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Lyr Req: James Connolly (Wolfe Tones)

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JAMES CONNOLLY
JAMES CONNOLLY (2)


Related threads:
Songbook Add: Songs of James Connolly (Ireland) (15)
(origins) Origins: James Connolly as sang by Mary Black (21)
Obit: Brian Heron - Grandson of James Connoly (22)
Obit:Irish playwright/poet Patrick Galvin-May 2011 (13)
Lyr Req: Connolly Was There (26)


Den 22 Sep 99 - 05:44 PM
paddymac 22 Sep 99 - 06:04 PM
paddymac 22 Sep 99 - 06:17 PM
Den 22 Sep 99 - 08:13 PM
Big Mick 23 Sep 99 - 01:21 AM
Den 23 Sep 99 - 09:36 AM
Len Wallace 23 Sep 99 - 09:44 AM
Den 23 Sep 99 - 09:47 AM
paddymac 23 Sep 99 - 09:58 AM
Frank Howe 23 Sep 99 - 11:44 AM
Den 23 Sep 99 - 12:09 PM
Ferret 23 Sep 99 - 04:27 PM
Big Mick 23 Sep 99 - 09:40 PM
paddymac 24 Sep 99 - 04:10 AM
Den 24 Sep 99 - 09:36 AM
Big Mick 24 Sep 99 - 10:13 AM
Big Mick 24 Sep 99 - 10:52 AM
Ferret 24 Sep 99 - 11:14 AM
Big Mick 24 Sep 99 - 11:22 AM
Den 24 Sep 99 - 12:44 PM
Ferret 24 Sep 99 - 08:37 PM
Stewie 24 Sep 99 - 10:01 PM
GUEST 07 Aug 10 - 06:37 AM
GUEST,Lryics 07 Aug 10 - 07:42 AM
GUEST 22 Sep 12 - 06:56 PM
GUEST 23 Sep 12 - 07:47 AM
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Subject: James Connolly
From: Den
Date: 22 Sep 99 - 05:44 PM

I am currently reading the book Rebels and particularly James Connollys involvement in the '16 rising. I seem to remember a poem that proceeded the song James Connolly on, I think it was a Wolfe Tones album. Anyway I heard at one time that the poem was actually penned by one of the British soldiers in the firing squad so affected was he by Connolly. I heard too that he (the soldier) subsequently commited suicide. Now I don't know if there is any truth to that story or wheather its folklore but I am looking for the words to the poem if anyone can help. Thanks in advance Den


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: paddymac
Date: 22 Sep 99 - 06:04 PM

Den - I don't know the truth of your stories about the origin of the recitation, but they're good stories anyway. Here's the recitation. I have always found it well received by audiences, especially if you can put a bit of emotion into it.

The man was all shot through


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Subject: Lyr Add: JAMES CONNOLLY (Wolfe Tones)
From: paddymac
Date: 22 Sep 99 - 06:17 PM

I haven't the slightest idea how in hell I managed to send those. I haven't even had a pint yet. Maybe that's the problem. Anyway, here it is. I think it's also in one of the Wolfe Tones' songbooks.
_________________________________________________________

The man was all shot through that came to day into the Barrack Square,
And a soldier I, I am not proud to say that we killed him there.

They brought him from the prison hospital and to see him in that chair,
I swear his smile would, would far more quickly call a man to prayer.

Maybe, maybe I don't understand this thing that makes these rebels die,
Yet all men love freedom and the spring clear in the sky.

I wouldn't do this deed again for all that I hold by,
As I gazed down my rifle at his breast, but then, then a soldier I.

They say he was different, kindly too, apart from all the rest.
A lover of the poor, his wounds ill dressed.

He faced us like a man who knew a greater pain
Than blows or bullets ere the world began: died he in vain?

"Ready, Present," and him just smiling! Christ! I felt my rifle shake.
His wounds all open and around his chair a pool of blood.

And I swear his lips said, "Fire" before my rifle shot that cursed lead
And I, I was picked to kill a man like that, James Connolly!


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Den
Date: 22 Sep 99 - 08:13 PM

Thanks Paddy and your right very moving. Many thanks again Den.


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Big Mick
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 01:21 AM

As an Irish American Labor Organizer, we are speaking of one of my heroes here. Connolly was a Wobbly labor organizer and spent time in the United States, as did Big Jim Larkin, organizing. He was an amazing man. Den, may I suggest that you read Morgan Llywelyn's 1916 as well as Rebels. While they are both historical novels, Llywelyn's is a more accurate portrayal of the events of that time than Rebels. In Rebels, the author attempts to portray acts of pure fiction as fact. Llywelyn's work has been vetted by the families of the leaders of the Rising of '16, and they found it to be a much more historically accurate work set around a fictional character.

If you are interested in learing more about Connolly there are numbers of websites devoted to him including THIS, and HERE. There is also an out of print book that I found on one of the book search sites. I will get you a name later. There is also a songbook available of lyrics written by Connolly during his organizing years. I will find my copy and get the name and availability to you.

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Den
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 09:36 AM

Thanks Mick. I'm reading Rebels for the second time, I still enjoy it. The Llywelyn book sounds like it will be my next read. I work in a library so I'm just going to nip down stairs and see if we have it on the shelf. I'd be interested in more info thanks Den.


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Len Wallace
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 09:44 AM

The poem was written by Liam MacGabhann. He wrote in "Rags, Robes and Rebels" thatit was based on reading comments made by the son of a Welsh miner who was part of Connolly's firing squad who later asked Connolly's relatives to forgive him.


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Den
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 09:47 AM

Thanks Len.


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: paddymac
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 09:58 AM

BigMick - I wholeheartedly concur in your comparative assessment of "rebels"/"1916" (but I may be biased as Llewelyn is my favorite author). I think of Connolly as much more than "just" a labor leader. He was, I think, one of those men born to rebel against the great injustices of his time and place. In his case, that led him into the labor movement. I think it's fair to say that the Rising of 1916 might not have happened without Connolly and his Citizen's Army.


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Frank Howe
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 11:44 AM

if you like contemporary irish rock with a generous helping of trad thrown in - Black 47 does a nice tribute to James Connolly


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Den
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 12:09 PM

Actually the name did not register with me at first but then I remembered I had read Lion of Ireland by Llywelyn and had enjoyed that very much. I have actually done some pencil sketches of Connolly and am working on a comerative poster that includes drawings of all the men who signed the proclamation arranged around the document itself. Does anyone know of any pictures of Connolly other than the three quarter view picture that appears in most publications about him? I'm also trying to track down pictures of MacDonagh and Plunkett. Any help would be appreciated, thanks in advance Den.


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Ferret
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 04:27 PM

there is a pix of Joseph Plunkett in the book 'The Irish Civil War' by Tim Pat Coogan & George Morrison, page 91 ISBN 0 297 82454 6 Hop this of some help all the best ferret


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Big Mick
Date: 23 Sep 99 - 09:40 PM

Paddymac, you are absolutely on the mark on several scores. First off, Connolly was indeed so much more than a labor leader. He was possessed of a spirit that is timeless, and chooses to walk among us a various times as needed. Connolly was at once a fearless warrior, a visionary leader of men, and a tender and caring parent and spouse. Pearse, IMHO, sought martyrdom. Connolly accepted it. Your second contention, that the Rising may not have happened without his Citizens Army is accepted by most serious scholars as the fact. I do a presentation on Connolly using his words, writings and songs written by him and about him for heritage clubs.

With regard to Morgan Llywelyn, she is simply without equal. I have read most of her works. For those who want to understand the history of the Celts, the customs of the Celts, and the history and legendary figures of Ireland, you could not ask for a better or more enjoyable read than this woman. Her research is beyond reproach. I would recommend the following books, and probably in this order:
The Horse Goddess for the story of Epona and the Hallstadt Celts
Druids for an understanding of these priest/esses as they probably were instead of how people with their own motives want them to be. This is also the story of the Gaulic Confederacy and the one Celtic King, Vercingetorix who united the European Celts and almost defeated Julius Ceasar.
Bard which is based on the earliest poems written in Ireland by the Bard known as Amergin, or Aimirgin. It tells of the coming of the Milesian Princes to Ireland and the establishing of the Gaels as the dominant culture.
Red Branch which tells the story of young Setanta who grows up to be the legendary Hound of Ullain, or Cuchulain and the warriors of the Red Branch, or Craobh Rua.
Finn MacCool which tells the story of this legendary warrior as he probably was. A marvellous read.
Lion of IrelandThis tells the story of the greatest King in the history of Irealand, Brian Boru. Morgan captures this great man to the tee. The O'Brian, current leader of the family says that Morgan Llywelyn captured his famous ancestor to the tee. This is one of the best books you will read.
Pride of Lions which picks up with the death of Boru and tells of his son's attempt to live up to the legacy of his father.
Grainna which is the story of Grace O'Malley. This is an amazing story of an amazing human being and woman. I could not put it down.

I am proud to recommend these books to my fellow 'Catters. Be sure and order them through vendors who pay a commission to the Mudcat. Some of them, like Grainne, are out of print. Do yourself a favor and do an out of print search. You will not be sorry. I was well read on virtually all of these subjects before I read her works. Yet I felt as though I knew these figures in a way that I had never known them before. That is to say that I felt like I knew them as they were, instead of as what they have become in the passing of time. And of course, don't neglect to read 1916.

Mick


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: paddymac
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 04:10 AM

BigMick - Amen!


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Den
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 09:36 AM

I agree with your comments on Connolly and his influence on the rising and I agreee that Pearce did seek martyrdom. However I think that quite often he is written off as being a self centred unfeeling academic. I think that he (Pearce) had a great influence on people and that he was a great motivator orator and writer. I feel too that some of the other rebel leaders tend to be forgotten because they were'nt great speakers like Connolly and Pearce. Men like Eamon Kent, Thomas Clarke and of course Joseph Plunkett played an equally important part in the rising. Joseph Plunkett and Grace Quigley what a story. Do you think the men and women of the rising were a product of their time or did they define the time. It's unique in history to find so many strong and courages people gathered together in one place at one time.


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Big Mick
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 10:13 AM

Den, I don't think I have ever heard anyone postulate that the Pearse's were anything but caring and warm people. Everything I have read about the time at St. Enda's paints a picture of a passionate and caring family.

You are sure correct about the other leaders of the Rising. History always settles on a few leaders. I think it makes the telling easier. But it doesn't take much effort to find the contributions of Clarke, Kent, Plunkett, MacDonough and others.

I believe that powerful times are a convergence of a number of factors, such as political conditions, economic conditions, and the presence of powerful people who are willing to lead. In my own lifetime I have witnessed moments where you knew that the conditions were right for mementous change. And I always found myself praying that the right person(s) would step forward. Because the line between wonderful change and horror is very thin. Let me illustrate. Once there were two men. Both had the gift of bardic voice. Both could make masses of people do their bidding simply by suggestion. They lived in turbulent times, and change for their people was needed desperately. History has recorded their stories. One was Mahatma Gandhi. The other was Adolf Hitler. This is why I feel it is not a shame when people of honor do not pick up the mantle of leadership when they should. It is a mortal sin. The Brothers Pearse understood this. So did Connolly, Ceannt, Clarke, MacDonough, Plunket and the others. And it is why I have resolved that when I am in a circumstance that requires leadership, that I will do everything in my power to find the right person, or step into the breach myself. Because the other conditions will conspire to produce change. Good or bad is dependent on the person who steps up.

The story of Joseph Mary Plunkett and Grace Gifford is one of the greatest love stories ever written. It is about two young people, madly and immortally in love. These are two timeless spirits who grace us with their presence every so often. Of them, great love stories are written. When Plunkett left his sick bed to go to the GPO, he knew he would likely not survive. When he was captured and sentenced to die by firing squad, his beautiful Grace came to him in his cell. Knowing full well that he would not be alive in a few hours, she married him in the prison chapel. They were not even allowed to kiss. The next morning he was taken out and shot in the yard of Kilmainham jail. God be good to both of them.

There have been several threads on this song and story. Set the "Search the Forum" engine to "Grace" and you will find them.

All the best,

Big Mick


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Big Mick
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 10:52 AM

That should have been "momentous" in the third paragraph. I have to start proofing before I hit the button. Bad boy, Mick. A rap on the knuckles from Father Joebro for bad spelling and grammar. **grin**

Mick


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Ferret
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 11:14 AM

Well Mick we got the point and we all make mistakes. This is a good thread on Connolly have you read the book "The Irish Civil War" I posted. It is one of the best I have read on the subject. All the best Ferret


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Big Mick
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 11:22 AM

Yep Ferret, it is a great work. Most of Coogan's work is well done. This is another good recommendation for those interested in the subject.

All the best,

Mick


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Den
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 12:44 PM

Well said Mick. Of course I meant to say Gifford where the hell did Quigley come from oh hell alzheimers setting in. I asked my Dad if alzheimers ran in our family and he said he couldn't remember.I asked my Dad if alzheimers ran in our family and he said he couldn't remember. Den


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Ferret
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 08:37 PM

who said what er ferret


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Subject: RE: James Connolly
From: Stewie
Date: 24 Sep 99 - 10:01 PM

Although it is relatively old (1961), C.Desmond Greaves 'The Life and Times of James Connolly' is still well worth a read. It was republished in paperback by International Publishers New York 1971.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: James Connolly (Wolfe Tones)
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Aug 10 - 06:37 AM

Can anyone say what regiment the firing squad was drawn from?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: James Connolly (Wolfe Tones)
From: GUEST,Lryics
Date: 07 Aug 10 - 07:42 AM

You can find the lyrics and guitar chords on www.unitedirelandtripod.ie along with other Wolftones songs

Desi C


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: James Connolly (Wolfe Tones)
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Sep 12 - 06:56 PM

I disagree that Pearse and the others wanted to be martyrs. Everyone knew there would be a Peace Conference at the end of the war; the Irish wanted a place at the table.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: James Connolly (Wolfe Tones)
From: GUEST
Date: 23 Sep 12 - 07:47 AM

John McDonnell, For this poem and others about James Connolly and a good account of the period 1913-1916 see my book Songs of Struggle and Protest recenty re-published by The Irish Labour History Society.


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