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Origins: Shake Sugaree

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SHAKE SUGAREE


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Tab. needed for 'Shake Sugaree' please! (17)


murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 06 Jun 99 - 07:59 AM
Pete 06 Jun 99 - 02:56 PM
Art Thieme 06 Jun 99 - 03:06 PM
Art Thieme 06 Jun 99 - 03:07 PM
Rick Fielding 06 Jun 99 - 04:36 PM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 06 Jun 99 - 10:00 PM
Rick Fielding 07 Jun 99 - 01:04 AM
DonMeixner 07 Jun 99 - 07:59 AM
Marc Feingold (inactive) 10 Jun 99 - 01:12 AM
dwditty 10 Jun 99 - 06:00 AM
murray@mpce.mq.edu.au 10 Jun 99 - 07:44 AM
Joe Offer 22 Jan 17 - 08:51 PM
GUEST,Joseph Scott 23 Jan 17 - 12:28 AM
gillymor 23 Jan 17 - 07:39 AM
gillymor 23 Jan 17 - 08:36 AM
GUEST,Joseph Scott 23 Jan 17 - 08:40 PM
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Subject: Shake Sugaree
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 06 Jun 99 - 07:59 AM

I am renewing my acquaintance with Elizabeth Cotten's song "Shake Sugaree" and I realize I don't kow what the title means. In fact I am not sure if "sugaree" is an adverb modifying the verb "shake" or if "Sugaree" is the subject of the command "shake".

Anyond know?

Murray


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: Pete
Date: 06 Jun 99 - 02:56 PM

I'm not sure about the Elizabeth Cotten version but Grateful Dead do a version which includes the line "my darling Sugaree." I'd always assumed this was a person. Hope this helps. Pete


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: Art Thieme
Date: 06 Jun 99 - 03:06 PM

This was like we'll "have a shivaree"---a part---a celebration. Like sayin' "din't we have a time" or "didn't we boogie".

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: Art Thieme
Date: 06 Jun 99 - 03:07 PM

Of course, that's NOT "part"---it should be "party".

Art


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 06 Jun 99 - 04:36 PM

Is the phrase possibly connected to "Sugar on the floor", which Jean Ritchie says they did to "slick up the dance floor" back in the country?


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 06 Jun 99 - 10:00 PM

Art and Rick. Both of your explanations fit together. She might have been having fun with the expression to mean shake sugar on the floor. I didn't know about that custom, Rick. I was also not familiar with the expression "have a shivaree". She might have meant both expressions.

Pete. That might be the G.D's interpretation of the song. I suspect that anyone who learns it must have to try to work out what the prrase means.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: Rick Fielding
Date: 07 Jun 99 - 01:04 AM

I thought a "shivaree" was a knife used by a hood with a fey sense of humour.


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: DonMeixner
Date: 07 Jun 99 - 07:59 AM

Rick

Fey sense of humor?

At the boatyard I worked in we called rigging a sail boat a sheeveree.

Don


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: Marc Feingold (inactive)
Date: 10 Jun 99 - 01:12 AM

Great version of this song by Merl Saunders! Merl is a bay area musician/legend whose recordings with Jerry Garcia and others have made him pretty famous with the Dead set. He does a nice, slow version... it's a staple of his live shows, too.


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: dwditty
Date: 10 Jun 99 - 06:00 AM

To really appreciate Merle Saunders, go back to the Fugs.


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Subject: RE: Shake Sugaree
From: murray@mpce.mq.edu.au
Date: 10 Jun 99 - 07:44 AM

Or a very little knife.

Murray


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shake Sugaree
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Jan 17 - 08:51 PM

Here's another song that I'm not satisfied with. It seems like a timeless song, but I can't trace it back farther than Libba Cotten? Does it have earlier roots?
-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shake Sugaree
From: GUEST,Joseph Scott
Date: 23 Jan 17 - 12:28 AM

Supposedly she really wrote it. Unlike "Freight Train" so much probably, since a variant of that one was collected in 1919 (Frank C. Brown again -- and the college student born in 1901 again, Blake Harrison).


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shake Sugaree
From: gillymor
Date: 23 Jan 17 - 07:39 AM

I'd always heard that she wrote it at the age of 11 before some preacher convinced her to give up the guitar.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shake Sugaree
From: gillymor
Date: 23 Jan 17 - 08:36 AM

I may have been thinking of "Freight Train". Gotta remember, "Google first, then post."

My favorite version was done by the late Fred Neil who called it "I've Got a Secret (Shake Sugaree)" with some gorgeous guitar work by Pete Childs. I don't recall whether or not he claimed authorship.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Shake Sugaree
From: GUEST,Joseph Scott
Date: 23 Jan 17 - 08:40 PM

"I'd always heard that she wrote ['Freight Train'] at the age of 11 before some preacher convinced her to give up the guitar." Maybe she meant she wrote part of her version of it, which best I know she did.

Considering how many guitars and folk stanzas were all over the place, it's possible but unlikely that the child Ella Nevill (as she was known then) would completely originate a song that would -- more or less as she quit playing guitar for years -- find its way to a white college student by 1919, _and_ that that same child would also later happen to work as a maid for the Seeger family.


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