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Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)

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MISS FOGARTY'S CHRISTMAS CAKE


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Tune Add: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (21)


GUEST,Texas Guest 24 Aug 08 - 01:10 PM
maeve 24 Aug 08 - 01:22 PM
open mike 24 Aug 08 - 01:36 PM
GUEST,Texas Guest 24 Aug 08 - 08:44 PM
GUEST,Texas Guest 24 Aug 08 - 08:49 PM
Peace 24 Aug 08 - 09:42 PM
Joe Offer 24 Aug 08 - 11:00 PM
Bat Goddess 25 Aug 08 - 09:19 AM
maire-aine 25 Aug 08 - 10:01 PM
GUEST,Texas Guest 25 Aug 08 - 10:54 PM
GUEST,Timo_Tuokkola 26 Aug 08 - 04:14 AM
Jim Dixon 27 Aug 08 - 08:53 AM
Joe Offer 09 Oct 08 - 03:43 AM
Seamus Kennedy 09 Oct 08 - 02:31 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Oct 08 - 03:37 PM
Jim Dixon 10 Oct 08 - 09:33 PM
GUEST 25 Oct 09 - 10:35 PM
GEST 19 Nov 10 - 11:19 AM
MartinRyan 06 Dec 11 - 07:32 AM
Jim Dixon 08 Dec 11 - 02:04 PM
Jim Dixon 09 Dec 11 - 10:25 PM
michaelr 09 Dec 11 - 10:56 PM
CapriUni 11 Dec 11 - 08:54 PM
GUEST,Ellie 15 May 12 - 11:28 PM
MartinRyan 19 Dec 12 - 01:48 PM
GUEST,Mark Gilston 19 Dec 12 - 03:29 PM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: GUEST,Texas Guest
Date: 24 Aug 08 - 01:10 PM

Well, here we are again with hat in hand asking for assistance from the many at Mudcat.

Situation: at a music retreat last year I participated in a song circle where someone sang a funny song about a lady and her Christmas cake. Now it is almost September of the following year and nothing can be recalled about the song except that it was funny and the thought that it would make a good presentation around Christmas. Oh, I did come across a note from last year to look up, "Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake," - a lot of good that did.

Question: would any Mudcat folk have knowledge of and/or the lyrics to such a song? Any help would be appreciated since Christmas is right across the street for those of us who do Christmas shows. Thanks. Cheers.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: maeve
Date: 24 Aug 08 - 01:22 PM

This one?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: open mike
Date: 24 Aug 08 - 01:36 PM

MISS FOGARTY'S CHRISTMAS CAKE


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: GUEST,Texas Guest
Date: 24 Aug 08 - 08:44 PM

Thanks, folks - that's it. I'm gonna check the other thread, too, but I'll ask never-the-less - anyone know where I can find the melody, who wrote it, etc. Many thanks, you've given me a whole bunch more that what I came in with. Cheers.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: GUEST,Texas Guest
Date: 24 Aug 08 - 08:49 PM

Good Lord, sometimes I just need to open my eyes and look. I do believe that everything I need is in the earlier thread. Again, thanks to you both. Cheers.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: Peace
Date: 24 Aug 08 - 09:42 PM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: Joe Offer
Date: 24 Aug 08 - 11:00 PM

I'm a choir singer, so I've used hymnals all my life. I've met with some disdain from the folk music community for using songbooks or "cheat sheets," but I persist - but this is one song ya gotta sing from memory. If you read notes while you sing it, it just doesn't have the same effect.
And I think I'm too old to memorize all this. So, sadly, this is one song that probably won't make it into my repertoire.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 25 Aug 08 - 09:19 AM

John Duffy does it as a recitation.

Linn


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: maire-aine
Date: 25 Aug 08 - 10:01 PM

Like Joe says, you gotta go fast with this song. I don't even bother to play guitar on it, just sing it. If you take time to read the words, you're toast. I guess it will soon be time to get it out again.

In some other Mudcat thread (don't ask me to find it) I saw it attributed to C. Frank Horn, but it didn't mention a year. It is also similar to TRINITY CAKE, written I think by Johnny Burke c. 1870, but don't quote me.

You might also look for IRISH JUBILEE, which has that same sort of long list of things.

The easiest version to get a hold of is Mick Moloney's UNCOMMON BOUNDS album.

Whatever you do, just make sure that you "ham it up" for all it's worth. The audience will love it.

Maryanne


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: GUEST,Texas Guest
Date: 25 Aug 08 - 10:54 PM

Thanks, folks - great stuff. Cheers from Texas.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Mrs. (?)'s Christmas Cake
From: GUEST,Timo_Tuokkola
Date: 26 Aug 08 - 04:14 AM

I know I've got this song on an Irish Rovers christmas album. It' one of my favourites.


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Subject: Lyr Add: MISS FOGARTY'S CHRISTMAS CAKE (C F Horn)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Aug 08 - 08:53 AM

From the sheet music at the Library of Congress:

MISS FOGARTY'S CHRISTMAS CAKE
C. Frank Horn
--: Shaw, W. F., 1883.

1. As I sat at my windy last evenin', the letter man brought unto me
A little gilt-edg'd invitation sayin', "Gilhooly, come over to tea."
Sure I knew that the Fogartys sent it, so I wint just for old friendship's sake,
And the first thing they gave me to tackle was a slice of Miss Fogarty's cake.

CHORUS: There was plums and prunes and cherries,
And citron and raisins and cinnymon, too.
There was nutmeg, cloves and berries.
And the crust it was nail'd on with glue.
There was carroway seeds in abundance.
Sure 'twould build up a fine stomach-ache.
You would kill a man twice after 'ating a slice
Of Miss Fogarty's Christmas cake.

2. Miss Mulligan wanted to taste it, but really there wasn't no use.
They work'd at it over an hour and they couldn't get none of it loose
Till Fogarty wint for the hatchet and Killy came in with a saw.
That cake was enough, by the powers, to paralyze any man's jaw.

3. Mrs. Fogarty, proud as a peacock, kep' smilin' and blinkin' away
Till she fell over Flanigan's brogans and spill'd a whole brewin' of tay.
"Oh, Gilhooly," she cried, "you're not 'atin'. Try a little bit more for my sake."
"No, thanks, Misses Fogarty," sez I, "but I'd like the resate of that cake."

4. Maloney was took with the colic. McNulty complain'd of his head.
McFadden laid down on the sofy, and swore that he wish'd he was dead.
Miss Daly fell down in hysterics and there she did wriggle and shake
While ev'ry man swore he was poison'd thro' 'atin' Miss Fogarty's cake.

["resate" = receipt = recipe]


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Subject: ADD: Trinity Cake (Johnny Burke)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 09 Oct 08 - 03:43 AM

TRINITY CAKE
(Johnny Burke)

As I leaned o'er the rail of the Eagle,
The letter boy brought unto me,
A little gilt-edged invitation,
Sayin' the girls want you over for tea.
Sure I knew the O'Hooligans sent it,
And I went just for old friendship sake,
And the first thing they gave me to tackle,
Was a slice of the Trinity Cake.

There were bird calls, flutes, and mouth organs,
With handles of double edged files,
Corners of clergymen's pockets,
And pieces of broken bass viols.
Blue lights and petticoat jumpers,
That would build up a fine stomach ache,
For 'twould kill a man twice after eating a slice
Of this wonderful Trinity Cake.

Mrs O'Hooligan, proud as a peacock,
Kept smilin' and blinkin' away,
While her daughter Johanna, a spinster,
Was helping the boys to the "tay".
There was everything on the table,
That a man or a woman could take,
And my eyes nearly burst from their sockets,
For a taste of the Trinity Cake.

Ellen Reardigan wanted to taste it,
And she struggled near ready to bust,
Two sealers attacked it with hand spikes,
To try and remove the top crust.
Then McCarthy went out for a hatchet,
And Flannigan grabbed an old saw,
That cake was enough, by the powers,
To paralyze any man's jaw.

McCarthy complained of his stomach,
And Morgan felt bad in the head,
And Hogan crawled near the melodeon,
And fervently wished he was dead.
And Flannigan grabbed the accordion,
And there he did wriggle and shake,
And all of them swore they were poisoned or more,
From eating this wonderful cake.

There were glass eyes, bull's eyes, and fresh butter,
Lampwicks and liniment, too,
Pastry as hard as a shutter,
That a billy goat's jaw couldn't chew.
Tobacco and whiskers of crackies,
That would give you the fever and ache,
You'd crack off from the knees, if you happen to sneeze,
After eating this Trinity Cake.




from GEST


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake
From: Seamus Kennedy
Date: 09 Oct 08 - 02:31 PM

Seamus Kennedy has a great version of it on his Christmas Album, Goodwill To Men, and follows it with the jig The Cook In The Kitchen.

In all humility,

Seamus Kennedy


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Oct 08 - 03:37 PM

"Trinity Cake" was first published in "Old-Time Songs and Poetry of Newfoundland," (The Gerald S. Doyle Songbook), with no author cited. First edition 1927, fifth edition 1978 (with musical score); GEST took it from the 3rd. ed., 1955. No author given; don't know if the song appeared in the first edition.
The lyrics posted by Joe and attributed by GEST to Johnny Burke are the same.

Also published in several editions of a booklet of "Newfoundland Songs," Bennett Brewing Company Limited (no score).


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Subject: Lyr Add: MISS FOGGERTY'S CAKE
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 10 Oct 08 - 09:33 PM

Felleman, Hazel. The Best Loved Poems of the American People. New York: Doubleday, 1936, p 482:


MISS FOGGERTY'S CAKE

As I sat by my window last evening,
The letterman brought unto me
A little gilt-edged invitation
Saying, "Gilhooley, come over to tea."

Sure I knew 'twas the Foggertys sent it,
So I went for old friendship's sake,
And the first thing they gave me to tackle
Was a slice of Miss Foggerty's cake.

Miss Martin wanted to taste it,
But really there weren't no use,
For they worked at it over an hour
And couldn't get none of it loose.

Till Foggerty went for a hatchet
And Killey came in with a saw;
That cake was enough, by the powers,
To paralyze any man's jaw.

In it were cloves, nutmegs and berries,
Raisins, citron and cinnamon, too;
There were sugar, pepper and cherries,
And the crust of it nailed on with glue.

Miss Foggerty, proud as a preacher,
Kept winking and blinking away,
Till she fell over Flanigan's brogans
And spilt a whole brewing of tay.

"O, Gilhooley," she cried, "you're not eating,
Just take another piece for my sake."
"No, thanks, Miss Foggerty," says I,
"But I'd like the recipe for that cake."

McNulley was took with the colic,
McFadden complained of his head,
McDoodle fell down on the sofa
And swore that he wished he was dead.

Miss Martin fell down in hysterics,
And there she did wriggle and shake,
While every man swore he was poisoned
By eating miss Foggerty's cake.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Oct 09 - 10:35 PM

This is a great article from the NY Folklore Society about Mrs. Fogarty's Christmas Cake and even mentions this thread. I'm a coal cracker from Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and this song is a piece of our Irish-coal region history. Enjoy.

Volume 33
Fall-Winter
2007   

"Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake" is an important song for the Christmas season. Coming from a background of nineteenth-century Irish humor, it is a lighthearted contribution to the more serious Christmas musical offerings.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Stanley A. Ransom, a former board member of the New York Folklore Society, is retired as director of the Clinton-Essex- Franklin Library System in Plattsburgh, New York, and a folk singer since 1940. He performs as the Connecticut Peddler, since he was born in Winsted, Connecticut. He has issued nine recordings of New York State folk and traditional music and one of Connecticut folk songs. In September 2006, the American Association for State and Local History honored him with an Award of Merit for "preserving and sustaining the folk music of New York State." He and his wife, Christina, a medical librarian, have four children and four grandchildren.


New York Folklore Society
P.O. Box 764
Schenectady, NY 12301
518/346-7008
Fax 518/346-6617
nyfs@nyfolklore.org       PUBLICATIONS | VOICES | BACK ISSUES | FOLKLORE IN ARCHIVES | FOLK ARTISTS SELF-MGT | ORDER PUBLICATIONS | SEARCH

On a trip to Vermont with folklorist I. Sheldon "Shelley" Posen, I first heard the song "Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake," sung by performer Mick Moloney. I subsequently purchased his CD, called Uncommon Bonds (1993), and learned the song from it. Later on, when I sang the song at a local nursing home, an elderly gentleman, John Nolan, said he remembered his grandfather singing it in Ausable Forks, New York, in about the year 1900.

"Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake" has become part of the folklore of Christmas. It has also entered the realm of folklore in a number of other ways. Edith Fowke listed it in Canadian Journal for Traditional Music in 1979 as "an old favorite." It appears in the Columbia Granger's Index to Poetry, with the author listed as "anonymous." It is often reprinted. The Family Herald and Weekly Star, a Montreal publication, printed it numerous times between 1913 and 1959. The title shows some variation, with Rick Benjamin's Paragon Ragtime Orchestra recording it as a music hall song called "Miss Hooligan's Christmas Cake." Digital Tradition, the database of folk songs at Mudcat Café (www.mudcat. org), includes the song and a thread in which contributors discuss the song. One contributor notes that in 1939, the song was performed by Leon Ponce in the album California Gold: Northern California Folk Music from the Thirties, a field recording collected in 1938-40 by Sidney Robertson Cowell as a WPA project.


Sheet music for "Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake," reissued by Douglas D. Anderson in 2006.   


The most notable straying from the original text—adding "spice" to the cake—occurs in the third verse. Where the original song notes that Miss Fogarty "tripped over Flanagan's brogans, and spilt a whole brewin' of tay," we now see that Miss Fogarty "spilt the homebrew in her tay." This last representation has been preferred by such Irish musicians as Ted McGraw of Rochester and Mick Moloney of New York City.

Fruitcakes have long been an important tradition of the Christmas season. Some like them—some don't—but favorite fruitcake recipes abound. Stories, too: remember "A Christmas Memory," the 1966 short story with Truman Capote and his aunt going for moonshine to make Christmas fruitcakes? I like "Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake" because it treats a cherished tradition in a lighthearted way. As a folk music performer, I've found that "Miss Fogarty" livens up any Christmas program. As a librarian, I found myself wondering, "Who wrote this song?"


"Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake" was composed by Charles Frank Horn in Middleport, Pennsylvania, and published in 1883 by W. F. Shaw, a Philadelphia music publisher. The Library of Congress web site, Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, 1870-1885, lists fifty-seven compositions by C. Frank Horn, but I wish to thank Linda Wood, sheet music librarian at the Philadelphia Free Library, for my first information about C. Frank Horn himself. C. Frank Horn was born on April 19, 1851, in Tamaqua, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. His full name was Charles Frank Horn, but he usually went by C. Frank Horn to distinguish his name from his father's. His father, named Charles Horn, was a teamster born in Pennsylvania in 1800. C. Frank Horn's mother, Matilda Horn, was born about 1820, also in Pennsylvania.

Since joining the online genealogy service Ancestry.com, I have been able to access records from the U.S. Census from 1810 to 1920. There were hundreds of Horns, especially in Pennsylvania, and also large numbers of Horns who came from Germany. According to Ancestry.com, most Horn families living in the U.S. in 1840 and in 1920 lived in Pennsylvania. This fact has made it more difficult to distinguish among the many Charles Horns and Frank Horns. There is a Charles Horn in the 1810 census, in the 1830 census for Easton, Northampton, Pennsylvania, and in the 1840 census for Pottsville, Pennsylvania.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake
From: GEST
Date: 19 Nov 10 - 11:19 AM

Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake was also recorded by The McNulty Family (Decca Records, 78RPM, 1941) with lyrics fairly similar to the sheet music deposited at the Library Of Congress (see above).


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 06 Dec 11 - 07:32 AM

Check out "Miss Hooligan's Christmas Cake" at the Irish Traditional Music Archive:

Click here

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Dec 11 - 02:04 PM

Found at Papers Past, a web site of the National Library of New Zealand:

1. From a column with the heading "The Dunedin Exhibition" in the Evening Post [of Wellingon, New Zealand], Volume XXXVI, Issue 112, 8 November 1888, Page 2:
    The Epuni Football Club wound up the season last night with a concert and dance, which proved a decided success. The Lower Hutt Oddfellows' Hall, in which the affair was held, was comfortably filled, and the concert programme appeared to be thoroughly enjoyed. The programme was as follows:—Song, "On the ball," Mr. Wilford; song, "I canna sing the old songs," Miss Speedy (encored); recitation, "Kissing cups race," Mr. Adams (encored); quartette, "Tread softly the angels are calling," Misses Hooper, Hancox, Death, and Drummond (encored); song, "Many a mile away," Mr. W. J. Haybittle; song, "Later on," Mr. Wilford (encored); monologue, "The Reception," Mr. W. J. Haybittle (encored); song, "Miss Hooligan's Christmas Cake," Mr. Jonax; duet, "Flow on, thou shining river," Misses Speedy and Graham; song, "Sailing," Mr. W. J. Haybittle; recitation, "Mrs. Jones' Pirate," Mr. Adams; song, "Ye Gallants of England," Mr. Wilford; song (comic), Mr. Jonax (encored). At the conclusion of the concert the hall was cleared, and the footballers and their "sisters, cousins, and aunts" danced till the small hours of the morning.
2. From a column with the heading Fun on the Bristol, in Auckland Star, Volume XXII, Issue 41, 18 February 1891, Page 4:
    "Mulligan's Homemade Pie" is one of his new songs. It reminds one somewhat of another Irish comic ditty, "Miss (Somebody's) Christmas Cake."
Do you suppose the reporter simply couldn't remember the title, and didn't bother to look it up? Or was he acknowledging that the title frequently changed?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 09 Dec 11 - 10:25 PM

I have looked over the sheet music at the Irish Traditional Music Archive (Thanks to MartinRyan for the link!) and compared them to the Library of Congress version I posted earlier, and I believe the lyrics are identical except that "Hooligan" has been changed to "Fogarty" throughout.

—or vice versa, depending on which version is older. Is there any way to tell?

Why do you suppose they would make such a change—and not change anything else?

Also the (implied) songwriting credit is different.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: michaelr
Date: 09 Dec 11 - 10:56 PM

A great version by Seamus Kennedy is included on the new Mudcat THIS IS US CD set.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: CapriUni
Date: 11 Dec 11 - 08:54 PM

Hm... Seeing as the widespread celebration of Christmas had almost faded from living memory in the early-mid 1800s, and was revived as a cultural favorite through the popularity of Dickens' A Christmas Carol, in 1843, would this be one of the earliest in the genre of Christmas Novelty Songs?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: GUEST,Ellie
Date: 15 May 12 - 11:28 PM

I think that the song you want may be Miss Hooligan's Christmas Cake - the lyrics are easy to find on Google. It is and old Irish comic ballad which I remember my Grandfather singing to me. Hope this helps, if you are still looking for it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 19 Dec 12 - 01:48 PM

For a nice recording of the Miss Fogarty's version


Click here

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Miss Fogarty's Christmas Cake (C F Horn)
From: GUEST,Mark Gilston
Date: 19 Dec 12 - 03:29 PM

Here' my rendition: It's also on my CD, It Would Sure Be a Miracle

Click here


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