New-England Boys Song About Thanksgiving Day" (Thread 41403).


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Subject: ADD Version: ROLLING HOME
From: Lighter
Date: 30 Sep 04 - 07:28 PM

Here is the version sung in 1939 by Captain Leighton Robinson and others, as referred to in a post above:

Rolling Home

Pipe all hand to man the windlass,
See our cable run down clear;
As we heave away our anchor,
For old England's shores we'll steer.

CHORUS:

       Rolling home! Rolling home!
       Rolling home across the sea!
       Rolling home to Merry England!
       Rolling home, dear land, to thee

Man your bars! Heave with a will, lads!
Every hand that can, clap on!
As we heave away our anchor,
We will sing this well known song.

Fare you well, Australia's daughters,
Fare you well, sweet foreign shore!
For we're bound across the waters,
Homeward bound again once more!

Up aloft amongst the rigging,
Where the stormy winds do blow -
Oh, the waves, as they rush past us,
Seem to murmur as they go.

Twice ten thousand miles behind us,
Twice ten thousand miles we've gone,
Oh, the girls in dear old England
Gaily call us way [sic] along.


(The logic, if not the sentiment, in stanza 4 is dubious.)


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLLING HOME
From: radriano
Date: 01 Oct 04 - 11:24 AM

An interesting version of ROLLING HOME can be found in "Windjammers: Songs of the Great Lakes Sailors." The song is shown in 3/4 time here.

ROLLING HOME
Walton, I.H., editor, 2002, Windjammers, Songs of the Great Lakes Sailors
Capstan shanty

When the Mate calls up all hands
To man the capstan, Walk 'er round!
We'll heave 'er up, lads, with a will
For we are homeward bound!

Chorus:
Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to old Chicago
Rolling home, old town, to thee

We'll leave the ladies now, my lads
Them and our money both forsake
We'll weigh the anchor cheerily
And steer for the open lake

Oh, we'll steer for the rolling lake
And lads, we'll set the flowing sail
And to the town of Buffalo
We'll show the old ship's tail

Then we'll gather in the fo'c'sle
Then "off watch' we plough along
We'll have 'er going smoothly, lads
And sing a jolly song

Oh, we'll beat the length of Erie
With Long Point on our lee
We'll hail a tug 'neath Passage Light
Or tow from Point Pelee

Up the river on a towline
Past the city of Detrite
The cinders fall upon the deck
All day and half the night

We'll drag the length of steep St. Clair
And at Port Huron we'll let go
Hoist the canvas on the forestick
On the main and mizzen, too

Up the length of old Lake Huron
With all our canvas at her best
We'll drive across the pounding bay
With a wind from out of the west

Through the straits, a beat to windward
Far astern, the Isle Bob-Lo
Then southward down Lake Michigan
To the town of Chicago

Soon, my friends, our trip is over
And I got no more to say
We'll go to Old Black Pete's, my lads
And spend our whole trip's pay!


Notes from the book: This capstan chantey is more formal than most, telling as it does the chronological story of a vessel's passage. The names of port towns might easily be changed – and often were – to suit the particular voyage at hand. This is a localized version of a song imported from deep water. It was recalled by [Robert] Collen. (Robert Collen, one of Professor Ivan H. Walton's best informants. Walton met Collen at a Chicago sailors' union hall).


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLLING HOME TO DEAR OLD SWANSEA
From: Mick Tems
Date: 03 Oct 04 - 09:19 PM

The melody is the same as Kevin Barry, but precedes it. There are
versions of this song in just about every country where sailors crewed tall ships - versions in German, Scandinavian, Dutch, versions from Canada,Australia.
The version that we sang with Calennig comes from a shanty I recorded 30 years ago from the late Captain Frank Parker, of Sketty, Swansea, who was one of Swansea's last surviving Cape Horners. He told me it was the favourite song with all the Swansea barque crews when they were bringing the ships back into port at the end of their voyages to the copper ore ports in South America:

ROLLING HOME TO DEAR OLD SWANSEA

Come all hands to man the capstan, see your cable is all clear;
For today we're leaving anchor, for the shore of Wales we'll steer;
Mark your capstan bar right well, boys, every man you've got, clap on;
As we heave around the capstan you can hear our happy song:

CHORUS: Rolling home, rolling home, rolling home across the sea,
       Rolling home to dear old Swansea, rolling home, dear land, to thee;
       Rolling home, rolling home, rolling home across the sea,
       Rolling home to dear old Swansea, with old Ireland on our lee.

Up aloft, amid the rigging spreading out her snow white sail,
Like a bird upon the ocean, speeding on before the gale,
I can hear the bosun calling: "See your sheets and halyards clear,
And prepare for stormy weather as around Cape Horn we'll steer."

Many thousand miles behind us, many thousand miles before,
Spreading ocean waves to guide us till we reach that happy shore.
When I see the lights of Swansea then my anchor soon I'll drop,
And farewell to all our shipmates, for we've reached our homeland dock.

The song is available on Calennig's 1985 album Dyddiau Gwynion Ionawr/Snowy Days of January (Sain C935N) which is now available only in cassette - unless you're in Japan, where it's on CD.

The format doesn't change a hell of a lot between the different versions. This is the only version I have heard with the double length chorus, though. On the international theme: When we sang in Mariehavn, the capital of the Aland Islands in the middle of the Gulf of Bothnia between Sweden and Finland, we met up with the local shanty group. Their name? Rolling Home, of course!
Mick Tems


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Lighter
Date: 09 Oct 04 - 09:40 PM

Not much here that's new except this is how I learned it from overexposure to sea literature in youth:

Call all hand to man the capstan!
See the cable flaked down clear!
Heave away, and with a will, boys,
As homeward we will steer!
Breast the bars and heave away, boys,
Soon the anchor we will trip,
And across the Southern Ocean
We will steer our gallant ship!

      Rolling home, rolling home,
      Rolling home, across the sea!
      Rolling home to New York City,
      Rolling home, sweet town, to thee!

Fare you well, Australia's daughters,
We must bid you now adieu!
We'll ne'er forget the happy hours
That we've spent along with you!
Many thousand miles behind us,
Many thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean heaves to waft us,
To that well remembered shore.

High aloft, amidst the riggin',
Shouts the wild, exulting gale,
Straining every spar and backstay,
Every stitch in every sail.
'Round Cape Horn on a winter's morning,
All amidst the ice and snow,
You can hear the first mate callign,
"Sheet her home, boys! Let her go!"

And the waves we've cleft behind us
Seem to whisper as they go,
"Farewell, Jack! Kind hearts await you
In the land to which you go."
So we'll sing in jovial chorus
In the watches of the night,
Till we raise old Batt'ry Point, boys,
When the gray dawn brings the light.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Aug 08 - 09:15 PM

W. B. Whall (1910) included the song in his "Sea Songs and Shanties," a combination of lines to suit himself from several versions. He mentions several tunes have been used, and gives the score of his preference.

Lyr. Add: ROLLING HOME (Whall)

Call all hands to man the capstan,
See the cable run down clear,
Heave away, and with a will, boys,
For old England we will steer;
And we'll sing in joyful chorus
In the watches of the night,
And we'll sight the shores of England
When the grey dawn brings the light.

Chorus
Rolling home, rolling home,
rolling home across the sea;
Rolling home to dear old Enland,
rolling home, dear land, to thee.

2
Up aloft amid the rigging,
Blows the loud exulting gale,
Like a bird's wide out-stretched pinions
Spreads on high each swelling sail;
And the wild waves cleft behind us,
Seem to murmur as they flow,
There are loving hearts that wait you
In the land to which you go.

Chorus

3
Many thousand miles behind us,
Many thousand miles before,
Ancient ocean heave to waft us
To the well-remembered shore.
Cheer up, Jack, bright smiles await you
From the fairest of the fair,
And her loving eyes will greet you
With kind welcomes everywhere.

Chorus

With score, pp. 9-11, 1963 reprint.


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Subject: Lyr Add: ROLLING HOME TO OLD CAPE BRETON
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 19 Sep 08 - 01:16 AM

This is my re-write of this great song:

ROLLING HOME TO OLD CAPE BRETON

Call all hands to man the capstan
Keep the cable running clear
Haul the anchor, hoist the canvas
For our homeland we will steer
Fare thee well, you Boston maidens
Time has come to say adieu
Happy hours we've spent together
But we can't remain with you

Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to old Cape Breton
Rolling home dear land to thee

When we clear the harbour markers
'Cross the Gulf Of Maine we'll sail
Bearing out towards Cape Sable
Running hard before the gale
Along the coast of Nova Scotia
As we fight a heavy storm
Many hundred miles behind us
Just a few more miles before

As we stand beneath the rigging
On the watch that ends the night
We will see Cape Breton Island
With the coming morning light
From of Cape Canso in the darkness
Through Chedabucto Bay we'll go
And drop anchor in Ship Harbour
God will bring us safely home


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: MartinRyan
Date: 19 Sep 08 - 04:15 AM

Just to confirm something speculated on earlier in the thread - I have heard a Hamburg version sung in German, by a group of fishermen sitting in a pub in Athlone in the Irish midlands. The locals assumed it was "Kevin Barry"!

Regards


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Sep 08 - 05:58 PM

Nun ade, du mein lieb Heimatland,
Lieb' Heimatland, ade.
Es geht nun fort zum fremden Strand,
Lieb' Heimatland, ade!
    Full song is at singenundspielen.de. Not the same song as "Rolling Home," but there are interesting similarities. There's a YouTube recording.
    -Joe Offer-


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 19 Sep 08 - 06:08 PM

Does anyone have the Polish translation by Anna Kinecka?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 21 Sep 08 - 07:54 PM

The version Martin Ryan refers to is (I suspect) the Low German one I learnt in childhood:

Vun Hamborg föhr so'n olen Kassen
Mit Namen heet he Magellan
Dor weer bi Dag keen Tiet to'n Brassen
Dat bleev denn allns bet abends stahn
Rolling home, rolling home,
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to dear old Hamborg
Rolling home dear land to thee

(From Hamburg sailed an ancient vessel
It's name it was the Magelhan
During the day there was no time for working (will have to look up 'Brassen')
It was all left to be done at night ...)

Will try to dig out the rest of the verses if required.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: MartinRyan
Date: 22 Sep 08 - 04:16 PM

Thanks for that, Suzanne!

I don't know how low the German was but I seem to remember the Germans were fairly low alright - thanks to copious amounts of Guinness!

Regards


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 18 Feb 09 - 08:50 AM

refresh


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Feb 09 - 02:20 PM

Brassen- the main braces, according to Cassell's Wörtenbuch.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST,Fred B.
Date: 19 Jan 10 - 10:51 AM

Just looking on the web about this, I found a reference from the National Library of Australia which credits the tune (not specified) to Weiss, WH (Willoughby Hunter) 1820-1867. They offer a score for 5p, which I didn't look at. The website is:

catalogue.nla.gov.au/Record/20537


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 19 Jan 10 - 11:59 AM

Excellent thread and very informative.
Weiss also provided the tune to Longfellow's 'The Village Blacksmith'.
1855.
I have a copy of MacKay's 'Ballads and Lyrics' published in 1859, but all of the collected material within predates the 'Rolling Home' publication.
An original set of words appears on a broadside at Bodleian Firth c16 (386) website.

Something disturbs me from the earliest postings on this thread. There is a suggestion that because we know who wrote it it can't be traditional. Surely no-one still follows this pointless dogma!


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: GUEST,ron gillis
Date: 29 Sep 10 - 09:23 PM

i'm 71 years old and when i was born my father was 50. he was born in 1889 in newfoundland and spent his life on the sea, from two masted schooners to steamships and ended up as cook on the last schooner fishing from boston (the adventure.) i wish i could remember all the words but his version smelled of the north atlantic. "high aloft amidst the rigging, midst the freezing ice and snow." it was sung to the tune of kevin barry


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: ROLLING HOME to Dear Old England
From: katlaughing
Date: 29 Sep 10 - 09:29 PM

ron gillis, wow! Thanks so much for posting. We'd love to hear more of your father, if you feel so inclined.

Welcome to the Mudcat!

All the best,

kat


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 14 Jun 14 - 10:14 AM

In 2002, a GUEST posted information on a version of this song in the Library of Congress as part of the Cowell Collection. He didn't have a link to the audio. Rolling Home to Dear Old England Song was sung by Leighton Robinson, Alex Barr, Arthur Brodeur, and Leighton McKenzie, performers.


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England
From: toadfrog
Date: 21 Jul 14 - 07:54 PM

When I was growing up, that was sung to the same tune as "Kevin Barry." Where did people get the minor-key tune they always sing it to, and why?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Jul 14 - 03:51 AM

Hi, Toadfrog -
I saw that a couple of weeks ago in the Rise Up Singing songbook. I tried to sing "Rolling Home" to the tune I know for "Kevin Barry," and I couldn't get it to work.
Anybody know where I can find a recording of "Rolling Home" sung to the tune of "Kevin Barry"?

This is the tune I know for "Rolling Home: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25uLx3uyca0

And this is the one I know for "Kevin Barry":
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxlNcSv5ypQ

Oh, this rendition of "Rolling Home" is close to the tune I know for "Kevin Barry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nvr9LvA70LE

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Jul 14 - 08:19 AM

By traditional standards, they are all very similar. Close enough to be on the "identical tune" thread.

The YouTube performance has some very modern touches though, mainly in delivery.

On a related issue, why would Scottish sailors prefer the fancy-pants, Latinate "Caledonia" to the perfectly idiomatic and instantly comprehensible "bonnie Scotland"? And why do folkies?


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 12 Sep 14 - 03:44 PM

ROLLING HOME (LOW GERMAN)

Lyr, Add: DOR FOHR VUN HAMBORG MOL SO'N OLEN KASSEN
Rolling Home; Low German

Dor fohr vun Hamborg moi so'n olen Kassen
Mit Namen heet he Magelhan,
Dor weer bi Dag keen Tied tom Brassen,
dat leet man all'ns bit Obends stohn.

*(German refrain )
Segler heim, Segler heim,
Segler heim, wohl übers Meer,
Segler heim, zu deutschen Heimat,
Segler heim Feinslieb zur dir.

Rolling home, rolling home
Rolling home across the sea
Rolling home to di, old Hamborg
Rolling home, mien Deern to di

Bi Dag, dor kunn dat weihn un blasen,
dor wör noch lang keen Hand anleggt.
Doch so an'n Obend no veer Glasen,
denn wör de ganze Plünnkrom steckt.
Rolling home, &c.

Dat weer so recht den Ohln sien Freeten,
dat gung em öber Danz un Ball
harr Janmaat graad de Piep ansteken
den rööp de Ohl: Pull Grootmarsfall.
Rolling home &c.

Dat kunn den Kerl verdeubelt ropen,
Dat weer em just so no den Strich,
Man schraal de Wind denn noch 6 Streeken,
Wat weer der Kerl denn gnatterich.
Rolling home, &c.

Un unsen heiligen stillen Freedag
wat doch uns höchste Festdag is
un unsen heiligen Buß- und Beeddag
dor seggt de Ohl: Dat giff dat nich
Rolling Home &c.

Jedoch so recht bi Licht bekeeken
do weer uns Ohl nach lang nicht slecht
harr Smutje mol een Swien afsteken
trangscheer he sülben dat torecht
Rolling home, &c.

De Lüüd de kreegn so recht dat Lopen
se freiten sik, ik weet nich wie
se kregen von dat swien de Poten
un gele Arfensupp dorbi
Rolling home, &c.

Oh, Magelhan, du olen Kassen,
dit Leed schall die een Denkmol sien.
Bi Snee un Reg'n wascht Jan Maat Masten,
un achtern suupt se unsen Kööm.
Rolling home, &c.

(German refrain, var.)
*Wir fahre heim, fahren heim
fahren heim über die See,
Fahren heim zum geliebten alten Hamburg,
fahren heim, Geliebte, zu dir.
(The same song in standard German at www.hamburg.de /contentblob/2297172/data/rolling-home.pdf
C. 1870).
Versions sung on Youtube.

http://www.volksliederarchiv.de/text566.html


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Subject: RE: DTStudy: Rolling Home to Dear Old England
From: MartinRyan
Date: 12 Sep 14 - 05:34 PM

Thanks for that, Q.

Regards
    Thread closed due to Spam. If you have comments, ask me to reopen the thread. -Joe Offer-


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