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American Christmas Carols

jaze 16 Nov 04 - 03:34 PM
Nerd 16 Nov 04 - 03:44 PM
SINSULL 16 Nov 04 - 03:48 PM
MMario 16 Nov 04 - 03:49 PM
WFDU - Ron Olesko 16 Nov 04 - 03:51 PM
GUEST,ClaireBear 16 Nov 04 - 03:58 PM
Folkiedave 16 Nov 04 - 04:01 PM
GUEST,ClaireBear 16 Nov 04 - 04:03 PM
jaze 16 Nov 04 - 04:07 PM
Folkiedave 16 Nov 04 - 04:09 PM
Fliss 16 Nov 04 - 05:57 PM
PoppaGator 16 Nov 04 - 06:15 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Nov 04 - 06:23 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Nov 04 - 08:39 PM
John P 16 Nov 04 - 08:51 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 16 Nov 04 - 10:27 PM
Mary in Kentucky 16 Nov 04 - 10:54 PM
Mary in Kentucky 16 Nov 04 - 11:01 PM
WFDU - Ron Olesko 16 Nov 04 - 11:04 PM
Mary in Kentucky 16 Nov 04 - 11:10 PM
Mary in Kentucky 16 Nov 04 - 11:13 PM
GUEST,DD 16 Nov 04 - 11:25 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 17 Nov 04 - 06:02 AM
jaze 17 Nov 04 - 08:09 AM
PoppaGator 17 Nov 04 - 10:43 AM
masato sakurai 17 Nov 04 - 10:57 AM
GUEST,ClaireBear 17 Nov 04 - 11:07 AM
GLoux 17 Nov 04 - 11:13 AM
GUEST,belter 17 Nov 04 - 03:36 PM
GUEST,belter 17 Nov 04 - 03:42 PM
Burke 17 Nov 04 - 05:02 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 17 Nov 04 - 07:39 PM
Ron Davies 17 Nov 04 - 11:34 PM
bubukaba 18 Nov 04 - 12:05 AM
belter 18 Nov 04 - 03:08 PM
GUEST,DaveC 18 Nov 04 - 10:29 PM
Ron Davies 19 Nov 04 - 12:01 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 22 Nov 04 - 07:58 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 23 Nov 04 - 05:42 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Nov 04 - 03:38 PM
Burke 24 Nov 04 - 05:17 PM
Clinton Hammond 24 Nov 04 - 05:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Nov 04 - 08:41 PM
GUEST,Uncle Jaque 19 Dec 05 - 11:50 PM
GUEST,Texas Guest 20 Dec 05 - 01:04 AM
GUEST 20 Dec 05 - 02:46 PM
Folkiedave 20 Dec 05 - 02:53 PM
Margret RoadKnight 20 Dec 05 - 08:29 PM
jaze 20 Dec 05 - 08:59 PM
jaze 20 Dec 05 - 09:01 PM
GUEST,Dave'sWife sans cookie 21 Dec 05 - 06:09 PM
nutty 21 Dec 05 - 07:25 PM
leftydee 22 Dec 05 - 09:48 AM
Padre 22 Dec 05 - 04:09 PM
masato sakurai 22 Dec 05 - 07:48 PM
Genie 04 Jan 06 - 11:29 PM
Genie 04 Jan 06 - 11:33 PM
Kaleea 05 Jan 06 - 01:22 AM
GLoux 05 Jan 06 - 07:38 AM
Genie 05 Jan 06 - 06:19 PM
GUEST,Peter C 16 Dec 14 - 07:55 AM
GUEST 16 Dec 14 - 09:41 AM
GUEST,Tom 16 Dec 16 - 06:00 AM
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Subject: American Christmas Carols
From: jaze
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 03:34 PM

Are there any bonafide American Christmas carols? Most of the most famous carols I can think of are European.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Nerd
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 03:44 PM

Many famous Christmas songs are American. But whether you consider them "carols," which is not a very well-defined genre term, would be up to you.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: SINSULL
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 03:48 PM

I will die happy if I never have to sit through "The Little Drummer Boy" again, carol or not.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: MMario
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 03:49 PM

If you include Canada - then the 'Huron Carol' definately qualifies.

'White Christmas' - 'Chestnuts Roasting'- 'Winter Wonderland'?


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: WFDU - Ron Olesko
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 03:51 PM

O Little Town of Bethlehem, Away In a Manger, We Three Kings of Orient Are, It Came Upon the Midnight Clear, Go Tell it on the Mountain, Mary had A Baby are just a few.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,ClaireBear
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 03:58 PM

Oh, let's get a little more obscure and go for quality! How about Daniel Read's setting of "while shepherds watched their flocks by night," which is called Sherburne and for which the music is available here?

Like other hymns in the shape note tradition, the melody is in the tenor. Gorgeous!


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Folkiedave
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 04:01 PM

http://www.glenrockcarolers.org/ There is a great carol singing tradition in Glenrock PA which deserves to be much more widely known. their story can be found here:


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,ClaireBear
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 04:03 PM

Sorry, just to clarify -- my seemingly insensitive post was definitely not in response to Ron Olesko's impressive list, but to such overdone pseudo-carols as Winter Wonderland and White Christmas.

Lots of terrific ones in the spirituals tradition; Ron's just listed a couple of the most popular.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: jaze
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 04:07 PM

Ron, those carols are all American? I guess I thought "carols" were religious in nature. I can think of many American christmas songs, but I didn't realize those songs were American. Thanks


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Folkiedave
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 04:09 PM

Sorry pressed wrong button (again)

Glenrock Carolers can be found here:

http://www.glenrockcarolers.org/

Briefly the tradion is identical to that found in my own area of Sheffield and N. Pennines (UK) and was carried over there in 1848. It still exists and the story is well documented. We in Sheffield were really privileged to have a visit from them 2 years ago (since they rarely travel) to the Festival of Village Carols, Grenoside, Sheffield U.K. This is held every two years and this year's (November 27th) is already sold out.

Dirty Linen+Glenrock into google will also get you an article about them.

Deserves to be more widely known.

Best regards,

Dave Eyre
www.collectorsfolk.co.uk


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Subject: Lyr Add: I WONDER AS I WANDER (John Jacob Niles)
From: Fliss
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 05:57 PM

Why not learn the following carol... its beautiful

I WONDER AS I WANDER

I wonder as I wander out under the sky
How Jesus the Savior did come for to die
For poor on'ry people like you and like I
I wonder as I wander out under the sky

When Mary birthed Jesus, 'twas in a cow's stall
With wise men and farmers and shepherds and all
But high from God's heaven, a star's light did fall
And the promise of ages it then did recall

If Jesus had wanted for any wee thing
A star in the sky or a bird on the wing
Or all of God's angels in heav'n for to sing
He surely could have it, 'cause He was the King

I wonder as I wander out under the sky
How Jesus the Savior did come for to die
For poor on'ry people like you and like I
I wonder as I wander out under the sky

by John Jacob Niles

I did a search and came up with a site that plays the tune.
http://my.homewithgod.com/heavenlymidis/Christmas/wander.html

fliss


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: PoppaGator
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 06:15 PM

I'm pretty sure I've read that "Away in a Manger" was written my Martin Luther (and, obviously, translated from German to English at some point). I'm not absolutely sure, and can't produce documentation, but if true, then that carol would obviously not qualify as "American."

There have to be a few Black-Gospel Christmas songs that would qualify for this list. I'm sure there's at least one very well-known one, but I'm drawing a blank at the mmoment. If not one else comes up with the title I wish I could think of, I'll be back when it comes to me.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 06:23 PM

Carols may be secular as well as religious, e. g. the "Boar's Head Carol."

ClaireBear, many thanks for that link. I prefer the old Billings arrangement of "While Shepherds...." (also given at that same website). Nothing more Amurican than Billings, one of America's first great songwriters, even though he stuck pretty much to hymns (Maddy Prior belts them out in one of her cds). The original words, however, are by Nahum Tate, an Irishman who became a poet Laureate in England.

Ron, some humorous versions of "It came..." at Hymns and Carols of Christmas: Index ij Carols


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 08:39 PM

Sometimes it is difficult to attribute the carol. In a number of cases, a German (or whatever) rhyme has been taken by an Englishman and rewritten to fit a French tune, and in turn this piece has been re-arranged in both words and music by an American organist, etc. etc.

Poppagator, here is what Hymns and Carols of Christmas says about "Away in a(the) Manger." Although some believe that this carol was penned by Martin Luther,...... it is almost certainly of late 19th century American origin." Two tunes are mentioned, both seemingly American, but one preferred in England- Away in a manger
The main line of evidence is that it does not appear anywhere before late 19th c.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: John P
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 08:51 PM

I think both "Babe of Bethlehem" and "Star of the East" are American. Both close enough to being a carol to suit me. Both close enough to traditional music to suit me, if you want to get away from the Christmas-themed pop songs and the more over-used traditional carols.

John


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 10:27 PM

"Star in the East" is certainly American (1870).
There are two "Babe of Bethlehem" one English, one American. The American one also is known as "Ye nations all." Never heard that one.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 10:54 PM

There are many American Carols in Elizabeth Poston's The Second Penguin Book of Christmas Carols. One in particular that I like is Juda's Land, also known as In the Valley, and recoreded by Jean Ritchie. Hear it here.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 11:01 PM

Babe of Bethlehem is #2 in the book. You can hear it here.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: WFDU - Ron Olesko
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 11:04 PM

Martin Luther did not have anything to do with "Away in A Manger" . A music publisher put the song out in a book of children's songs as "Luther's Cradle Hymn" and attributed it to Martin Luther. He apparently was just trying to generate a little interest in the song.

Yes Jaze, those songs are all American. There are many more, I only thought of a few of the popular ones.   I guess we should include "Jingle Bells", even though it is not a carol and it doesn't mention Christmas!

There is a church in Philadelphia where Rev. Phillip Brooks wrote "O Little Town of Bethlehem" that is still standing and celebrates the song each season.

One of my favorite songs is rarely sung unfortunately. Longfellow's "I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day" was written during the civil war after his son was wounded in battle.

Every year I put together a radio program of Christmas music on the Sunday before Christmas. I briefly share some histories of the songs and celebrate the season with folk artists singing these songs.   This year it will air on December 19 from 3 to 6pm ET and can be heard on the internet at www.wfdu.fm


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 11:10 PM

Here is a discussion of Away in a Manger. Also note Masato's link for Not So Far Away in a Manger - Forty-one Settings of an American Carol.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Mary in Kentucky
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 11:13 PM

The "here" above should be here. ;-)


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,DD
Date: 16 Nov 04 - 11:25 PM

I wonder as I wonder.....wonderful sounding Christmas tune. And then there is the one...gosh WHAT is the name??

Christ was born in Bethlehem
Christ was born in Bethlehem
Christ was born in Bethlehem
and in the manger lay
and in the manger lay
Christ way born in bethlehem and in the manger lay.

GO tell it on the Mountain. TOO


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 06:02 AM

You haven't heard a truly American carol until you've heard the Sherburne version of "While Shepherds...", cited above by Clairebear,
sung with a truly American text: Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. It works. Really!

Allison (ducking and running)


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: jaze
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 08:09 AM

Thanks, Ron and everyone. I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day was the only American "carol" I could think of. Thanks for all the info.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: PoppaGator
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 10:43 AM

refresh

Thanks to Q (and a couple of others afterwards) for the correction about "Away in a Manger" and Luther. I'm somewhat reassured that I wasn't dreaming, but accurately remembering some (wrong) information that had been published and that I had read.

The gospel carol whose name I couldn't remember yesterday was "Go Tell It On the Mountain," which Ron had mentioned much earlier.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: masato sakurai
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 10:57 AM

See the thread: Go tell it on the Mountain. Also in the DT.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,ClaireBear
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 11:07 AM

Animaterra, you are truly twisted. I admire that in a person. I sure wish I could be in your choir!

Unfortunately, it will never happen as I shall now proceed to go slowly mad, with Rudolph the Sherburne Reindeer running ceaselessly, unrelentingly, pitilessly through my fevered brain. Ah well. It's been a fun few years...


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GLoux
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 11:13 AM

Didn't Nowell Sing We Clear record that version of Sherburne a while back?


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,belter
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 03:36 PM

There's a song that contains the line "They didn't know who you were." I don't think thats the title. It may be "Mary did you Know."
I've heard this song described as a black spirital writen by an irish man.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,belter
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 03:42 PM

I found "Mary Did You Know" Hear. http://www.mudcat.org/Detail.CFM?messages__Message_ID=356100


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Burke
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 05:02 PM

Joy to the World! as arranged by Lowell Mason. I believe the current thinking is that it has nothing to do with Handel & that Mason based it on a folk tune.

Didn't Nowell Sing We Clear record that version of Sherburne a while back?

Yes, doubtless where Animaterra got the idea.

Here are some of my favorite Shape Note Christmas tunes.
Star in the East

There are 2 good settings of:
Shepherds, rejoice! lift up your eyes,
And send your fears away;
News from the regions of the skies--
"A Saviour's born to-day!
Oxford, is one of my favorite Shape Note Christmas hymns. Also Shepherd's Rejoice


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 07:39 PM

Sorry, ClaireBear darlin'!
Yes, Nowell Sing We Clear is my ultimate inspiration for Rudolph. This year, however, I'm using it as an encore for my otherwise very lovely holiday concert!

Meanwhile, Elizabeth Poston's "Second Penguin Book of Christmas Carols" is a wonderful source of American carols.

See, I am a serious musical scholar, too!

Allison


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Ron Davies
Date: 17 Nov 04 - 11:34 PM

Belter--

I think "They didn't know who you was (were)" comes from "Sweet Little Jesus Boy".


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: bubukaba
Date: 18 Nov 04 - 12:05 AM

The Christmas Revels (www.revels.org) have a great American Christmas album (track list here: http://revels.bizland.com/store/product4.html).


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: belter
Date: 18 Nov 04 - 03:08 PM

Ron Davies - Thanks for putting me on the right track.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,DaveC
Date: 18 Nov 04 - 10:29 PM

There is a rather neat little anecdote involving 'O Little Town of Bethlehem.'

When Winston Churchill conferred with FDR in the dark days of either late 1940 or 1941 (at sea, I believe aboard the battleship Prince of Wales), there was a church service on deck. Churchill in his memoirs -- I don't remember which of the six books it was in, but it would not be hard to find -- he remarked how they played this carol he had never heard before and liked very much.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Ron Davies
Date: 19 Nov 04 - 12:01 AM

Belter--

You're welcome.

It's remarkable how MacGimsey wrote that song in 1934, in homage to the great tradition of spirituals, and it fits so perfectly. My group has it on one of our Christmas CD's, sung by a wonderful local black singer, and it's wonderful. It was just stunning when she sang it in the packed Kennedy Center Concert Hall---just her voice ringing out, no other sound. It sounded as if she'd grown up with it.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 22 Nov 04 - 07:58 PM

I have been checking the sources of several old tunes used in carols and hymns.
Sherburne is taken from Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, so is German, not American.

There are several manuals of tunes and chants. One that was reprinted many times was the "Bristol Tune Book" ed. by Alfred Stone and published in England by Novello et. al.; old copies should be obtainable for very little. Mine has music for 758 tunes, later editions have 900 or more.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 23 Nov 04 - 05:42 AM

Q, what is the Mendelssohn-Bartholdy source of Sherburne? Is it lifted wholesale, or adapted?

Allison


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Nov 04 - 03:38 PM

Allison, I wish I knew. So many song books make statements like that above the music, but don't give the source composition. Frustrating!

Sometime ago there was a thread on a song, and the reference was to Bach. It was finally traced to a secular cantata, a tuneful one but seldom heard.

Looking through the Bristol Tune Book, there are many similar examples.
Drayton 8.8.6.8.8.6 Moravian (one presumes a hymn or folk tune)
Lubeck: German Chorale
Nottingham: From Mozart
Redhead No. 47: Redhead
Now if the Opus number of the Mendelssohn piece had been added, it would be easy to look up.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Burke
Date: 24 Nov 04 - 05:17 PM

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, 1809-1847, can't possibly be the composer of the Sherburne we've been talking about in this thread because he wasn't even born when it was first published. Daniel Read published it in 1783.

The information Q has is either about a different tune with the same name; is the same or a similar tune with its antecedents mixed up; or it's just plain wrong. You can compare the tune at ClairBear's link or HERE


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Clinton Hammond
Date: 24 Nov 04 - 05:36 PM

These folks are 'mericans aren't they?

:-)


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Nov 04 - 08:41 PM

Took a while for me to absorb it, but there are two tunes: "Sherburne," by Daniel Read, and "Sherborne," a tune from Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (haven't found the source composition).

Both are used for "While (Whilst) Shepherds...," along with "Christmas" from "Siroe" by Handel, a tune arranged by Methfessel (Academy Song Book, Levermore), "Seraph" by Fink, a rearrangement of the Fink version by Sir Arthur Sullivan,- and I am sure, others.

Sorry for my confusion of two different tunes.

"Sherborne" may be heard at Cyberhymnal, attached to the Saxton hymn, "See the Gold Upon the Hills." Sherborne midi


Sorry for the confusion


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Subject: Lyr Add: SWEET LITTLE JESUS BOY
From: GUEST,Uncle Jaque
Date: 19 Dec 05 - 11:50 PM

Belter - That's the one, all right!

SWEET LITTLE JESUS BOY

Sweet little Jesus Boy
They made You be born in a manguh
Sweet little Holy chil'
Didn't know who You wus

Didn't know You'd come to save us Lawd
To take our sins away
Our eyes wus bline
We couldn't see
We didn't know who You wus

Long time ago You wus bawn
Bawn in a manguh low
Sweet little Jesus Boy
De worl' treat You mean, Lawd
Treat me mean too
But please, Suh, fuhgive us Lawd
We didn't know 'twas You

You done showed us how,We is a-tryin'.
Master, You done showed us how,
Even when you's dyin'.
Just seem like we can't do right,
Look how we treated You.
But please, sir, forgive us Lord,
We didn't know 'twas You.

Sweet little Jesus Boy
Bawn [born] long time ago
Sweet little Holy chil'
An' we didn't know who You wus

*******************

Does anyone know where I can get online (free, prefferably) a MIDI, Mp3, or score for this Spiritual?
It's a pretty complex tune - pretty, though.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,Texas Guest
Date: 20 Dec 05 - 01:04 AM

...'course, y'all know that "Grandma Got Runned Over By A Reindeer" is
Texan - written just a few years before all this nonsense was started in Washington by Thimble-wit and his rogues gallery of appointees.
Once upon a time he was guv-ner down here, then he went to D.C.; but, we're still allowed to be part of the union, so long as it continues to exist. So..............Merry Christmas,...y'all.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST
Date: 20 Dec 05 - 02:46 PM

Poppagator, are you thinking of "Go, Tell it on the Mountain"?


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Folkiedave
Date: 20 Dec 05 - 02:53 PM

I posted the stuff about Glen Rock earlier in this thread. There is a nice article about them here.

http://www.americanprofile.com/issues/20051218/20051218_4951.asp

Best regards,

Dave


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Margret RoadKnight
Date: 20 Dec 05 - 08:29 PM

Great version of "Sweet Little Jesus Boy" (without all that 'plantation' dialect) sung by Princess Stewart on the Broadway cast album of BLACK NATIVITY (you can hear 30 secs at Amazon.com).
Same CD contains other Black Christmas songs, as does Odetta's CHRISTMAS SPIRITUALS.
Ruth Crawford Seeger's book has 54 "American Folk Songs for Christmas"


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: jaze
Date: 20 Dec 05 - 08:59 PM

I wonder, would The Rebel Jesus by Jackson Browne now count?


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: jaze
Date: 20 Dec 05 - 09:01 PM

Or do they have to be "popularly" sung?


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Subject: Lyr Add: LIGHT OF THE STABLE
From: GUEST,Dave'sWife sans cookie
Date: 21 Dec 05 - 06:09 PM

I don't know when it was written, but I alays enjoy "Light of The Stable' which emmylou harris recorded on her fine Christmas album of the same name. It's been re-recorded a few times but no one does it as well as she.

I once attended a Candlelight Christmas worship service that used it as a processional hymn and it works very well for that purpose. Sorry I dount have the writing credits:

LIGHT OF THE STABLE

Hail, hail to the newborn king
Let our voices sing him our praises
Hail, hail to the guiding light
That brought us tonight to our savior

Call and response chorus:
Ale, (lead singer)
alleluia (Chorus)
alle,(lead singer)
alleluia (Chorus)


Come now, there it shines so bright
To the knowing light of the stable
Lean close to the child so dear
Cast aside your fear and the thankful

Chorus


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE COWBOY CAROL (Cecil Broadhurst)
From: nutty
Date: 21 Dec 05 - 07:25 PM

How about this one.......

THE COWBOY CAROL

Chorus
There'll be a new world beginnin' from tonight,
There'll be a new world beginnin' from tonight,
When I climb up to my saddle,
Gonna take him to my heart!
There'll be a new world beginnin' from tonight.


Right across the prairie, clear across the valley
Straight across the heart of every man
There'll be a right new brand of livin'
That'll spread like lightnin' fire
And take away the hate from every land.

Chorus
      
Yih Yippee!
We're gonna ride the trail!
Yih Yippee!
We're gonna ride today.
When I climb up to my saddle
Gonna take him to my heart!
There'll be a new world beginnin' from tonight
From tonight!



Composer: Cecil Broadhurst
Lyricist: Cecil Broadhurst
Arranger: Malcolm Sargent


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: leftydee
Date: 22 Dec 05 - 09:48 AM

As a side note, there's a good website for carols and Christmas songs for you guitarists. www.guitar.about.com. There must be 100 listings with lyrics and chords. I played thru them all and had a ball. Enjoy!

Sorry, still to dumb to work the blue clicky thing. (sigh)


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Padre
Date: 22 Dec 05 - 04:09 PM

I am playing the CD 'American Folk Songs for Christmas' from Rounder Records - Mike, Peggy, and Penny Seeger singing from Ruth Crawford Seeger's book of the same name. 53 songs on 2 CDs!!! If you don't have this one, get it now!!

Padre


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: masato sakurai
Date: 22 Dec 05 - 07:48 PM

From here:
      Sweet Little Jesus Boy
This now-classic song is actually not a slave spiritual, but rather an original composition by Robert MacGimsey, written in the form and style of a spiritual. This song too (like "His Name So Sweet") expresses the singer's precious, intimate relationship with Jesus. The fact that "Sweet Little Jesus Boy" has become a Christmas favorite in churches, community settings and concert halls around the world speaks volumes about MacGimsey's effectiveness in capturing the power of the slave song genre.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Genie
Date: 04 Jan 06 - 11:29 PM

"Mary, Did You Know" (lyrics: Mark Lowry/tune: Buddy Greene) was written here in the US some time around 1975-1985. (I can look it up if needed.) It's since become a "modern classic."

Genie


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Genie
Date: 04 Jan 06 - 11:33 PM

Also, there's the bluegrass Christmas carol "Star Of Bethlehem."   (There's a thread about that song that has been active recently.)


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: Kaleea
Date: 05 Jan 06 - 01:22 AM

Alfred Burt has written some very good ones. His 'Some Children See Him' is one which people never fail to come to me & ask about whenever I sing it. I believe there's even a website just for his carols: (my apologies, the blue clicky thingie never works for me)
alfredburtcarols.com


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GLoux
Date: 05 Jan 06 - 07:38 AM

Alfred Burt Carols


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Subject: American Christmas Carols/ Mary, Did You Know?
From: Genie
Date: 05 Jan 06 - 06:19 PM

Update/correction:
"Mary, Did You Know" is not as old as I earlier estimated.   (I remember hearing it and learning it in 1993, shortly after Kathy Mattea recorded it, so I looked it up.

Here's the copyright info:
"Mary Did You Know?" - Lyrics: Mark Lowry/Music: Buddy Greene (© 1991 Word Music/Rufus Music

Some articles about the story behind this song are listed here:
here.


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,Peter C
Date: 16 Dec 14 - 07:55 AM

Does anyone know the name of the tune used for 'Shepherds Rejoice' as sung by Maddy Prior and The Carnival Band on the CD 'Carols & Capers' It is not either of the tunes used on the Christmas Carols Music web site. The CD sleeve just says 'American 19th C'


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Dec 14 - 09:41 AM

"And Glory Shone Around: Early American Carols, Country Dances, Southern Harmony Hymns and Shaker Spiritual Songs" by the Rose Ensemble is a wonderful CD that is a joy to listen too... even for us non believers... :)


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Subject: RE: American Christmas Carols
From: GUEST,Tom
Date: 16 Dec 16 - 06:00 AM

Peter C:
Did you find your answer?
I've just come across it - I think! It's a Sacred Harp version by LP Breedlove in 1850 (that would fit with the reference to 19th C American). The score is available as a jpeg on the site www.sacredharpbremen.org, "lieder 152" (song 152).


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