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Songs of emigration

GUEST,spailpin 12 Oct 12 - 02:14 PM
Bettynh 12 Oct 12 - 11:25 AM
GUEST,Tony 11 Oct 12 - 02:43 PM
CupOfTea 11 Oct 12 - 02:21 PM
GUEST,mg 11 Oct 12 - 02:14 PM
Bert 11 Oct 12 - 01:04 PM
open mike 10 Oct 12 - 01:55 PM
GUEST,Peter from Cara Cleibh 10 Oct 12 - 11:05 AM
Beer 09 Oct 12 - 04:46 PM
GUEST,999 02 Oct 12 - 11:50 AM
GUEST,Desi C 02 Oct 12 - 11:18 AM
GUEST,Desi C 02 Oct 12 - 11:15 AM
GUEST,JTT 01 Oct 12 - 08:14 AM
GUEST,JTT 01 Oct 12 - 08:11 AM
Beer 30 Sep 12 - 01:45 PM
Jim Carroll 30 Sep 12 - 11:19 AM
ollaimh 29 Sep 12 - 11:14 PM
Beer 29 Sep 12 - 10:36 PM
GUEST 29 Sep 12 - 08:13 PM
Jim Carroll 24 Nov 10 - 03:43 PM
Jack Campin 24 Nov 10 - 03:33 PM
Graham_Pirt 24 Nov 10 - 02:56 PM
Commander Crabbe 23 Nov 10 - 07:38 PM
GUEST,Tim Connor. 23 Nov 10 - 09:20 AM
Beer 23 Nov 10 - 08:28 AM
GUEST,4321p 23 Nov 10 - 07:42 AM
Driscoll 11 Mar 99 - 10:22 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 11 Mar 99 - 07:37 PM
Martin _Ryan 11 Mar 99 - 08:56 AM
donmeixner 10 Mar 99 - 10:26 PM
Gearoid 08 Mar 99 - 03:36 AM
Big Mick 08 Mar 99 - 12:56 AM
Liam's Brother 07 Mar 99 - 10:30 PM
Brakn 07 Mar 99 - 04:12 PM
alison 07 Mar 99 - 12:10 AM
alison 06 Mar 99 - 10:40 PM
Driscoll 06 Mar 99 - 07:25 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 06 Mar 99 - 07:11 PM
Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca 06 Mar 99 - 07:10 PM
Big Mick 06 Mar 99 - 06:14 PM
Barry Taylor 06 Mar 99 - 06:13 PM
bill\sables 06 Mar 99 - 09:54 AM
bill\sables 06 Mar 99 - 09:52 AM
O'Boyle 06 Mar 99 - 07:16 AM
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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,spailpin
Date: 12 Oct 12 - 02:14 PM

Missing you .....Can still recall the man from mayo in the cardboard bed outside Waterloo station on a wet and cold December night ...I was heading back to Kerry and he was looking for a few bob and a fag !!


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Bettynh
Date: 12 Oct 12 - 11:25 AM

Here is a related thread


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Subject: Lyr Add: NORA DARLING
From: GUEST,Tony
Date: 11 Oct 12 - 02:43 PM

I am going far away, Nora darling, just as sure as there's a God that we adore.
And remember what I say, that until the judgement day you will never see your Barney any more.
I would go with you, Barney darling, if my mother and the rest of them were there;
for I know we would be blessed in that dear land of the west, living happy with you, Barney McCoy.
Then come to my arms, Nora darling. Bid your friend an old Ireland goodbye.
It will break my heart in two, which I'd fondly give to you, as no other is so loving, kind and true.

I am going far away, Nora darling, and the ship is now anchored in the bay.
And before tomorrow's sun, you will hear the signal gun. So be ready; it will carry us away.
I would go with you, Barney darling. But the reasons why, I've told you oft before.
It would break my mother's heart if from her I was to part and go roaming with you, Barney McCoy.
Then come to my arms, Nora darling. Bid your friend an old Ireland goodbye.
It will break my heart in two, which I'd fondly give to you, as no other is so loving, kind and true.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: CupOfTea
Date: 11 Oct 12 - 02:21 PM

The plentiful store of Irish songs of emigration seem to span a wide emotional range, from whimsical to horrible, with lots of nostalgic description of home places (Galway Bay, Cliffs of Doneen) along the way.

Tommy Sands: "When the Boys Come Rolling Home" - the wistfulness hope of return - merriest sounding emigration song I know.

Percy French: " Mountains of Mourne" - music hall whimsy

Luca Bloom: "City of Chicago" - harsh, stark realities, with folks dreaming of home

Robert Emmet Dunlap: "Mick Ryan's Lament" (tune of Garyowen) - being appalled by what coming to America meant in terms of conscription in the Army to the extreme of "better off dead" - right up there with "Paddy's Lamentation" in theme, period, and emotional impact.

The whole concept of forced emigration by legal transportation spawned a whole genre of it's own, nearly. "Black Velvet Band" is the tip of very big iceberg.

If you think about emigration in a more intimate sense, there are a number of American & Canadian songs that are about going from the settled east to the "wild" west. "Across the Blue Mountains," "Going to the West" (from Alabama westward), along with Stan Rogers' "The Idiot" - he also covered Glendenning' s "Scarborough Settler's Lament" for Scotland.

It strikes me that we know author or source for most of these. and they pass very quickly into aural tradition because of the strong emotional impact they have.

Joanne in Cleveland (with Irish, English and Prussian immigrant ancestors)


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,mg
Date: 11 Oct 12 - 02:14 PM

SOme of the ones mentioned above and many other beautiufl songs besides are on our Songs for Our Ancestors..some sung by Mudcatters...just PM me if you want a copy for a reasonable cost.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Bert
Date: 11 Oct 12 - 01:04 PM

The Dear Old Shannon Shore.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: open mike
Date: 10 Oct 12 - 01:55 PM

Tom Russel has an "album" called The Man From God Knows Where...it paints a picture of his ancestors coming to america from Ireland and Norway. Here is one song...Mary Clare Malloy...by Tom russell and dolores Keane..http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhWGGiBxhrM

here is a cover of the title song...admittedly "badly sung"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pErlGstz1JA

Claudia Nygaard has a song that has a similar theme. Big Country seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=31nFwwl7ziI


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,Peter from Cara Cleibh
Date: 10 Oct 12 - 11:05 AM

Try 'Bridal Train' by The Waifs for a more modern emigration classic


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Beer
Date: 09 Oct 12 - 04:46 PM

Jim, your gift is very special indeed. Thank you so much. Song like those were sung in our home in Prince Edward Island when I was a wee tot.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,999
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 11:50 AM

Lyrics and performance here by The Battlefield Band. It is beautiful.

It takes about five seconds to load.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,Desi C
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 11:18 AM

P.S


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,Desi C
Date: 02 Oct 12 - 11:15 AM

Another lover of emigration songs here, probably because I'm an immigrant myself. Two of my favourites are, Eileen McManus, and. Noreen Bawn. Also Flight Of Earls as someone else mentioned. And one I've just re discovered from my childhood, Teddy O'Neil, I reccomendv Delores Keane's version on You Tube. And finally my own song, Singing In Kilkenny, just look up 'desi singing in Kilkenny' on You tube


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 01 Oct 12 - 08:14 AM

There are also bunches of these songs by John Beag Ó Flaithearta, by the way.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,JTT
Date: 01 Oct 12 - 08:11 AM

Cóilín Phádraig Shéamuis, written at the height of the Celtic Tiger when people were still emigrating from the west and northwest coasts of Ireland to work on oil rigs and oil lines and in mines abroad, with its bitter lines (in translation): "Slaving and digging clay from the rising of the sun to its setting will you be in the land of the foreigners, Cóilín Phádraig Shéamuis".
Here it is sung by its composer, Pádraig Ó hAoláin


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Beer
Date: 30 Sep 12 - 01:45 PM

Thanks Jim.
ad.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 30 Sep 12 - 11:19 AM

Adrien
Have PM'd you about the air of 'Seven Irishmen
Jim Carroll


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Subject: Lyr Add: GOING DOWN THE ROAD (Bruce Cockburn)
From: ollaimh
Date: 29 Sep 12 - 11:14 PM

don't forget canadian internal immigration. and let me tell you, in ontario nova scotians and new foundlanders are treated like any foreign immigrant. so i nominte bruce cockburn's }going down the road"

in the isle of cape breton my father did toil
and his fathers father before
fishoing the bankd and digging the coal
in the mines that don't give no more ore

so i'm going down the road boys
seeking what i'm owed
and i know it must get better
the farther down i go

i remember the fishing boats nets full of silver
when fishing was always the best
but they could not compete with the fireigners fleet
so its welfare relief or go west

so i'm going...

we came to the city with the sun in our eyes
our nouthe full of laughter and trust
but asll that we found there was concrete and dust
and hard times sold in vending machines

so i'm going....


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Beer
Date: 29 Sep 12 - 10:36 PM

Jim,
Is there anyway you can post the tune to this wonderful ballad. Man that was great reading. I must have the melody that goes with it.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Sep 12 - 08:13 PM


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Subject: Lyr Add: SEVEN OF OUR IRISHMEN
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 24 Nov 10 - 03:43 PM

Probably the second most prolific theme for songs in Ireland - not without good cause.
Best collection of them is Wright's 'Irish Songs and Ballads of Emigration'
My own particular favourite is one particularly popular here in the West of Ireland - a bit of a sting in the tail.
Jim Carroll

SEVEN OF OUR IRISHMEN,

All you that love the shamrock green, attend both young and old,
I feel it is my duty these lines for to unfold
Concerning these young emigrants that lately sailed away
To seek a better livelyhood all in Americay,

On the fourteenth day of April our gallant ship set sail
With fifty-five young Irishmen, true sons of Granuale.
They landed safe all in New York on the fourteenth day of May
To meet their friends and relatives all in Americay,

Some of them made aquaintences as soon as they did land,
With flowing bumpers drank a health to poor old Paddy's land.
Though many of them they had no friends but their hearts were stout and bold,
And by these cursed Yankees they would not be controlled.

As seven of our Irish boys were going down Georges Street
One of these Yankee gentlemen they happened for to meet,
He promised them employment in a brickyard near the town,
To which they were conducted, their names for to put down.

He brought them to an alehouse were he called for drinks galore,
And sure, such entertainment they never got before,
For when he thought he had them drunk he this to them did say,
"You're enlisted now as soldiers to defend our countery,

They looked at one another and this to him did say,
"It's not to 'list that we did come in to Americay,
But to labour for a livelyhood as many have done before
That we have emigrated from that lovely shamrock shore,"

Twelve Yankees then in soldiers dress they came without delay
And said, "Me boys, you must prepare with us to come away,
For this is our Yankee officer who's enlisted you complete,
You need not strive for to resist, we will no longer wait."

Their Irish blood began to boil, one of these heroes said,
"We only have one life to lose, therefore we're not afraid,
Although we be from Ireland, today we'll let you see,
We'll die like sons of Granuale or keep our liberty,"

Our Irish boys got to their feet which made the Yankees frown.
As fast as they could strike a blow they knocked a soldier down,
The officer and all his men lay bleeding in their gore,
They proved themselves St. Patrick's men throughout Columbia's shore,

You'd think it was a slaughterhouse there where those Yankees lay,
The officer and all his men they all did run away,
With bloody heads and broken bones they minded evermore
That sprig of sweet shilleleigh that was brought from Erin's shore,

Now to conclude and finish, let old and young unite
And offer up a fervent prayer both morning noon and night
In hope the lord he will protect out sons that's far away
And keep them from all danger when they're in Americay,

ALTERNATIVE LAST VERSE
Now to conclude and finish' let irishmen unite,   
And together hand in hand, both morning noon and night
Let's hope they're free from danger when they are far away
And they will earn good living when they're in Americay.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Jack Campin
Date: 24 Nov 10 - 03:33 PM

Lots of Irish ones. I know a few Scottish ones. There seem to be some Yiddish ones, but they focus so much on where they've come from that where they've emigrated to doesn't really feature.

What about the others? English, Italian, German, Polish, Chinese...?


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Graham_Pirt
Date: 24 Nov 10 - 02:56 PM

Phil Colclough's song of modern emigration - 'Lights across the Bay'


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Commander Crabbe
Date: 23 Nov 10 - 07:38 PM

A failed emigration song is "The Outside Track" originally a poem by turn of the century poet Henry Lawson. Now set to music, a beautiful tune and one of my all time favourites.

CC


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,Tim Connor.
Date: 23 Nov 10 - 09:20 AM

The Reason I Left Mullingar was written by Pat Cooksey, the same guy who wrote The Sick Note, The Fureys still sing it.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: Beer
Date: 23 Nov 10 - 08:28 AM

Mick, "Far From Their Homes" has to be one of the saddest songs I ever heard. So powerful. Brendan is a great singer song writer.

Tom Russell's "Immigrant Eyes" is a classic.
Ad.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emigration
From: GUEST,4321p
Date: 23 Nov 10 - 07:42 AM

you should put some songs from percy french on this website that we can actually listen to


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Driscoll
Date: 11 Mar 99 - 10:22 PM

Seems to me that "Mary From Dungloe" and "From Clare To Here" are two of the nicest emmigration ballards.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 11 Mar 99 - 07:37 PM

"Thousands Are Sailing", both the original version and the Pogues's updated version.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Martin _Ryan
Date: 11 Mar 99 - 08:56 AM

Don

Try "The Ballad of John Williams" (in DT). I suppose its best described as a "failed emigration" song - and it has the sentiment you're looking for!

regards


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: donmeixner
Date: 10 Mar 99 - 10:26 PM

Lets don't forget "The Mountains of Mourne" by Percy French either. Or "The Aran Convict" or "The Setting" or "Noreen Bawn", or "The Old Bog Road". But does anyone know any immigration songs that have the sentiments, "Thank Christ I'm finally gone from theta place int it"?

Don


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Gearoid
Date: 08 Mar 99 - 03:36 AM

Tim

I think the song you were refering to is The Streets of New York.

Gearoid


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Big Mick
Date: 08 Mar 99 - 12:56 AM

You know, when I think about it, "When New York Was Irish", though not strictly an emmigration song, would almost fit here. It is modern, but I find it to be a wonderful song.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Liam's Brother
Date: 07 Mar 99 - 10:30 PM

As someone who has actually immigrated to America twice, this is a group of songs very dear to my heart and I keep hearing great ones all the time.

Although it's been done 1,000,000,000 times or more, "Spancil Hill," particularly when you know the story behind the song, still stands out as a great one. "Edward Connors" is another. The older, local version of "The Shamrock Shore" (later "Paddy's Green Shamrock Shore") sung around Inishowen is a fine song. The fact is, there are so, so many.

Among modern songs, I like "Slip Jigs and Reels" as well as any.

All the best,
Dan Milner


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Subject: Lyr Add: The Emigrant's Letter (2 more verses)^^
From: Brakn
Date: 07 Mar 99 - 04:12 PM

Alison, here's two more verses.

I spoke to the captain, he won't turn her round
And if I swam back, I'd be apt to be drowned
So here I must stay, oh I've no cause to fret
The dinner was what you might call a banquet
But though it was "sumpchus", I'd swop the whole lot
For the ould wooden spoon and the stir-about pot
And sweet Katey Farrell awettin' the tae
Where they're cuttin' the corn in Creeshla the day

If Katey is courted by Patsey or Mick
Put a word in for me, with a lump of a stick
Don't kill Patsey outright, he has no sort of chance
But Mickey's a rogue, you might murder at once
For Katey might think as the longer she waits
A boy in the hand is worth two in the States
And she'll promise to honour, to love and obey
Some robber that's roamin' round Creeshla the day

Regards Mick Bracken


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE EMIGRANT'S LETTER (Percy French)^^
From: alison
Date: 07 Mar 99 - 12:10 AM

Hi,


THE EMIGRANT'S LETTER
Percy French

Dear Danny, I'm taking the pen in my hand,
To tell you we're just out of sight of the land,
In the grand Allen liner I'm sailing in style,
But I'm sailing away from the Emerald Isle.
And a long sort of sigh seemed to come from us all
When the waves hit the last bit of auld Donegal,
Ah, it's well to be you that is taking your tay (tea),
Where' they're cutting the corn in Creeslough (Creesh-la) today.

There's a woman on board who knows Katie by sight,
And we talked of auld times 'til they put out the light.
I'm to meet the good woman tomorrow on deck,
And we'll talk about Katie from here to Quebec,
I know I'm no match for her, no not the least
With her house and two cows, and her brother a priest.
But the woman declares Katie's heart's on the say (sea),
While mine's with the reaper's in Creeslough today.

Ah, goodbye to you Danny, no more's to be said,
And I think the salt water's got into my head,
For it drips from my eyes when I call to my mind
The friends and the colleagues I'm leaving behind.
But still she might wait. When I bade her goodbye
There was just the least trace of a tear in her eye,
And a brake in her voice when she said, "You might stay,
But, please God you'll return to auld Creeslough, some day."


Slainte
alison


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: alison
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 10:40 PM

Hi

the Percy French one is called "The Emmigrants letter", beautiful song.... I'll do a search before I post it.

I like Clannad's "Green fields of Gaodthdobhair"(pronounced Gweedore), although it's written by the person still in Ireland watching the boat going away.

And although they're not emmigration songs....... they're transportation ones..... it's still people reminiscing about home I like "Back home in Derry", and "The land where the shamrocks grow". (There are earlier threads on both of these.)

Slainte

alison


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Driscoll
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 07:25 PM

So many songs on emmigration old and new. One of the saddest of the older songs I know is "Noreen Bond" with the great line about the "curse of emmigration". Some of the newer songs which I like and are heard now and then in the Irish pubs in my area (Buffalo, NY) are "Emigrant Eyes" and "Kitty Bawn O'Brien" where the woman leaves to go to Canada. Hear things are changing in Ireland for the better in Ireland. Lot of jobs and people are now talking about going back home. Like the songs says "those big airplanes go both ways."

To O'Boyle: Could you please post chords to "Reason I left Mullingar." Great song written by Davy Fury?


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 07:11 PM

And what's the one about the Irish policeman in New York?


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Tim Jaques tjaques@netcom.ca
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 07:10 PM

"Many Young Men of Twenty". "Kilkelly", a particularly sad one which is in the database.

"Scarborough Settler's Lament", from Canada, which is in the database in a rather corrupt form. Stan Rogers did the best recorded version, and the tune is the same as "O' A' the Airts The Wind Can Blaw". Speaking of Stan, his "The Idiot" is an emigration song of sorts too.

"Spancil Hill", too.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Big Mick
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 06:14 PM

Far From There Homes by Brendan Nolan. It is the story of the coffin ships and the Grosse Ile quarantine facility. If you would like to see the lyrics click here

Mick


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: Barry Taylor
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 06:13 PM

I have adapted the melody of The Grenadier and the Lady to accommodate the lyrics of a commemorative poem I wrote about one of my ancestors, a young girl, who died on the sea voyage from Ireland to Canada in 1842. It's titled An Emigrant's Daughter. It's another of those suitable for quieter moments. You can hear a midi of it with lyrics here. I hoisted it to the web for the heckuvit a while back, and I was surprised and pleased that several groups and performers around the globe are using it.


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: bill\sables
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 09:54 AM

I just thought of another one, more modern this time, The Flight Of Earls I heard it on a cassete by Dublin City Ramblers


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Subject: RE: Songs of emmigration
From: bill\sables
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 09:52 AM

One of my favourite emmigration songs was one written by Percy French, I think, I don't know the title but it starts; Dear Danny I'm taking the pen in my hand, to say that we're just out of sight of the land, next lines I can't remember but it ends; Where there cutting the corn in Creslia today. If anyone has the words I would love to get them. Cheers Bill


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Subject: Songs of emmigration
From: O'Boyle
Date: 06 Mar 99 - 07:16 AM

I was looking over the St Patrick's Favorites thread started a year ago by Alison, and was struck by Rich and Dee's entry about Thousands are Sailing, which although it may not go over too well on St Patrick's, I have played it with success in more quiet (and musician friendly) pubs. I have always thought that song of emmigration are the saddest Irish songs, and have written a few myself. I would like to hear about other's favorite songs of emmigration. I have been playing "The Reason I Left Mullingar" lately and it is my new favorite probably because it hits close to home. I would like to hear other's thoughts on this.

Slainte

Rick


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