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Lyr Req: The Maid Who Sold Her Barley

Clare 26 Jan 99 - 10:35 PM
Bruce O. 26 Jan 99 - 10:44 PM
Joe Offer 26 Jan 99 - 11:57 PM
Bruce O. 27 Jan 99 - 12:06 AM
Bruce O. 27 Jan 99 - 03:57 PM
Jim Dixon 25 Oct 08 - 09:50 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Mar 10 - 06:53 PM
Jim Dixon 22 Mar 10 - 07:41 PM
MGM·Lion 22 Mar 10 - 11:49 PM
Jim Dixon 23 Mar 10 - 09:47 AM
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Subject: Need Lyrics for
From: Clare
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 10:35 PM

I'm looking for the music and lyrics to the Irish Trad song called "The Maid who Sold her Barley". (or a web site that might have them). Can anyone help? thanks!


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Subject: RE: Need Lyrics for
From: Bruce O.
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 10:44 PM

The song is by Thomas D'Urfey, 1688, and is in DT.


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Subject: RE: Need Lyrics for Maid Who Sold Her Barley
From: Joe Offer
Date: 26 Jan 99 - 11:57 PM

The database hasn't been working. I'll post the lyrics now, and delete them once the database is back online.
-Joe Offer-

The database also has the tune. It's just been down today. Max will no doubt have it fixed soon.

THE MAID WHO SOLD HER BARLEY (click here - database is fixed)


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Subject: RE: Need Lyrics for
From: Bruce O.
Date: 27 Jan 99 - 12:06 AM

Sorry, I looked in my downloaded copy. The broadside expansion (7 verses) of D'Urfey's song (5 verses) is listed at ZN499 in my broadside ballad index, along with 3 sequels. Early copies of its tune are B450 and B451 in the broadside ballad tunes: www.erols.com/olsonw

You might also compare D'Urfey's song with "Maulkin was a country Maid/ Within the North Country/ Farmer's Daughter of Merry Wakefield" also on my website in the Scarce Songs file.


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Subject: RE: Need Lyrics for
From: Bruce O.
Date: 27 Jan 99 - 03:57 PM

I've added an early copy of D'Urfey's version from 'Pills to Purge Melancholy' to the Scarce Songs 2 file on my website. Look for "Cold and Raw". Click


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE MAID THAT SOLD HER BARLEY (Bodleian)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 25 Oct 08 - 09:50 PM

From the Bodleian Library Ballads Catalogue: Harding B 11(2300):

THE MAID THAT SOLD HER BARLEY.

1. Cold and raw the north wind blows,
    bleak in the morning early.
When all the hills are covered in snow,
    then comes winter fairly;
And as I then rode over the moor,
    I met with a farmer's daughter.
Her two red cheeks and her rolling black eyes
    did cause my mouth to water.

2. I lowered my hat then very low,
    to let her know my breeding.
She answered me with a courteous smile.
    Her looks they were so engaging.
"Where are you going, my pretty fair maid?
    It's now in the morning early."
The answer that she gave to me:
    "Kind sir, to sell my barley."

3. "'Tis twenty guineas I have in my purse,
    and twenty more lies yearly.
You need not go to the market town,
    for I will buy all your barley;
And if twenty pounds would gain the delights
    of a maid that I love dearly,
To tarry with me then all the night
    and go home in the morning early."

4. "If I would tarry with you all night
    and get a young babe together,
It's when nine months would be past and gone,
    where would I go look for its father?
It's first you would bring me to shame and disgrace
    before I would say nay, sir.
If it's me you want to embrace,
    first marry and then you may, sir."

5. He says, "I am a married man
    this nine long months and better,
And I never meet a pretty young lass
    but I love her all the faster."
"Then if you are a married man
    and joined in wedlock fairly,
I pray, kind sir, pass on your way,
    for another will buy my barley."

6. And as I then rode over the moor
    a couple of hours after,
It was my fortune for to meet
    the farmer's only daughter.
Although the night was cold and raw,
    I wanted awhile to parley,
But the answer that she gave to me:
    "Kind sir, I sold my barley."

7. So all the money that I had got
    to her I did deliver,
And then we rode a long way
    till we came to a river.
The river it being large and wide,
    the like I ne'er saw in any,
For she skipt her horse to the other side
    and left me not a penny.

8. "Come back; come back, my pretty fair maiden.
    Indeed I did but lend it."
But the answer that she gave to me:
    "Kind sir, I never intend it;
For all the money that I have got,
    it's not at your disposing,
Then all the money that I have got
    will help to enlarge my fortune."


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER (from D'Urfey)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Mar 10 - 06:53 PM

From Wit and Mirth: Or, Pills to Purge Melancholy, Volume 2 by Thomas D'Urfey, Henry Playford (London: J. Tonson, 1719), page 167:


THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER

1. Cold and Raw the North did blow,
Bleak in the Morning early;
All the Trees were hid in Snow,
Dagl'd by Winter yearly:
When come Riding over a Knough,
I met with a Farmer's Daughter;
Rosie Cheeks and bonny Brow,
Good faith made my Mouth to water.

2. Down I vail'd my Bonnet low,
Meaning to shew my breeding;
She return'd a graceful bow,
A Visage far exceeding:
I ask'd her where she went so soon,
And long'd to begin a Parly;
She told me unto the next Market Town,
A purpose to sell her Barly.

3. In this purse, sweet Soul, said I,
Twenty pounds lie fairly;
Seek no farther one to buy,
For I'se take all thy Barly:
Twenty more shall buy Delight,
Thy Person I Love so dearly;
If thou wouldst stay with me all Night,
And go home in the Morning early.

4. If Twenty pound could buy the Globe,
Quoth she, this I'd not do, Sir;
Or were my Kin as poor as Job,
I wo'd not raise 'em so, Sir;
For should I be to Night your friend,
We'st get a young Kid together;
And you'd be gone ere the nine Months end,
And where should I find a Father?

5. I told her I had Wedded been,
Fourteen years and longer;
Or else I'd choose her for my Queen,
And tie the Knot much stronger:
She bid me then no farther rome,
But manage my Wedlock fairly;
And keep Purse for poor Spouse at home,
For some other shall have her Barly.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NORTHERN DITTY / SCOTCHMAN OUTWITTED BY..
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 Mar 10 - 07:41 PM

From A Collection of Old Ballads, Volume 1 by Ambrose Philips (London: J. Roberts, 1723), page 211:

XXVIII. The Northern Ditty: Or, The Scotchman outwitted by the Country Damsel.

To a new Scotch Tune.

Now I am got into the Reign of King James the First, I shall chuse to insert the following Song, said to be written much about his time on an amorous Intrigue of a certain Great Man. One would not chuse to insert bare Conjectures, without being able to second 'em with good Arguments, or at least very great Probabilities; my Reader will therefore excuse me, I hope, from relating the Particulars I have heard; and I shall make no Observation on the Song, save, that the Scottish Dialect pretty plainly intimates that it was written on some Person of that Nation.

1. Cold and Raw the North did blow,
Bleak in the Morning early,
All the Trees were hid with Snow,
Cover'd with Winter Yearly:
As I was riding o'er the Slough,
I met with a Farmer's Daughter,
Rosy Cheeks and a bonny Brow,
Good Faith my Mouth did water.

2. Down I vail'd my Bonnet low,
Meaning to show my Breeding,
She return'd a graceful Bow,
Her Visage far exceeding:
I ask'd her where she was going so soon,
And long'd to hold a Parley,
She told me to the next Market-Town,
On purpose to sell her Barley.

3. In this Purse, sweet Soul, said I,
Twenty Pounds lies fairly,
Seek no further one to buy,
For Ise take all thy Barley:
Twenty Pound more shall purchase Delight,
Thy Person I love so dearly,
If thou wilt lig with me all Night,
And gang Home in the Morning early.

4. If Forty Pound would buy the Globe,
This thing I'd not do, Sir,
Or were my Friends as Poor as Job,
I'd never raise 'em so, Sir,
For should you prove one Night my Friend,
We's get a young Kid together,
And you'd be gone e'er nine Month's end,
Then where should I find the Father?

5. Pray what would my Parents say,
If I should be so silly,
To give my Maidenhead away,
And lose my true Love Billy?
Oh, this would bring me to Disgrace,
And therefore I say you nay, Sir;
And if that you would me embrace,
First marry, and then you may, Sir.

6. I told her I had wedded been
Fourteen Years, and longer,
Else I'd chuse her for my Queen,
And tye the Knot more stronger,
She bid me then no farther come,
But manag'd my Wedlock fairly,
And keep my Purse for poor Spouse at home,
For some other would buy her Barley.

7. Then as swift as any Roe,
She rode away and left me;
After her I could not go,
Of Joy she quite bereft me:
Thus I my self did disappoint,
For she did leave me fairly;
My Words knock'd all things out of joynt,
I lost both the Maid and the Barley.

8. Riding down a narrow Lane,
Some two or three Hours after,
There I chanc'd to meet again,
This Farmer's bonny Daughter:
Although it was both Raw and Cold,
I stay'd to hold a Parley,
And shew'd once more my Purse of Gold,
When as she had sold her Barley.

9. Love, said I, pray do not frown,
But let us change Embraces,
I'll buy thee a silken Gown,
With Ribbons, Gloves and Laces;
A Ring and Bodkin, Muff and Fan,
No Lady shall have neater;
For, as I am an honest Man,
I ne'er saw a sweeter Creature.

10. Then I took her by the Hand,
And said, my dearest Jewel,
Why should'st thou thus disputing stand,
I prithee be not cruel.
She found my Mind was fully bent,
To pleasure my fond Desire,
Therefore she seemed to consent,
But I wish I had never come nigh her.

11. Sir, said she, what shall I do,
If I commit this Evil,
And yield my self in Love with you;
I hope you will prove civil?
You talk of Ribbons, Gloves and Rings,
And likewise Gold and Treasure:
Oh, let me first enjoy those things,
And then you shall have your Pleasure.

12. Sure thy Will shall be obey'd,
Said I, my own dear Honey,
Then into her Lap I lay'd
Full Forty Pounds in Money;
We'll to the Market Town this Day,
And straitway end this Quarrel,
And deck thee like a Lady gay,
In flourishing rich Apparel.

13. All my Gold and Silver there
To her I did deliver:
On the Road we did repair,
Out coming to a River,
Whose Waters are both deep and wide,
Such Rivers I ne'er see many,
She leapt her Mare on the other Side,
And left me not one Penny.

14. Then my Heart was sunk full low,
With Grief and Care surrounded,
After her I could not go,
For fear of being drowned;
She turn'd about, and say'd, Behold,
I am not for your Devotion,
But, Sir, I thank you for my Gold,
'Twill serve to inlarge my Portion.

15. I began to stamp and stare,
To see what she had acted;
With my Hands I tore my Hair,
Like one that was quite distracted.
Give me my Money then I cry'd,
Good Faith, I did but lend it,
But she full fast away did ride,
And vow'd she did not intend it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Maid Who Sold Her Barley
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 22 Mar 10 - 11:49 PM

Known also as "Cold & Raw" as sung by Bert Lloyd, to a tune I use on my Butter&Cheese&All record [BH8904]. Another tune carries the song "If Any Wench Venus's Girdle Wear" in John Gay's The Beggar's Opera (1729), [AIR III, Act I, sc iv].


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: The Maid Who Sold Her Barley
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 23 Mar 10 - 09:47 AM

A tune for COLD AND RAW THE NORTH DID BLOW can be seen in A Select Collection of English Songs, Vol. 3: Airs to the Songs, edited by Joseph Ritson (London: J. Johnson, 1783), page clxxix (=179).

The lyrics that go with this tune are nearly the same as those for THE NORTHERN DITTY seen above.


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